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Encyclopedia > Batik
Indonesian batik fabric
Indonesian batik fabric

Batik (Javanese-Indonesian-Malay pronunciation: [ˈba.teʔ], but often, in English, is [ˈbætɪk] or [bəˈtiːk]) is an Indonesian word and refers to a generic wax-resist dyeing technique used on textile. The word originates from Javanese word "amba", meaning ”to write” and the Javanese word for dot or point, "titik." Look up batik in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 864 pixel, file size: 595 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 864 pixel, file size: 595 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Resist dyeing, resist-dyeing and variants is a term for a number of traditional methods of dyeing textiles with patterns. ... Look up dye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


It is known to be more than a millennium old, probably originating in ancient Egypt or Sumeria. There is evidence that cloth decorated through some form of resist technique was in use in the early centuries AD.[citation needed] It is found in several countries later in West Africa such as Nigeria, Cameroon and Mali, or in Asia, such as India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh , Iran, Thailand, and Malaysia, but the most popular are in Indonesia. The art of Batik reach its highest achievement in technique, intricate design, and refined aesthetic in Java, Indonesia. The island of Java itself is famous and has been well known for its exquisite batik for centuries, particularly in places such as Yogyakarta, Solo, Cirebon, and Pekalongan. Sumeria may refer to: A back-formation from the adjective Sumerian, often used to mean the ancient civilisation more properly known as Sumer Sumeria, a disco artist best known for the 1978 hit Golden Tears 1970 Sumeria, an asteroid discovered in 1954 by Miguel Itzigsohn Donna Sumeria, a song on...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Java island. ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... The Special Region of Yogyakarta (Indonesian: Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta, or DIY), is a province of Indonesia on the island of Java. ... Surakarta (its formal name; locally it is referred to as Solo) is an Indonesian city of approximately 500,000 people located in Central Java. ... Cirebon (formerly Cheribon) is a city on north coast of the Indonesian island of Java. ... Pekalongan is a city and regency on the northern coast of Central Java, Indonesia. ...

Contents

Culture

Batik has been both an art and a craft for centuries. In Java, Indonesia, batik is part of an ancient tradition, and some of the finest batik cloth in the world is still made there.


Contemporary batik, while owing much to the past, is markedly different from the more traditional and formal styles. For example, the artist may use etching, discharge dyeing, stencils, different tools for waxing and dyeing, wax recipes with different resist values and work with silk, cotton, wool, leather, paper or even wood and ceramics.


Batik is historically the most expressive and subtle of the resist methods. The ever widening range of techniques available offers the artist the opportunity to explore a unique process in a flexible and exciting way..


Procedure

A batik painting depicting two Indian women.
A batik painting depicting two Indian women.
Dipping a cloth in a dye.
Dipping a cloth in a dye.

Melted wax is applied to cloth before being dipped in dye. It is common for people to use a mixture of bees wax and paraffin wax. The bee's wax will hold to the fabric and the paraffin wax will allow cracking, which is a characteristic of batik. Wherever the wax has seeped through the fabric, the dye will not penetrate. Sometimes several colors are used, with a series of dyeing, drying and waxing steps. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (741x1083, 122 KB) Summary A photo of a Batik painting depicting two Indian women. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (741x1083, 122 KB) Summary A photo of a Batik painting depicting two Indian women. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1063 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Batik Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1063 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Batik Metadata This file contains additional... candle wax This page is about the substance. ...


Thin wax lines are made with a canting needle, a wooden handled tool with a tiny metal cup with a tiny spout, out of which the wax seeps. Other methods of applying the wax onto the fabric include pouring the liquid wax, painting the wax on with a brush, and applying the hot wax to precarved wooden or metal wire block and stamping the fabric. Stamping may refer to more than one thing: The craft of applying ink or dyes to a product with a Rubber stamp. ...


After the last dyeing, the fabric is hung up to dry. Then it is dipped in a solvent to dissolve the wax, or ironed between paper towels or newspapers to absorb the wax and reveal the deep rich colors and the fine crinkle lines that give batik its character. For other uses, see Solvent (disambiguation). ...


The invention of the copper block or cap developed by the Javanese in the 20th century revolutionised batik production. It became possible to make high quality designs and intricate patterns much faster than one could possibly do by hand-painting. For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


Indonesian batik used for clothing normally has an intricate pattern. The traditional ones carry natural colors while the contemporary ones have more variety of color. Some batik may be mystic-influenced, but very rarely used for clothing. Some may carry illustrations of animals and people. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Malaysian batik used for clothing emphasizes the bright color arrangements more than the patterns.


Further reading

  • Elliott, Inger McCabe. (1984) Batik : fabled cloth of Java photographs, Brian Brake ; contributions, Paramita Abdurachman, Susan Blum, Iwan Tirta ; design, Kiyoshi Kanai. New York : Clarkson N. Potter Inc., ISBN 0517551551
  • Fraser-Lu, Sylvia.(1986) Indonesian batik : processes, patterns, and places Singapore : Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195826612
  • Doellah, H.Santosa. (2003). Batik : The Impact of Time and Environment, Solo : Danar Hadi. ISBN 9799717310

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Batik. Free instructions. (1094 words)
Batik became most deeply rooted in Indonesia, particularly the island of Java, where it was a highly developed art by the 13th century.
Batik was considered a fitting occupation for aristocratic ladies whose delicately painted designs, based on bird and flower motifs, were a sign of cultivation and refinement, just as fine needlework was for European ladies of a similar position.
Because batik wax is applied hot it is necessary to work fairly rapidly and this can produce a freedom (or loss of self-consciousness) that makes many people who think they cannot draw find, to their amazement, that they can.
THE COLLECTOR’S GUIDE: BATIK AS ART (953 words)
The word batik is Javanese and has been translated as "good points or dots." This refers to the tiny dots in Indonesian patterns that give them a lively quality and that show a mastery of technique.
A standard definition of the medium of batik is that it is a way of coloring fabric with successive dyebaths, producing a design by using wax to resist dyes on cloth.
Batik jap involves the use of an intricately patterned stamp made from copper strips and is usually used by the men.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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