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Encyclopedia > Bates College

Bates College

Motto Amore Ac Studio ("With Ardor and Devotion," or "Through Zeal and Study," by Charles Sumner)
Established March 16, 1855
Type Private
Endowment $234,300,000[1]
President Elaine Tuttle Hansen
Staff 206
Undergraduates 1,684
Postgraduates 0
Location Lewiston, Maine, USA
Campus Suburban
Athletics 31 varsity teams, 9 club teams
Mascot Bobcat
Website www.bates.edu

Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. Bates confers Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees. The College enrolls about 1,700 students. Bates is a nonsectarian institution. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Charles Sumner, see Charles Sumner (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Elaine Tuttle Hansen is the president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, a position she has held since 2002. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The Bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family, Felidae. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... “B.S.” redirects here. ... Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or religious denomination. ...


Bates' 109-acre (441,000 m²) campus includes the George and Helen Ladd Library; the Olin Arts Center, which houses a concert hall, the Bates College Museum of Art; and the Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library, which holds the papers of the former Maine Governor, U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of State, author of the U.S. Clean Air and Water Acts and member of the Class of 1936. The College also holds access to the 574-acre (2.32 km²) Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area, in Phippsburg, Maine, which preserves one of the few undeveloped barrier beaches on the Atlantic coast; and the neighboring Bates College Coastal Center at Shortridge, which includes an 80-acre (324,000 m²) woodland and freshwater habitat, scientific field station, and retreat center. The United States Environmental Protection Agency honored Bates as a member of the Green Power Leadership Club because 96% of the energy used on campus is from renewable resources. Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. Â§ 1251, et seq. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Phippsburg is a town located in Sagadahoc County, Maine. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... EPA redirects here. ...


In 1984, Bates instituted one of the first SAT optional programs in the United States. In 1990, the Bates faculty voted to make all standardized tests optional in the college's admissions process. In October 2004, Bates published a study regarding the testing optional policy to the National Association for College Admission Counseling. Following two decades without required testing, the college found that the difference in graduation rates between submitters and non-submitters was 0.1%, that Bates' applicant pool had doubled since the policy was instated with approximently 1/3 of applicants not submitting scores, non-submitting students averaged only 0.05 points lower on their collegiate Grade Point Average, and applications from minority students raised dramatically.[2] Today, Bates remains a leader in the SAT optional movement. This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... October 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Events Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher... The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) is an international organization of professionals dedicated to serving students as they make choices about pursuing postsecondary education. ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ...

Contents

History

Hathorn Hall, the oldest building on campus
Hathorn Hall, the oldest building on campus

Founded in 1855, Bates was New England's first coeducational college. The founders of Bates were active abolitionists, and several of the college's earliest students were former slaves.[3] The college was originally called the Maine State Seminary and replaced the Parsonsfield Seminary, which burned under mysterious circumstances in 1854.[1] The Parsonsfield Seminary was founded in 1832 by Free Will Baptists and served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Parsonsfield's Cobb Divinity School, founded in 1840, merged with Bates in 1870 and eventually became Bates' religion department. Therefore, Bates' religion department is 15 years older than the College itself. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 864 KB)Hathorn Hall, Bates College Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 864 KB)Hathorn Hall, Bates College Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Original name of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine from 1855-1863. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Bates College. ... Free Will Baptist Church (or Free Will Baptists) is a group of churches that share a common history, name, and an acceptance of the Arminian theology of free grace, free salvation, and free will, based on the idea of general atonement. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... Cobb Divinity School was a department of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine until 1908 when it merged with the Religion Department of the College. ...


As with many New England institutions, religion played a vital role in the college's founding. The Reverend Oren Burbank Cheney founded and served as the first president of Bates. He was a Freewill Baptist minister, a teacher, and a former Maine legislator. Cheney steered through the Maine Legislature a bill creating a corporation for educational purposes initially called the Maine State Seminary, located in Lewiston, Maine's fastest-growing industrial and commercial center. Oren B. Cheney Oren Burbank Cheney was the founder of Bates College. ... Free Will Baptist Church (or Free Will Baptists) is a group of churches that share a common history, name, and an acceptance of the Arminian theology of free grace, free salvation, and free will, based on the idea of general atonement. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ...


