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Encyclopedia > Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano
The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design.
The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design.

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano — in English, the Basilica of Saint John Lateran — is the cathedral church of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Pope. Officially named Archibasilica Sanctissimi Salvatoris (Archbasilica of the Most Holy Savior), it is the oldest and ranks first among the five major basilicas, and holds the title of ecumenical motherchurch among Catholics. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (634x648, 40 KB)Basilica photo from German Wikipedia, taken by German User:Mogantiner at the end of October 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (634x648, 40 KB)Basilica photo from German Wikipedia, taken by German User:Mogantiner at the end of October 2004. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... The pope is the Catholic Patriarch and Bishop of Rome, and leader of the Catholic Church. ... The word ecumenical comes from a Greek word that means pertaining to the whole world. ... A motherchurch or mother church in Christianity is used in three forms. ...


An inscription on the façade, Christo Salvatore, dedicates the Lateran as Archbasilica of the Most Holy Saviour, for all patriarchal basilicas are dedicated to Christ himself. As the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, containing the papal throne (Cathedra Romana), it ranks above all other churches in the Catholic Church, even above St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. The Basilica of Saint Peter from Castel SantAngelo. ...

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Lateran Palace

The site on which the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano sits was occupied during the Early Empire by the palace of the gens Laterani. The Laterani served as administrators for several emperors; Sextius Lateranus was the first plebeian to attain the rank of consul. One of the Laterani, Consul-designate Plautius Lateranus, became famous for being accused by Nero of conspiracy against the emperor. The accusation resulted in the confiscation and redistribution of his properties. The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Caesar Augustus), until its radical reformation in what was later to be known as the Byzantine Empire. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... GENS is Sega Genesis emulator for Windows 98/2000/ME/XP. It is considered to be one of the most compatible Genesis emulators available, meaning that most ROMs available will play on it without any problems. ... Look up Administrator on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Administrator may refer to— Administrators of the Government in various Commonwealth Realms and territories. ... An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ... In Ancient Rome, the plebs was the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. ... For modern diplomatic consuls, see Consulate general. ... Nero Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37–June 9, 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called (50–54) Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ...

The square in front of the Lateran Palace has an obelisk built by Tuthmosis III in Karnak, and placed in Circus Maximus before being re-erected in its current place.
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The square in front of the Lateran Palace has an obelisk built by Tuthmosis III in Karnak, and placed in Circus Maximus before being re-erected in its current place.

The Lateran Palace fell into the hands of the emperor when Constantine married his second wife Fausta, sister of Maxentius. Known by that time as the "Domus Faustae" or "House of Fausta," the Lateran Palace was eventually given to the Bishop of Rome by Constantine. The actual date of the gift is unknown but scholars believe it had to have been during the pontificate of Pope Miltiades, in time to host a synod of bishops in 313 that was convened to challenge the Donatist schism, declaring Donatism as heresy. The palace basilica was converted and extended, eventually becoming the cathedral of Rome, the seat of the popes as patriarchs of Rome. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (710x967, 473 KB) Rome, Lateran obelisk, near San Giovanni in Laterano. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (710x967, 473 KB) Rome, Lateran obelisk, near San Giovanni in Laterano. ... From the beginning of the 4th Century, when it was given to the Pope by Constantine, the Palace of the Lateran on Piazza San Giovanni in south-east Rome was the principal residence of the Popes, and continued so for about a thousand years. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris An obelisk is a tall, thin, four-sided, tapering monument which ends in a pyramidal top. ... Thutmose III (also written as Tuthmosis III; called Manahpi(r)ya in the Amarna letters) (? - 1426 BC), was Pharaoh of Egypt in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ... Obelisk at Karnak temple El-Karnak is a small village in Egypt, located on the banks of the River Nile some 2. ... Map of downtown Rome during the Roman Empire, with Circus Maximus at the lower right corner The Circus Maximus is a park today. ... From the beginning of the 4th Century, when it was given to the Pope by Constantine, the Palace of the Lateran on Piazza San Giovanni in south-east Rome was the principal residence of the Popes, and continued so for about a thousand years. ... Bronze, contemporary head of Constantine. ... Maxentius Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius, Western Roman Emperor from AD 306 to 312, was the son of Maximian, and the son-in-law of Galerius. ... Miltiades, or Melchiades (other forms of the name being Meltiades, Melciades, Milciades, and Miltides) was Pope from July 10, 310 or 311 to January 10 or 11, 314. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... For other uses, see 313 (number). ... The word schism, from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ... The Donatists (founded by the Berber christian Donatus) were followers of a belief considered a heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... The Basilica of St. ...


