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Encyclopedia > Bath, Somerset
Bath

Bath shown within Somerset
Population 90,144
OS grid reference ST745645
 - London 116m
Unitary authority Bath and North East Somerset
Ceremonial county Somerset
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BATH
Postcode district BA1, BA2
Dialling code 01225
Police Avon and Somerset
Fire Avon
Ambulance Great Western
UK Parliament Bath
European Parliament South West England
List of places: UKEnglandSomerset

Coordinates: 51°22′46″N 2°22′01″W / 51.3794, -2.367 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Bath and North East Somerset (commonly referred to as BANES or B&NES) is a unitary authority that was created on April 1, 1996 following the abolition of the County of Avon. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia[1]; the Soviet Union referring to the... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The BA postcode area, also known as the Bath postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Bath, Bradford on Avon, Bruton, Castle Cary, Frome, Glastonbury, Radstock, Shepton Mallet, Street, Templecombe, Trowbridge, Warminster, Wells, Westbury, Wincanton and Yeovil in England. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Avon & Somerset Constabulary is a police force in England covering the county of Somerset and the districts of South Gloucestershire, Bristol, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset; these districts were the now defunct county of Avon hence the forces name. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Temple Back Fire Station and Service HQ The Avon Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory FRS or Fire and Rescue Service covering the area of what used to be the County of Avon (1974-1996) but now consists of the four unitary authorities of Bath and North East Somerset... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust provides services in Bath and North East Somerset, Bristol, Gloucestershire, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Swindon and Wiltshire in the South West England region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Bath is a constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. It is situated 99 miles (159 km) west of London and 13 miles (21 km) south east of Bristol. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57 F or... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the English city. ...


The city is founded around the only naturally occurring hot springs in the United Kingdom. It was first documented as a Roman spa, although tradition suggests that it was founded earlier. The waters from its spring were believed to be a cure for many afflictions. From Elizabethan to Georgian times it was a resort city for the wealthy. As a result of its popularity during the latter period, the city contains many fine examples of Georgian architecture, most notably the Royal Crescent. The city has a population of over 90,144 and is a World Heritage Site. There are several geothermal springs in the UK: Tunbridge Wells, Kent thermal spring Stoney Middleton Thermal Springs, Derbyshire 17. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... Elizabethan redirects here. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture is the name given in English-speaking countries to the architectural styles current between about 1720 and 1840, named after the four British monarchs named George. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Contents

History

City of Bath*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

Aerial view over northern Bath from a hot air balloon. The famous Royal Crescent is in the centre.
State Party United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iv
Reference 428
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1335, 645 KB) Aerial view over the northern side of Bath, England, from a hot air balloon. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Celtic and Roman

Main article: Aquae Sulis

The archaeological evidence shows that the site of the Roman Baths' main spring was treated as a shrine by the Celts, and dedicated to the goddess Sulis. The Romans probably occupied Bath shortly after their invasion of Britain in 43 AD. They knew it as Aquae Sulis (literally "the waters of Sul" or "Sulis"), identifying the goddess with Minerva. In Roman times the worship of Sulis Minerva continued and messages to her scratched onto metal have been recovered from the Sacred Spring by archaeologists. These are known as curse tablets. These curse tablets were written in Latin, and usually laid curses on other people, whom they feel had done them wrong. For example, if a citizen had his clothes stolen at the Baths, he would write a curse on a tablet, to be read by the Goddess Sulis Minerva, and also, the "suspected" names would be mentioned. The collection from Bath is the most important found in Britain. For alternate meanings see Bath (disambiguation) Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... This article is about the European people. ... In ancient Celtic polytheism, Sulis (also found as Sulevis/Sulis/Sulla) was the deification of spring-water, especially of thermal spring-water, conceived as a nourishing, life-giving Mother goddess. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ...


During the Roman period increasingly grand temples and bathing complexes were built, including the Great Bath. Rediscovered gradually from the 18th century onward, they have become one of the city's main attractions. The city was given defensive walls, probably in the 3rd century. From the later 4th century on, the Western Roman Empire and its urban life declined. However, while the great suite of baths at Bath fell into disrepair, some use of the hot springs continued. Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ...

The Great Bath at the Roman Baths. The entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction.
The Great Bath at the Roman Baths. The entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction.
Bath Abbey From The Roman Baths Gallery
Bath Abbey From The Roman Baths Gallery

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2499x2103, 2361 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Wikipedia:Featured pictures Thermae Roman Baths User talk:Diliff User:Diliff Wikipedia:Featured... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2499x2103, 2361 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Wikipedia:Featured pictures Thermae Roman Baths User talk:Diliff User:Diliff Wikipedia:Featured... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 889 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)View Of Bath Abbey From The Roman Baths Gallery - March 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 889 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)View Of Bath Abbey From The Roman Baths Gallery - March 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public...

Post-Roman and Saxon

It has been suggested that Bath may have been the site of the Battle of Mons Badonicus (circa 500 AD), where King Arthur is said to have defeated the Saxons, but this is disputed. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle mentions Bath falling to the West Saxons in 577 after the Battle of Deorham. The Anglo-Saxons called the town Baðum, Baðan or Baðon, meaning "at the baths," and this was the source of the present name. In 675, Osric, King of the Hwicce, set up a monastic house at Bath, probably using the walled area as its precinct. King Offa of Mercia gained control of this monastery in 781 and rebuilt the church, which was dedicated to St. Peter. Bath had become a royal possession. The old Roman street pattern was by now lost, and King Alfred laid out the town afresh, leaving its south-eastern quadrant as the abbey precinct. Edgar of England was crowned king of England in Bath Abbey in 973. Britain, c. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... The Battle of Deorham occurred in 577 between the West Saxons and the Britons. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Osric was a king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the Hwicce, perhaps reigning jointly with his presumed brother Oshere. ... The Hwicce were one of the peoples of Anglo-Saxon Britain. ... Offa (died July 26/29, 796) was the King of Mercia from 757 until his death. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... Alfred (also Ælfred from the Old English: ÆlfrÄ“d //) (c. ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ...


Norman, Medieval and Tudor

King William Rufus granted the city to a royal physician, John of Tours, who became Bishop of Wells and Abbot of Bath in 1088. It was papal policy for bishops to move to more urban seats, and he translated his own from Wells to Bath. He planned and began a much larger church as his cathedral, to which was attached a priory, with the bishop's palace beside it. New baths were built around the three springs. Later bishops, however, returned the episcopal seat to Wells, while retaining the name of Bath in their title. William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. ... John of Tours[1] (d. ... For other uses, see Wells (disambiguation). ...


By the 15th century, Bath's abbey church was badly dilapidated and in need of repairs. Oliver King, Bishop of Bath and Wells, decided in 1500 to rebuild it on a smaller scale. The new church was completed just a few years before Bath Priory was dissolved in 1539 by Henry VIII. The abbey church was allowed to become derelict before being restored as the city's parish church in the Elizabethan period, when the city revived as a spa. The baths were improved and the city began to attract the aristocracy. Bath was granted city status by Royal Charter in 1590. Oliver King was the bishop of Bath who organised the restoration of Bath Abbey after 1500. ... The Bishop of Bath and Wells is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... Look up spa, Spa, SpA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Bold text{| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1587 1588 1589 - 1590 - 1591 1592 1593 |-vdsf gno[gldw[pvkijxaiamknn csogfhbvdowkhbfkqhjkhrjkhwgfhbjkpnkfokfgok3pkpk9pjhkt9erktyujkip9kijker9thhrkg9hkitr9gtkih9t0ykltk[u0jo0iey9uhyit90ertyhige9rity9riyh9ujirtyuhjnh-4e9tyigh9thiuy0h8tyh34tu8uy8u8u8u8rtu5y8ru8thu0tru0ut0rhutuh0trhu0hseogtrhr8uyhju8t89er9te9r8fy8shit ass dick bitch fuck | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1560s 1570s 1580s - 1590s - 1600s 1610s 1620s |- | align=center | Centuries...


17th century

During the English Civil War the Battle of Lansdowne was fought on July 5, 1643 on the northern outskirts. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 789 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2163 × 1644 pixel, file size: 393 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Circus, Bath, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 789 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2163 × 1644 pixel, file size: 393 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Circus, Bath, England. ... The Circus The Circus is a famous Georgian feature in the city of Bath. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The English Civil War battle of Lansdowne (or Lansdown) was fought on July 5, 1643, near Bath. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ...


