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Bats
Fossil range: Late Paleocene - Recent
"Chiroptera" from Ernst Haeckel's Kunstformen der Natur, 1904
"Chiroptera" from Ernst Haeckel's Kunstformen der Natur, 1904
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Eutheria
Superorder: Laurasiatheria
Order: Chiroptera
Blumenbach, 1779
Suborders

Megachiroptera
Microchiroptera
See text for families. Chiroptera, the order of flying mammals commonly called bats Chiroptera (anime), fictional creatures in the anime series Blood+ Category: ... The Paleocene, early dawn of the recent, is a geologic epoch that lasted from 65. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2314x3220, 1743 KB) Wikipedia links on Talk: Because the description below is a Wikimedia Commons description page, the links are to Wikimedia Commons pages also. ... Ernst Haeckel. ... The 8th print, Discomedusae. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Orders[1] Magnorder Xenarthra: Cingulata (Armadillos) Pilosa (Sloths, True Anteaters) Magnorder Epitheria: Superorder Afrotheria: Afrosoricida (Tenrecs, etc. ... Laurasiatheria is a proposed clade with the rank of cohort or super-order, of the Epitheria infraclass of the Placentalia (living) or Eutheria (Placentals and their extinct ancestors) subclass of Mammals, based on molecular and DNA research It is a sister group to Euarchontoglires. ... Johann Friedrich Blumenbach Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (May 11, 1752 - January 22, 1840) was a German physiologist and anthropologist. ... Large flying fox (Pteropus vampyrus) Megabats constitute the suborder Megachiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ...

A bat is a mammal in the order Chiroptera. Their most distinguishing feature is that their forelimbs are developed as wings, making them the only mammals in the world naturally capable of flight (though other mammals, such as flying squirrels and gliding flying possums, can glide for limited distances). The word Chiroptera can be translated from the Greek words for "hand wing," as the structure of the open wing is very similar to an outspread human hand with a membrane (patagium) between the fingers that also stretches between hand and body. Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... WING ESPN 1410 is a commercial AM radio station in Dayton, Ohio operating with 5,000 watts at 1410 kHz with studios, offices and transmitter located on David Road in Kettering. ... A hummingbird Female Mallard Duck in midflight A dragonfly in flight Flight is the process by which an object achieves sustained movement either through the air by aerodynamically generating lift or aerostatically using buoyancy, or movement beyond earths atmosphere, in the case of spaceflight. ... Two groups of rodents are referred to as flying squirrels. ... Flying Possum or Flying Phalanger refers to species of gliding marsupials including: Sugar Glider Squirrel Glider Category: ... A modern glider crossing the finish line of a competition at high speed. ... Beyond overall skin structure, refer below to: See-also. ... In bats, the skin forming the surface of the wing. ...


There are estimated to be about 1,100 species of bats worldwide, accounting for about 20 percent of all mammal species.[1] About 70 percent of bats are insectivores. Of the remainder, most feed on fruits and their juices. Only three species sustain themselves with blood, some preying on vertebrates: these include the leaf-nosed bats (Phyllostomidae) of Central America and South America, and the two bulldog bat (Noctilionidae) species, which feed on fish. At least two known species of bat are cannibalistic, feeding on other bats: the Spectral Bat, also called the American False Vampire bat, and the Ghost Bat of Australia. One species, the Greater Noctule bat, is believed to catch and eat small birds in the air. Bats are present throughout most of the world; despite the cold weather, there are six species of bats in Alaska. The hierarchy of scientific classification. ... Any organism with a diet that consists chiefly of insects and similar small creatures is an insectivore. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... Juice is the liquid naturally contained in plants. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Genera See text. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Noctilionidae family of bats, commonly known as Bulldog bats, are represented by two species, the Greater Bulldog Bat and the Lesser Bulldog Bat. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are cold-blooded, covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... This article is about consuming ones own species. ... Binomial name Vampyrum spectrum (Linnaeus,, 1758) The genus Vampyrum contains only one species, the Spectral Bat (). Some alternate names for this species are Linnaeuss False Vampire Bat, False Vampire Bat and Spectral Vampire Bat. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Binomial name Nyctalus lasiopterus (Schreber, 1780) The Greater Noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus), or Greater Noctule, is a rare and little known mammal. ... who cares though]] island species, have also lost the ability to fly. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ...


Some of the smaller bat species are important pollinators of some tropical flowers. Indeed, many tropical plants are now found to be totally dependent on them, not just for pollination, but for spreading their seeds by eating the resulting fruits. This role explains environmental concerns when a bat is introduced in a new setting. Tenerife provides a recent example with the introduction of the Egyptian fruit bat. A pollinator is the agent that moves pollen from the male anthers of a flower to the female stigma of a flower to accomplish fertilization or syngamy of the female gamete in the ovule of the flower by the male gamete from the pollen grain. ... Look up flower in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A flower-fly pollinating a Common Daisy (Bellis perennis) Pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants: the transfer of pollen grains (male gametes) to the plant carpel, the structure that contains the ovule (female gamete). ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... Sweet clover (), introduced and naturalized to the U.S. from Eurasia as a forage and cover crop. ... Flag of Tenerife Tenerife in the Canary Islands chain. ... ggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggg ...