Cheney assembled a six-person faculty dedicated to teaching the classics and moral philosophy to both men and women. In 1863 he received a collegiate charter, and obtained financial support for an expansion from the city of Lewiston and from Benjamin E. Bates, the Boston financier and manufacturer whose mills dominated the Lewiston riverfront. In 1864 the Maine State Seminary became Bates College. The College consisted of Hathorn and Parker halls and a student body of fewer than 100. For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... Benjamin Edward Bates (1808-1878) was a New England industrialist, who was the namesake and a founder of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Nearly 200 students and alumni of the College and Seminary served in the American Civil War (1861-65), and only two students from Georgia fought for the Confederacy[4]. With Cheney's support, the first woman to graduate from a New England college was Mary Mitchell, class of 1869. Cheney also ensured that no secret societies or fraternities were allowed on campus. One secret society was founded at Bates in 1881 and is thought to be responsible for a fire starting in the bell tower of Hathorn Hall in March of 1881, but the society was not sanctioned by the President or the College[5]. By the end of Cheney's tenure, in 1894, the campus had expanded to 50 acres (202,000 m²) and six buildings. For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A secret society is a social organization that requires its members to conceal certain activities—such as rites of initiation or club ceremonies—from outsiders. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


George Colby Chase, a graduate of the Bates Class of 1868, succeeded Cheney in 1894. Known as "the great builder," Chase oversaw the construction of eleven new buildings on campus, including Coram Library, the Chapel, Chase Hall, Carnegie Science Hall, and Rand Hall. A twelve-inch reflecting telescope was installed in Stephens Observatory on top of Carnegie Science Hall in 1929. Chase tripled the number of students and faculty, as well as the endowment. The Cobb Divinity School (Bates Theological Seminary) and Nichols Latin School departments of the College were discontinued under President Chase. George Colby Chase (1844-1919) was the second president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine and an English scholar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A reflecting telescope (reflector) is an optical telescope which uses a combination of curved and plane (flat) mirrors to reflect light and form an image (catoptric), rather than lenses to refract or bend light to form an image (dioptric). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Bates College. ... Cobb Divinity School was a department of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine until 1908 when it merged with the Religion Department of the College. ... Department of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine from 1870-1900. ...


His successor was Clifton Daggett Gray, a clergyman and former editor of The Standard, a Baptist periodical published in Chicago. Gray saw Bates through an era marked by vibrant growth and modernization, but also through the years of the Great Depression and World War II. On campus, renovations were completed on Libbey Forum and the Hedge Science Laboratory, and the Clifton Daggett Gray Athletic Building and Alumni Gymnasium were constructed. In the 1940s, when male students abandoned college campuses to enlist in the armed forces, Gray established a V-12 Navy College Training Program Unit on campus, assuring the College students - men and women - during wartime. When he retired, in 1944, Gray had increased the student enrollment to more than 700 and doubled the faculty to seventy; the endowment had doubled to $2 million. Clifton Daggett Gray was the third president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine and a Baptist theologian. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The V-12 Navy College Training Program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Between July 1, 1943 and June 30, 1946, over 125,000 men were enrolled in the V-12 program in 131 colleges and universities in... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Charles Franklin Phillips was a professor at Colgate University and a leading economist before coming to Bates as the College's fourth president. He initiated the Bates Plan of Education, a liberal arts "core" study program. He also directed expansions of campus facilities, including the Memorial Commons, the Health Center, Dana Chemistry Hall, Pettigrew Hall, Treat Gallery, Schaeffer Theatre, and Page Hall. When he retired in 1967, Phillips left a student body of 1,000 and an endowment of $7 million. Charles Franklin Phillips was the fourth president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine and a well known economist and author. ... Colgate in fall. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


Thomas Hedley Reynolds assumed the presidency in 1967. His greatest achievement was the development and support of faculty, which brought Bates recognition as a national college. In addition to recruiting teacher-scholars, Reynolds championed better faculty pay, an expanded sabbatical leave program, and smaller classes. Thomas Hedley Reynolds was the fifth president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine and an American historian. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


Additions to the campus under Reynolds' presidency included the George and Helen Ladd Library, Merrill Gymnasium and the Tarbell Pool, the Olin Arts Center and the Bates College Museum of Art, as well as the conversion of the former women's gymnasium into the Edmund S. Muskie Archives and the acquisition of the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area. Many of the early twentieth-century houses on Frye Street that now accommodate students, a popular alternative to larger residential halls, were acquired at this time. Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ...