In 1668 Thomas Guidott moved to Bath and set up his practice there. He was a student of chemistry and medicine at Wadham College Oxford. He became interested in the curative properties of the waters and in 1676 he wrote A discourse of Bathe, and the hot waters there. Also, Some Enquiries into the Nature of the water. Thomas Guidott (1638-1706) Doctor of Physik and Writer became one of the 17th Centuries most prolific physical scientists using the latest techniques of the time for analysis and documentation. ... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ...


This brought the health-giving properties of the hot mineral waters to the attention of the country and soon the aristocracy started to arrive to partake in them.


18th century

The Royal Crescent from the air: Georgian taste favoured the civilised regularity of Bath's streets and squares and the delightful contrast with rural nature immediately at hand.

There had been much rebuilding in the Stuart period, but this was eclipsed by the massive expansion of the city in Georgian times. The old town within the walls was also largely rebuilt. This was a response to the continuing demand for elegant accommodation for the city's fashionable visitors, for whom Bath had become a pleasure resort as well as a spa. The architects John Wood the elder and his son John Wood the younger laid out the new quarters in streets and squares, the identical facades of which gave an impression of palatial scale and classical decorum. The creamy gold of Bath stone further unified the city, much of it obtained from the limestone Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines, which were owned by Ralph Allen (1694–1764). The latter, in order to advertise the quality of his quarried limestone, commissioned the elder John Wood to build him a country house on his Prior Park estate between the city and the mines. He was also responsible for improving and expanding the postal service in western England, for which he held the contract for over forty years. Though not fond of politics, Allen was a civic-minded man, and served as a member of the Bath Corporation for many years. He was elected Mayor of the city for a single term, in 1742, at age fifty. An aerial view of Baths Royal York Crescent. ... An aerial view of Baths Royal York Crescent. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... John Wood (1704- May 23, 1754, Bath), also named Wood of Bath, was an English architect. ... John Wood, the Younger (February 25, 1728, Bath-June 18, 1782, Batheaston) was an English architect, working principally in the city of Bath, England. ... Bath Stone is an Oolitic Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Location in Enland Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines (Grid reference ST761625) is a 6. ... Ralph Allen (1693 - June 29, 1764) was baptised at St Columb Major Cornwall on July 24 1693. ... Prior Park Landscape Garden is an 18th-century landscape garden, designed by the poet Alexander Pope and Capability Brown, and now owned by the National Trust. ...


The early 18th century saw Bath acquire its first purpose-built theatre, pump room and assembly rooms. Master of Ceremonies Beau Nash, who presided over the city's social life from 1705 until his death in 1761, drew up a code of behaviour for public entertainments. Beau Nash (1674-1762), as Richard Nash was always known, was a celebrated dandy and leader of fashion in 18th century Britain. ...


Bath elected two members to the unreformed House of Commons. The House of Commons in the 18th century The unreformed House of Commons is the name generally given to the British House of Commons as it existed before the Reform Act of 1832. ...


19th century

By the 1801 census the population of the city had reached 40,020 making it amongst the largest cities in Britain.[1]


Jane Austen moved to the city with her father, mother and sister Cassandra in 1801, and the family remained in the city at four successive addresses until 1806.[2] 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ...


William Thomas Beckford bought a house in Lansdown Crescent in 1822, eventually buying a further two houses in the Crescent to form his residence. Having acquired all the land between his home and the top of Lansdown Hill, he created a garden over half a mile in length and built Beckford's Tower at the top. William Beckford William Thomas Beckford (October 1, 1760 – May 2, 1844) was an English novelist, art critic, travel writer and politician. ... Lansdown Crescent is a well-known example of Georgian architecture in Bath, England, designed by John Palmer and constructed by a variety of builders between 1789 and 1793. ... Lansdown is in Bath, England, United Kingdom and is a suburb of the World Heritage City of Bath. ... Beckfords Tower, Bath Beckfords Tower is an architectural folly built in neo-classical style and situated on Lansdown Hill, just outside Bath, Somerset, England. ...


20th century

Between the evening of 25 April and the early morning of 27 April 1942 Bath suffered three air raids in reprisal for RAF raids on the German cities of Lübeck and Rostock. The three raids formed part of the Luftwaffe campaign popularly known as the Baedeker Blitz: they damaged or destroyed more than 19,000 buildings, and killed more than 400 people. Much damage was done to noteworthy buildings. Houses in the Royal Crescent, Circus and Paragon were burnt out along with the Assembly Rooms, while the south side of Queen Square was destroyed. All have since been reconstructed. is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... Motto: Within your walls be concordance and public welfare Rostock (pronounced // from Polabian Roz toc, literally to flow apart) is the largest city in the north German state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... The Baedeker Blitz or Baedeker raids were a series of reprisal raids for the bombing of the erstwhile Hanseatic League city of Lübeck during World War II, which was being used to supply the Russian front. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... The Circus The Circus is a famous Georgian feature in the city of Bath. ... Paragon may refer to: a definition: A peerless example of something Paragon (unit), a unit of mass equal to 20 grams, used to measure diamonds a place: Paragon, Indiana, a town in the United States Paragon (shopping mall), a shopping mall on Orchard Road in Singapore Paragon City, a fictional...


Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia spent the five years of his exile at Fairfield House in Bath. Haile Selassie Haile Selassie (Power of Trinity) (July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975) was the last Emperor (1930–1936; 1941–1974) of Ethiopia, and is a religious symbol in the Rastafarian movement. ... The Fairfield House was the residence of Emperor Haile Selassie I during the five years he spent in exile (1936–1941). ...


21st century

Regeneration efforts include the Bath Spa, Southgate and the Bath Western Riverside project.


Governance

Coat of arms of the City of Bath
Coat of arms of the City of Bath

The Liberal Democrat Don Foster is the Member of Parliament for Bath. His election was perhaps the most notable result of the 1992 results, as Chris Patten, the previous Member (and a Cabinet Minister), played a major part, as Conservative Party Chairman, in getting the government of John Major re-elected, but failed to defend his marginal seat in Bath. Don Foster has been re-elected as the MP for Bath in every election since. His majority was significantly reduced from over 9000 in both the 1997 and 2001 general elections to 4638 in 2005.[3] The Coat of Arms of Bath. ... The Coat of Arms of Bath. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Donald Michael Ellison Foster, MP, better known as Don Foster (born 31 March 1947) is a British Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament, representing Bath. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Bath is a constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992. ... Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944 in Bath, Somerset) is a prominent British Conservative politician and a Patron of the Tory Reform Group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Historically part of the county of Somerset, Bath was made a county borough in 1889, and has been independent of Somerset county council control ever since. Bath came into Avon when that non-metropolitan county was created in 1974. Since the abolition of Avon in 1996, Bath has been the main centre of the unitary authority of Bath and North East Somerset (B&NES). Bath remains, however, in the ceremonial county of Somerset. The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... The County of Avon was a short-lived non-metropolitan county and ceremonial county in the west of England, named after the River Avon which ran through it. ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Bath and North East Somerset (commonly referred to as BANES or B&NES) is a unitary authority that was created on April 1, 1996 following the abolition of the County of Avon. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ...


The City of Bath's ceremonial functions, including the mayoralty – which can be traced back to 1230 – and control of the coat of arms, are now maintained by the Charter Trustees of the City of Bath. The coat of arms includes two silver strips, which represent the River Avon and the hot springs. The sword of St. Paul is a link to Bath Abbey. The supporters, a lion and a bear, stand on a bed of acorns, a link to Bladud, the subject of the Legend of Bath. The knight's helmet indicates a municipality and the crown is that of King Edgar, the first king of a united England, who was crowned in Bath in 973 on the site of the current abbey.[4] In the United Kingdom, the office of Mayor or Lord Mayor (Provost and Lord Provost in Scotland) had long been ceremonial posts, with little or no duties attached to it. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Acorn (disambiguation). ... Bladud was a legendary king of the Britons as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Events Edgar of England is crowned king by Saint Dunstan Births September 15 - Al_Biruni, mathematician († 1048) Abu al-Ala al-Maarri, poet Deaths May 7 - Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor Categories: 973 ...


Electoral wards

The electoral wards of the Bath and North East Somerset unitary authority within Bath are: A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods, thoroughfares, parishes, landmarks, geographical... Bath and North East Somerset (commonly referred to as BANES or B&NES) is a unitary authority that was created on April 1, 1996 following the abolition of the County of Avon. ...