Bats can also be in the superorder Archonta. Orders Primates Plesiadapiformes (extinct) Scandentia Dermoptera Chiroptera The Archonta are a group of mammals considered a superorder in some classifications. ...

Contents

Classification and evolution

Townsends's Big-eared Bat, Corynorhinus townsendii
Townsends's Big-eared Bat, Corynorhinus townsendii
Giant golden-crowned flying fox, Acerodon jubatus
Parti-coloured bat, Vespertilio murinus
Common Pipistrelle, Pipistrellus pipistrellus
Common Pipistrelle, Pipistrellus pipistrellus

Bats are mammals. Though sometimes called "flying rodents", "flying mice," or even mistaken for insects and birds, bats are not, in fact, rodents. There are two suborders of bats: Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Golden crowned fruit bat Released as GFDL by LDC,Inc. ... Golden crowned fruit bat Released as GFDL by LDC,Inc. ... Binomial name Acerodon jubatus (Eschscholtz, 1831) The Giant golden-crowned flying fox (Acerodon jubatus), also known as the Golden-capped fruit bat, is a rare fruit bat said to be the largest bat in the world. ... Image File history File links Beschreibung: Vespertilio murinus. ... Image File history File links Beschreibung: Vespertilio murinus. ... Binomial name Vespertilio murinus Linnaeus, 1758 The Parti-coloured Bat (Vespertilio murinus) is a species of bats in the family of Vesper bats. ... Image File history File links Pipistrellus_pipistrellus01. ... Image File history File links Pipistrellus_pipistrellus01. ... Binomial name Pipistrellus pipistrellus (Schreber, 1774) The Common Pipistrelle Pipistrellus pipistrellus is a small bat. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Monura - extinct Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (may be paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Diaphanopterodea - extinct Protodonata - extinct Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Caloneurodea - extinct Titanoptera - extinct Protorthoptera - extinct Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents. ...

Despite the name, not all megabats are larger than microbats. The major distinction between the two suborders is based on other factors: See also the band, Fruit Bats. ... The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ...

  • Microbats use echolocation, whereas megabats do not (except for Rousettus and relatives, which do).
  • Microbats lack the claw at the second toe of the forelimb.
  • The ears of microbats do not form a closed ring, but the edges are separated from each other at the base of the ear.
  • Microbats lack underfur; they have only guard hairs or are naked.

Megabats eat fruit, nectar or pollen while microbats eat insects, blood (small quantities of the blood of animals), small mammals, and fish, relying on echolocation for navigation and finding prey. Echolocation, also called Biosonar, is the biological sonar used by several mammals such as bats (not all of them), dolphins and whales. ... Species 9 species, see article. ... Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ... Toes on foot. ... A forelimb is an anterior limb on an animals body. ... The ear is the sense organ that detects sounds. ... A dogs fur usually consists of longer, stiffer, guard hairs—which can be straight, wiry, or wavy, and of various lengths, hiding a soft, short-haired undercoat. ... Guard hairs are the longest, thickest hairs in a mammals coat, forming the topcoat (or outer coat). ... In Greek mythology, nectar and ambrosia are the food of the gods. ... SEM image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Monura - extinct Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (may be paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Diaphanopterodea - extinct Protodonata - extinct Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Caloneurodea - extinct Titanoptera - extinct Protorthoptera - extinct Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Echolocation, also called Biosonar, is the biological sonar used by several mammals such as bats (not all of them), dolphins and whales. ...


Genetic evidence indicates that megabats should be placed within the four major lines of microbats (Yinochiroptera), who originated during the early Eocene. The same research also seems to show that the microbats are the original bats while megabats evolved from them independently through parallel evolution, where most of them lost the ability to use echolocation. DNA, the molecular basis for inheritance. ... hfajhfiudshfas == == == --24. ... Bee hovering in flight In evolutionary biology, parallel evolution refers to the independent evolution of similar traits in closely related lineages of species, while convergent evolution refers to the appearance of striking similarities among lineages of organisms only very distantly related. ...


There is some morphological evidence that Megachiroptera evolved flight separately from Microchiroptera; if so, the Microchiroptera would have uncertain affinities. When adaptations to flight are discounted in a cladistic analysis, the Megachiroptera are allied to primates by anatomical features that are not shared with Microchiroptera. But this alternative seems to have little support these days. The term morphology in biology refers to the outward appearance (shape, structure, colour, pattern) of an organism or taxon and its component parts. ... Greek clados = branch) or phylogenetic systematics is a branch of biology that determines the evolutionary relationships of living things based on derived similarities. ... For the ecclesiastical use of this term, see primate (religion) Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, and apes, including humans. ...