Donald West Harward began his service as sixth president of Bates in 1989. During Harward's presidency, students received greater opportunities to study off campus with Bates faculty or in College-approved programs. He integrated more fully into student academic and intellectual life the senior thesis, the important capstone experience that has been a part of the Bates curriculum since the early twentieth century but is now a focal point. Donald West Harward is a philosopher and served as the sixth president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine from 1989 to 2002. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


Under Harward, Bates for the first time in many years reached out institutionally into the community of Lewiston-Auburn. Bates students and faculty built relationships in the community through one of the most active service-learning programs in the country. Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... Location in Androscoggin County, Maine Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City {{{area_total}}} km²  - Land 59. ...


More than twenty major academic, residential, and athletic facilities were built during his tenure, including Pettengill Hall, the Residential Village and Benjamin E. Mays Center, and the Bates College Coastal Center at Shortridge.


Elaine Tuttle Hansen became Bates' seventh president in 2002. Her immediate goals included securing resources for financial aid, competitive faculty and staff salaries, increased diversity of the faculty and student body, technological advances, and new curricular initiatives. Hansen's accomplishments include a successful major fundraising effort, "The Campaign for Bates: Endowing Our Values," which ended in June 2006 and raised nearly $121 million, $1 million more than its stated goal; and a comprehensive facilities master plan whose realization began in 2006 with construction of new student residences and a new dining commons. Elaine Tuttle Hansen is the president of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, a position she has held since 2002. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Academics

Pettengill Hall
Pettengill Hall

Bates operates on a 4-4-1 schedule: two semesters and a month-long "Short Term." The College offers 24 department majors, eight interdisciplinary program majors, and 8 secondary concentrations. The most popular majors at Bates are economics, psychology, biology, English, political science, history, and environmental studies. Most majors require a senior thesis. Image File history File links Pettengill_Hall. ... Image File history File links Pettengill_Hall. ...


The percentage of Bates students who study off-campus is among the highest in the nation, with 64% of the Class of 2004 receiving credit for off-campus study.[2] Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Currently, all tenured or tenure-track faculty members hold Ph.D.s or other terminal degrees. Bates students work directly with faculty; the student-faculty ratio is 10:1, and faculty members teach all classes. Nearly 60% of class sections, excluding independent studies and senior theses, have fewer than 20 students enrolled.[3] Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Ninety-one percent of Bates College seniors or alumni applying to graduate programs in the health professions were accepted for matriculation in the fall of 2005. Bates students and alumni are consistently accepted to the top tier of law schools, including Cornell, Duke, Harvard, University of Michigan and New York University. More than 70% of recent alumni earned graduate or professional degrees within 10 years of graduation.[4] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... This article is about the nobility title. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...


The Princeton Review named Bates the No. 1 "Best Value College" in the United States in its 2005 ranking. The college is ranked 23rd, just behind Colby College, among liberal arts colleges in annual rankings published by U.S. News & World Report[6]. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Bates is part of the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission. It was one of the first schools to become a part of this movement in 1984. For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ...


Athletics

Soccer is popular at Bates
Soccer is popular at Bates

The Bates Bobcats compete in the NCAA Division III New England Small College Athletic Conference, and Colby-Bates-Bowdoin Consortium. The official school color is garnet (the Garnet was the original mascot), though black is traditionally employed as a complement. Bates is home to one of the oldest college football teams and fields in the United States, Garcelon Field. The first college football game in Maine was played versus Tufts in 1875[7]. Image File history File links Brendan_O'Connell_'06. ... Image File history File links Brendan_O'Connell_'06. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... The Colby-Bates-Bowdoin (CBB) is an athletic conference containing three NCAA Division III schools, Colby College, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Tufts University is a university located in Medford, Massachusetts (near Boston). ...