  • Abbey, Bathwick, Combe Down, Kingsmead, Lambridge, Lansdown, Lyncombe, Newbridge, Odd Down, Oldfield, Southdown, Twerton, Walcot, Westmoreland, Weston and Widcombe.

Bathwick is an electoral ward in the City of Bath, England, on the opposite bank of the River Avon to the historic city centre. ... Statistics Population: {{{Population}}} Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST761625 Administration District: Bath and North East Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office and... Lansdown is in Bath, England, United Kingdom and is a suburb of the World Heritage City of Bath. ... Chelsea Road shopping area Newbridge is an electoral ward within Bath, England. ... A view of the closed Twerton-on-Avon railway station. ... Weston is a suburb of Bath in England, located in the north west of the city. ...

Geography

Situation and transport

Bath is approximately 15 miles (25 km) south-east of the larger city and port of Bristol, to which it is linked by the A4 road, and is a similar distance south of the M4 motorway. Its main railway station, Bath Spa, lies on the Great Western Railway, the main line between Bristol and London, as well as on the line linking Cardiff with Portsmouth. This article is about the English city. ... The A4 at Hotwells in Bristol The A4 crosses Picadilly Circus in central London The A4 is a major road in England, also known as the Great West Road. ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in Great Britain linking London with Wales. ... Bath Spa railway station is the principal railway station in the city of Bath, Somerset. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... Maidenhead Railway Bridge The Great Western Main Line is a main line railway in England that runs westwards from London Paddington station to Temple Meads station in Bristol. ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Wessex Main Line is the railway line from Bristol Temple Meads to Southampton. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ...


Bath is connected to Bristol and the sea by the River Avon, navigable via locks by small boats. The river was connected to the River Thames and London by the Kennet and Avon Canal in 1810 via Bath Locks; this waterway — closed for many years, but restored in the last years of the 20th century — is now popular among users of narrow boats.[5] The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Canal locks in England. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... The canal at Bathampton, near Bath The Kennet and Avon Canal is a canal in southern England. ... Entering Bath Bottom Lock from the River Avon Bath Locks (grid reference ST756643) are a series of locks situated on the Kennet and Avon Canal, at Bath, England. ... A narrowboat is a boat or small barge used on narrow beam canals in Britain. ...


Physical geography

Bath is at the bottom of the Avon Valley, and near the southern edge of the Cotswolds, a range of limestone hills designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The hills that surround and make up the city have a maximum altitude of 238 m (780 ft) on the Lansdown plateau. It has an area of 11 mile² (29 km²).[6] The Cotswolds is the name given to a range of hills in central England, sometimes called the Heart of England, a hilly area reaching over 300 m or 1000 feet. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government; the Countryside Council for Wales on behalf of the Welsh Assembly Government... Lansdown is in Bath, England, United Kingdom and is a suburb of the World Heritage City of Bath. ...

Cleveland House and the cast iron bridges of Sydney Gardens over the Kennet and Avon Canal

The surrounding hills give Bath its steep streets and make its buildings appear to climb the slopes. The flood plain of the River Avon, which runs through the centre of the city, here has an altitude of 17 metres (56 ft). The river, once an unnavigable series of braided streams broken up by swamps and ponds, has been managed by weirs into a single channel. Nevertheless, periodic flooding, which shortened the life of many buildings in the lowest part of the city, was normal until major flood control works in the 1970s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1952, 1828 KB) Cleveland House over Bath Locks on the Kennet and Avon Canal. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1952, 1828 KB) Cleveland House over Bath Locks on the Kennet and Avon Canal. ... The canal at Bathampton, near Bath The Kennet and Avon Canal is a canal in southern England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Floodplain. ... A braided river channel consists of a network of small channels separated by small islands called braid bars. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Two people reflected in a fish pond A pond is typically a man made body of water smaller than a lake. ... The bridge and weir mechanism at Sturminster Newton on the River Stour, Dorset. ...


The city has the hottest geothermal springs in the UK. [7] Three of these springs feed the thermal baths. There are several geothermal springs in the UK: Tunbridge Wells, Kent thermal spring Stoney Middleton Thermal Springs, Derbyshire 17. ... Thermae Bath Spa is a multi-million pound development project in the city of Bath in Somerset. ...


Climate

In 2003 the annual mean temperature was 10.3 °C, with an average maximum of 14.2 °C and average minimum of 6.5 °C (50.5 °F, 57.5 °F and 43.7 °F, respectively). There were 1645 hours of sunshine, and 957 millimetres of rainfall. The temperatures, sunshine duration and rainfall are higher than the United Kingdom averages (which are 9.5 °C, or 49 °F, 1587 hours and 901.5 millimetres, respectively)[citation needed]. Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ...


Demography

According to the UK Government's 2001 census,[8] Bath, together with North East Somerset (the latter being more or less coterminous with the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), has a population of 169,040, with an average age of 39.9 (the national average being 38.6). According to the same statistics, the district is overwhelmingly populated by people of a white ethnic background at 97.2% — significantly higher than the national average of 90.9%. Other non-white ethnic groups in the district, in order of population size, are multiracial at 1%, Asian at 0.5% and black at 0.5% (the national averages are 1.3%, 4.6% and 2.1%, respectively). The Politics of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland takes place in the framework of a constitutional monarchy in which the Monarch is head of state and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Actress Halle Berry was born to a white mother of British extraction and a black father of American extraction. ...


The district is largely Christian at 71%, with no other religion reaching more than 0.5%. These figures generally compare with the national averages, though the non-religious, at 19.5%, are significantly more prevalent than the national 14.8%. Since Bath is known for the restorative powers of its waters, it is interesting to note that only 7.4% of the population describe themselves as "not healthy" in the last 12 months, compared to a national average of 9.2%; only 15.8% of the inhabitants say they have had a long-term illness, as against 18.2% nationally. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Culture

The 18th Century Pulteney Bridge by Robert Adam
The 18th Century Pulteney Bridge by Robert Adam

During the 18th century, Bath became the leading centre of fashionable life in England. It was during this time that Bath's Theatre Royal was built, as well as architectural triumphs such as Royal Crescent, Lansdown Crescent,[9] the Royal Crescent,[10] The Circus and Pulteney Bridge.[11] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2123 × 2999 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2123 × 2999 pixel, file size: 3. ... Pulteney Bridge, Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... The Theatre Royal in Bath has been established for over 200 years and is one of the more important provincial (ie not in London) theatres in the UK, with a capacity for an audience of 950. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... Lansdown Crescent is a well-known example of Georgian architecture in Bath, England, designed by John Palmer and constructed by a variety of builders between 1789 and 1793. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... The Circus The Circus is a famous Georgian feature in the city of Bath. ... Pulteney Bridge, Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ...


Today, Bath has five theatresBath Theatre Royal, Ustinov Studio, the egg, the Rondo Theatre, and the Mission Theatre — and attracts internationally renowned companies and directors, including an annual season by Sir Peter Hall. The city also has a long-standing musical tradition; Bath Abbey[12] is home to the Klais Organ and is the largest concert venue in the city, with about 20 concerts and 26 organ recitals each year. Another important concert venue is the Forum, a 1700-seat art deco building which originated as a cinema. The city holds the Bath International Music Festival and Mozartfest every year. Other festivals include the annual Bath Film Festival, Bath Literature Festival, the Bath Fringe Festival and the Bath Beer Festival. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The Theatre Royal in Bath is over 200 years old. ... the egg is a theatre in Bath, built specifically for the use of young people. ... The Rondo Theatre, in Bath, was established in 1989 through the generosity of Doreen and Wilf Williams, who bought the former church hall from St. ... Sir Peter Reginald Frederick Hall CBE (born 22 November 1930) is an English theatre and film director. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Bath International Music Festival the United Kingdoms largest international music festival. ... Bath Film Festival was established in 1991, in Bath, England. ... Established in 1995, the Bath Literature Festival has become an important date in the national literary calendar, playing host to an array of journalists, novelists, poets, politicians, actors, comedians, scriptwriters and biographers. ...


