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The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek, Basiliké Stoà, Royal Stoa), was originally used to describe a Roman public building (as in Greece, mainly a tribunal), usually located in the forum of a Roman town. In Hellenistic cities, public basilicas appeared in the 2nd century BC. Image File history File links Portal. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 578 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 578 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Basileios Stoa, basiliké stoà, or Royal Stoa, was constructed in the 6th century BC. Its location is in the northwest corner (known as the Herms because of the great number of Herms set up there) of the Athenian Agora. ... The Painted Porch (Stoa poikile), during the 3rd century BC, was where Zeno of Citium taught Stoicism. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A tribunal is a generic term for any body acting judicially, whether or not it is called a tribunal in its title. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ...


After the Roman Empire became officially Christian, the term came by extension to refer to a large and important church that has been given special ceremonial rites by the Pope. Thus the word retains two senses today, one architectural and the other ecclesiastical. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ...

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Architecture

The Basilica of St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is one of the earliest examples of Romanesque revival in North America. When completed in 1855, it was the largest church building on the continent.
The Basilica of St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is one of the earliest examples of Romanesque revival in North America. When completed in 1855, it was the largest church building on the continent.

In architecture, the Roman basilica was a large roofed hall erected for transacting business and disposing of legal matters. Such buildings usually contained interior colonnades that divided the space, giving aisles or arcaded spaces at one or both sides, with an apse at one end (or less often at each end), where the magistrates sat, often on a slightly raised dais. The central aisle tended to be wide and was higher than the flanking aisles, so that light could penetrate through the clerestory windows. For the Anglican cathedral of St. ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... A style of building in the late 19th century (roughly 1840 and 1900) inspired by the 11th and 12th century Romanesque style of architecture. ... Enormous colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ...


The oldest known basilica, the Basilica Porcia, was built in Rome in 184 BC by Cato the Elder during the time he was censor. Other early examples include the one at Pompeii (late 2nd century BC). Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC - 180s BC - 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC Years: 189 BC 188 BC 187 BC 186 BC 185 BC - 184 BC - 183 BC 182 BC... Marcus Porcius Cato (Latin: M·PORCIVS·M·F·CATO[1]) (234 BC, Tusculum–149 BC) was a Roman statesman, surnamed the Censor (Censorius), Sapiens, Priscus, or the Elder (Major), to distinguish him from Cato the Younger (his great-grandson). ... Censor was the title of two magistrates of high rank in the Roman Republic. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ...


Probably the most splendid Roman basilica is the one constructed for traditional purposes during the reign of the pagan emperor Maxentius and finished by Constantine after 313. As early as the time of Augustus, a public basilica for transacting business had been part of any settlement that considered itself a city, used like the late medieval covered markethouses of northern Europe (where the meeting room, for lack of urban space, was set above the arcades). Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius ( 278-28 October 312) was Western Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. ... Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on...


Basilicas in the Roman Forum

Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC - 180s BC - 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC Years: 189 BC 188 BC 187 BC 186 BC 185 BC - 184 BC - 183 BC 182 BC... Ancient Roman Official. ... Reconstructive drawing of the facade of Basilica Emilia in the Augustean Era, viewed from the Roman Forum, 1905. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC - 170s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 184 BC 183 BC 182 BC 181 BC 180 BC - 179 BC - 178 BC 177 BC 176... The Basilica Julia, was a large, ornate, public building used for meetings and other official business during the early Roman Empire. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... now. ... Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (Latin: TI·SEMPRONIVS·TI·F·P·N·GRACCVS) (163 BC-132 BC) was a Roman politician of the 2nd century BC. In his short life he caused a political turmoil in the Republic, by his attempts, as plebeian tribune, to legislate agrarian reforms. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC - 160s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 174 BC 173 BC 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC - 169 BC - 168 BC 167 BC 166... The Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine in Rome. ... Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ...

Palace basilicas

In the early Imperial period, a basilica for large audiences also became a feature in the palaces. In the 3rd century AD, the governing elite appeared less easily in the forums. "They now tended to dominate their cities from opulent palaces and country villas, set a little apart from traditional centers of public life. Rather than retreats from public life, however, these residences were the forum made private." (Peter Brown, in Paul Veyne, 1987). Seated in the tribune of his basilica the great man would meet his dependent clientes early every morning. // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first...