The official dedication of the Lateran Palace and basilica was presided by Pope Sylvester I in 324, declaring both as Domus Dei or "House of God." In reflection of the basilica's primacy in the world as mother church, the words Sacrosancta Lateranensis ecclesia omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput are incised across the façade, meaning "Most Holy Lateran Church, of all the churches in the city and the world, the mother and head." ... Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ...


Twice the Lateran Palace and basilica have been rededicated. Pope Sergius III dedicated them to Saint John the Baptist in the 10th century in honor of the newly consecrated basilica baptistry. Pope Lucius II dedicated the Lateran Palace and basilica to Saint John the Evangelist in the 12th century. The church became the most important shrine in honor of the two saints, not often jointly venerated (but see Peruzzi Chapel, Santa Croce, Florence). In later years, a Benedictine monastery was established at the Lateran Palace, devoted to serving the basilica as a devotional to the two saints. Pope Sergius III, scion of Benedictus, of a noble Roman family, reigned in two intervals between 897 and April 14, 911, during a period of feudal violence and disorder in central Italy, where the Papacy was a pawn of warring aristocratic factions. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Christen redirects here. ... Lucius II, né Gherardo Caccianemici dal Orso (d. ... Categories: Saints | Ancient Roman Christianity | Christianity-related stubs ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... The Peruzzi were bankers of Florence, among the leading families of the city in the 14th century, before the rise to prominence of the Medici. ... ... A monastery is the habitation of monks, derived from the Greek word for a hermits cell. ... Devotional songs are hymns that accompany religious rituals. ...


Every pope since Miltiades occupied the Lateran Palace until the reign of the French Pope Clement V, who in 1309 decided to transfer the official seat of the Church to Avignon, a papal fief that was an enclave within France. During the Avignon papacy, the Lateran Palace and the basilica began to decline. Two destructive fires rampaged through the Lateran Palace and the basilica, in 1307 and again in 1361. In both cases, the Avignon papacy sent money to their bishops in Rome to cover costs in reconstruction and maintenance. Despite the action, the Lateran Palace and the basilica lost its former splendor. Clement V, né Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was pope from 1305 to his death. ... Events Rhodes falls to forces of the Knights of St. ... Coat of arms of Avignon Avignon (pronounced in IPA, Provençal: Avignoun) is a commune in southern France with some 88,300 inhabitants in the city itself and 155,500 in the Greater Avignon area. ... The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1305 to 1378 during which the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, lived in Avignon (now a part of France) rather than in Rome. ... Events July - The Knights Hospitaller begin their conquest of Rhodes. ... Events Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ...


When the Avignon papacy formally ended and the Bishop of Rome again resided in Rome, the Lateran Palace and the basilica were deemed inadequate considering the accumulated damage. The popes took up residency at the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere and later at the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore. Eventually, the Palace of the Vatican was constructed, and the papacy moved in; the papacy remains there today. Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches in Rome. ... The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is the largest church dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and used for Christian liturgy. ... The Palace of the Vatican, also called the Papal Palace or the Apostolic Palace, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City. ...


Pope Sixtus V tore down the original Lateran Palace and basilica and commissioned replacements. The rebuilt Lateran Palace and the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano became separate entities. Today the Lateran Palace is home to the Pontifical Museum of Christian Antiquities. Sixtus V, born Felice Peretti (December 13, 1521 -– August 27, 1590) was pope from 1585 to 1590. ... The Pontifical Museum of Christian Antiquities is a museum founded by the popes of the Roman Catholic Church housed in the Lateran Palace, adjacent to the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterno. ...