The city is home to the Victoria Art Gallery,[13] the Museum of East Asian Art, and The Holburne Museum of Art,[14] as well as numerous museums, among them The Bath Postal Museum, The Museum of Costume, the Jane Austen Centre, the Herschel Museum of Astronomy and the Roman Baths.[15] The Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, now in Queen Square, and founded in 1824 on the base of a 1777 Society for the encouragement of Agriculture, Planting, Manufactures, Commerce and the Fine Arts, has an important collection and holds a rich and popular programme of talks and discussions. See 'Places of interest' below for details of many other places of artistic, cultural and historical interest. , The Victoria Art Gallery is free public facility in Bath, Somerset, England. ... The Jane Austen Centre, Bath The Jane Austen Centre at 40 Gay Street in Bath, Somerset is a permanent exhibition which tells the story of Jane Austens Bath experience - the effect that living here had on her and her writing. ... , The Herschel Museum of Astronomy (also known as the William Herschel Museum) is a small independent museum dedicated to the life and works of the famous astronomer, William Herschel and his sister, Caroline Herschel. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... The Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution is an institution based in Bath, England, that was founded in 1824 and it provides a museum, an independent library, lecture hall and a botannical garden. ...


There are numerous commercial art galleries and antique shops in Bath, which is one of the most important centres of the English antiques trade outside London.


For a list of churches in Bath, see here. In addition to the churches listed, Manvers Gospel Hall is located in the city centre.


Bath in the arts

Perhaps the best known resident of Bath was Jane Austen, who lived in the city from 1801 until 1806. However, Jane Austen never liked the city, and wrote to her sister Cassandra, "It will be two years tomorrow since we left Bath for Clifton, with what happy feelings of escape." Despite these feelings, Bath has honoured her name with the Jane Austen Centre and a city walk. Austen's later Northanger Abbey and Persuasion are largely set in the city and feature descriptions of taking the waters, social life, and music recitals. 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... For films named Northanger Abbey, see Northanger Abbey (1986 film) or Northanger Abbey (2007 TV drama). ... For other uses, see Persuasion (disambiguation). ...

  • Thomas Gainsborough moved to Bath in 1759, where he first became fashionable. He moved to London in 1774.
  • Sir Thomas Lawrence first became famous in the city, where he lived from 1782 to 1787.
  • Charles Dickens' novel Pickwick Papers also features Bath, and satirises its social life. Pickwick takes the waters and his servant, Sam Weller, comments that the water has "a very strong flavour o' warm flat irons", while the Royal Crescent is the venue for a chase between two of the characters, Dowler and Winkle.
  • William Friese-Greene began experimenting with celluloid and motion pictures in his studio in Bath in the 1870s, developing some of the earliest movie camera technology there. He is credited as the inventor of cinematography.
  • In August 2003 the Three Tenors sang at a special concert to mark the opening of the Thermae Bath Spa, a new hot water spa in Bath City Centre; delays to the project meant the spa actually opened three years later on August 7, 2006.

Thomas Gainsborough (14 May 1727 (baptised) – 2 August 1788) was one of the most famous portrait and landscape painters of 18th century Britain. ... Alexander MacKenzie painted by Thomas Lawrence (c. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ... Sam Weller is a fictional character in The Pickwick Papers, the first novel by Charles Dickens, and is allegedly the character that made Dickens famous. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... William Friese-Greene (September 7, 1855–May 5, 1921) (born William Edward Green) was a portrait photographer and prolific inventor. ... Moyra Caldecott (June 1, 1927) is a British author of historical fiction, fantasy, science fiction and non-fiction. ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan Richard Brinsley Sheridan (October 30, 1751 – July 7, 1816) was an Irish playwright and Whig statesman. ... The Rivals, a play by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, is a comedy of manners in five acts. ... Tagline: Vanity Fair is a 2004 drama/romance film, directed by Mira Nair. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... The short story is a literary genre. ... The Landlady is a short story by Roald Dahl, included in his 1960 collection Kiss Kiss. ... The Three Tenors is how noted operatic tenors Plácido Domingo, José Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti are billed when they perform together. ... Thermae Bath Spa is a multi-million pound development project in the city of Bath in Somerset. ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Parks

Parade Gardens in July after a rain shower
Parade Gardens in July after a rain shower

The city has several public parks, the main one being Royal Victoria Park, a short walk from the centre of the city. It was opened in 1830 and has an area of 57 acres (231,000 m²).[16] Several events are held in the park every year, including the Bath International Music Festival, and it is favoured as a take-off site by hot air balloon companies. The park features a botanical garden, a large children's play park, and sports facilities, including crazy golf, bowls and lawn tennis. Much of its area is lawn; a notable feature is the way in which a ha-ha segregates it from the Royal Crescent, while giving the impression to a viewer from the Crescent of a greensward uninterrupted across the Park down to Royal Avenue. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (4242x1965, 5107 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (4242x1965, 5107 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... In Bath it was open by the Queen Victotia herself ... The Bath International Music Festival the United Kingdoms largest international music festival. ... This article is about hot air balloons themselves. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ... Miniature golf, also known as mini-golf, crazy golf or Putt-Putt, is a game modelled after the sport of golf. ... Swifts Creek Bowls Club Bowls (also known as Lawn Bowls or Lawn Bowling) is a precision sport in which the goal is to roll slightly radially asymmetrical balls (called bowls) closer to a smaller white ball (the jack or kitty) than ones opponent is able to do. ... This article is about the sport, tennis. ... A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ... The ha-ha or sunken fence is a type of boundary to a garden, pleasure-ground, or park, designed not to interrupt the view and to be invisible until closely approached. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ...


Other parks in Bath include: Alexandra Park, which crowns a hill and overlooks the city; Parade Gardens, along the river front near the Abbey in the centre of the city; Sydney Gardens, known as a pleasure-garden in the 18th century; Henrietta Park; Hedgemead Park; and Alice Park. Jane Austen wrote of Sydney Gardens that "It would be pleasant to be near the Sydney Gardens. We could go into the Labyrinth every day." Alexandra, Alice and Henrietta parks were built into the growing city among the housing developments.[17] There is also a linear park following the old Somerset and Dorset railway line.


Food

Sally Lunn's, home of the world famous Sally Lunn Bun
Sally Lunn's, home of the world famous Sally Lunn Bun

Sally Lunn's buns (a type of teacake) have long been baked in Bath. They were first mentioned by that name in verses printed in a local newspaper, the Bath Chronicle, in 1772. At that time they were eaten hot at public breakfasts in the city's Spring Gardens. They can be eaten with sweet or savoury toppings. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 797 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3040 × 2288 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 797 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3040 × 2288 pixel, file size: 1. ... A toasted teacake with Mocha. ...


Visitors sometimes confuse Sally Lunn's buns with Bath buns – smaller, round, very sweet, very rich buns that were associated with the city following The Great Exhibition. Bath Buns were originally topped with crushed 'comfits' created by dipping caraway seeds repeatedly in boiling sugar; but today seeds are added to a 'London Bath Bun' (a reference to the bun's promotion and sale at the Great Exhibition). The seeds may be replaced by crushed sugar granules or 'nibs'. The Bath bun is a rich, sweet yeast dough shaped round that has a lump of sugar baked in the bottom and more crushed sugar sprinkled on top after baking. ... The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851. ...


Bath has also lent its name to one other distinctive recipe – Bath Olivers — the dry baked biscuits invented by Dr William Oliver, physician to the Mineral Water Hospital in 1740. Oliver was an early anti-obesity campaigner, writing a "Practical Essay on the Use and Abuse of warm Bathing in Gluty Cases". Local legend has it that he bequeathed the recipe for his low calorie biscuits to his coachman, a Mr Atkins, along with £100 and a hundred sacks of flour. Atkins subsequently opened a shop in Green Street, Bath and became a rich man on the proceeds. In more recent years Dr Oliver's efforts have been traduced by the introduction of a version of the biscuits with a plain chocolate coating. The Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases NHS Trust is a small, specialist Trust in the centre of Bath. ...


Bath chap, the cheek and jawbones of the pig, salted and smoked is named after Bath, its place of origin, and still available from a stall in the market. [18].


Sport

The city's best known sporting team is Bath Rugby, a rugby union team which is currently in the Guinness Premiership league and coached by Steve Meeham. It plays in black, blue and white kit with its sponsors' logo, Helphire, on the front of the shirts. The team plays at the Recreation Ground in the city, where it has been since the late 19th century, following its establishment in 1865. The team rose to national prestige during the 1980s, and it has remained one of the best rugby teams in the country. Its first major honour was winning the John Player Cup four years consecutively from 1984 until 1987. The team then led the Courage league for six consecutive seasons, from 1988/1989 until 1995/1996, during which time it also won the Pilkington Cup in 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. It finally won the Heineken Cup in the 1997/1998 season, and topped the Zürich (now Guinness) Premiership in 2003/2004. Official website www. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Guinness Premiership is a professional league competition for rugby union clubs in the top division of the English rugby system. ... The Recreation Ground (the Rec) is a multi-use sports ground in the centre of Bath, Somerset, next to the River Avon. ... The Heineken Cup sponsored by Heineken (known as the H Cup in France due to alcohol advertising laws) is an annual rugby union competition involving leading club, regional and provincial teams from England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ...