Bates fields thirty-one varsity teams. There are also intercollegiate club teams in cycling, ice hockey, rugby, sailing, ultimate frisbee, men's volleyball and water polo. The men's rugby team placed second in the nation in 1997. Recent NESCAC champions include men's track and field (2000). The 2004 women's basketball team was ranked the number one NCAA Division III team in the United States for most of February 2005 and finished the year ranked number six by the USA Today/ESPN Today 25 National Coaches' Poll. They lost to University of Southern Maine in the Sweet 16. The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... The University of Southern Maine (USM) is a multi-campus public university and part of the University of Maine System. ... The term Sweet Sixteen refers to the final sixteen teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the semi-final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ...


The Bates College athletics department was ranked 19th out of 420 in the 2005 NCAA Division III winter rankings. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ...


In addition to outdoor athletic fields, Bates has indoor and outdoor tracks, a swimming pool, squash courts, an ice hockey rink, a boathouse, several basketball courts, indoor and outdoor tennis courts, an independent weight room with treadmills and elliptical machines, and a new astroturf field.


Student life

Bates College in the 1860s
Bates College in the 1860s

The approximately 1,700 students at Bates come from 44 states, Washington, D.C., and 68 foreign countries. Bates does not and has never had fraternities or sororities. Bates is often described by New Englanders as one of the "Little Ivies." Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 483 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (617 × 765 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a 19th century stereoview of Bates College. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 483 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (617 × 765 pixel, file size: 88 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a 19th century stereoview of Bates College. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Little Ivies is a colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective[1] American colleges and universities; however, it does not denote any official organization. ...


There are nearly 90 student-run clubs and organizations at Bates, chief among them the Bates College Student Government (BCSG). The BCSG acts as the voice of the student body and oversees all other student organizations. Some of the most active clubs include:

  • WRBC Bates College Radio, one of the highest-rated college stations in the country (The Princeton Review).
  • The Chase Hall Committee (CHC), the campus programming board, sponsors a wide range of social activities - concerts, comedians and dances.
  • A cappella groups such as the Deansmen (all male), the Merimanders (all female), the Manic Optimists (all male), and the Crosstones (co-ed)
  • The Bates College Outing Club, one of the oldest college outing clubs in the United States.
  • The nationally ranked Brooks Quimby Debate Council.
  • The Strange Bedfellows, an improv comedy group.
  • Robinson Players, a theater group and Bates' oldest student group.
  • OUTfront, a group for LGBTQ students and their allies.
  • New World Coalition, a radical social justice group.
  • The Bates Musician's Alliance, a student-run group that organizes events featuring a number of student bands.
  • The Bates College Democrats.
  • The Bates College Republicans.

The Bates Student has been the main student newspaper since 1873. The John Galt Press, a conservative/libertarian newspaper, was founded and published at Bates and distributed at a number of other colleges and universities though it hasn't been printed at Bates since the Winter semester of 2005. The Bates College Mirror has been the student yearbook since 1909. Also, the Garnet, a literary magazine, has been published at Bates since 1879. WRBC is the radio station of Bates College, located in Lewiston, Maine and at 91. ... The Bates College Deansmen or simply, Deansmen are a College A Cappella group formed in 1957 at Bates College with a repertoire spanning genres as diverse as pop, rock and roll, soul, funk and electro. ... The Bates Student is the student newspaper of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ...


Bates has many official and unofficial annual traditions including WRBC's Annual Trivia Night, Puddle Jump, Ronjstock, Senior Pub crawl Parade to the Goose, Lick-It, President's Gala, "Ivy Day" (also known as the Baccalaureate, where class Ivy Stones have been chosen since 1879), Trick-or-Drink, Halloween Dance, Class Dinner, Mustachio Bashio, Triad Dance since 1981, Stanton Ride, Newman Day, Clambake at Popham Beach and Winter Carnival by the Outing Club since 1920, Alumni Reunion Parade since 1914, and the annual Oxford-Bates debate since 1921. WRBC is the radio station of Bates College, located in Lewiston, Maine and at 91. ... A pub like this would be a likely stop on a pub crawl. ... Speakers and student body leaders at a Baccalaureate A baccalaureate service is a speech or series of speeches given to a graduating senior class from a college or high school. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Named after Paul Newman, this is an annual tradition at Bates College and Princeton University where 24 beers are consumed over 24 hours. ... Popham may refer to: Alexander Popham, (c. ... A Winter carnival is an outdoor celebration that occurs in wintertime. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Alumni and faculty