Little is known about the evolution of bats, since their small, delicate skeletons do not fossilize well. However a Late Cretaceous tooth from South America resembles that of an early Microchiropteran bat. The oldest known definite bat fossils, such as Icaronycteris, Archaeonycteris, Palaeochiropteryx and Hassianycteris, are from the early Eocene (about 50 million years ago), but they were already very similar to modern microbats. Archaeopteropus, formerly classified as the earliest known megachiropteran, is now classified as a microchiropteran. This article is about evolution in biology. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Geography of the US in the Late Cretaceous Period Late Cretaceous (100mya - 65mya) refers to the second half of the Cretaceous Period, named after the famous white chalk cliffs of southern England, which date from this time. ... Icaronycteris is an extinct genus of bat. ... Species  ? Palaeochiropteryx is an extinct genus of bat. ... hfajhfiudshfas == == == --24. ...


Bats are traditionally grouped with the tree shrews (Scandentia), colugos (Dermoptera), and the primates in superorder Archonta because of the similarities between Megachiroptera and these mammals. However, molecular studies have placed them as sister group to Ferungulata -- a large grouping including carnivorans, pangolins, odd-toed ungulates, even-toed ungulates, and whales. It has been suggested that Echolocating shrew be merged into this article or section. ... Genera Tupaia Anathana Urogale Dendrogale Lyonogale Ptilocercus The tree shrews are small, squirrel-like mammals native to the tropical forests of South-east Asia. ... Species  Cynocephalus varigatus  Cynocephalus volans Colugos are arboreal gliding mammals found in South-east Asia. ... Families 15, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Orders Primates Plesiadapiformes (extinct) Scandentia Dermoptera Chiroptera The Archonta are a group of mammals considered a superorder in some classifications. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or IPA: ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Species Manis gigantea Manis temmincki Manis tricuspis Manis tetradactyla Manis crassicaudata Manis pentadactyla Manis javanica Pangolins are mammals with large scales on their skins which can be found in parts of Africa and Asia. ... Families Equidae Tapiridae Rhinocerotidae The odd-toed ungulates or Perissodactyla are large to very large browsing and grazing mammals with relatively simple stomachs and a large middle toe. ... Families Suidae Hippopotamidae Tayassuidae Camelidae Tragulidae Moschidae Cervidae Giraffidae Antilocapridae Bovidae The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti Archaeoceti (extinct) (see text for families) The order Cetacea (IPA: , L. cetus, whale) includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ...