A private basilica excavated at Bulla Regia (Tunisia), in the "House of the Hunt," dates from the first half of the 4th century. Its reception or audience hall is a long rectangular nave-like space, flanked by dependent rooms that mostly also open into one another, ending in a circular apse, with matching transept spaces. The "crossing" of the two axes was emphasized with clustered columns. Mosaic from the House of Amphitrite, Bulla Regia Bulla Regia is a Roman city, now in Tunisia. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ...


Christianising the Roman basilica

The Basilica of St Francis Xavier, Dyersville, Iowa. This is one of only a handful of basilicas in the United States outside of a major metropolitan area.
The Basilica of St Francis Xavier, Dyersville, Iowa. This is one of only a handful of basilicas in the United States outside of a major metropolitan area.

In the 4th century, Christians were prepared to build larger and more handsome edifices for worship than the furtive meeting places they had been using. Architectural formulas for temples were unsuitable, not simply for their pagan associations, but because pagan cult and sacrifices occurred outdoors under the open sky in the sight of the gods, with the temple, housing the cult figures and the treasury, as a backdrop. The usable model at hand, when Constantine wanted to memorialize his imperial piety, was the familiar conventional architecture of the basilicas [1]. These had a center nave with one aisle at each side and an apse at one end: on this raised platform sat the bishop and priests. Constantine built a basilica of this type in his palace complex at Trier, later very easily adopted for use as a church. It is a long rectangle two stories high, with ranks of arch-headed windows one above the other, without aisles (no mercantile exchange in this imperial basilica) and at the far end, beyond a huge arch, the apse in which Constantine held state. Exchange the throne for an altar, as was done at Trier, and you had a church. Basilicas of this type were built not only in Western Europe but in Greece, Syria, Egypt, and Palestine. Good early examples of the architectural basilica are the Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem (6th century), the church of St Elias at Thessalonica (5th century), and the two great basilicas at Ravenna. This is the exterior of the Basilica of St. ... This is the exterior of the Basilica of St. ... The Basilica of St. ... Dyersville is a city in eastern Delaware and western Dubuque Counties in the U.S. state of Iowa. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Trier (French: ; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. ... View of The Church of the Nativity from Manger Square The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest continuously operating churches in the world. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ...

Old St. Peter's, Rome, as the 4th century basilica had developed by the late 15th century, in a 19th century reconstruction
Old St. Peter's, Rome, as the 4th century basilica had developed by the late 15th century, in a 19th century reconstruction

The first basilicas with transepts were built under the orders of Emperor Constantine, both in Rome and his "New Rome," Constantinople: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (831x551, 501 KB) (Vaticano) como se encontrava ainda em 1450 – Basílica da época de Constantino. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (831x551, 501 KB) (Vaticano) como se encontrava ainda em 1450 – Basílica da época de Constantino. ... Cathedral ground plan. ... Constantine. ...

"Around 380, Gregory Nazianzen, describing the Constantinian Church of the Holy Apostles at Constantinople, was the first to point out its resemblance to a cross. Because the cult of the cross was spreading at about the same time, this comparison met with stunning success." (Yvon Thébert, in Veyne, 1987)

Thus a Christian symbolic theme was applied quite naturally to form borrowed from civil semi-public precedents. In the later 4th century other Christian basilicas were built in Rome: Santa Sabina, St John Lateran and St Paul's-outside-the-Walls (4th century), and later San Clemente (6th century). This article is about the year 380 AD. For the aircraft, see Airbus A380. ... Saint Gregory Nazianzus (AD 329 - January 25, 389), also known as Saint Gregory the Theologian, was a 4th century Christian bishop of Constantinople. ... According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... Santa Sabina interior. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


A Christian basilica of the 4th or 5th century stood behind its entirely enclosed forecourt ringed with a colonnade or arcade, like the stoa or peristyle that was its ancestor or like the cloister that was its descendant. This forecourt was entered from outside through a range of buildings along the public street. This was the architectural groundplan of St Peter's Basilica in Rome, until first the forecourt, then all of it was swept away in the 15th century to make way for a great modern church on a new plan. The Painted Porch (Stoa poikile), during the 3rd century BC, was where Zeno of Citium taught Stoicism. ... In Roman architecture a peristyle is a columned porch or open colonnade in a building that surrounds a court that may contain an internal garden. ... For the Princeton University eating club, see Cloister Inn. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...