See also: List of Bates College people

Many notable individuals have attended Bates College, including Leo Ryan, Edmund Muskie, Bryant Gumbel, Robert F. Kennedy (as part of the Navy's V-12 program in World War II), Peter J. Gomes, Ella Knowles, William Stringfellow, Benjamin Mays, John Shea, David Chokachi, Mark Helm, Maria Bamford and Alice Swanson Esty. Seal of Bates College Secretary of State Edmund S. Muskie, Class of 1936 This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... Leo Joseph Ryan, Jr. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Bryant Charles Gumbel (born September 29, 1948), is an American television personality for news and sports programs. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Peter John Gomes is a prominent African American preacher and theologian at Harvard Universitys Divinity School. ... Ella J. Knowles Haskell (1860-1911) was the first female lawyer in Montana and the first female candidate for state attorney general in the United States. ... William Stringfellow (Johnston, Rhode Island, 1929 – 1985) was a renowned theologian and human rights activist. ... Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays ( August 1, 1894 (?) – March 28, 1984) was an African-American minister, educator, scholar, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. ... John Shea as Lex Luthor. ... David Chokachi (born David Al-Chokhachy, January 16, 1968, Plymouth, Massachusetts) is an American film and television actor. ... Mark Alan Helm was an attorney in the Elizabeth Smart kidnapping case, where he represented the alleged kidnapper, Brian David Mitchell. ... Maria Bamford (born September 3, 1970) is an American stand-up comedian. ... Alice Theresa Hildagard Swanson Esty (8 November 1904 – July 21, 2000) was an American actress, soprano and arts patron who commissioned works by members of Les Six and other French composers, and American composers such as Ned Rorem, Virgil Thomson and Mark Blitzstein, among others. ...


School songs

Alma Mater

Bates College Chapel, modeled after Cambridge University's King's College Chapel

Here's to Bates, our Alma Mater dear, Proudest and fairest of her peers; We pledge to her our loyalty, Our faith and our honor thru the years. Long may her praises resound. Long may her sons exalt her name. May her glory shine while time endures, Here's to our Alma Mater's fame. Image File history File links Bates_College_Chapel. ... Image File history File links Bates_College_Chapel. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ...


Words by Irving H. Blake 1911; Music by Hubert P. Davis 1912


The Fight Song

Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight on for Bates For Vict'rys at our door, Today the Garnet Bobcats conquer again, Hathorn bells are ringing in another win Down the field the Bobcats are marching Piling up the score - So fight (pause) for Bates (pause) and glory Give us more! more! more! more! (shout) Hey! Words and music by Hal Hunter Class of '55


Bates Field Song

Bates, Bates, fight till the end, Fight till the end of ev'ry game. Right, right, right till the end Fight for our Alma Mater's name. Fair and square may the battle be, In life or on the field of play. For Bates, Bates, strive till the end To honor her name in ev'ry way.


Words and music by Hubert P. Davis 1912


Bates Victory

Oh Bates, awake to the sound of battle The Garnet waves on high Thy sons are following on to victory Joy and fair fame are nigh The bands are playing, the stands are swaying Now rah! rah! rah! Bates! rah! rah! Up to your cheering Bates Up ev'ry man of you Shout to the welkin blue All together, Bates together, Rolling up the score Add a little, then a little, and a little more And at last when night is falling And the day is done We'll cheer again for dear old Bates And another vict'ry won.


Words and music by Richard B. Stanley 1897


The Bobcat

Oh the day of days is here, And the Bobcat will appear, Yes the claws will fly and the bears will die On this day of Victory, For the Bobcat dotes on fighting And his courage is supreme. And when it comes to smiting, Bears and Mules are all the same. Oh here’s to the fighting Bobcats, The Garnet mascot ever. So here’s three cheers for him who shares The glory of the name of Bates.


Hollis D. Bradbury, Class of '27


The Bates Smoker

Ofttimes at night I light my pipe, And watch the glowing grates; The shadows fall while I recall Each dream of dear old Bates; Each fair coed, each lesson read, Each comrade’s friendliness. Each victory comes back to me, Each dream brings happiness.


