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Encyclopedia > Bastarnae

The Bastarnae were a Celtic or mixed Germanic-Celtic tribe who lived in the Danube estuary and western Balkans during the last centuries BC and early centuries AD. The origin of their name is uncertain, but may mean 'mixed-bloods' (compare 'bastard') as opposed to the neighbouring Germanic Skiri 'clean-' or 'pure-bloods'.


The theory that they were a Germanic tribe (see below) considers them to have been among the first East Germanic tribes to have emigrated from Scandinavia (possibly as early as the 8th century BC[1]). Reaching the lower Danube in c. 200 BC, they were among the first Germanic tribes to come into contact with the ancient world. The term Germanic tribes applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... The tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. In historical times these tribes were differentiated as Goths, Burgundians and Vandals among others. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) Events and trends Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia, Greece. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC - 200 BC - 199 BC 198 BC...


When the Bastarnae first appear in the historical sources, they were settled in Galicia and Bukovina. They appeared on the lower Danube about 200 BC, and were used by Philip V of Macedon against his Thracian neighbours. Defeated by the Dacians, the Bastarnae returned north, leaving some of their number settled on Peuce an island on the Danube (hence an alternative tribal name, Peucini). Their main body occupied the country between the eastern Carpathians and the Danube. Coat-of-arms of Galicia Galicia is a historical region currently split between Poland and Ukraine. ... Bukovina (Ukrainian: Буковина, Bukovyna; Romanian: Bucovina; German and Polish: Bukowina; see also other languages) is a historical region on the northern slopes of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plains. ... The Danube bend at Visegrád is a popular destination of tourists The Danube (ancient Danuvius) is Europes second-longest river (after the Volga). ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC 202 BC 201 BC - 200 BC - 199 BC 198 BC... Coin of Philip V. The Greek inscription reads ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ ([coin] of King Philip). ... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ... Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat. ... Peuce is the Greek name of an island in the Black Sea (16 km from the delta of the River Danube) actually held by Ukraine (USSR 1947 - 1992). ... The Danube bend at Visegrád is a popular destination of tourists The Danube (ancient Danuvius) is Europes second-longest river (after the Volga). ... Satellite image of the Carpathians Souvenir from Carpathian region (Poland) The Carpathian Mountains are the eastern wing of the great Central Mountain System of Europe, curving 1500 km (~900 miles) along the borders of Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Montenegro and northern Hungary. ... The Danube bend at Visegrád is a popular destination of tourists The Danube (ancient Danuvius) is Europes second-longest river (after the Volga). ...


The Bastarnae were regarded as excellent warriors. Appian called them "the bravest nation of all". As allies of King Perseus of Macedonia, then as subjects of the Sarmatians (who seem to have overcome them in the early 2nd century AD), and then as mercenaries under Mithridates the Great and lastly on their own account, they had hostile relations with the Romans. In the time of Augustus, the Romans defeated the Bastarnae and made a peace. This peace however was disturbed by a series of incursions by the Bastarnae against neighbouring Roman provinces. Appian (c. ... Coin of Perseus of Macedon Perseus was a king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedon created upon the death of Alexander the Great. ... Sarmatia Europæa separated from Sarmatia Asiatica by the Tanais (the River Don), based on Greek literary sources, in a map printed in London, ca 1770. ... Coin of Mithridates II from the mint at Seleucia. ... Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC – August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (in English Octavian, Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important...


Polybius and the authors who copy him regard the Bastarnae as Galatae or Galatians; the Romans originally used German as a geographical rather than ethnic classification, leading to the confusion of the Bastarnae with Germans. See "Atlas of Ancient History", p.50 by Colin McEvedy for a discussion of this point. Strabo claims ignorance of their origins; Tacitus expressly declares their German origin but says that the race was degraded by intermarriage with Sarmatians. Polybius (ca 203 BC - 120 BC, Greek Πολυβιος) was a Greek historian of the Mediterranean world famous for his book called The Histories or The Rise of the Roman Empire, covering the period of 220 BC to 146 BC. // Personal experiences As the former tutor of Scipio Aemilianus , the famous adopted... The Epistle to Galatians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... Colin Peter McEvedy (born Salford, Lancashire 6 June 1930; died London 1 August 2005), was a British psychiatrist, historian, demographer and author. ... the Greek georgapher Strabo, in a 16th‑century engraving. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... Sarmatia Europæa separated from Sarmatia Asiatica by the Tanais (the River Don), based on Greek literary sources, in a map printed in London, ca 1770. ...


In the second or third centuries AD, the Bastarnae gave way to the Goths, with whom they seem to have amalgamated, and we last hear of them as transferred by the emperor Probus to the right bank of the Danube. They probably disappeared into the melting pot of Chernyakhov culture of the 3rd-5th centuries AD, a multi-ethnic culture dominated by the Goths, which undoubtedly had a role in the emergence of the Slavs. Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... This antoninianus minted under Probus (c. ... Chernyakhov culture is shown in orange, the third-century Wielbark Culture in red. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

 
 

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