The team's current squad includes several members who also play in the English national elite team including: Steve Borthwick, Lee Mears, Matt Stevens, Olly Barkley, David Flatman and Danny Grewcock. Colston's Collegiate School, Bristol has had a large input in the team over the past decade, providing current 1st XV squad members Barkley, Bell, Brooker, Crockett, Davey, Davis, Delve, Hawkins, Mears and Smith. The former England Rugby Team Manager Andy Robinson used to play for Bath Rugby team and was Captain and later Coach. While in the Bath team, he was a Physical Education, Rugby and Mathematics teacher at King Edward's School, North Road, Bath. Both of Robinson's predecessors, Clive Woodward and Jack Rowell, were also former Bath coaches and managers. In the fire service a Squad is a Engine Company with a compliment of rescue tools. ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... Stephen William Borthwick (born 12 October 1979 in Carlisle) is an English rugby union footballer who plays lock for Bath and England. ... Lee Mears (born 5 March 1979 in Torquay) is an English rugby union footballer, who plays hooker for Bath. ... Matthew Stevens (born 1 October 1982 in Durban, South Africa) is a rugby union player, who plays at prop for Bath and England. ... Oliver John Barkley (born 28 November 1981 in Hammersmith) is an English rugby union footballer who plays at fly-half or centre for Bath and England. ... David Luke Flatman was born in 20. ... Daniel Jonathan Grewcock MBE (born November 7, 1972) is an English rugby union footballer. ... Colstons Collegiate School is an independent co-educational school in Bristol, England. ... This article is about the English city. ... Andy Robinson (born 3 April 1964 in Taunton, Somerset) is a former English rugby union footballer who played openside flanker for Bath and England. ... King Edwards School (KES), Bath in South-West England is a Private School providing education for pupils aged 3 - 18. ... Sir Clive Ronald Woodward, CBE (born 6 January 1956 at Ely in Cambridgeshire) is a former English rugby union international who was the coach of the England rugby union team from 1997 to 2004. ... Jack Rowell (born 1937) is the Director of Rugby at Bath. ...


Bath City F.C. and Team Bath F.C. (affiliated with the University of Bath) are the major football teams. Bath City play in the Conference South, while Team Bath play one division below in the Southern Football League. In 2007, Bath City became champions of the Southern Football League, and were promoted. In 2002, Team Bath became the first university team to enter the FA Cup in 120 years, and advanced through four qualifying rounds to the first round proper. Unlike the city's rugby team, Bath City have never attained an elite status in English football; its highest position has been seventh in the Football Conference in the 1992/1993 season. The University's team was established in 1999, while the city team has existed since before 1908 (when it entered the Western League). Bath City F.C. play their games at Twerton Park. Current players include Scott Partridge, Jim Rollo, Lewis Hogg and former South African international goalkeeper Paul Evans. Bath City F.C. are a football club based in Bath, Somerset, currently playing in the Conference South. ... Team Bath is a football club affiliated with the University of Bath that currently plays in the Southern League. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Conference South (currently billed as Blue Square Southern for sponsorship reasons) is one of the second divisions of the Football Conference in England, taking its place immediately below the Conference National. ... For other uses, see Southern Football League (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football Conference is a football league at the top of the National League System of non-League football in England. ... The Western League is a football league in the south west of England. ... Bath City F.C. are a football club based in Bath, Somerset, currently playing in the Conference South. ...


Cricket is played at the Bath Cricket Club, located, like the rugby Recreation Ground, east of the river, near Pulteney Bridge. The cricket ground is the venue for the annual Bath Cricket Festival which sees Somerset County Cricket Club play several games. Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Pulteney Bridge, Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ... Somerset County Cricket Club is a county cricket club with headquarters at the County Cricket Ground, Taunton. ...


Bath also has a thriving biking community, with places for biking including Royal Victoria Park, 'The Tumps' in Odd Down, the jumps on top of Lansdown, and Prior Park. Places for biking near Bath include Brown's Folly in Batheaston and Box Woods, in Box.


The Recreation Ground is also home to Bath Croquet Club, which was re-formed in 1976 and is affiliated with the South West Federation of Croquet Clubs. The Recreation Ground (the Rec) is a multi-use sports ground in the centre of Bath, Somerset, next to the River Avon. ... For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ...


TeamBath is the umbrella name for all of the University of Bath sports teams, including the aforementioned football club. Other sports for which TeamBath is noted are athletics, badminton, basketball, bob skeleton, bobsleigh, hockey, judo, modern pentathlon, netball, rugby, swimming, tennis, triathlon and volleyball. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of Bath. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... United States Air Force Major Brady Canfield, 2003 U.S. skeleton champion, shows his takeoff form. ... Historic bobteam from Davos around 1910 Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-02-04, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... A Netball game in Australia Netball is a sport similar to and derived from basketball, and was originally known in its country of origin, the United States, as womens basketball. Invented by Clara Gregory Baer[1], a pioneer in womens sport, it is now the pre-eminent women... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The three components of triathlon: Swimming, Cycling, Running A triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


Bath is also the home of the Bath American Football Club, which has been playing American Football in the city since 2001. It caters for Youth and Junior levels of play. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


The Bath Half Marathon is run annually through the city streets, with over 10,000 runners.[19] The City of Bath Triathlon takes place annually at the University of Bath. The Bath Half Marathon is an annual road running half marathon held in Bath, UK. The has been held every year since 1981. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ...


The city has one major skate park; Victoria Skatepark, located near inside the Victoria play park vicinity, and just a few 100 meters away from the Royal Cresent. It features 1 vertical ramp, 1 medium sized ramp, 1 spine, 1 block and a few other bits of park course.


Industry

Today, Bath's once-important manufacturing sector is much diminished, but it has notable software, publishing and service-oriented industries, in addition to tourism. Its main employers are the National Health Service, the two universities and the Bath and North East Somerset Council, as well as the Ministry of Defence, although a number of MOD offices formerly in Bath have now moved to Bristol. In the private sector, the magazine publisher Future Publishing is one of Bath's bigger employers. The firm publishes over 100 magazines, including many in the computer and video gaming sector. Others include Helphire Group plc, an Accident Management Company specialising in non-fault motor accidents, and Buro Happold. The city contains many small single-shop or restaurant-based businesses which serve niche markets and are primarily supported by tourism. “NHS” redirects here. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... This article is about the English city. ... Future Publishing (FTSE:FUTR) is a magazine publishing company based in Bath, UK. Future Publishing employs more than 1,500 people worldwide, and is one of the largest publishing houses in the UK. It is responsible for publishing over 150 magazines, in the UK, US, France and Italy. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ...


Tourism

Bath swarms with tourists in the summer. This entertainer performs in front of Bath Abbey and to the right, the Roman Baths
Bath swarms with tourists in the summer. This entertainer performs in front of Bath Abbey and to the right, the Roman Baths

Bath's principal industry is tourism, with visits mainly falling into the categories of heritage tourism and cultural tourism. All significant stages of the history of England are represented within the city, from the Roman Baths (including their significant Celtic presence), to Bath Abbey and the Royal Crescent, to Thermae Bath Spa in the 2000s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2175x1450, 1008 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2175x1450, 1008 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... “Tourist” redirects here. ... The Hawai Mahal in Jaipur, Rajasthan. ... Cultural tourism (or culture tourism) is the subset of tourism concerned with a country or regions culture, especially its arts. ... England is the largest and most populous of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom (the United Kingdom is a nation which was created by the bonding of the four succsessor states). ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... This article is about the European people. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... Thermae Bath Spa is a multi-million pound development project in the city of Bath in Somerset. ...


