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Encyclopedia > Basketball
Basketball
Michael Jordan goes for a slam dunk
Highest governing body FIBA
First played 1891, Springfield, Massachusetts, (USA)
Characteristics
Contact Contact
Team Members 12 to 15 (5 at a time)
Mixed Gender Single
Category Indoor
Ball Basketball
Olympic 1936

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10 feet (3 m) high hoop (the goal) under organized rules. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world. This article is about the ball used in basketball. ... Basketball may refer to: Basketball, the sport Basketball, a 1967 film directed by Donald Shebib The Basketball Diaries, a 1978 book by Jim Carroll, subsequently a 1995 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio Note the exact spelling of the following: BASEketball, a 1998 David Zucker comedy film This is a disambiguation page... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term, slam dunk. For other uses, see Slam dunk (disambiguation). ... A sport governing body comes in several forms. ... The International Basketball Federation (French Fédération Internationale de Basketball) is an association of national organizations which governs international competitition in the sport. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... For other uses, see Ball (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ball used in basketball. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the ball used in basketball. ...


Points are scored by shooting the ball through the basket from above; the team with more points at the end of the game wins. The ball can be advanced on the court by bouncing it (dribbling) or passing it between teammates. Disruptive physical contact (fouls) is not permitted and there are restrictions on how the ball can be handled (violations). In sports such as football (soccer), basketball, bandy and water polo, dribbling refers to the maneuvering of a ball around a defender through short skillful taps or kicks with either the legs (football/soccer), hands (basketball), stick (bandy) or swimming strokes (water polo). ... In sports, a foul is a violation of the games rules. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Through time, basketball has developed to involve common techniques of shooting, passing and dribbling, as well as players' positions, and offensive and defensive structures. While competitive basketball is carefully regulated, numerous variations of basketball have developed for casual play. In some countries, basketball is also a popular spectator sport. Variations of basketball are games or activities based on or similar to the game of basketball, in which the player utilizes common basketball skills. ...


While competitive basketball is primarily an indoor sport, played on a basketball court, less regulated variations have become exceedingly popular as an outdoor sport among both inner city and rural groups. In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor with baskets at either end. ...

Contents

History

The first basketball court: Springfield College.
The first basketball court: Springfield College.

In early December 1891, Dr. James Naismith,[1] a Canadian physical education student and instructor at YMCA Training School[2] (today, Springfield College) in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA, sought a vigorous indoor game to keep his students occupied and at proper levels of fitness during the long New England winters. After rejecting other ideas as either too rough or poorly suited to walled-in gymnasiums, he wrote the basic rules and nailed a peach basket onto a 10-foot (3.05 m) elevated track. In contrast with modern basketball nets, this peach basket retained its bottom, and balls had to be retrieved manually after each "basket" or point scored, this proved inefficient, however, so a hole was drilled into the bottom of the basket, allowing the balls to be poked out with a long dowel each time. A further change was soon made, so the ball merely passed through, paving the way for the game we know today. A soccer ball was used to shoot goals. Whenever a person got the ball in the basket, they would give their team a point. Whichever team got the most points won the game. [3] Image File history File links Firstbasketball. ... Image File history File links Firstbasketball. ... James A. Naismith,(November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Springfield College is a college located in Springfield, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... The rules of basketball are the rules and regulations that govern the play, officiating, equipment and procedures of basketball. ... Fluted wood dowel Dowel joint A dowel is a pin, usually made of wood, plastic or metal, used to secure two objects together. ...


Naismith's handwritten diaries, discovered by his granddaughter in early 2006, indicate that he was nervous about the new game he had invented, which incorporated rules from a Canadian children's game called "Duck on a Rock", as many had failed before it. Naismith called the new game 'Basket Ball'.[4] Duck on a Rock was a medieval children’s game. ...


The first official basketball game was played in the YMCA gymnasium on January 20, 1892 with nine players, on a court just half the size of a present-day Streetball or National Basketball Association (NBA) court. "Basket ball", the name suggested by one of Naismith's students, was popular from the beginning. is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Streetballers at the Venice Beach basketball courts, California, USA. Streetball is an urban form of basketball, played on playgrounds and in gymnasiums across the world. ... NBA redirects here. ...


Women's basketball began in 1892 at Smith College when Senda Berenson, a physical education teacher, modified Naismith's rules for women. Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Senda Berenson Abbott (b. ...


Basketball's early adherents were dispatched to YMCAs throughout the United States, and it quickly spread through the USA and Canada. By 1895, it was well established at several women's high schools. While the YMCA was responsible for initially developing and spreading the game, within a decade it discouraged the new sport, as rough play and rowdy crowds began to detract from the YMCA's primary mission. However, other amateur sports clubs, colleges, and professional clubs quickly filled the void. In the years before World War I, the Amateur Athletic Union and the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (forerunner of the NCAA) vied for control over the rules for the game. - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ... NCAA redirects here. ...


Basketball was originally played with an association football ball. The first balls made specifically for basketball were brown, and it was only in the late 1950s that Tony Hinkle, searching for a ball that would be more visible to players and spectators alike, introduced the orange ball that is now in common use. Soccer redirects here. ... Paul D. Tony Hinkle (born: December 19, 1899 in Logansport, IN; died: September 22, 1992) was a basketball coach at Butler University in Indianapolis/Indiana. ...


Dribbling was not part of the original game except for the "bounce pass" to teammates. Passing the ball was the primary means of ball movement. Dribbling was eventually introduced but limited by the asymmetric shape of early balls. Dribbling only became a major part of the game around the 1950s as manufacturing improved the ball shape.


Basketball, netball, dodgeball, volleyball, and lacrosse are the only ball games which have been identified as being invented by North Americans. Other ball games, such as baseball and Canadian football, have Commonwealth of Nations, European, Asian or African connections. A netball game in Australia Netball is a non contact sport similar to, and derived from, basketball. ... For the 2004 film, see Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Diagram of a Canadian football field. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


Although there is no direct evidence as yet that the idea of basketball came from the ancient Mesoamerican ballgame, knowledge of that game had been available for at least 50 years prior to Naismith's creation in the writings of John Lloyd Stephens and Alexander von Humboldt. Stephen's works especially, which included drawings by Frederick Catherwood, were available at most educational institutions in the 19th century and also had wide popular circulation. Ballcourt at Monte Alban Ballcourt at Uaxactun The Mesoamerican ballgame[1] was a sport with ritual associations played for over 3000 years by the peoples of Mesoamerica in Pre-Columbian times. ... John Lloyd Stephens in 1839 John Lloyd Stephens (November 28, 1805–October 13, 1852) was an American explorer, writer, and diplomat. ... An 1859 portrait of Alexander von Humboldt by the artist Julius Schrader, showing Mount Chimborazo in the background. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


