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Encyclopedia > Basket weaving
A woman weaves a basket in Cameroon.
A woman weaves a basket in Cameroon.
Woven Bamboo Basket kept for sale in K R Market,Bangalore, India
Woven Bamboo Basket kept for sale in K R Market,Bangalore, India

Basket weaving (or basket making, basketry, or basketmaking) is the process of weaving unspun vegetable fibers into a basket. People with the profession of weaving baskets are basketmakers. Basket weaving is the craft of weaving together fibrous or pliable material—anything that will bend or form a shape. That is including but not limited to: pine straw, animal hair and/or hide, different grasses, thread, branches, and wood. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 759 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1485 × 1173 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 759 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1485 × 1173 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 2. ... , For other uses, see Bangalore (disambiguation). ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... Four styles of household basket. ... A profession is an occupation, vocation or career where specialized knowledge of a subject, field, or science is applied. ...


Basket weaving might seem like an outdated or antique craft, but it has never left the eye of public interest or demand, and for good reason. Frequently vendors are seen on the side of small country roads, especially in tourist areas, or at the farmer’s markets around the country. Regardless of where they are seen, baskets are still as popular today as they ever were—but for less functional reasons. There is a certain aura of quaintness surrounding basket making—probably because it is one of the only crafts that has never been modernized. While there are weaving machines that make cloth, basket weaving has never been done successfully on a machine. So there is a degree of idealistic “old fashioned” myth surrounding basket weaving (one of the oldest crafts in human history.)


While basket weaving is one of the widest spread crafts in the history of any human civilization, it is hard to say just how old the craft is because natural materials like wood, grass, and animal remains decay naturally and constantly. So without proper preservation (which was not available two hundred years ago, much less two thousand years ago) much of the history of basket making has been lost and is simply speculated upon.[1]


Erdly reports[2] that the oldest known baskets are (according to radiocarbon dating) between 10,000 and 12,000 years old, earlier than any established dates for archeological finds of pottery, and were discovered in Faiyum in upper Egypt. Other baskets have been discovered in the Middle East that are up to 7,000 years old. However, baskets seldom survive, as they are made from perishable materials. The most common evidence of a knowledge of basketry is an imprint of the weave on fragments of clay pots, formed by packing clay on the walls of the basket and firing. Still, the technique of weaving has been passed along, re-discovered, and expanded upon throughout the years, and is still being expanded upon today. Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Egypt: Site of Al Fayyum oasis (top center). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


Baskets were at one time used simply for storage and transportation of goods—decoration being an afterthought at best. While people still enjoy a functional basket today, our society seems to be interested in baskets that serve a more decorative purpose than those of our ancestors.


While many people might initially think of Indian baskets, Indian basket weaving is not the “genre” of basket weaving attracting the most interest today. Actually, weaving with rattan core—or what is known as reed, is one of the more popular techniques being practiced. That is because reed is easily available from basket weaving supply stores.[3] It is pliable and when woven correctly, it is very sturdy. Also, while oak, hickory, and willow might be hard to come by—reed is plentiful and can be cut into any size or shape that might be needed for a pattern. This includes flat reed, which is used for most square baskets; oval reed which is used for many round baskets; and round reed which is used to twine. And reed can also be dyed easily to look like oak or hickory. Ireland is reputed as a modern India vis-a-vis with notable basket-weavers such as John Horgan (Galway) and Maura Leane (Currow, Co. Kerry). Genera Calamus Calospatha Ceratolobus Daemonorops Eremospatha Eugeissonia Korthalsia Laccosperma Metroxylon Myrialepis Oncocalamus Pigafetta Plectocomia Plectomiopsis Raphia Zalacca Zalacella Rattan (from the Malay rotan), is the name for the roughly six hundred species of palms in the tribe Calameae, native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. ...


Erdly classifies basketry into four types:

  • "Coiled" basketry, using grasses and rushes
  • "Plaiting" basketry, using materials that are wide and ribbon-like, such as palms, yucca or New Zealand flax
  • "Twining" basketry, using materials from roots and tree bark. Twining actually refers to a weaving technique where two or more flexible weaving elements ("weavers") cross each other as they weave through the stiffer radial spokes.
  • "Wicker" and "Splint" basketry, using reed, cane, willow, oak, and ash

The type of baskets that reed is used for are most often referred to as “wicker” baskets, though another popular type of weaving known as “twining” is also a technique used in most wicker baskets. For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... Look up Rush in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Species New Zealand flax describes common New Zealand perennial plants Phormium tenax and Phormium cookianum, known by the Māori names harakeke and wharariki respectively. ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bark (disambiguation). ... This article is about common reed. ... For the US TV series, see Cane (TV series). ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but...


Basket weaving utilizes stakes or spokes and weavers. Stakes/spokes usually form the bottom of the basket and become the vertical framework for the basket sides. Round baskets have spokes; other shapes have stakes (Nantucket baskets use the term "staves"). The weavers fill in the sides of a basket.


The parts of a basket are the base, the side walls, and the rim.[4] A basket may also have a lid, handle, or embellishments.