The size of the tourist industry is reflected in the almost 300 places of accommodation—including over 80 hotels, and over 180 bed and breakfasts—many of which are located in Georgian buildings and have five-star ratings. There are also two campsites located very close to the city centre. The city also contains approximately 100 restaurants, and a similar number of public houses and bars. Several companies offer open-top bus tours around the city, as well as tours on foot and on the river. For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... Tourists of various nationalities chatting over breakfast at a B&B in Quebec City. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture is the name given in English-speaking countries to the architectural styles current between about 1720 and 1840, named after the four British monarchs named George. ... Pub redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A London AEC Routemaster, RML 2473 (JJD 473D), on route 7 approaching Ladbroke Grove tube station in April 2002. ...


While many tourists come to Bath to see the city in general, some are attracted to particular aspects of the city, such as the Jane Austen landmarks or the Roman Baths. 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ...


The Spa

Since 2006, with the opening of Thermae Bath Spa, the city has attempted to recapture its historical position as the only town in the United Kingdom offering visitors the opportunity to bathe in naturally heated spring waters. Thermae Bath Spa is a multi-million pound development project in the city of Bath in Somerset. ...


Twinned towns

Bath has four twinned towns: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Bath also has a partnership agreement with Beppu, Japan and is a sister city to Manly, Australia. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aix (prounounced eks), or, to distinguish it from other cities built over hot springs, Aix-en-Provence is a city in southern France, some 30 km north of Marseille. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Accijnstoren Cheese market Canal and bridge Weighing house Alkmaar (West Frisian: Alkmare) is a municipality and a city in the Netherlands, in the province of Noord Holland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Coordinates: Time zone: CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country: Germany State: Lower Saxony District: Urban district City subdivisions: 20 Boroughs Lord Mayor: Gert Hoffmann (CDU) Governing parties: CDU / FDP Basic Statistics Area: 192. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Kaposvár (German Kopisch, Ruppertsberg, Ruppertsburg, Turkish KapoÅŸvar) is the capital of the county of Somogy in Hungary. ... Beppu (別府市; -shi) is a city located in Oita, Japan. ... Manly is a suburb in Local Government Area of Manly Council on Northern Beaches of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ...


Transport

Bath is served by the Bath Spa railway station (designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel), which has regular connections to London Paddington, Bristol Temple Meads, Cardiff Central, Swansea, Exeter, Plymouth and Penzance (see Great Western Main Line), and also Westbury, Warminster, Salisbury, Southampton, Portsmouth and Brighton (see Wessex Main Line). Services are provided by First Great Western. There is a suburban station on the main line, Oldfield Park, which has a limited commuter service to Bristol. The charming Green Park station was once operated by the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway, whose line (always steam driven) climbed over the Mendips and served many towns and villages on its 71 mile run to Bournemouth; sadly this most splendid example of an English rural line was closed by Beeching in March 1966, with few remaining signs of its existence, but its Bath station building survives and now houses a number of shops. Bath Spa railway station is the principal railway station in the city of Bath, Somerset. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... This article is about the English city. ... The original station (left) closed in 1965. ... The term Cardiff Central has several meanings: Cardiff Central station Cardiff Central (UK Parliament constituency) Cardiff Central (National Assembly for Wales constituency) Cardiff central bus station Cardiff city centre Category: ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... Maidenhead Railway Bridge The Great Western Main Line is a main line railway in England that runs westwards from London Paddington station to Temple Meads station in Bristol. ... , Westbury is a town and civil parish (population 11,135 in the 2001 census) in the west of the English county of Wiltshire, most famous for the Westbury White Horse. ... This article is about the English town. ... Salisbury Cathedral by Constable. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ... The Wessex Main Line is the railway line from Bristol Temple Meads to Southampton. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... Oldfield Park railway station is a suburban railway station in the city of Bath, BANES. It is located on the London-Bristol and Bristol-Southampton trunk routes. ... Green Park railway station is a former railway station in Bath, Somerset. ... The Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway (S&DJR) was an English railway company jointly owned by the Midland Railway and the London and South Western Railway. ... Dr. Richard Beeching later Baron Beeching (21 April 1913 — 23 March 1985) was an British physicist and engineer, and former chairman of British Railways. ...


Bath has three full time Park and Ride sites, Odd Down, Lansdown and Newbridge, with a Saturdays only site at the University of Bath.


Although Bath does not have an airport, the city is not far from Bristol International Airport (approximately 18 miles), which may be reached by car and by bus or taxi, and by rail via Bristol Temple Meads or Nailsea and Backwell. Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol in England, and the surrounding area. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... “Autobus” redirects here. ...


National Express operates coach services from Bath to a number of cities. Internally, Bath has a network of bus routes run by First Group, with services to surrounding towns and cities. There is one other company running open top double-decker bus tours around the city. National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... For other uses, see Coach. ... First Group PLC (LSE: FGP) is a British transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Bath is on National Cycle Route 4, with one of Britain's first cycleways, the Bristol & Bath Railway Path, to the west, and an eastern route toward London on the Kennet and Avon Canal towpath. The Bristol & Bath Railway Path is part of Route 4. ... This article or section should include material from Cycle path debate Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... The Bristol & Bath Railway Path, looking towards Bristol from the former Mangotsfield railway station The Bristol & Bath Railway Path is a 13-mile off road cycleway that forms part of National Cycle Network National Cycle Route 4. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The canal at Bathampton, near Bath The Kennet and Avon Canal is a canal in southern England. ...


Architecture

Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. Made from local Bath stone, this is a Victorian restoration (made in the 1860s) of the original roof from 1608
Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. Made from local Bath stone, this is a Victorian restoration (made in the 1860s) of the original roof from 1608
Bath Abbey at twilight
Bath Abbey at twilight

Of Bath's notable buildings, Bath Abbey is one of the most striking. Originally a Norman church on earlier foundations, it was rebuilt in the early 16th century and transformed into a late Perpendicular fantasy of flying buttresses with crocketed pinnacles decorating a crenellated and pierced parapet. The choir and transepts have a fine fan vault by Robert and William Vertue, who worked on the vault at King's College Chapel, Cambridge and designed similar vaulting in the Henry VII chapel at Westminster Abbey. The nave was given a matching vault in the 19th century. The building is lit by 52 windows. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2075x2676, 1661 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2075x2676, 1661 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x3355, 2305 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x3355, 2305 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... The nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave is a forerunner of the Gothic style. ... Winchester Cathedral Sherborne Abbey The Perpendicular Gothic period (or simply Perpendicular) is the third historical division of English Gothic architecture, and is so-called because it is characterised by an emphasis on vertical lines; it is also known as the Rectilinear style, or Late Gothic. ... Flying buttresses at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... pinnacle Sint-Petrus-en-Pauluskerk, Ostend, Belgium A pinnacle (from Latin pinnaculum, a little feather, pinna) is an architectural ornament originally forming the cap or crown of a buttress or small turret, but afterwards used on parapets at the corners of towers and in many other situations. ... A parapet consists of a dwarf wall along the edge of a roof, or round a lead flat, terrace walk, etc. ... Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


The dominant style of architecture in Bath is Georgian; this evolved from the Palladian revival style which became popular in the early 18th century. Many of the prominent architects of the day were employed in the development of the city, and as a result Bath has many fine terraces. However, the original purpose of much of Bath's fine architecture is concealed by the honey-coloured classical facades; in an era before the advent of the luxury hotel, these apparently elegant residences were frequently purpose-built lodging houses, where visitors could hire a room, a floor, or (according to their means) an entire house for the duration of their visit, and be waited on by the house's communal servants. One example of this kind of aspirational deception is found on the north side of Queen Square. This development was designed to appear from the front as a single residence of palatial proportions, but inside seven more modest residences were concealed. Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... An era is a long period of time with different technical and colloquial meanings, and usages in language. ... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... A servant is a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ...