The square in front of the Lateran Palace has a red granite obelisk, the largest in the world, erected by Tuthmosis III in Karnak. It was removed to Rome by Constantius in 357 and re-erected in the Circus Maximus. Sixtus V had it re-erected in 1587 on its present site. The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris An obelisk is a tall, thin, four-sided, tapering monument which ends in a pyramidal top. ... Thutmose III (also written as Tuthmosis III; called Manahpi(r)ya in the Amarna letters) (? - 1426 BC), was Pharaoh of Egypt in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ... Obelisk at Karnak temple El-Karnak is a small village in Egypt, located on the banks of the River Nile some 2. ... Constantius can refer to a number of Roman emperors: Constantius Chlorus - emperor 305-306 Constantius II - emperor 337-361 Constantius III - co-emperor in 421 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map of downtown Rome during the Roman Empire, with Circus Maximus at the lower right corner The Circus Maximus is a park today. ...


The Lateran Palace has also been the site of five Ecumenical councils. See Lateran councils. In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, an ecumenical council or general council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... The Lateran councils were ecclesiastical councils or synods of the Catholic Church held at Rome in the Lateran Palace next to the Lateran Basilica. ...


Reconstruction

There were several attempts at reconstruction of the basilica before Pope Sixtus V's definitive project. Sixtus hired his favorite architect Domenico Fontana to oversee much of the project. Further renovation of the interior ensued under the direction of Francesco Borromini, commissioned by Pope Innocent X. The vision of Pope Clement XII for reconstruction was an ambitious one: he launched a competition to design a new façade. The winner of the competition was Alessandro Galilei. The façade as it appears today was completed in 1735. Galilei's façade however removed all vestiges of traditional ancient basilica architecture. Domenico Fontana (1543 – 1607) was a Italian architect of the late Renaissance. ... Francesco Borromini (Bissone near Lugano, Switzerland, September 25, 1599 – August 3, 1667 in Rome) was a Baroque architect, and active in Rome alongside the more prolific papal architect, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. ... Innocent X born Giovanni Battista Pamphili (May 6, 1574 – January 5, 1655) was Pope from 1644 to 1655. ... Clement XII, born as Lorenzo Corsini (Florence, April 7, 1652 – Rome, February 6, 1740), (pope 1730-1740), had been an aristocratic lawyer and financial manager under preceding pontiffs. ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ...


Architectural history

The Lateran apse, holding the Papal cathedra, making this basilica the cathedral of Rome. Note the cosmatesque decorations.
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The Lateran apse, holding the Papal cathedra, making this basilica the cathedral of Rome. Note the cosmatesque decorations.

An apse lined with mosaics and open to the air still preserves the memory of one of the most famous halls of the ancient palace, the "Triclinium" of Pope Leo III, which was the state banqueting hall. The existing structure is not ancient, but it is possible that some portions of the original mosaics have been preserved in a three-part mosaic: in the centre Christ gives their mission to the Apostles, on the left he gives the keys to St. Sylvester and the Labarum to Constantine, while on the right St. Peter gives the papal stole to Leo III and the standard to Charlemagne. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x683, 645 KB) Description: Popes chair, Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Roma, Italy File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano Cathedra ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x683, 645 KB) Description: Popes chair, Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Roma, Italy File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano Cathedra ... Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. ... The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago preaches from his cathedra, placed in front of the altar on special occasions. ... During Mediaeval ages, in the 12th and 13th centuries, many marble workers created their pieces taking their marble from ancient Roman ruins, and composing the fragments in geometrical decorations. ... In Roman Era dwellings (particularly those of the wealthy), triclinia were standard issue. ... Leo III (died June 12, 816) was Pope from 795 to 816. ... An image of the labarum, with the Greek letters Alpha and Omega inscribed. ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... Charlemagne (ca. ...


Some few remains of the original buildings may still be traced in the city walls outside the Gate of St. John, and a large wall decorated with paintings was uncovered in the 18th century within the basilica itself, behind the Lancellotti Chapel. A few traces of older buildings also came to light during the excavations made in 1880, when the work of extending the apse was in progress, but nothing was then discovered of real value or importance. The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