College basketball and early leagues

Naismith was instrumental in establishing college basketball. Naismith coached at University of Kansas for six years before handing the reins to renowned coach Phog Allen. Naismith's disciple Amos Alonzo Stagg brought basketball to the University of Chicago, while Adolph Rupp, a student of Naismith's at Kansas, enjoyed great success as coach at the University of Kentucky. In 1892, University of California and Miss Head's School, played the first women's inter-institutional game. Berenson's freshmen played the sophomore class in the first women's collegiate basketball game at Smith College, March 21, 1893. The same year, Mount Holyoke and Sophie Newcomb College (coached by Clara Gregory Baer) women began playing basketball. By 1895, the game had spread to colleges across the country, including Wellesley, Vassar and Bryn Mawr. The first intercollegiate women's game was on April 4, 1896. Stanford women played Berkeley, 9-on-9, ending in a 2-1 Stanford victory. In 1901, colleges, including the University of Chicago, Columbia University, Dartmouth College, University of Minnesota, the U.S. Naval Academy, the University of Utah and Yale University began sponsoring men's games. By 1910, frequent injuries on the men's courts prompted President Roosevelt to suggest that college basketball form a governing body. And the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) was created. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Forrest Phog Allen, D.O. (November 18, 1885 – September 16, 1974) was an American collegiate basketball coach known as the Father of Basketball Coaching. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mount Holyoke (elevation 940/286m) is the western-most peak of the Mt. ... H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College of Tulane University was established in New Orleans, Louisiana, circa 1884, as a womens college. ... Clara Gregory Baer is famous for her pioneering role in womens sports. ... Wellesley is the name of various places in the world including: Wellesley, Massachusetts Wellesley College is a private college in Wellesley, Massachusetts. ... Vassar, Michigan is a place in the State of Michigan in the United States of America. ... Brynmawr (Bryn-mawr) is a market town in the county borough of Blaenau Gwent, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Having no offical mascot, the athletic teams at Stanford University are referred to as Stanford Cardinal. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... Yale redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... NCAA redirects here. ...


Teams abounded throughout the 1920s. There were hundreds of men's professional basketball teams in towns and cities all over the United States and little organization of the professional game. Players jumped from team to team and teams played in armories and smoky dance halls. Leagues came and went. And barnstorming squads such as the Original Celtics and two all African American teams, the New York Renaissance Five ("Rens") and (still in existence as of 2006) the Harlem Globetrotters played up to two hundred games a year on their national tours. Women's basketball was more structured. In 1905, the National Women's Basketball Committee's Executive Committee on Basket Ball Rules was created by the American Physical Education Association. These rules called for six to nine players per team and 11 officials. The International Women's Sports Federation (1924) included a women's basketball competition. 37 women's high school varsity basketball or state tournaments were held by 1925. And in 1926, the Amateur Athletic Union backed the first national women's basketball championship, complete with men's rules. The first women's AAU All-America team was chosen in 1929. Women's industrial leagues sprang up throughout the nation, producing famous athletes like Babe Didrikson of the Golden Cyclones and the All American Red Heads Team who competed against men's teams, using men's rules. By 1938, the women's national championship changed from a three-court game to two-court game with six players per team. The first men's national championship tournament, the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball tournament, which still exists as the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) tournament, was organized in 1937. The first national championship for NCAA teams, the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) in New York, was organized in 1938; the NCAA national tournament would begin one year later. Professional basketball refers to a number of leagues in which athletes play in sports arenas, on organized teams, for profit. ... The Original Celtics, no relation to the equally famous Boston Celtics, were an outstanding barnstorming professional basketball team in the 1920s. ... The New York Renaissance, also known as the Rens, were an all-black professional basketball team founded in 1922, a few years before the Harlem Globetrotters. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The American Association for the Advancement of Physical Education, founded in 1885 to support gymnastics education. ... The International Womens Sports Federation held an Olympic-style Games, in 1922, in Paris. ... National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Womens Basketball Championship Division I The NAIA National Womens Basketball Championship is held in Jackson,TN and is played at Oman Arena. ... - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ... Babe Didrikson in the 1932 Olympic javelin competition Mildred Ella Babe Didrikson Zaharias (June 26, 1911-September 27, American athlete, who excelled in many sports. ... The Golden Cyclones were a 1930s group of women athletes who played AAU softball, basketball and track-and-field. ... The All American Red Heads was one of the first professional women’s basketball teams. ... 6 on 6 Basketball or Basquette is a largely-archaic variant of womens basketball. ... The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ... The NAIA Mens Basketball National Championship has been held yearly since 1937, when it was established by James Naismith, to crown a national champion for smaller colleges and universities. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... // Final four redirects here. ...


College basketball was rocked by gambling scandals from 1948 to 1951, when dozens of players from top teams were implicated in match fixing and point shaving. Partially spurred by an association with cheating, the NIT lost support to the NCAA tournament. Match fixing or game fixing in organized sports occurs when a match is played to a completely or partially pre-determined result. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


U.S. high school basketball

Before widespread school district consolidation, most United States high schools were far smaller than their present day counterparts. During the first decades of the 20th century, basketball quickly became the ideal interscholastic sport due to its modest equipment and personnel requirements. In the days before widespread television coverage of professional and college sports, the popularity of high school basketball was unrivaled in many parts of America. For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Today virtually every high school in the United States fields a basketball team in varsity competition. Basketball's popularity remains high, both in rural areas where they carry the identification of the entire community, as well as at some larger schools known for their basketball teams where many players go on to participate at higher levels of competition after graduation. In the 2003–04 season, 1,002,797 boys and girls represented their schools in interscholastic basketball competition, according to the National Federation of State High School Associations. The states of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky are particularly well known for their residents' devotion to high school basketball, commonly called Hoosier Hysteria in Indiana; the critically acclaimed film Hoosiers shows high school basketball's depth of meaning to these rural communities. In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The National Federation of State High School Associations (or NFHS) is the body which oversees and governs most high school interscholastic athletics and extracirriculars in the United States at the national level. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Hoosier Hysteria. ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ...


National Basketball Association

In 1946, the Basketball Association of America (BAA) was formed, organizing the top professional teams and leading to greater popularity of the professional game. The first game was played in Toronto, Canada between the Toronto Huskies and New York Knickerbockers on November 1, 1946. Three seasons later, in 1949, the BAA became the National Basketball Association (NBA). An upstart organization, the American Basketball Association, emerged in 1967 and briefly threatened the NBA's dominance until the rival leagues merged in 1976. Today the NBA is the top professional basketball league in the world in terms of popularity, salaries, talent, and level of competition. NBA redirects here. ... The Toronto Huskies was a team in the Basketball Association of America (a forerunner of the National Basketball Association) during the 1946-1947 season, based in Toronto, Canada. ... Knicks redirects here. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NBA redirects here. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ...