"The Circus" is one of the most splendid examples of town planning in the city. Three long, curved terraces designed by the elder John Wood form a circular space or theatre intended for civic functions and games. The games give a clue to the design, the inspiration behind which was the Colosseum in Rome. Like the Coliseum, the three facades have a different order of architecture on each floor: Doric on the ground level, then Ionic on the piano nobile and finishing with Corinthian on the upper floor, the style of the building thus becoming progressively more ornate as it rises. Wood never lived to see his unique example of town planning completed, as he died five days after personally laying the foundation stone on May 18, 1754. The Circus The Circus is a famous Georgian feature in the city of Bath. ... John Wood (1704- May 23, 1754, Bath), also named Wood of Bath, was an English architect. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Doric order was one of the orginal pokersthree orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... Architects first real look at the Greek Ionic order: Julien David LeRoy, Les ruines plus beaux des monuments de la Grèce Paris, 1758 (Plate XX) Ionic order: 1 - entrablature, 2 - column, 3 - cornice, 4 - frieze, 5 - architrave or epistyle, 6 - capital (composed of abacus and volutes), 7 - shaft, 8... Kedleston Hall. ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. The contrast between the architectural style of the front and rear of this terrace is clear
Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. The contrast between the architectural style of the front and rear of this terrace is clear

The best known of Bath's terraces is the Royal Crescent, built between 1767 and 1774 and designed by the younger John Wood. But all is not what it seems; while Wood designed the great curved facade of what appears to be about 30 houses with Ionic columns on a rusticated ground floor, that was the extent of his input. Each purchaser bought a certain length of the facade, and then employed their own architect to build a house to their own specifications behind it; hence what appears to be two houses is sometimes one. This system of elegant town planning is betrayed at the rear of the crescent: while the front is completely uniform and symmetrical, the rear is a mixture of differing roof heights, juxtapositions and fenestration. This "all to the front and no rear" architecture occurs repeatedly in Bath. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1372, 510 KB) Royal Crescent (Bath, England) viewed from a hot air balloon, on a dull September evening. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1372, 510 KB) Royal Crescent (Bath, England) viewed from a hot air balloon, on a dull September evening. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... This article is about hot air balloons themselves. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... John Wood, the Younger (February 25, 1728, Bath-June 18, 1782, Batheaston) was an English architect, working principally in the city of Bath, England. ... For other uses, see Column (disambiguation). ...


Around 1770 the eminent neoclassical architect Robert Adam designed Pulteney Bridge, using as the prototype for the three-arched bridge spanning the Avon an original, but unused, design by Palladio for the Rialto Bridge in Venice. Thus, Pulteney Bridge became not just a means of crossing the river, but also a shopping arcade. Along with the Rialto Bridge, is one of the very few surviving bridges in Europe to serve this dual purpose. It has been substantially altered since it was built. The bridge was named after Frances and William Pulteney, the owners of the Bathwick estate for which the bridge provided a link to the rest of Bath. Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Pulteney Bridge, Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ... Illustration from a 1736 English edition of I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura. ... The Rialto Bridge Rialto Bridge The Rialto Bridge (Italian: Ponte di Rialto) The Rialto Bridge (Italian: Ponte di Rialto) spans the Grand Canal in Venice. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet (October 1729 – 30 May 1805) was an eminent Scottish lawyer, Member of Parliament, and at one time reputedly the wealthiest man in the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...


The heart of the Georgian city was the Pump Room, which, together with its associated Lower Assembly Rooms, was designed by Thomas Baldwin, a local builder who was responsible for many other buildings in the city, including the terraces in Argyle Street. Baldwin rose rapidly, becoming a leader in Bath's architectural history. In 1776 he was made the chief City Surveyor, and in 1780 became Bath City Architect. In 1776 he designed the Bath Guildhall, where his design of the interior produced what is considered one of the finest neo-classical interiors in the country. Great Pulteney Street, where he eventually lived, is another of his finest works: this wide boulevard, constructed circa 1789 and over 1000 ft (300m) long and 100 ft (30m) wide, is one of England's most attractive thoroughfares, and is lined on both sides by Georgian terraces. Thomas Baldwin (c. ... Argyle Street is the name of a street in oodles of cities and towns around the planet. ... The prominent post of Bath City Architect was bestowed by the Corporation of Bath on an architect who would be repeatedly chosen for civic projects. ... The prominent post of Bath City Architect was bestowed by the Corporation of Bath on an architect who would be repeatedly chosen for civic projects. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Great Pulteney Street is a grand boulevard that that joins Pulteney Bridge to the eastern side of Bath. ... The Champs Elysees in Paris, France. ...


Architecturally, Bath is one of the most balanced cities in England, and is an unusual example of coherent town planning combined with well-executed and diverse architectural styles. Nonetheless, in the 1960s and early 1970s some parts of Bath were unsympathetically redeveloped, resulting in the loss of some 18th and 19th century buildings. This process was largely halted by a popular campaign which drew strength from the publication of Adam Fergusson's The Sack of Bath.

A panoramic view of the Royal Crescent
A panoramic view of the Royal Crescent

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (7017x1109, 2464 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bath Royal Crescent Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or...

Education

Bath has two universities. The University of Bath was established in 1966 and has grown to become a leading university in the United Kingdom, present in many top 10 lists and rated as excellent, the highest rating on government scales, in 14 subjects. The university is known, academically, for the physical sciences, mathematics, architecture, management and technology. It is also well known for its sports, which it plays under the name Team Bath. In football, Team Bath F.C. was, in the 2002/2003 season, the first university team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1880. For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of Bath. ... Team Bath is a football club affiliated with the University of Bath that currently plays in the Southern League. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ...


Bath Spa University was first granted degree-awarding powers in 1992 as a university college (Bath Spa University College), before being granted university status in August 2005. It has schools in the following subject areas: Art and Design, Education, English and Creative Studies, Historical and Cultural Studies, Music and the Performing Arts, and Social Sciences. Bath Spa University is a university near Bath, England. ... University College can refer to several institutions: in Canada University College, University of Toronto University College of the North, The Pas, Manitoba University College of the Cariboo, Kamloops, British Columbia, merged with British Columbia Open University and renamed Thompson Rivers University Kings University College (Edmonton), Alberta in England University... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


The city contains one further education college, City of Bath College, and several sixth forms as part of both state, private, and public schools. Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... // The college opened in 1892 under the name of Bath City Science, Art and Technical Schools. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level... State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A public school, in current English, Welsh and Northern Ireland usage, is a (usually) prestigious independent school, for children usually between the ages of 11 or 13 and 18, which charges fees and is not financed by the state. ...

School Type Results Website
State-funded Schools
Beechen Cliff School boys-only with co-educational sixth form [2] [3]
Culverhay School boys-only with co-educational sixth form [4] [5]
Hayesfield School Technology College girls-only with co-educational sixth form [6] [7]
Oldfield School girls-only with co-educational sixth form [8] [9]
Ralph Allen School co-educational with sixth form [10] [11]
St Gregory's Catholic College co-educational with no sixth form [12] [13]
St Mark's CofE School co-educational with no sixth form [14] [15]
Independent Schools
King Edward's School co-educational with sixth form [16] [17]
Kingswood School co-educational with sixth form [18] [19]
Prior Park College co-educational with sixth form [20] [21]
Royal High School girls-only with sixth form [22] [23]
Monkton Combe School co-educational with sixth form

[24] Beechen Cliff School is a boys secondary school in Bath, England. ... Culverhay School is a boys secondary school situated at Rush Hill, Odd Down in Bath. ... Hayesfield School Technology College is a girls secondary school, with a co-educational sixth form, in Bath, England. ... Oldfield School is a girls secondary school, with a small co-educational sixth form, in Newbridge, Bath, England. ... Ralph Allen School in Combe Down, Bath, England is a non-denominational, co-educational school with a sixth form. ... King Edwards School (KES), Bath in South-West England is a Private School providing education for pupils aged 3 - 18. ... Kingswood School is a day and boarding school in Bath, Somerset. ... Prior Park College is a Catholic co-educational boarding school with a fascinating heritage. ... The Royal High School is a private girls school in the city of Bath, catering for approximately 1000 pupils in total. ... Monkton Combe School is an independent Christian school near Bath, England. ...