Megabats are primarily fruit- or nectar-eating. They have probably evolved for some time in New Guinea without microbat concurrention. This has resulted in some smaller megabats of the genus Nyctimene becoming (partly) insectivorous to fill the vacant microbat ecological niche. Furthermore, there is some evidence that the fruit bat genus Pteralopex from the Solomon Islands, and its close relative Mirimiri from Fiji, have evolved to fill some niches that were open because there are no nonvolant (non-flying) mammals in those islands. Large flying fox (Pteropus vampyrus) Megabats constitute the suborder Megachiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... See also the band, Fruit Bats. ... Large flying fox (Pteropus vampyrus) Megabats constitute the suborder Megachiroptera within the order Chiroptera ( bats). ... The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... Genera Balantiopteryx Centronycteris Coleura Cormura Cyttarops Diclidurus Emballonura Mosia Peropteryx Rhynchonycteris Saccolaimus Saccopteryx Taphozous The sac-winged or sheath-tailed bats constitute a family, Emballonuridae, of 47 species of bats. ... Genera Balantiopteryx Centronycteris Coleura Cormura Cyttarops Diclidurus Emballonura Mosia Peropteryx Rhynchonycteris Saccolaimus Saccopteryx Taphozous The sac-winged or sheath-tailed bats constitute a family, Emballonuridae, of 47 species of bats. ... Genera Balantiopteryx Centronycteris Coleura Cormura Cyttarops Diclidurus Emballonura Mosia Peropteryx Rhynchonycteris Saccolaimus Saccopteryx Taphozous The sac-winged or sheath-tailed bats constitute a family, Emballonuridae, of 47 species of bats. ... Binomial name Antrozous pallidus (LeConte, 1856) The Pallid Bat (Antrozous pallidus) is a species of bat, which ranges from western Canada to central Mexico. ... Binomial name Antrozous pallidus (LeConte, 1856) The Pallid Bat (Antrozous pallidus) is a species of bat, which ranges from western Canada to central Mexico. ... The Free-tailed bats in the family Molossidae are generally quite robust and consist of many strong flying forms with relatively long and narrow wings. ... The Free-tailed bats in the family Molossidae are generally quite robust and consist of many strong flying forms with relatively long and narrow wings. ... Furipteridae, also known as Smoky Bats or Thumbless Bats, is a small group of bats from Central and South America, closely related to Natalidae and Thyropteridae bat families. ... Binomial name Milne-Edwards & A. Grandidier, 1878 The Madagascar Sucker-footed Bat, Old World Sucker-footed Bat, or Sucker-footed Bat (Myzopoda aurita and Myzopoda schliemanni) is a species of bat in the Myzopodidae family. ... Natalidae, or Funnel Eared Bats, is a small group of bats from Central and South America. ... Disc-winged bats are a small group of bats of the family Thyropteridae. ... Mustached bats are a small group of bats of the family Mormoopidae. ... Species (believed extinct) The New Zealand short-tailed bats are the Mystacinidae family of bats. ... Species (believed extinct) The New Zealand short-tailed bats are the Mystacinidae family of bats. ... The Noctilionidae family of bats, commonly known as Bulldog bats, are represented by two species, the Greater Bulldog Bat and the Lesser Bulldog Bat. ... The Noctilionidae family of bats, commonly known as Bulldog bats, are represented by two species, the Greater Bulldog Bat and the Lesser Bulldog Bat. ... The Noctilionidae family of bats, commonly known as Bulldog bats, are represented by two species, the Greater Bulldog Bat and the Lesser Bulldog Bat. ... The Leaf-nosed bats, family Phyllostomidae are by far the most varied and diverse within the whole order Chiroptera and count within their number true predatory species that take vertebrate prey including small Dove -sized birds in the case of the False Vampire, Vampyrum spectrum, the largest bat in the... Genera See text. ... Reference in Borneo Hall LS, Gordon G. Grigg, Craig Moritz, Besar Ketol, Isa Sait, Wahab Marni and M.T. Abdullah. ... Binomial name Vampyrum spectrum (Linnaeus, 1758) The genus Vampyrum contains only one species, the Spectral Bat (). Some alternate names for this species are Linnaeuss False Vampire Bat, False Vampire Bat and Spectral Vampire Bat. ... Nycteridae is the family of slit-faced or hollow-faced bats. ... Nycteridae is the family of slit-faced or hollow-faced bats. ... Nycteridae is the family of slit-faced or hollow-faced bats. ... Horseshoe bats (family Rhinolophidae) are a large family of bats including approximately 130 species grouped in 10 genera. ... Horseshoe bats (family Rhinolophidae) are a large family of bats including approximately 130 species grouped in 10 genera. ... The Bumblebee Bat or perhaps more correctly Kittis Hog-nosed Bat, (Craseonycteris thonglongyai) is the worlds smallest species of bat at 29-33 mm in length and a weight of 2 grams (about as much as a dime). ... Binomial name Craseonycteris thonglongyai Hill, 1974 The Bumblebee Bat, or perhaps more correctly Kittis Hog-nosed Bat, (Craseonycteris thonglongyai or Craseonycterus thonglongyai) is the worlds smallest species of bat and the smallest mammal in the world at 30-40 mm in length and weighing approximately 1. ... The Bumblebee Bat or perhaps more correctly Kittis Hog-nosed Bat, (Craseonycteris thonglongyai) is the worlds smallest species of bat at 29-33 mm in length and a weight of 2 grams (about as much as a dime). ... Species Mouse-tailed bats are a group of insectivorous bats of the family Rhinopomatidae with only three species contained in the since genus Rhinopoma. ... Evening bats or perhaps more correctly Vesper bats (family Vespertilionidae) are the largest and best-known family of bats. ... Evening bats or perhaps more correctly Vesper bats (family Vespertilionidae) are the largest and best-known family of bats. ... Evening bats or perhaps more correctly Vesper bats (family Vespertilionidae) are the largest and best-known family of bats. ... Nyctimene is a character in Ovids Metamorphoses. ... Binomial name (Hill & Beckon, 1978) The Fijian monkey-faced bat (Mirimiri acrodonta) is an Old World fruit bat endemic to Fiji. ...


Anatomy

By emitting high-pitched sounds and listening to the echoes, also known as sonar, microbats locate prey and other nearby objects. This is the process of echolocation, an ability they share with dolphins and whales. Two groups of moths exploit the bats' senses: tiger moths produce ultrasonic signals to warn the bats that the moths are chemically-protected (aposematism) (this was once thought to be a form of "radar jamming", but this theory has been disproved); the moths Noctuidae have a hearing organ called a tympanum which responds to an incoming bat signal by causing the moth's flight muscles to twitch erratically, sending the moth into random evasive manoeuvres. In audio signal processing and acoustics, an echo (plural echoes) is a reflection of sound, arriving at the listener some time after the direct sound. ... Genera See article below. ... A Fin Whale The term whale is ambiguous: it can refer to all cetaceans, to just the larger ones, or only to members of particular families within the order Cetacea. ... A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. ... Diversity  ? genera 11,000 species Type Species Arctia caja (Garden Tiger Moth) Subfamilies Arctiinae Ctenuchinae Lithosiinae Pericopinae Syntominae Arctiidae is a large and diverse family of moths with around 11,000 species found all over the world, with 6000 Neotropical species (Scoble 1995). ... Ultrasound is sound with a frequency greater than the upper limit of human hearing, approximately 20 kilohertz. ... The bright colours of this Yellow-winged Darter dragonfly serve as a warning to predators of its noxious taste. ... Radar jamming is the intentional emission of radio frequency signals to interfere with the operation of a radar by saturating its receiver with false information. ... Diversity 4,200 genera 35,000 species Type Species Noctua pronuba (Large Yellow Underwing) Subfamilies Acontiinae Acronictinae Aganainae Agaristinae Amphipyrinae Amphipyrinae Bagisarinae Bryophilinae Calpinae Catocalinae Cocytiinae Condicinae Cuculliinae Dilobinae Eucocytiinae Eustrotiinae Euteliinae Glottulinae Hadeninae Heliothinae Herminiinae Hypeninae Ipimorphinae Noctuinae Plusiinae Psaphidinae Raphiinae Stictopterinae Stiriinae Strepsimaninae Ufeinae The Noctuidae or Owlets... A hearing organ in insects, consisting of a membrane (tympanum) stretched across a frame backed by an air sac. ...