The NBA has featured many famous players, including George Mikan, the first dominating "big man"; ball-handling wizard Bob Cousy and defensive genius Bill Russell of the Boston Celtics; Wilt Chamberlain, who originally played for the barnstorming Harlem Globetrotters; all-around stars Oscar Robertson and Jerry West; more recent big men Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Karl Malone; playmaker John Stockton; crowd-pleasing forward Julius Erving; European stars Dirk Nowitzki and Drazen Petrovic and the three players who many credit with ushering the professional game to its highest level of popularity: Larry Bird, Earvin "Magic" Johnson, and Michael Jordan. George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the professional basketball player. ... Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a former American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Dirk Werner Nowitzki (IPA pronunciation: ) (born June 19, 1978 in Würzburg, Germany) is a German basketball player for the United States National Basketball Associations (NBA) Dallas Mavericks. ... Dražen Petrović, playing for the New Jersey Nets. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ...


The NBA-backed Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) began 1997. Though it had an insecure opening season, several marquee players (Sheryl Swoopes, Lisa Leslie and Sue Bird among others) helped the league's popularity and level of competition. Other professional women's basketball leagues in the United States, such as the American Basketball League (1996-1998), have folded in part because of the popularity of the WNBA. The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... Sheryl Denise Swoopes (born March 25, 1971) is an American professional basketball player, currently playing for the Houston Comets in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... Lisa Leslie (born July 7, 1972 in Gardena, California) is a Womens National Basketball Association player currently playing for the Los Angeles Sparks. ... Suzanne Brigit Bird (born October 16, 1980) is a professional womens basketball player. ... Professional athletes are distinguished from amateur athletes by virtue of being paid. ... The American Basketball League of 1996 was an attempt to establish an independent professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ...


In 2001, the NBA formed a developmental league, the NBDL. The league currently has eight teams, but added seven more for the 2006-2007 season. The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ...


International basketball

XX. Olympic games Munich 1972 Krešimir Ćosić of Yugoslavia (blue shirt) vs. Petr Novicky of Czechoslovakia
XX. Olympic games Munich 1972 Krešimir Ćosić of Yugoslavia (blue shirt) vs. Petr Novicky of Czechoslovakia

The International Basketball Federation was formed in 1932 by eight founding nations: Argentina, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Portugal, Romania and Switzerland. At this time, the organization only oversaw amateur players. Its acronym, in French, was thus FIBA; the "A" standing for amateur. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1217x1504, 627 KB) Summary XX. Olympic games Munich 1972 - Kresimir Cosic (Yugoslavia) vs. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1217x1504, 627 KB) Summary XX. Olympic games Munich 1972 - Kresimir Cosic (Yugoslavia) vs. ... For the Croatian politician, see Krešimir Ćosić (politician). ... The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ...


Basketball was first included in the Olympic Games in 1936, although a demonstration tournament was held in 1904. This competition has usually been dominated by the United States, whose team has won all but three titles, the first loss in a controversial final game in Munich in 1972 against the Soviet Union. In 1950 the first FIBA World Championship for men was held in Argentina. Three years later, the first FIBA World Championship for Women was held in Chile. Women's basketball was added to the Olympics in 1976, with teams such as Brazil and Australia rivaling the American squads. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... The FIBA World Championship (also called the Basketball World Championship) is a world basketball tournament for mens national teams held quadrennially by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... // Like the mens event, the Women’s World Championship was created by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ...


FIBA dropped the distinction between amateur and professional players in 1989, and in 1992, professional players played for the first time in the Olympic Games. The United States' dominance continued with the introduction of their Dream Team. However, with developing programs elsewhere, other national teams started to beat the United States. A team made entirely of NBA players finished sixth in the 2002 World Championships in Indianapolis, behind Yugoslavia, Argentina, Germany, New Zealand and Spain. In the 2004 Athens Olympics, the United States suffered its first Olympic loss while using professional players, falling to Puerto Rico (in a 19-point loss) and Lithuania in group games, and being eliminated in the semifinals by Argentina. It eventually won the bronze medal defeating Lithuania, finishing behind Argentina and Italy. The United States mens national basketball team is the representative for the United States of America in international mens basketball. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Yugoslavia was generally regarded as the second-leading force in international basketball, behind only the United States of America. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Worldwide, basketball tournaments are held for boys and girls of all age levels. The global popularity of the sport is reflected in the nationalities represented in the NBA. Players from all over the globe can be found in NBA teams. Chicago Bulls star forward Luol Deng is a Sudanese refugee who settled in Great Britain; Steve Nash, who won the 2005 and 2006 NBA MVP award, is Canadian; Kobe Bryant is an American who spent much of his childhood in Italy; Dallas Mavericks superstar and 2007 NBA MVP Dirk Nowitzki is German; All-Star Pau Gasol of the Memphis Grizzlies is from Spain; 2005 NBA Draft top overall pick Andrew Bogut of the Milwaukee Bucks is Australian; 2006 NBA Draft top overall pick Andrea Bargnani of the Toronto Raptors is from Italy; Houston Rockets Center Yao Ming is from China; Cleveland Cavaliers big man Zydrunas Ilgauskas is Lithuanian; and the San Antonio Spurs feature Tim Duncan of the U.S. Virgin Islands, Manu Ginobili of Argentina (like Chicago Bulls player Andrés Nocioni) and Tony Parker of France. (Duncan competes for the United States internationally, as the Virgin Islands did not field a basketball team for international competition until well after Duncan started playing internationally, and all U.S. Virgin Islands natives are United States citizens by birth.) The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Luol Deng (born April 16, 1985 in Wau, Sudan) is a British professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Chicago Bulls, where he plays small forward. ... Steven John Nash, OBC (born February 7, 1974),[1] is a Canadian professional basketball player who plays point guard for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... Kobe Bryant (born August 23, 1978) is an American All-Star shooting guard in the National Basketball Association who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... Dirk Werner Nowitzki (IPA pronunciation: ) (born June 19, 1978 in Würzburg, Germany) is a German basketball player for the United States National Basketball Associations (NBA) Dallas Mavericks. ... Pau Gasol Sáez (born July 6, 1980, in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain) is a 2. ... This is an article about the National Basketball Association team; for the defunct World Football League team, see Memphis Southmen. ... The 2005 NBA Draft logo The 2005 NBA Draft took place on June 28, 2005 in the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... Andrew Michael Bogut (born November 28, 1984) is an Australian professional basketball player. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 2006 NBA Draft was held on June 28 at the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... Andrea Bargnani, nicknamed Il Mago (translated to The Magician), (born October 26, 1985 in Rome, Italy) is an Italian professional basketball player with the Toronto Raptors of the National Basketball Association. ... The Toronto Raptors are a professional basketball team based in Toronto, Ontario. ... The Houston Rockets are an American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yao (姚) Yao Ming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born September 12, 1980, in Shanghai, China) is a Chinese professional basketball player and is arguably the best center in the National Basketball Association (NBA) today. ... The Cleveland Cavaliers (also known as the Cavs) are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Zydrunas Ilgauskas (born June 5, 1975 in Kaunas, Lithuania) is a basketball player for the Cleveland Cavaliers and one of the top centers in the NBAs Eastern Conference. ... The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... Emanuel David Ginobili (Spanish: Ginóbili) (born July 28, 1977 in Bahía Blanca, Argentina), better known as Manu Ginobili, is an Argentine basketball player of Italian descent. ... The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Andrés Marcelo Nocioni (last name pronounced No-CEE-oh-nee) (born November 30, 1979 in Santa Fe, Argentina) is a basketball player for the NBAs Chicago Bulls, and the Argentine national team. ... This article is about the French basketball player. ...