Words and music by Stanton Howe Woodman, Class of '20


Bates in literature, film, and culture

  • The Sopranos (1999) — In an episode entitled "College," Tony Soprano and his daughter Meadow visit Bates, where Meadow remarks that Bates students claim "Bates is the world's most expensive form of contraception." Tony and Meadow also visit Colby and Bowdoin, but Meadow is waitlisted and goes to Columbia[8]
  • The Bates campus was filmed in the The Letter, a movie about the pro-diversity rally for the local Somali population in Lewiston, Maine.
  • The College gained national notoriety in the New York Times in 2004 for its celebration of Newman Day.
  • Dave Matthews referred to a concert he performed at Bates in 1995 on the Charlie Rose Show, claiming that the concert "at this little college in Maine" sparked his career[9].
  • During World War II, a warship was commissioned the S.S. Bates Victory, named after the College.
  • In a July, 2006 article in Sports Illustrated, Bates students are credited with inventing "One Ringing." One Ring is a game where friends torment each other by calling and then hanging up immediately during sport matches.

This article is about the television series. ... Information Aliases Ron Spears, Kevin Finnerty, Mr. ... Meadow Mariangela Soprano, played by Jamie-Lynn Sigler, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Main Street, also U.S. Route 202 in downtown Lewiston Coordinates: Counties Androscoggin County Area    - City 35. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Named after Paul Newman, this is an annual tradition at Bates College and Princeton University where 24 beers are consumed over 24 hours. ... David John Matthews (born January 9, 1967) is a South African, now naturalized American, Grammy-winning lead vocalist and guitarist for the Dave Matthews Band. ... Charlie Rose is a television interview show, with Charlie Rose as executive producer, executive editor, and host. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...

Notes

is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Alfred Williams Anthony, Bates College and Its Background (Philadelphia: Judson Press, 1936).
  • Bates College Catalog 2004-2006, Lewiston, ME: Bates College, 2004.
  • Bates Student, 1873-2006
  • Emeline Cheney. The Story of the Life and Work of Oren B. Cheney (Boston: Morning Star Publishing, 1907).
  • Mabel Eaton, General Catalogue of Bates College and Cobb Divinity School: 1864-1930 (Lewiston, ME: Bates College, 1930)

See also

The Bates Student is the student newspaper of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ... Seal of Bates College Secretary of State Edmund S. Muskie, Class of 1936 This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... Cobb Divinity School was a department of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine until 1908 when it merged with the Religion Department of the College. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Bates College. ... The Maine Central Institute (MCI), is a private high school, founded in 1866, located in Pittsfield, Maine, in the United States. ... The Lapham Institute was a well-known Freewill Baptist academy in North Scituate, Rhode Island in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. ... WRBC is the radio station of Bates College, located in Lewiston, Maine and at 91. ... The Ronj, also known as Le Ronj, is the student-run, on-campus coffee house at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CampusChamps.com - Bates College Athletics (496 words)
Bates College senior defensive back Adam Shepard will be one of two college players recognized as scholar-athletes at a banquet put on by the Maine chapter of the National Football Foundation and the College Football Hall of Fame.
Bates first-year thrower Kelly Godsey placed third in the hammer throw with a hurl of 178-3, breaking her own mark by more than five feet at the second day of the 2003 NCAA Division III Men's and Women's Outdoor Track and Field Championships.
Bates senior distance runner Kelley Puglisi finished 10th in the trials of the 1500-meter run in a new school record time of 4:35.77, at the 2003 NCAA Division III Men's and Women's Outdoor Track and Field Championships.
Second Nature | History (1535 words)
Bates Dining Services is an example of how college staff, students and members of the greater community can work together to create a program that is beneficial to all.
Bates Dining looked at possible changes that would reduce wastes coming from the college, reduce costs, and benefit the health of local farmers and businesses, as well as the health of the student body.
Bates Dining seeks to reduce the amount of waste going to the city landfill, and reduce the costs associated with this food waste, by composting preconsumer food scraps and unbleached, recycled paper napkins at a local farm.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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