Although the eyes of most microbat species are small and poorly developed, their sense of vision is typically very good, especially at long distances, beyond the range of echolocation. It has even been discovered that some species are able to detect ultraviolet light. Their senses of smell and hearing are excellent. A human eye Eyes are organs of vision that detect light. ... “UV” redirects here. ...


The teeth of microbats resemble those of the insectivorans. They are very sharp in order to bite through the hardened armour of insects or the skin of fruits. Families Erinaceidae Soricidae Talpidae Solenodontidae The biological order Insectivora in the past was used as a scrapbasket for a variety of small to very small, relatively unspecialized, insectivorous mammals. ... Sclerites are hardened body parts. ...

Thermographic image of a bat using trapped air as insulation.
Thermographic image of a bat using trapped air as insulation.

While other mammals have one-way valves only in their veins to prevent the blood from flowing backwards, bats also have the same mechanism in their arteries. Image File history File links Wiki_bat. ... Image File history File links Wiki_bat. ... In the circulatory system, a vein is a blood vessel that carries blood toward the heart. ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ...


The finger bones of bats are much more flexible than those of other mammals. One reason is that the cartilage in their fingers lacks calcium and other minerals nearer the tips, increasing their ability to bend without splintering. The cross-section of the finger bone is also flattened instead of circular as is the bone in a human finger, making it even more flexible. The skin on their wing membranes is a lot more elastic and can stretch much more than is usually seen among mammals. Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... General Name, Symbol, Number calcium, Ca, 20 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 40. ... A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has a characteristic chemical composition, a highly ordered atomic structure and specific physical properties. ...


Because their wings are much thinner than those of birds, bats can manoeuvre more quickly and more precisely than birds. The surface of their wings are also equipped with touch-sensitive receptors on small bumps called Merkel cells, found in most mammals, including humans. But these sensitive areas are different in bats as each bump has a tiny hair in the centre,[2] making it even more sensitive, and allowing the bat to detect and collect information about the air flowing over its wings. An additional kind of receptor cell is found in the wing membrane of species that use their wings to catch prey. This receptor cell is sensitive to the stretching of the membrane.[2] The cells are concentrated in areas of the membrane where insects hit the wings when the bats capture them. Merkel cells are large oval cells found in the skin of vertebrates. ...


One species of bat has the longest tongue of any mammal relative to its body size. This is extremely beneficial to them in terms of pollination and feeding - their long narrow tongues can reach deep down into the long cup shape of some flowers. When their tongue retracts, it coils up inside their rib cage.[3] This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Look up flower in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Reproduction

Colony of Mouse-eared Bats, Myotis myotis
Colony of Mouse-eared Bats, Myotis myotis

Mother bats usually have only one offspring per year, and they are viviparous. A baby bat is referred to as a pup.[4] Pups are usually left in the roost when they are not nursing. However, a newborn bat can cling to the fur of the mother and be transported, although they soon grow too large for this. It would be difficult for an adult bat to carry more than one young, but normally only one young is born. Bats often form nursery roosts, with many females giving birth in the same area, be it a cave, a tree hole, or a cavity in a building. Mother bats are able to find their young in huge colonies of millions of other pups. Pups have even been seen to feed on other mothers' milk if their mother is dry. Only the mother cares for the young, and there is no continuous partnership with male bats. Image File history File linksMetadata Myotis_myotis,_nursery_roost. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Myotis_myotis,_nursery_roost. ... Species See text. ... A viviparous animal is an animal employing vivipary, a method of reproduction in which the embryo develops inside the body of the mother from which it gains nourishment, and not from an egg. ... PUP is a TLA that can stand for: PARC Universal Packet, one of the two earliest internetworking communications protocols Potentially unwanted programs, a term used for software you probably dont want installed, but isnt as annoying as adware, one example of PUP is spyware. ... Breastfeeding an infant Symbol for breastfeeding (Matt Daigle, Mothering magazine contest winner 2006) Breastfeeding is the feeding of an infant or young child with milk from a womans breasts. ... Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico A cave is a natural underground void large enough for a human to enter. ...


The ability to fly is congenital, but at birth the wings are too small to fly. Young microbats become independent at the age of 6 to 8 weeks, megabats not until they are four months old. At the age of two years, bats are sexually mature. The microbats constitute the suborder Microchiroptera within the order Chiroptera (bats). ... See also the band, Fruit Bats. ...


A single bat can live over 20 years, but the bat population growth is limited by the slow birth rate.[5]


Behavior

Most microbats are active at night or at twilight.