The all-tournament teams at the two most recent FIBA World Championships, held in 2002 in Indianapolis and 2006 in Japan, demonstrate the globalization of the game equally dramatically. Only one member of either team was American, namely Carmelo Anthony in 2006. The 2002 team featured Nowitzki, Ginobili, Peja Stojakovic of Yugoslavia (now of Serbia), Yao Ming of China, and Pero Cameron of New Zealand. Ginobili also made the 2006 team; the other members were Anthony, Gasol, his Spanish teammate Jorge Garbajosa and Theodoros Papaloukas of Greece. The only players on either team to never have joined the NBA are Cameron and Papaloukas. The FIBA World Championship (also called the Basketball World Championship) is a world basketball tournament for mens national teams held quadrennially by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... The 2002 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball tournament held by the International Basketball Federation in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from August 29 to September 8, 2002. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Official logo The winner, Spain, is being celebrated The 2006 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball competition hosted by Japan from August 19 to September 3, 2006. ... Carmelo Anthony (born May 29, 1984 in the Red Hook Projects of Brooklyn, New York)[1] is an American professional basketball player at the small forward position for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association and the USA National Team. ... Predrag Peja Stojaković (Serbian Cyrillic: Предраг Пеђа Стојаковић; born June 9, 1977 in Slavonska Požega, SR Croatia, Yugoslavia) is a Serbian basketball player for the NBAs New Orleans Hornets. ... Basketball Federation of Serbia The Serbia national basketball team represents Serbia in international basketball matches. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yao (姚) Yao Ming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born September 12, 1980, in Shanghai, China) is a Chinese professional basketball player and is arguably the best center in the National Basketball Association (NBA) today. ... Sean Pero MacPherson Cameron (born 6 May 1974) is a New Zealand professional basketball player. ... Jorge Garbajosa Chaparro Jr. ... Theodoros Papaloukas (Greek: Θεόδωρος Παπαλουκάς; born May 8, 1977) is a Greek top professional basketball player who has been playing for CSKA Moscow since June 2002. ...


Rules and regulations

Main article: Rules of basketball

Measurements and time limits discussed in this section often vary among tournaments and organizations; international and NBA rules are used in this section. The rules of basketball are the rules and regulations that govern the play, officiating, equipment and procedures of basketball. ...


The object of the game is to outscore one's opponents by throwing the ball through the opponents' basket from above while preventing the opponents from doing so on their own. An attempt to score in this way is called a shot. A successful shot is worth two points, or three points if it is taken from beyond the three-point arc which is 6.25 meters (20 ft 6 in) from the basket in international games and 23 ft 9 in (7.24 m) in NBA games. Look up shot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2007 In basketball, a three-point field goal, three-pointer, three-point shot, or simply three is a field goal made from beyond the three point line, a designated semi-ellipsoid arc radiating from the basket. ...


Playing regulations

Games are played in four quarters of 10 (international) or 12 minutes (NBA). College games use two 20 minute halves while most high school games use eight minute quarters. Fifteen minutes are allowed for a half-time break, and two minutes are allowed at the other breaks. Overtime periods are five minutes long. Teams exchange baskets for the second half. The time allowed is actual playing time; the clock is stopped while the play is not active. Therefore, games generally take much longer to complete than the allotted game time, typically about two hours. Overtime is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport in order to bring the game to a decision and avoid declaring the contest a tie or draw. ...


Five players from each team (out of a twelve player roster) may be on the court at one time. Substitutions are unlimited but can only be done when play is stopped. Teams also have a coach, who oversees the development and strategies of the team, and other team personnel such as assistant coaches, managers, statisticians, doctors and athletic trainers. In sports, a coach or manager is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ...


For both men's and women's teams, a standard uniform consists of a pair of shorts and a jersey with a clearly visible number, unique within the team, printed on both the front and back. Players wear high-top sneakers that provide extra ankle support. Typically, team names, players' names and, outside of North America, sponsors are printed on the uniforms. The high-top is a shoe that extends significantly over the wearers ankle. ...


A limited number of time-outs, clock stoppages requested by a coach for a short meeting with the players, are allowed. They generally last no longer than one minute unless, for televised games, a commercial break is needed.


The game is controlled by the officials consisting of the referee ("crew chief" in the NBA), one or two umpires ("referees" in the NBA) and the table officials. For both college and the NBA there are a total of three referees on the court. The table officials are responsible for keeping track of each teams scoring, timekeeping, individual and team fouls, player substitutions, team possession arrow, and the shot clock. In basketball, a personal foul is a breach of the rules that concerns illegal personal contact with an opponent. ... A jump ball is the method used to begin play in basketball. ... The Shot Clock Monument in Syracuse, New York A shot clock is a timer designed to increase the pace (and subsequently, the score) in a competitive sport. ...


Equipment

Traditional eight-panel basketball
Traditional eight-panel basketball
A diagram of a FIBA basketball court.
A diagram of a FIBA basketball court.

The only essential equipment in basketball is the basketball and the court: a flat, rectangular surface with baskets at opposite ends. Competitive levels require the use of more equipment such as clocks, scoresheets, scoreboard(s), alternating possession arrows, and whistle-operated stop-clock systems. Image File history File linksMetadata Basketball. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Basketball. ... Download high resolution version (446x749, 45 KB)larger version of the basketball court. ... Download high resolution version (446x749, 45 KB)larger version of the basketball court. ... The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ...


A regulation basketball court in international games is 28 by 15 meters (approx. 92 by 49 ft) and in the NBA is 94 by 50 feet (29 by 15 m). Most courts are made of wood. A steel basket with net and backboard hang over each end of the court. At almost all levels of competition, the top of the rim is exactly 10 feet (3.05 m) above the court and 4 feet (1.2 m) inside the baseline. While variation is possible in the dimensions of the court and backboard, it is considered important for the basket to be of the correct height; a rim that is off by but a few inches can have an adverse effect on shooting. In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor with baskets at either end. ...