Notre-Dame de Québec Basilica-Cathedral in Quebec was the first church in North America to be elevated to the rank of minor Basilica
Notre-Dame de Québec Basilica-Cathedral in Quebec was the first church in North America to be elevated to the rank of minor Basilica

In most basilicas the central nave is taller than the aisles, forming a row of windows called a clerestory. Some basilicas in the Caucasus, particularly those of Georgia and Armenia, have a central nave only slightly higher than the two aisles and a single pitched roof covering all three. The result is a much darker interior. This plan is known as the "oriental basilica." Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3072, 1787 KB) fr: La fr:Basilique-cathédrale Notre-Dame de Québec, dans la vieille ville de Québec. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x3072, 1787 KB) fr: La fr:Basilique-cathédrale Notre-Dame de Québec, dans la vieille ville de Québec. ... The Cathedral-Basilica of Notre-Dame de Québec (Our Lady of Quebec City), in Quebec City, Quebec, is the primate church of Canada and seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Quebec, the oldest see in the New World north of Mexico. ... Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ...


Famous existing examples of churches constructed in the ancient basilica style include:

Gradually in the early Middle Ages there emerged the massive Romanesque churches, which still retained the fundamental plan of the basilica. St. ... For the Biblical Mount Sinai, and a discussion of its possible locations, see Biblical Mount Sinai. ... The Basilica of San Vitale The Basilica of San Vitale is the most famous monument of Ravenna, Italy and is one of the most important examples of Byzantine Art and architecture in western Europe. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ...


Ecclesiastical basilicas

Fátima basilica, Fátima
Fátima basilica, Fátima

The Early Christian purpose-built basilica was the cathedral basilica of the bishop, on the model of the semi-public secular basilicas, and its growth in size and importance signalled the gradual transfer of civic power into episcopal hands, underway in the fifth century. Basilicas in this sense are divided into classes, the major ("greater"), and the minor basilicas, i.e., three other patriarchal and several pontifical minor basilicas in Italy, and over 1,400 lesser basilicas on all continents. Download high resolution version (600x800, 103 KB)Photograph taken by Francs2000 in June 2003, taken from Bajcsy Zsilinszky Útca. ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 103 KB)Photograph taken by Francs2000 in June 2003, taken from Bajcsy Zsilinszky Útca. ... St. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Download high resolution version (603x901, 90 KB)Large version, by <[email protected] ... Download high resolution version (603x901, 90 KB)Large version, by <[email protected] ... District or region Santarém Municipality Ourém Area 71. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ...

Tintinabulum and conopaeum, one of the privileges granted to a basilica.
Tintinabulum and conopaeum, one of the privileges granted to a basilica.