Many bats migrate, while others pass into torpor in cold weather but rouse themselves and feed when warm spells permit insect activity. Yet others retreat to caves for winter and hibernate for six months. mtDNA-based chart of large human migrations. ... Torpor is a state of regulated hypothermia in an endotherm lasting for periods ranging from just a few hours to several months. ... This article refers to the process of hibernation in biology. ...


The social structure of bats varies, with some bats leading a solitary life and others living in caves colonized by more than a million bats. The fission-fusion social structure is seen among several species of bats. "Fusion" refers to the grouping of large numbers of bats in one roosting area and "fission" is the breaking apart and mixing of subgroups, with individual bats switching roosts with others and often ending up in different trees and with different roostmates. In primatology, a fission-fusion society is one in which the social group, e. ...


Studies also show that bats make all kinds of sounds to communicate with others. Scientists in the field have listened to bats and have been able to identify some sounds with some behaviour bats will make right after the sounds are made.


As vectors for pathogens

Bats are natural reservoirs or vectors for a large number of zoonotic pathogens[6] including rabies,[7] severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS),[8] Henipavirus (ie. Nipah virus and Hendra virus)[9] and possibly ebola virus.[10] Their high mobility, broad distribution, social behaviour (communal roosting, fission-fusion social structure) and close evolutionary relationship to humans make bats favourable hosts and disseminators of disease. Many species also appear to have a high tolerance for harbouring pathogens and often do not develop disease while infected. In epidemiology, a vector is an organism that does not cause disease itself but which spreads infection by conveying pathogens from one host to another. ... Zoonosis (pronounced ) is any infectious disease that may be transmitted from other animals, both wild and domestic, to humans or from humans to animals (the latter is sometimes called reverse zoonosis). ... A pathogen or infectious agent is a biological agent that causes disease or illness to its host. ... Severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS is a respiratory disease in humans which is caused by the SARS coronavirus. ... Species Hendravirus Nipahvirus Henipavirus is a genus of the family Paramyxoviridae, order Mononegavirales containing two members, Hendravirus and Nipahvirus. ... Species Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus Zaire virus Ebola hæmorrhagic fever (EHF — alternatively Ebola hemorrhagic fever; commonly referred to as simply Ebola) is a recently identified, severe, often fatal infectious disease occurring in humans and some primates caused by the Ebola virus. ...

A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) approaches a wax moth (Galleria mellonella), which serves as the control species for the studies of the tiger moths. The moth is only "semi-tethered," allowing it to fly evasively.

Only 0.5% of bats carry rabies. However, of the very few cases of rabies reported in the United States every year, most are caused by bat bites[citation needed]. Although most bats do not have rabies, those that do may be clumsy, disoriented, and unable to fly, which makes it more likely that they will come into contact with humans. Although one should not have an unreasonable fear of bats, one should avoid handling them or having them in one's living space, as with any wild animal. If a bat is found in living quarters near a child, mentally handicapped person, intoxicated person, sleeping person, or pet, the person or pet should receive immediate medical attention for rabies. Bats have very small teeth and can bite a sleeping person without necessarily being felt. Download high resolution version (1200x2200, 157 KB) [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1200x2200, 157 KB) [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Binomial name Eptesicus fuscus (Palisot de Beauvois, 1796) The Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus, is larger in size than comparitive species of bats, from about 4 to 5 inches (10 - 13 cm) in length and weighing 1/2 to 5/8 ounce. ... de Havilland Tiger Moth is a trainer biplane. ... A small boy biting an older boy. ...


If a bat is found in a house and the possibility of exposure cannot be ruled out, the bat should be sequestered and an animal control officer called immediately, so that the bat can be analysed. This also applies if the bat is found dead. If it is certain that nobody has been exposed to the bat, it should be removed from the house. The best way to do this is to close all the doors and windows to the room except one to the outside. The bat should soon leave.


Due to the risk of rabies and also due to health problems related to their guano, bats should be excluded from inhabited parts of houses. For full detailed information on all aspects of bat management, including how to capture a bat, what to do in case of exposure, and how to bat-proof a house humanely, see the Centers for Disease Control's website on bats and rabies. In certain countries, such as the United Kingdom, it is illegal to handle bats without a license. The Chincha guano islands in Peru. ...


Where rabies is not endemic, as throughout most of Western Europe, small bats can be considered harmless. Larger bats can give a nasty bite. They should be treated with the respect due to any wild animal. The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ...