Violations

The ball may be advanced toward the basket by being shot, passed between players, thrown, tapped, rolled or dribbled (bouncing the ball while running).


The ball must stay within the court; the last team to touch the ball before it travels out of bounds forfeits possession. The ball-handler may not move both feet without dribbling, known as traveling, nor may he dribble with both hands or catch the ball in between dribbles, a violation called double dribbling. A player's hand cannot be under the ball while dribbling; doing so is known as carrying the ball. A team, once having established ball control in the front half of the court, may not return the ball to the backcourt. The ball may not be kicked nor struck with the fist. A violation of these rules results in loss of possession, or, if committed by the defense, a reset of the shot clock. In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball illegally moves one or both of his feet. ... In the game of basketball, a double dribble is a violation in which a player dribbles (bounces) the ball, clearly holds it with a combination of either one or two hands (while either moving or stationary), and then proceeds to dribble again without first either attempting a field goal or... In the game of basketball, a carrying violation is almost the same as a double dribble. ... The Shot Clock Monument in Syracuse, New York A shot clock is a timer designed to increase the pace (and subsequently, the score) in a competitive sport. ...


There are limits imposed on the time taken before progressing the ball past halfway (8 seconds in international and NBA; 10 seconds in NCAA and high school), before attempting a shot (24 seconds in the NBA; 35 seconds in NCAA), holding the ball while closely guarded (5 seconds), and remaining in the restricted area (the lane, or "key") (3 seconds). These rules are designed to promote more offense. Note: most high school games do not employ a shot clock. A FIBA-sanctioned basketball court, with the key located as the trapezoid nearest to the basket. ...


No player may interfere with the basket or ball on its downward flight to the basket, or while it is on the rim (or, in the NBA, while it is directly above the basket), a violation known as goaltending. If a defensive player goaltends, the attempted shot is considered to have been successful. If a teammate of the shooter goaltends, the basket is cancelled and play continues with the defensive team being given possession.


Fouls

Main articles: Personal foul, Technical foul
The referee signals that a foul has been committed.
The referee signals that a foul has been committed.

An attempt to unfairly disadvantage an opponent through physical contact is illegal and is called a foul. These are most commonly committed by defensive players; however, they can be committed by offensive players as well. Players who are fouled either receive the ball to pass inbounds again, or receive one or more free throws if they are fouled in the act of shooting, depending on whether the shot was successful. One point is awarded for making a free throw, which is attempted from a line 15 feet (4.5 m) from the basket. In basketball, a personal foul is a breach of the rules that concerns illegal personal contact with an opponent. ... In basketball, a technical foul is an infraction of the rules usually concerning unsportsmanlike non-contact behavior. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (599x700, 192 KB) Summary Taken by Gunnar Freyr Steinsson, January 21st 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (599x700, 192 KB) Summary Taken by Gunnar Freyr Steinsson, January 21st 2006. ... It has been suggested that Three point play be merged into this article or section. ...


The referee may use discretion in calling fouls (for example, by considering whether an unfair advantage was gained), sometimes making fouls controversial calls. The calling of fouls can vary between games, leagues and even between referees.


A player or coach who shows poor sportsmanship, for instance, by arguing with a referee or by fighting with another player, can be charged with a more serious foul called a technical foul. The penalty involves free throws (which unlike a personal foul, the other team can choose who they want to shoot the free throws) and varies between leagues. Repeated incidents can result in disqualification. Blatant fouls with excessive contact or that are not an attempt to play the ball are called unsportsmanlike fouls (or flagrant fouls in the NBA) and typically will result in ejection. In basketball, a technical foul is an infraction of the rules usually concerning unsportsmanlike non-contact behavior. ... In sports, an ejection is a disqualifying action assessed to a player or coach by a game official (such as a referee or umpire), usually for unsportsmanlike conduct. ...


If a team surpasses a preset limit of team fouls in a given period (quarter or half) – four for NBA and international games – the opposing team is awarded one or two free throws on all subsequent fouls for that period, the number depending on the league. In the US college game if a team surpasses 7 fouls in the half the opposing team is awarded a one-and-one free throw (make the first you have a chance at a second). If a team surpasses 10 fouls in the half the opposing team is awarded two free throws on all subsequent fouls for the half. A player who commits five fouls, including technical fouls, in one game (six in some professional leagues, including the NBA) is not allowed to participate for the rest of the game, and is described as having "fouled out".


After a team has committed a specified number of fouls, it is said to be "in the penalty". On scoreboards, this is usually signified with an indicator light reading "Bonus" or "Penalty" with an illuminated directional arrow indicating that team is to receive free throws when fouled by the opposing team. (Some scoreboards also indicate the number of fouls committed.)


The number of free throws awarded increases with the number of fouls committed. Initially, one shot is awarded, but after a certain number of additional fouls are committed the opposing team may receive (a) one shot with a chance for a second shot if the first shot is made, called shooting "one-and-one", or (b) two shots. If a team misses the first shot (or "front end") of a one-and-one situation, the opposing team may reclaim possession of the ball and continue play. If a team misses the first shot of a two-shot situation, the opposing team must wait for the completion of the second shot before attempting to reclaim possession of the ball and continuing play.


If a player is fouled while attempting a shot and the shot is unsuccessful, the player is awarded a number of free throws equal to the value of the attempted shot. A player fouled while attempting a regular two-point shot, then, receives two shots. A player fouled while attempting a three-point shot, on the other hand, receives three shots.


If a player is fouled while attempting a shot and the shot is successful, typically the player will be awarded one additional free throw for one point. In combination with a regular shot, this is called a "three-point play" because of the basket made at the time of the foul (2 points) and the additional free throw (1 point). Four-point plays, while rare, can also occur.


Common techniques and practices

Positions and structures

Basketball positions in the offensive zone
Basketball positions in the offensive zone

Although the rules do not specify any positions whatsoever, they have evolved as part of basketball. During the first five decades of basketball's evolution, one guard, two forwards, and two centers or two guards, two forwards, and one center were used. Since the 1980s, more specific positions have evolved, namely: Image File history File links Basketball_positions. ... Image File history File links Basketball_positions. ... The five tactical basketball positions normally employed by organized basketball teams are: point guard, shooting guard, small forward, power forward, and center. ...

  1. point guard: usually the fastest player on the team, organizes the team's offense by controlling the ball and making sure that it gets to the right player at the right time
  2. shooting guard: creates a high volume of shots on offense; guards the opponent's best perimeter player on defense
  3. small forward: often primarily responsible for scoring points via cuts to the basket and dribble penetration; on defense seeks rebounds and steals, but sometimes plays more actively
  4. power forward: plays offensively often with his back to the basket; on defense, plays under the basket (in a zone defense) or against the opposing power forward (in man-to-man defense)
  5. center: uses size to score (on offense), to protect the basket closely (on defense), or to rebound.