A great many donations from the popes and other benefactors to the basilica are recorded in the Liber Pontificalis, and its splendour at an early period was such that it became known as the "Basilica Aurea", or Golden Basilica. This splendour drew upon it the attack of the Vandals, who stripped it of all its treasures. St. Leo the Great restored it about 460, and it was again restored by Pope Hadrian, but in 896 it was almost totally destroyed by an earthquake— ab altari usque ad portas cecidit "it collapsed from the altar to the doors"— damage so extensive that it was difficult to trace the lines of the old building, but these were in the main respected and the new building was of the same dimensions as the old. This second church lasted for four hundred years and then burnt in 1308. It was rebuilt by Pope Clement V and Pope John XXII, only to be burnt down once more in 1360, but again rebuilt by Pope Urban V. The Book of the Popes or the Liber Pontificalis is a major source for early medieval history but was also met with intense critical scrutiny. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... Leo I was Pope from 440 to 461. ... Events March 27 night - Swabians invade the Gallic city of Lugo. ... Adrian, or Hadrian I, (died December 25, 795) was pope from 772 to 795. ... Events The Bulgarians, under Simeon I, defeat the Byzantine Empire at Bulgarophygon. ... Clement V, né Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was pope from 1305 to his death. ... Pope John XXII, né Jacques dEuse (1249 – December 4, 1334),was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... Urban V, né Guillaume Grimoard (1310 – December 19, 1370), pope from 1362 to 1370, was a native of Grizac in Languedoc (today part of the commune of Le Pont-de-Montvert, département of Lozère). ...


Through these various vicissitudes the basilica retained its ancient form, being divided by rows of columns into aisles, and having in front a peristyle surrounded by colonnades with a fountain in the middle, the conventional Late Antique format that was also followed by the old St Peter's. The façade had three windows, and was embellished with a mosaic representing Christ, the Saviour of the World. The porticoes were frescoed, probably not dating further back than the twelfth century, commemorating the Roman fleet under Vespasian, the taking of Jerusalem, the Baptism of the Emperor Constantine and his "Donation" of the Papal States to the Church. Inside the basilica the columns no doubt ran, as in all other basilicas of the same date, the whole length of the church from east to west, but at one of the rebuildings, probably that which was carried out by Clement V, the feature of a transverse nave was introduced, imitated no doubt from the one which had been, long before this, added at Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls. It was probably at this time also that the church was enlarged. In Roman architecture a peristyle is a columned porch or open colonnade in a building that surrounds a court that may contain an internal garden. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... The Roman Navy (Latin: Classis) operated between the First Punic war and the end of the Western Roman Empire. ... Emperor Vespasian Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 18, 9 – June 23, 79), originally known as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and best known as Vespasian, was the emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Jerusalem and the Old City. ... The Donation of Constantine (Latin, Constitutum Donatio Constantini or Constitutum domini Constantini imperatoris) is a famous forged Roman imperial edict devised probably between 750CE and 850CE. Its precise purpose is not entirely certain, but it was clearly a defence of papal interests, perhaps against the claims of either the Byzantine... Statue in front of the Basilica Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — also known in English as the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome, Italy. ...


Some portions of the older buildings still survive. Among them the pavement of medieval Cosmatesque work, and the statues of St. Peter and Saint Paul, now in the cloisters. The graceful baldacchino over the high altar, which looks so utterly out of place in its present surroundings, dates from 1369. The stercoraria, or throne of red marble on which the popes sat, is now in the Vatican Museums. It owes its unsavoury name to the anthem sung at the papal enthronement, "De stercore erigens pauperem" ("lifting up the poor out of the dunghill", from Psalm 112). From the fifth century there were seven oratories surrounding the basilica. These before long were incorporated in the church. The devotion of visiting these oratories, which held its ground all through the medieval period, gave rise to the similar devotion of the seven altars, still common in many churches of Rome and elsewhere. During Mediaeval ages, in the 12th and 13th centuries, many marble workers created their pieces taking their marble from ancient Roman ruins, and composing the fragments in geometrical decorations. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... An early portrait of the Apostle Paul. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... Entrance to the museum The Vatican Museums (Musei Vaticani) are the public art and sculpture museums in the Vatican City, which display works from the extensive collection of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Of the façade by Alessandro Galilei (1735), the cliché assessment has ever been that it is the façade of a palace, not of a church. Galilei's front, which is a screen across the older front creating a narthex or vestibule, does express the nave and double aisles of the basilica, which required a central bay wider than the rest of the sequence; Galilei provided it, without abandoning the range of identical arch-headed openings, by extending the central window by flanking columns that support the arch, in the familiar Serlian motif. By bringing the central bay forward very slightly, and capping it with a pediment that breaks into the roof balustrade, Galilei provides an entrance doorway on a more-than-colossal scale, framed in the paired colossal Corinthian pilasters that tie together the façade in the manner introduced at Michelangelo's palace on the Campidoglio. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (634x648, 40 KB)Basilica photo from German Wikipedia, taken by German User:Mogantiner at the end of October 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (634x648, 40 KB)Basilica photo from German Wikipedia, taken by German User:Mogantiner at the end of October 2004. ... Alessandro Galilei (1691 - 1736) was a Florentine architect and theorist. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... The narthex of a church is the entrance or lobby area. ... Categories: Stub ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... Michelangelo (full name Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni) (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564) was a Renaissance sculptor, architect, painter, and poet. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the famous seven hills of Rome, the site of a temple for the Capitoline Triad: the gods Jupiter, his wife Juno and their daughter Minerva. ...