Many notable people, such as Sir Roger Bannister, MP Ann Widdecombe, comedian Bill Bailey, theatrical producer Cameron Mackintosh, singer and musician Curt Smith, archaeologist Helen Geake and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, went to school in Bath. Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister KBE (born March 23, 1929) is a former British athlete best known as the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a British Conservative Party politician. ... Bill Bailey is also the name commonly used to refer to a popular song with the full title of Wont You Come Home Bill Bailey. Mark Bill Bailey (born 24 February 1964, Bath, Somerset) is an English comedian, actor, and musician known for appearing on Never Mind the Buzzcocks... A theatrical producer is the person ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of mounting a theatrical production. ... Sir Cameron Mackintosh (born 17 October 1946) is a successful British theatrical producer. ... Curt Smith (born June 24, 1961, Bath, Somerset, England) is an English singer, bassist, synthesizer player and songwriter. ... Helen Geake with Stewart Ainsworth while shooting a Time Team in 2007 Dr Helen Geake is one of the key members of Channel 4s popular and long-running archaeology series Time Team, presented by Tony Robinson, along with Mick Aston and Phil Harding. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Cormac Cardinal Murphy-OConnor (born 24 August 1932 in Reading, Berkshire) is a priest of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Media

Bath has two main local newspapers, the Bath Chronicle and the Bath Times. Both of these are published by Bath Newspapers with joint sales of approximately 178,000 per week, although the Bath Times is a freely distributed paper that contains the highlights from the past week's editions of the Chronicle. The BBC's Where I Live web site for Somerset has featured coverage of news and events within Bath since 2003.[20] The Bath Chronicle is a daily newspaper, published since 1760 in Bath, England. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The Bath Chronicle, published since 1760, was a daily newspaper until mid-September 2007 when it became a weekly. Owned by the Daily Mail newsgroup, it is a tabloid with a circulation of 14,633 and a readership of 40,252.[21] The Bath Times is a free weekly newspaper, largely based around advertising. Also a tabloid, it has a circulation of 29,946 and maintains a readership of some 44,577.[21] In addition to these, The University of Bath has its own newspaper publication called impact, a free fortnightly newspaper, written and edited entirely by students at the University of Bath. It has a circulation of 3,000 and a readership of perhaps 10,000[citation needed]. The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gratis versus Libre is the distinction between zero price and freedom. ... Advert redirects here. ... Bath Impact is the student newspaper for the University of Bath, England. ... Gratis versus Libre is the distinction between no cost and freedom, a distiction not made by the word free. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located near Bath, England. ...


For television, Bath is served by the BBC West studios based in Bristol, and by ITV West (formerly HTV) with studios similarly in Bristol. BBC West is the BBC English Region covering the local radio editorial areas of [[Bristol], Somerset, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire. ... This article is about the English city. ... HTV Group plc is a television company, the ITV contractor of Wales and the West of England, owned by ITV plc. ... ITV Wales & West Ltd (formally and more commonly known as HTV) is the ITV contractor for Wales and the West of England[1]. It is owned by ITV plc. ...


Radio stations broadcasting to the city include Bath's GWR FM and the more locally-focused Bath FM, as well as The University of Bath's 1449AM URB, a student-focused radio on campus and also available online [25] and Classic Gold 1260 a networked commercial radio station with local programs. GWR FM is a UK radio station that serves Bath. ... Categories: Bath and North East Somerset | Radio stations in the United Kingdom | United Kingdom broadcasting stubs ... 1449AM URB is the student radio station for the University of Bath, England. ... Classic Gold Logo in Bristol and Bath Classic Gold Logo in Swindon and West Wiltshire For the local Swindon radio station of a similar name see Brunel FM Classic Gold is the regional Classic Gold station in the west of England. ...


Places of interest

Central Bath
Greater Bath
Outskirts of Bath
Near to Bath

Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Forrestry Commision logo for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... The Forestry Commission (established in 1919) is a non ministerial Government Department responsible for forestry in Great Britain. ... Image File history File links Country_Park1. ... A country park is an area designated for people to visit and enjoy recreation in a countryside environment. ... Access Land icon for use on UK lists of places of interest, created by Joe D. File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... A scene on a heritage railway. ... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Historic houses in England is a link page for any stately home, country house or other historic house in England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Castles in England is a link page for any castle in England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Abbeys and priories in England is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other monastic religious house in England. ... The Bath Assembly Rooms are a set of elegant assembly rooms located in the heart of the World Heritage City of Bath in England which are now open to the public as a visitor attraction. ... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... , The Building of Bath Museum in Bath, Somerset, England provides exhibits which explain the building of the Georgian era city during the 18th century. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... The Circus The Circus is a famous Georgian feature in the city of Bath. ... Great Pulteney Street is a grand boulevard that that joins Pulteney Bridge to the eastern side of Bath. ... , The Holburne Museum of Art (also known as the Holburne of Menstrie Museum) is in Sydney Pleasure Gardens Bath, Somerset, England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... The Jane Austen Centre, Bath The Jane Austen Centre at 40 Gay Street in Bath, Somerset is a permanent exhibition which tells the story of Jane Austens Bath experience - the effect that living here had on her and her writing. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... , The Museum of Bath at Work is at Camden Works, Julian Road, in Bath, Somerset, England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... , The Museum of East Asian Art is in Bennett Street, Bath, Somerset, England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... , The Bath Postal Museum is in Bath, Somerset. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Pulteney Bridge, Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Roman Bath The Great Bath — the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later reconstruction. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... In Bath it was open by the Queen Victotia herself ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Thermae Bath Spa is a multi-million pound development project in the city of Bath in Somerset. ... , The Victoria Art Gallery is free public facility in Bath, Somerset, England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... , The Herschel Museum of Astronomy (also known as the William Herschel Museum) is a small independent museum dedicated to the life and works of the famous astronomer, William Herschel and his sister, Caroline Herschel. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Cleveland Bridge, Bath Cleveland Bridge is a listed building located in the world heritage site of Bath, England. ... The canal at Bathampton, near Bath The Kennet and Avon Canal is a canal in southern England. ... Lansdown Crescent is a well-known example of Georgian architecture in Bath, England, designed by John Palmer and constructed by a variety of builders between 1789 and 1793. ... The American Museum in Britain is based at Claverton Manor, a 19th century manor house in Bath. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Beckfords Tower, Bath Beckfords Tower is an architectural folly built in neo-classical style and situated on Lansdown Hill, just outside Bath, Somerset, England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... View from Prior Park over the bridge toward the city For the nearby Catholic Independent School adjoining the Prior Park Landscape Garden see Prior Park College; for its prep school, see Prior Park Preparatory School Prior Park Landscape Garden is an 18th-century landscape garden, designed by the poet Alexander... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... The English Civil War battle of Lansdowne (or Lansdown) was fought on July 5, 1643, near Bath. ... Claverton Pumping Station is a pumping station, located at Claverton in the English county of Somerset, which pumps water from the River Avon to the Kennet and Avon Canal using power from the flow of the Avon. ... Arch of the Dundas Aqueduct Somerset Coal Canal at Dundas Dundas Aqueduct taken from the western end Dundas Aqueduct (grid reference _region:GB_scale:25000 ST784625 ) carries the Kennet and Avon Canal over the River Avon and the Bath to Westbury railway line, near Limpley Stoke in Wiltshire, England. ... Dyrham Park is a important baroque mansion near the village of Dyrham in Gloucestershire, England. ... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... St Catherines Court is a Tudor manor house in a secluded valley north of Bath, England. ... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Panoramic view on top of the hill Little Solsbury Hill (grid reference ST768679) (more commonly known as, Solsbury Hill) is a small flat-topped hill above the village of Batheaston in Somerset, England. ... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ...

Notable Bathonians

A Bathonian is somebody who comes from the city of Bath, England. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/unit_page.jsp?u_id=10167607
  2. ^ http://www.janeausten.co.uk/
  3. ^ Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  4. ^ Arms of The City of Bath. The City of Bath. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.
  5. ^ Allsop, Niall (1987). The Kennet & Avon Canal. Bath: Millstream Book. ISBN 0-948975-15-6. 
  6. ^ Contaminated Land Inspection of the area surrounding Bath
  7. ^ There is no universal definition to distinguish a hot spring from another geothermal spring, though by several definitions, the Bath springs can be considered the only hot springs in the UK.
  8. ^ Office for National Statistics, Census 2001. Statistics about Bath.
  9. ^ 1 to 20 Lansdown Crescent. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  10. ^ Royal Crescent. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  11. ^ Pulteney Bridge. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  12. ^ Abbey Church. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  13. ^ Victoria Art Gallery. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.
  14. ^ Holburne of Menstrie Museum. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.
  15. ^ Roman Baths Treatment Centre. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.
  16. ^ Size and date of establishment of Victoria Park from [1]
  17. ^ Information on other parks from Historic Public Parks of Bath
  18. ^ http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O39-Bathchap.html
  19. ^ Bath Half Marathon
  20. ^ BBC Somerset
  21. ^ a b Circulation and readership numbers from official website

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57 F or... Earth cutaway from core to exosphere. ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57 F or... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bath
Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Bath
  • Bath Tourist Information
  • Wikitravel — Bath
  • Gildas and Bath: etymology
  • Virtual tour of Bath
  • Bath at the Open Directory Project
Places with city status in the United Kingdom

 
 

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