Today, patterns and “how to” books are written, bought, and sold so that anyone can learn to basket weave if they are willing to put some effort into it. Popular styles of wicker baskets are vast, but some of the more notable styles are Nantucket Baskets and Williamsburg Baskets. Nantucket Baskets are oversized and bulky while Williamsburg Baskets can be any size, so long as the two sides of the basket bow out slightly and get larger as it is weaved up. Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ... Williamsburg is the name of some places in the United States of America: Williamsburg, Brooklyn in New York City Williamsburg, Colorado Williamsburg, Florida Williamsburg, Iowa Williamsburg, Kansas Williamsburg, Kentucky Williamsburg, Maryland Williamsburg, Massachusetts Williamsburg, Michigan Williamsburg, New Mexico Williamsburg, North Carolina Williamsburg, Ohio Williamsburg, Pennsylvania Williamsburg, Virginia including Colonial Williamsburg...


Patterns are vast because changing the size, color, or placement of a certain style of weave can be re-named a different basket. A beginner might start with something like a Kleenex basket, using long pieces of reed to construct a base and then bending the pieces to form right angles so that there are spokes to weave through. Then multiple rows would be woven into the spokes until a desired height was reached. To finish the basket, all the inside spokes would be cut while the outside spokes would be tucked into rows on the inside of the basket. Finally, a rim would be added and secured by a flexible and thin twining material.


There is quite a market for baskets and basket supplies, especially if they are hand made. Basket makers want supplies that are as authentic as possible, so buying decorations, special ornaments, handles, and bases that have all been hand made is considered the next best thing to making the reed themselves. Prices for supplies vary. On average, a round of reed (which is roughly dinner plate size, and has two or three dozen long pieces of reed in it) costs about $6—though if you ask for it to be dyed a special color it might cost $8 or $9. However, a round of reed can make anywhere from one to a dozen baskets depending on the size of the baskets being made. Handles and bases are more expensive, bases especially so. A single handle can range from $4 to $10 on average and a base might be as much as $30 or $40, though the smaller bases might only cost $15 or so.[5]


In addition to the actual basket supplies, there are also several tools that can be found at these basket making supply stores. Tools that make it easier to “tuck” the ends of the reed into the basket where they are secure and hidden, as well as tools that measure the size of reed in case the label is missing or materials have been mixed up. There are also clips, similar in function to clothes pins that can be bought.[6]


However expensive supplies are, a well crafted basket could be valued at much more than what it cost to make it. Some baskets—depending on how tight the weave is, whether there is a solid base or a woven one, materials used, size, color, and the different weaving patterns used—can be sold for hundreds of dollars.

Contents

Native American basket weaving

Tribes made their baskets from the materials available locally.


Native Americans in New England wove their baskets from swamp ash. The wood would be peeled off the felled log in strips, following the growth rings of the tree.[7] They also wove baskets from sweetgrass. Northwestern tribes used spruce root, cedar bark, and swampgrass. Southeastern tribes like the Cherokee used bundled pine needles. Southwestern tribes coiled baskets from sumac, yucca, and willow. In northwestern Mexico, the Seri people continue to "sew" baskets using splints of the limberbush plant, Jatropha cuneata. Arctic and Sub-Arctic tribes use baleen, and incorporate ivory and whale bone. Birchbark was used by Northern tribes like the Dene. Birchbark baskets are often embellished with dyed porcupine quills.- This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... The growth rings of an unknown tree species, at Bristol Zoo, England. ... This page contains special characters. ... The Seris are an indigenous group of the Mexican state of Sonora. ... Baleen hair is attached to the baleen plate Baleen (also called whalebone) is a substance made of keratin and is therefore stiff but somewhat elastic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Dene are a group of First Nations that live in the Arctic regions of Canada. ...

Seri basket of the haat hanóohcö style
Seri basket of the haat hanóohcö style

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 568 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1740 × 1835 pixel, file size: 461 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 568 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1740 × 1835 pixel, file size: 461 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

See also

Underwater basket-weaving is a process of making wicker baskets which involves dipping reeds or stalks of plants into (or, as the name suggests, under) water and allowing them to soak. ...

References

  1. ^  Catherine Erdly. History. Basket Weaving. Retrieved on November 13, 2005.
  2. ^  Our Basketmakers of 1879. History of Basketville. Retrieved on November 13, 2005.
  3. ^  Making Baskets. Basket Making. Retrieved on December 28, 2005.
  4. ^  Erdly, Catherine. Basket Weaving. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  5. ^  Teel, Glen. Sarah's Baskets: The Weavers Source. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.

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External links

  • The description of Nantuck Baskets TheNantucketBasket.com website
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Basket Weaving - History (716 words)
However, the increasing number of new basket makers, coupled with the scarcity of native woods, has meant that larger quantities of supplies must be imported to replace many of the natural materials that were once used.
In times past, baskets were usually named for their uses, the location in which they were made, the people who made them or occasionally objects that the basket resembled.
Today, basket makers range from the purist who still fells the trees to make the traditional utilitarian baskets, to the artist-basketmaker, whose interest is primarily aesthetic and who uses and and every material imaginable.
Westville Basket Weaving (254 words)
Baskets were placed nearly everywhere in the house to store all kinds of items.
The basket weaver first goes to the woods and looks for a white oak tree measuring four to six inches in diameter, which he cuts into eight foot lengths.
Then he weaves the oak strips in and out of the ribs to form the basket.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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