Cultural aspects

The bat is sacred in Tonga and West Africa and is often considered the physical manifestation of a separable soul. Bats are closely associated with vampires, who are said to be able to shapeshift into bats, fog, or wolves. Bats are also a symbol of ghosts, death, and disease. Among some Native Americans, such as the Creek, Cherokee and Apache, the bat is a trickster spirit. Chinese lore claims the bat is a symbol of longevity and happiness, and is similarly lucky in Poland and geographical Macedonia and among the Kwakiutl and Arabs. The bat is also a heraldic animal of the Spanish autonomous community of Valencia.  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... The soul, according to many religious and philosophical traditions, is the self-aware essence unique to a particular living being. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... Tsarevna Frog by Viktor Vasnetsov: a frog metamorphoses into a princess Shapeshifting is a common theme in mythology and folklore, as well as in science fiction and fantasy. ... Golden Gate Bridge in Fog Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... An artists interpretation of a ghostly woman on a flight of stairs, based on common descriptions A ghost is usually defined as the apparition of a deceased person, frequently similar in appearance to that person, and encountered in places she or he frequented, or in association with the person... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term disease refers to an abnormal condition of an organism that impairs function. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... The Creeks are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Native American tribe, for other uses of the word see Apache (disambiguation). ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ... Until the 1980s the termKwakiutl was usually applied to all of the various First Nations peoples of northern Vancouver Island, Queen Charlotte Strait and the Johnstone Strait whose traditional Wakashan language was Kwakwala. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... Capital Valencia Official language(s) Valencian and Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 8th  23,255 km²  4. ...


In Western Culture, the bat is often a symbol of the night and its foreboding nature. The bat is a primary animal associated with fictional characters of the night, both villains like Dracula and the Future Predator from the 2007 TV series Primeval and heroes like Batman. The association of the fear of the night with the animal was treated as a literary challenge by Kenneth Oppel, who created a best selling series of novels, beginning with Silverwing, which feature bats as the central heroic figures much in a similar manner as the classic novel Watership Down did for rabbits. An old wives' tale has it that bats will entangle themselves in people's hair. A likely root to this myth is that insect-eating bats seeking prey may dive erratically toward people, who attract mosquitoes and gnats, leading the squeamish to believe that the bats are trying to get in their hair. Leonardo da Vincis Vitruvian Man, for many a symbol of the changes of the Western culture during the Renaissance Western culture or Western civilization is a term used to generally refer to most of the cultures of European origin and most of their descendants. ... For other uses of the term, see Villain (disambiguation). ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ... Cast of Primeval: (left to right:) Hannah Spearritt, Andrew-Lee Potts, Douglas Henshall, Lucy Brown, James Murray and Mark Wakeling. ... “Heroine” redirects here. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Kenneth Oppel (born 31 August 1967) is a Canadian author. ... Silverwing is a novel, part of a trilogy, written by Kenneth Oppel, published in 1997 by Simon & Schuster It tells the story of a colony of silverwing bats. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Rabbits are small mammals in the family Leporidae of the order Lagomorpha, found in several parts of the world. ... An old wives tale is a wisdom much like an urban legend, supposedly passed down by old wives to a younger generation. ... Diversity 41 genera Genera See text. ... The term gnat is applied as a colloquial name to any of various small insects in the order Diptera and specifically within the suborder Nematocera. ...


In the United Kingdom all bats are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Acts, and even disturbing a bat or its roost can be punished with a heavy fine. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 is an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom which aims to protect the wildlife and countryside of the United Kingdom. ...


Austin, Texas, under the Congress Avenue bridge, is the summer home to North America's largest urban bat colony, an estimated 1,500,000 Mexican free-tailed bats, who eat an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 pounds of insects each night and attract 100,000 tourists each year. Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: , Country United States State Texas Counties Travis County Government  - Mayor Will Wynn Area  - City  296. ... Downtown Austin and the State Capitol as seen from the Congress Avenue Bridge over Town Lake. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Binomial name Tadarida brasiliensis (I. Geoffroy, 1824) The Mexican Free-tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) is a medium sized bat. ...


In Sarawak, Malaysia bats are protected species under the Wildlife Protection Ordinance 1998 (see Malaysian Wildlife Law). The large Naked bat (see Mammals of Borneo) and Greater Nectar bat are consumed by the local communities. State motto: Bersatu, Berusaha, Berbakti State anthem: Ibu Pertiwiku Capital Kuching Ruling party Barisan Nasional  - Yang di-Pertua Negeri Abang Muhammad Salahuddin  - Ketua Menteri Abdul Taib Mahmud History    - Brunei Sultanate 19th century   - Brooke dynasty 1841   - Japanese occupation 1941-1945   - British control 1946   - Accession into Malaysia 1963  Area  - Total 124,450... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The mammal species of Borneo include 288 species of terrestrial and 91 species of marine mammals recorded within the territorial boundaries of Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. ...


Bat houses

Many people put up bat houses to attract bats just like many people put up birdhouses to attract birds. Reasons for this vary, but mostly center around the fact that bats are the primary nocturnal insectivores in most if not all ecologies. Bat houses can be made from scratch, made from kits, or bought ready made. Plans for bat houses exist on many web sites, as well as guidelines for designing a bat house[citation needed]. Some conservation societies are giving away free bat houses to bat enthusiasts worldwide[citation needed]. ...


A bat house constructed in 1991 at the University of Florida campus next to Lake Alice in Gainesville has a population of over 100,000 free-tailed bats.[11] The University of Florida (commonly referred to as Florida or UF) is a public land-grant, space-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Location of Gainesville, Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Alachua Incorporated (city) 15 April 1869 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Pegeen Hanrahan  - City Manager Russ Blackburn Area [1]  - City  49. ...