The above descriptions are flexible. On some occasions, teams will choose to use a three guard offense, replacing one of the forwards or the center with a third guard. The most commonly interchanged positions are point guard and shooting guard, especially if both players have good leadership and ball handling skills. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Shooting guard (SG), also known as the two or off guard,[1] is one of five traditional positions on a basketball team. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Power forward is a position in the sport of basketball. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


There are two main defensive strategies: zone defense and man-to-man defense. Zone defense involves players in defensive positions guarding whichever opponent is in their zone. In man-to-man defense, each defensive player guards a specific opponent and tries to prevent him from taking action. Zone defense is a type of defense used in sports which is the alternative to man-to-man defense; instead of each player guarding a corresponding player on the other team, each defensive player is given an area, or a zone, to cover. ... Man to man defense is a type of defensive tactic used in basketball and Football (Soccer) in which each player is assigned to defend and follow the movements of a single player on offense. ...


Offensive plays are more varied, normally involving planned passes and movement by players without the ball. A quick movement by an offensive player without the ball to gain an advantageous position is a cut. A legal attempt by an offensive player to stop an opponent from guarding a teammate, by standing in the defender's way such that the teammate cuts next to him, is a screen or pick. The two plays are combined in the pick and roll, in which a player sets a pick and then "rolls" away from the pick towards the basket. Screens and cuts are very important in offensive plays; these allow the quick passes and teamwork which can lead to a successful basket. Teams almost always have several offensive plays planned to ensure their movement is not predictable. On court, the point guard is usually responsible for indicating which play will occur. The pick and roll (also called screen and roll or shortened to screen-roll) in basketball, is an offensive play in which a player sets a screen (pick) for a teammate handling the ball and then slips behind the defender (rolls) to accept a pass. ...


Defensive and offensive structures, and positions, are more emphasized in higher levels in basketball; it is these that a coach normally requests a time-out to discuss.


Shooting

Player releases a short jump shot, while her defender is either knocked down, or trying to "take a charge."
Player releases a short jump shot, while her defender is either knocked down, or trying to "take a charge."

Shooting is the act of attempting to score points by throwing the ball through the basket. While methods can vary with players and situations, the most common technique can be outlined here. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x750, 95 KB)Caption: 040130-N-6213R-014 U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x750, 95 KB)Caption: 040130-N-6213R-014 U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. ...


The player should be positioned facing the basket with feet about shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, and back straight. The player holds the ball to rest in the dominant hand's fingertips (the shooting arm) slightly above the head, with the other hand on the side of the ball. To aim the ball, the player's elbow should be aligned vertically, with the forearm facing in the direction of the basket. The ball is shot by bending and extending the knees and extending the shooting arm to become straight; the ball rolls off the finger tips while the wrist completes a full downward flex motion. When the shooting arm is stationary for a moment after the ball released, it is known as a follow-through; it is incorporated to maintain accuracy. Generally, the non-shooting arm is used only to guide the shot, not to power it.


Players often try to put a steady backspin on the ball to deaden its impact with the rim. The ideal trajectory of the shot is somewhat arguable, but generally coaches will profess proper arch. Most players shoot directly into the basket, but shooters may use the backboard to redirect the ball into the basket.


The two most common shots that use the above described set up are the set shot and the jump shot. The set shot is taken from a standing position, with neither foot leaving the floor, typically used for free throws. The jump shot is taken while in mid-air, near the top of the jump. This provides much greater power and range, and it also allows the player to elevate over the defender. Failure to release the ball before returning the feet to the ground is a traveling violation. A jump shot being taken at the FIBA EuroCup Women Finals in 2005. ...


Another common shot is called the layup. This shot requires the player to be in motion toward the basket, and to "lay" the ball "up" and into the basket, typically off the backboard (the backboard-free, underhand version is called a finger roll). The most crowd-pleasing, and typically highest-percentage accuracy shot is the slam dunk, in which the player jumps very high, and throws the ball downward, straight through the hoop. Allen Iverson performing a high percentage layup. ... This article is about the term, slam dunk. For other uses, see Slam dunk (disambiguation). ...


Another shot that is becoming common is the "circus shot". The circus shot is a low-percentage shot that is flipped, heaved, scooped, or flung toward the hoop while the shooter is off-balance, airborne, falling down, and/or facing away from the basket. Dwyane Wade is the current king of circus shots, following in the footsteps of former circus shooting legends like Michael Jordan and Dominque Wilkins.


A shot that misses both the rim and the backboard completely is referred to as an air ball. A particularly bad shot, or one that only hits the backboard, is jocularly called a brick. In basketball, an air ball is any shot that misses the basket completely and does not hit either the net, rim, or backboard. ... Brick (Basketball) is a slang term used in basketball to describe a shot that misses in a rather dramatic way. ...


Rebounding

Main article: Rebound (basketball)

The objective of rebounding is to successfully gain possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw, as it rebounds from the hoop or backboard. This plays a major role in the game, as most possessions end when a team misses a shot. There are two categories of rebounds: offensive rebounds, in which the ball is recovered by the offensive side and does not change possession, and defensive rebounds, in which the defending team gains possession of the loose ball. The majority of rebounds are defensive, as the team on defense tends to be in better position to recover missed shots. A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ...


Passing

See also: Assist (basketball)

A pass is a method of moving the ball between players. Most passes are accompanied by a step forward to increase power and are followed through with the hands to ensure accuracy. In basketball, an assist is attributed to a player who passes the ball to a teammate in a way that leads to a score by field goal, meaning that he or she was assisting in the basket. ...


A staple pass is the chest pass. The ball is passed directly from the passer's chest to the receiver's chest. A proper chest pass involves an outward snap of the thumbs to add velocity and leaves the defense little time to react.


Another type of pass is the bounce pass. Here, the passer bounces the ball crisply about two-thirds of the way from his own chest to the receiver. The ball strikes the court and bounces up toward the receiver. The bounce pass takes longer to complete than the chest pass, but it is also harder for the opposing team to intercept (kicking the ball deliberately is a violation). Thus, players often use the bounce pass in crowded moments, or to pass around a defender.


The overhead pass is used to pass the ball over a defender. The ball is released while over the passer's head.


The outlet pass occurs after a team gets a defensive rebound. The next pass after the rebound is the outlet pass.


The crucial aspect of any good pass is being impossible to intercept. Good passers can pass the ball with great accuracy and touch and know exactly where each of their teammates like to receive the ball. A special way of doing this is passing the ball without looking at the receiving teammate. This is called a no-look pass.