Lateran cloister

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The cloister of the monastry, with a cosmatesque decoration.

Between the basilica and the city wall there was in former times the great monastery, in which dwelt the community of monks whose duty it was to provide the services in the basilica. The only part of it which still survives is the cloister, surrounded by graceful columns of inlaid marble. They are of a style intermediate between the Romanesque proper and the Gothic, and are the work of Vassellectus and the Cosmati. This beautiful cloister dates to the early 13th century. Image File history File links File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano ... Image File history File links File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano ... During Mediaeval ages, in the 12th and 13th centuries, many marble workers created their pieces taking their marble from ancient Roman ruins, and composing the fragments in geometrical decorations. ... Roman pillar In architecture and structural engineering, a column is that part of a structure whose purpose is to transmit through compression the weight of the structure. ... Marble This page is about the metamorphic rock. ... Romanesque St. ... See also Gothic art. ... During Mediaeval ages, in the 12th and 13th centuries, many marble workers created their pieces taking their marble from ancient Roman ruins, and composing the fragments in geometrical decorations. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


Lateran bapistry

Main article: Lateran Baptistery.

The octagonal Lateran Bapistry stands somewhat apart from the basilica. It was founded by Pope Sixtus III, perhaps on an earlier structure, for a legend grew up that Constantine the Great had been baptized there and enriched the structure. (He was actually baptised in the East, by an Arian bishop.) This baptistry was for many generations the only baptistery in Rome, and its octagonal structure, centered upon the large basin for full immersions provided a model for others throughout Italy, and even an iconic motif of illuminated manuscripts, "The fountain of Life". The domed octagonal Lateran Baptistery stands somewhat apart from the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, to which it has become joined by later construction. ... Sixtus III (d. ... Constantine. ... Arianism was a Christological view held by followers of Arius, a Christian priest who lived and taught in Alexandria, Egypt, in the early 4th century. ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ... Godescalc Lectionary, commemorating the Baptism of Charlemagnes son in Rome in 781 with an image of the Fountain of Life. ...


Catholic liturgy

On the liturgical calendar of the Catholic Church, November 9 is the feast of the Dedication of the Basilica of St. John Lateran. The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Village Feast. ...


See also

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

Early Christian art and architecture is the art produced by Christians or under Christian patronage from about the year 200 to about the year 500. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

  • Catholic Encyclopedia Article on the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano
  • Illustrated Guide of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano
  • Lateran entry from "Guide to the Churches of Rome"
  • Satellite Photo of St. John Lateran
  • Constantine's obelisk

  Results from FactBites:
 
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1662 words)
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano in English, the Basilica of Saint John Lateran — is the cathedral church of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Pope.
The palace basilica was converted and extended, eventually becoming the cathedral of Rome, the seat of the popes as patriarchs of Rome.
On the liturgical calendar of the Catholic Church, November 9 is the feast of the Dedication of the Basilica of St. John Lateran.
St. Peter's Basilica - encyclopedia article about St. Peter's Basilica. (4440 words)
Contrary to popular belief, the basilica does not hold the distinction in the Roman Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian body, with over 1.2 billion members, and professes to be the one holy catholic and apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ.
That distinction belongs to the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano — known in English as Saint John Lateran Basilica — is one of the five great ancient basilicas of Rome.
At the apse of the church is the Triumph of the Chair of Saint Peter (1666) by Bernini, a focus of the Feast of Cathedra Petri celebrated annually on February 22 in accordance to the calendar of saints.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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