See also

In the United States, there was a World War II proposal to drop bats carrying tiny incendiary bombs over Japan, hence creating bat bombs. ... In Europe all bat species are protected, and in particular, bats and bat roosts are legally protected from disturbance. ... Introduction Bat World Sanctuary was founded in 1994 as a rescue-rehabilitation center and sanctuary operated exclusively for bats. ... European Bat Night is the name of an annual popular event of ecologists and families to draw public awareness for the sake of menaced bat populations. ... A number of animals have evolved aerial locomotion, either by powered flight or by gliding. ... // An audiogram is used to show the quietest sounds someone can hear at different frequencies Hz (pitches). ...

References

  1. ^ Tudge, Colin (2000). The Variety of Life. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-860426-2. 
  2. ^ a b Melissa Calhoun (15 December 2005). Bats Use Touch Receptors on Wings to Fly, Catch Prey, Study Finds. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  3. ^ Chamberlain, Ted (2006-12-06). Photo in the News: Bat Has Longest Tongue of Any Mammal. National Geographic News. National Geographic Society. Retrieved on 2007-06-18. “A. fistulata (shown lapping sugar water from a tube) has the longest tongue, relative to body length, of any mammal—and now scientists think they know why.”
  4. ^ "Baby bats under threat from wet weather", Bat Conservation Trust, 3 July 2007, retrieved 2 August 2007
  5. ^ http://www.batworld.org/main/main.html Retrieved 22 October 2006.
  6. ^ Wong, S, Lau, S, Woo, P, Yuen, KY. (2007). Bats as a continuing source of emerging infections in humans. Rev Med Virol. 17(2):67–91.
  7. ^ McColl, KA, Tordo, N, Aquilar Setien, AA. (2000). Bat lyssavirus infections. Rev Sci Tech. 19(1):177–196.
  8. ^ Li, W, Shi, A, Yu, M et al (2005) Bats are natural reservoirs of SARS-like coronaviruses. Science 310(5748):676–679.
  9. ^ Halpin K, Young PL, Filed HE, Mackenzie JS. Isolation of Hendra virus from pteropid bats: a natural reservoir of Hendra virus. Journal of General Virology 2000; 81:1927–1932. PMID 10900029. Available from http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/81/8/1927
  10. ^ Leroy, EM, Kimulugui, B, Pourrut, X et al. (2005). Fruit bats as reservoirs of Ebola virus. Nature. 438:575–576.
  11. ^ Nordlie, Tom (2001-10-29). Backyard Bat Houses Promote Pest Control, Says UF Expert. UF News 30. University of Florida. Archived from the original on 2001-11-30. Retrieved on 2007-06-18. “... an example of good bat management. When a large colony of Brazilian free-tailed bats roosting in a campus stadium caused odor problems, university officials installed the massive house, which now holds about 100,000 bats and has become a local landmark.”
General references
  • Greenhall, Arthur H. 1961. Bats in Agriculture. A Ministry of Agriculture Publication. Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Nowak, Ronald M. 1994. " Walker's BATS of the World". The John Hopikins University Press, Baltimore and London.
  • John D. Pettigrew's summary on Flying Primate Hypothesis
  • Altringham, J.D. 1998. Bats: Biology and Behaviour. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Dobat, K.; Holle, T.P. 1985. Blüten und Fledermäuse: Bestäubung durch Fledermäuse und Flughunde (Chiropterophilie). Frankfurt am Main: W. Kramer & Co. Druckerei.
  • Fenton, M.B. 1985. Communication in the Chiroptera. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Findley, J.S. 1995. Bats: a Community Perspective. Cambridge: Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.
  • Fleming, T.H. 1988. The Short-Tailed Fruit Bat: a Study in Plant-Animal Interactions. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Kunz, T.H. 1982. Ecology of Bats. New York: Plenum Press.
  • Kunz, T.H.; Racey, P.A. 1999. Bat Biology and Conservation. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  • Kunz, T.H.; Fenton, M.B. 2003. Bat Ecology. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Neuweiler, G. 1993. Biologie der Fledermäuse. Stuttgart: Georg Thieme Verlag.
  • Nowak, R.M. 1994. Walker's Bats of the World. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Richarz, K. & Limbruner, A. 1993. The World of Bats. Neptune City: TFH Publications.
  • Twilton, B. 1999. My Life as The Bat. Liverpool Hope University press

is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
The Bat Conservation Trust (281 words)
There are 17 species of bat in the UK, all of which are protected by law because their numbers have decreased so dramatically.
Watch bats now on a live Bat-Cam, tucked away in a roost at the Lost Gardens of Heligan.
Bats are not blind, but they can also 'see' in the dark by listening to the echoes of their high frequency calls!
Bat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2695 words)
Bats are traditionally grouped with the tree shrews (Scandentia), colugos (Dermoptera), and the primates in superorder Archonta because of the similarities between Megachiroptera and these mammals.
Bats often form nursery roosts, with many females giving birth in the same area, be it a cave, a tree hole, or a cavity in a building.
Chinese lore claims the bat is a symbol of longevity and happiness, and is similarly lucky in Poland and geographical Macedonia and among the Kwakiutl and Arabs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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