Another advanced style of passing is the behind-the-back pass which, as the description implies, involves throwing the ball behind the passer's back to a teammate. Although some players can perform them effectively, many coaches discourage no-look or behind-the-back passes, believing them to be fundamentally unsound, difficult to control, and more likely to result in turnovers or violations.


Dribbling

A U.S. Naval Academy ("Navy") player, left, posts up a U.S. Military Academy ("Army") defender
A U.S. Naval Academy ("Navy") player, left, posts up a U.S. Military Academy ("Army") defender
Main article: Dribble

Dribbling is the act of bouncing the ball continuously, and is a requirement for a player to take steps with the ball. To dribble, a player pushes the ball down towards the ground rather than patting it; this ensures greater control. Download high resolution version (500x684, 93 KB)Caption: 040130-N-9693M-020 U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. ... Download high resolution version (500x684, 93 KB)Caption: 040130-N-9693M-020 U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. ... Jerec is a fictional character of the Star Wars universe, appearing in the computer game Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II. Jerec is the leader of the seven Dark Jedi that the player must face in the game. ...


When dribbling past an opponent, the dribbler should dribble with the hand farthest from the opponent, making it more difficult for the defensive player to get to the ball. It is therefore important for a player to be able to dribble competently with both hands.


Good dribblers (or "ball handlers") tend to bounce the ball low to the ground, reducing the travel from the floor to the hand, making it more difficult for the defender to "steal" the ball. Additionally, good ball handlers frequently dribble behind their backs, between their legs, and change hands and directions of the dribble frequently, making a less predictable dribbling pattern that is more difficult to defend, this is called a crossover which is the most effective way to pass defenders while dribbling.


A skilled player can dribble without watching the ball, using the dribbling motion or peripheral vision to keep track of the ball's location. By not having to focus on the ball, a player can look for teammates or scoring opportunities, as well as avoid the danger of someone stealing the ball from him/her. Peripheral vision is a part of vision that occurs outside the very center of gaze. ...


Height

At the professional level, most male players are above 1.90 meters (6 ft 3 in) and most women above 1.70 meters (5 ft 7 in). Guards, for whom physical coordination and ball-handling skills are crucial, tend to be the smallest players. Almost all forwards in the men's pro leagues are 2 meters (6 ft 6 in) or taller. Most centers are over 2.1 meters (6 ft 10 in) tall. According to a survey given to all NBA teams, the average height of all NBA players is just under 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m), with the average weight being close to 222 lb (101 kg). The tallest players ever in the NBA were Manute Bol and Gheorghe Mureşan, who were both 2.31 m (7 ft 7 in) tall. The tallest current NBA player is Yao Ming, who stands at 2.26 m (7 ft 6 in). Manute Bol (born October 16, 1962) is a Sudanese-born basketball player and activist. ... Gheorghe Dumitru MureÅŸan (IPA: /gi. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yao (姚) Yao Ming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born September 12, 1980, in Shanghai, China) is a Chinese professional basketball player and is arguably the best center in the National Basketball Association (NBA) today. ...


The shortest player ever to play in the NBA is Muggsy Bogues at 1.60 meters (5 ft 3 in). Other short players have thrived at the pro level. Anthony "Spud" Webb was just 5 feet 7 inches (1.70 m) tall, but had a 42-inch (1.07 m) vertical leap, giving him significant height when jumping. The shortest player in the NBA today is Earl Boykins at 5 feet 5 inches (1.65 m). While shorter players are often not very good at defending against shooting, their ability to navigate quickly through crowded areas of the court and steal the ball by reaching low are strengths. Tyrone Curtis Bogues (born January 9, 1965, in Baltimore, Maryland), better known as Muggsy Bogues, is a retired American professional basketball point guard and former head coach of the now-defunct Charlotte Sting of the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... Webb playing for the Atlanta Hawks. ... Earl Antoine Boykins (born June 2, 1976 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American professional basketball player currently with the Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association. ...


Variations and similar games

Variations of basketball are activities based on the game of basketball, using common basketball skills and equipment (primarily the ball and basket). Some variations are only superficial rules changes, while others are distinct games with varying degrees of basketball influences. Other variations include children's games, contests or activities meant to help players reinforce skills. Variations of basketball are games or activities based on or similar to the game of basketball, in which the player utilizes common basketball skills. ...


Wheelchair basketball is played on specially designed wheelchairs for the physically impaired. The world governing body of wheelchair basketball is the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation [5] (IWBF). Water basketball, played in a swimming pool, merges basketball and water polo rules. Beach basketball is played in a circular court with no backboard on the goal, no out-of-bounds rule with the ball movement to be done via passes or 2 1/2 steps, as dribbling is not allowed.[6] Wheelchair basketball is a sport played primarily by people with disabilities. ... Water basketball is a water sport which mixes rules of basketball and water polo. ...


There are many variations as well played in informal settings without referees or strict rules. Perhaps the single most common variation is the half court game. Only one basket is used, and the ball must be "cleared" - passed or dribbled outside the half-court or three-point line - each time possession of the ball changes from one team to the other. Half-court games require less cardiovascular stamina, since players need not run back and forth a full court. Half-court games also raise the number of players that can use a court, an important benefit when many players want to play. The circulatory system or cardiovascular system is the organ system which circulates blood around the body of most animals. ...


A popular version of the half-court game is 21. Two-point shots count as two points and shots from behind the three-point line count three. A player who makes a basket is awarded up to three extra free throws (or unlimited if you are playing "all day"), worth the usual one point. When a shot is missed, if one of the other players tips the ball in with two while it is in the air, the score of the player who missed the shot goes back to zero, or if they have surpassed 13, their score goes back to 13. This is called a "tip". If a missed shot is "tipped" in, but the player who tips it in only uses one hand, then the player who shot it is out of the game and has to catch an air ball to get back in. The first player to reach exactly 21 points wins. If they go over, their score goes back to 13. Jonathan


Other variations include streetball, knockout, and one-on-one; a variation in which two players will use only a small section of the court (often no more than a half of a court) and compete to play the ball into a single hoop. Such games tend to emphasize individual dribbling and ball stealing skills over shooting and team play. Streetballers at the Venice Beach basketball courts, California, USA. Streetball is an urban form of basketball, played on playgrounds and in gymnasiums across the world. ...


References

  1. ^ The Greatest Canadian Invention.
  2. ^ Hoop Hall History Page.
  3. ^ James Naismith Biography (2007-02-14). Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  4. ^ Newly found documents shed light on basketball's birth. ESPN.com. Associated Press (2006-11-13). Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  5. ^ http://www.iwbf.org/
  6. ^ [1] Beachbasketball.com web site

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Basketball Portal

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Basketball. ... Bank shot redirects here. ... The five tactical basketball positions normally employed by organized basketball teams are: point guard, shooting guard, small forward, power forward, and center. ... Basketball has been played consistently at the Summer Olympic Games since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ... The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional mens basketball league in the United States. ... NBA redirects here. ... For other uses of PBA, see PBA. The Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) is a professional basketball league in the Philippines founded in 1975. ... The FIBA World Championship (also called the Basketball World Championship) is a world basketball tournament for mens national teams held quadrennially by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... // Like the mens event, the Women’s World Championship was created by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... Wheelchair basketball is a sport played primarily by people with disabilities. ...

External links

Historical

Organizations

Other

The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Liga Sudamericana (Portuguese: Liga Sul-Americana, English: South American League) is an international male basketball cup competition played annually by the top clubs of South America, organized by the South American Basketball Confederation. ... This article contains a list of developmental and minor sports leagues: two concepts which are largely restricted to North American sports. ... For information on the original league that lasted until 1976, see American Basketball Association (1967-1977). ... The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional mens basketball league in the United States. ... The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ... The Eastern Basketball Alliance is a professional mens winter basketball league which plays from January through April. ... The International Basketball League (IBL) was a short lived professional basketball league in the United States. ... The Premier Basketball League is a new league scheduled to begin play in Fall 2007. ... This article is about the United Basketball League. ... The United States Basketball League OTCBB: USBL is a professional mens spring basketball league. ... The World Basketball Association is a professional basketball league entering its third year of play. ... FIBA Europe is a zone within the FIBA association which contains all 50 national European FIBA federations. ... The Euroleague (EL) is the highest caliber professional basketball league in Europe, with teams from thirteen different European countries. ... The Opportunity League (Montenegrin: Opportunity Liga) is a regional basketball league played in Montenegro. ... Naša Sinalko Liga (English: Our Sinalco League) is a domestic basketball league in Serbia. ... “EBL” redirects here. ... The Scottish Mens National League is the top mens basketball league in Scotland, and forms the second tier of British basketball (in cohesion with the English Basketball League) after the professional setup of the BBL, where Scotland has just one representative in the Scottish Rocks. ... The ULEB Cup is a second-caliber professional basketball league with teams from Europeean federation associated to ULEB (Basketball European Leagues Union), that havent qualified to Euroleague. ... // ClanBase often abbreviated to CB by gamers is the largest electronic sports league in the world and one of the oldest online gaming leagues in the world. ... The NLB League, also called the Adriatic League (previously Goodyear Adriatic League), is a top-level basketball league that features teams from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro and Slovenia, all of which are former republics of SFR Yugoslavia. ... Baltic Basketball League (BBL) was founded in year 2005. ... FIBA Asia subzones FIBA Asia is a zone within the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) which contains all 44 Asian FIBA federations. ... The FIBA Asia Champions Cup is the Asian club championship for basketball organized by FIBA Asia. ... The Korean Basketball League or KBL is the professional basketball league of South Korea. ... FIBA Oceania is a zone within the FIBA association which contains all 21 national Oceania FIBA federations. ... FIBA Africa is a zone within the FIBA association which contains all 53 national African FIBA federations, it was founded in 1961. ... The La FIBA Africa Clubs Champions Cup is the highest caliber mens basketball competition for clubs, organized by the FIBA Africa and played by the champions of the leagues of the African countries. ... Womens Australian rules football is a team sport. ... A sport governing body comes in several forms. ... There are a variety of articles listing people of a particular sport. ... A national sport is a sport or game that is considered to be a popularly intrinsic part of the culture or is the most popular sport of a country or nation. ... A korfball match in the Netherlands between Trekvogels and OZC Korfball (Dutch: Korfbal) is a team ball game, similar in many ways to mixed netball. ... A netball game in Australia Netball is a non contact sport similar to, and derived from, basketball. ... Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashī: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök blue + börü wolf, Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Beach handball is a team sport where two teams pass and bounce a ball trying to throw it in the goal of the opposing team. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Fistball is a very old sport which continues to be practiced all over the world: in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia. ... A child demonstrating sepak takraw. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Soccer redirects here. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Beach Soccer is a variant of the sport of association football. ... Futsal in Germany Futsal is an indoor version of football (soccer). ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... An indoor soccer game in Mexico. ... Rugby league football (usually shortened to rugby league, football, league) is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A game of broomball begins with a face-off Broomball is a popular recreational ice sport originating in Canada and played around the world. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... A floorball match between Sweden (yellow) and Finland (white) Floorball is a gay indoor team sport played using composite or carbon sticks with a plastic vented blade where the aim is to put a light plastic ball into the opponents goal. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Indoor field hockey is an indoor variant of traditional outdoor field hockey. ... Ringette is a team sport played on an ice surface. ... Roller Hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using skates with wheels. ... Inline hockey is a variation of roller hockey very similar to ice hockey, from which it is derived. ... Roller hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using skates with wheels. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... Safe haven games are field games played by opposing teams; a player on one team puts a ball in play and becomes a runner, trying to advance to a marked safe haven. As long as the runner maintains contact with this marker, he or she is safe from the other... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Adults playing kickball. ... Girls playing pesäpallo in Siilinjärvi Pesäpallo (Swedish: Boboll, also referred to as Finnish baseball) is a fast-moving ball sport thats quite often referred to as the national sport of Finland and has some presence in other countries, such as Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia, and Northern... For the movie, see Rounders (film). ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... Stool ball is a historical ball game, originating in southern England, where variants are still played in some schools. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Basketball Videos - Basketball Training and Basketball Coaching at Better Basketball (796 words)
The result is that when highly developed basketball coaching minds watch the Better Basketball videos, they’re blown away by the detailed techniques, the incredible amount of content, and the innovative yet logical learning progression.
When Better Basketball was formed in conjunction with Ferko Films, we searched for the best person to lead the way in compiling the ultimate collection of improvement methods for our basketball videos.
Better Basketball is the home for people who have experienced that nearly indescribable love of basketball, a love first discovered at a young age when the game is uncontrollably fun...
Basketball - MSN Encarta (1538 words)
Today, the standard basketball is generally orange or brown in color, with an outer cover of leather or nylon and a pebbled (indented) surface to help players grip and control the ball.
In women's play the basketball can be slightly smaller and lighter, 28.5 to 29 in (72.4 to 73.7 cm) in circumference and 18 to 20 oz (510 to 567 g) in weight.
Whether basketball is played informally on playgrounds or in organized fashion in leagues, it is played with essentially the same set of rules, which have stayed generally consistent since the game's invention in 1891.
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COMMENTARY     

Issues in Sport
6th October 2010
Basketball is a well-known sport that requires years of training and practice to master. A lot of superstars we know started their careers since they were still children.
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