As of March 26, 2006, there were no less than 1,476 basilicas, of which the majority are in Europe (526 in Italy alone, including all those of elevated status; 166 in France; 96 in Poland; 94 in Spain; 69 in Germany; 27 in Austria; 23 in Belgium; 13 in the Czech Republic; 12 in Hungary; 11 in the Netherlands; and less than ten in many other countries), many in the Americas (58 in the U.S.; 47 in Brazil; 41 in Argentina; 27 in Mexico; 25 in Colombia; 21 in Canada; 13 in Venezuela; 12 in Peru; etc), and fewer in Asia (14 in India; 12 in the Philippines; nine in Israel; and some other countries one or two), Africa (several countries one or two) and Australasia (Australia 4 and Guam one). Coat of arms during the sede vacante - featuring an umbracullum The umbracullum, a Latin word derived from umbra shade for a sun-umbrella, is an historic piece of the papal regalia and insignia, once used on a daily basis to provide shade for the pope. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The privileges attached to the status of basilica, which is conferred by Papal Brief, include a certain precedence before other churches, the right of the conopaeum (a baldachin resembling an umbrella; also called umbraculum, ombrellino, papilio, sinicchio, etc.) and the bell (tintinnabulum), which are carried side by side in procession at the head of the clergy on state occasions, and the cappa magna which is worn by the canons or secular members of the collegiate chapter when assisting at the Divine Office. This article is about permission granted by law or other rules. ... The Papal Brief is a formal document emanating from the Roman Catholic Pope, in a somewhat simpler and more modern form than a Papal Bull. ... Coat of arms during the sede vacante - featuring an umbracullum The umbracullum, a Latin word derived from umbra shade for a sun-umbrella, is an historic piece of the papal regalia and insignia, once used on a daily basis to provide shade for the pope. ... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet Margaret Beaufort, Queen Mother, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Engraving of the Gnadenaltar in the Vierzehnheiligen Basilica, Bad Staffelstein, Bavaria. ... a priest wearing a cope The cope (Known in Latin as pluviale rain coat or cappa cape) is a liturgical vestment, which may conveniently be described as a very long mantle or cloak, open in front and fastened at the breast with a band or clasp. ... Canons, Bruges A Canon of the Seminary, Sint Niklaas, Flanders. ... Chapter (Latin capitulum) designates certain corporate ecclesiastical bodies in the Roman Catholic, Anglican and Nordic Lutheran churches. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time (also called offices), developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between prayers. ...


Churches designated as patriarchal basilicas, in particular, possess a papal throne and a papal high altar from which no one may celebrate Mass without the pope's permission. The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... An ancient Roman altar An altar is any structure upon which sacrifices or other offerings are offered for religious purposes. ...


Numerous basilicas are notable shrines, often even receiving significant pilgrimages, especially among the many that were built above a Confession (Burial Place of a Martyr). Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... Confession of sins is an integral part of the Christian faith and practice. ...


Major or papal basilicas

A former papal cathedra in the cloister of the Basilica of Saint John Lateran, Rome.
A former papal cathedra in the cloister of the Basilica of Saint John Lateran, Rome.

To this class belong just four great papal churches of Rome, which among other distinctions have a special "holy door" and to which a visit is always prescribed as one of the conditions for gaining the Roman Jubilee. Upon relinquishing the title of Patriarch of the West, Pope Benedict XVI renamed these basilicas from "Patriarchal Basilicas" to "Papal Basilicas". Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,704 × 2,272 pixels, file size: 347 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roma, chiostro della basilica di san Giovanni: sedia papale by Lalupa File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,704 × 2,272 pixels, file size: 347 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roma, chiostro della basilica di san Giovanni: sedia papale by Lalupa File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... The cathedra of the Pope in the apse of St. ... Rear of the Holy door of St. ... The concept of the Jubilee is a special year of remission of sins and universal pardon. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...

  • St. John Lateran, also called the Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, the Pope. It is the only one called an "archbasilica". Its full official names are "Papal Basilica of Saint John Lateran", "Archbasilica of the Most Holy Saviour and of Saints John the Baptist and the Evangelist at the Lateran", "Cathedral of Rome".[1]
  • St. Peter's Basilica, also called the Vatican Basilica, is a major pilgrimage site, being built over the burial place of Saint Peter. Perhaps the largest church in the world, it is used for most of the chief religious ceremonies in which the Popes participate. Its official name is "Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican".[2]
  • St. Paul outside the Walls, also known as the Ostian Basilica, because situated on the road that led to Ostia, is built over the burial place of Paul the Apostle. Its official name is "Papal Basilica of Saint Paul outside the Walls".[3]
  • St. Mary Major, also called the Liberian basilica, because the original building (not the present one) was attributed to Pope Liberius, is the largest church in Rome dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary , whence its name of Saint Mary Major, i.e. the Greater. Its official name is "Papal Basilica of Saint Mary Major".[4]

These four papal[5] or major basilicas were formerly known as "patriarchal basilicas". Together with the minor basilica of St Lawrence outside the Walls, they were by some associated with the five ancient patriarchal sees of Christendom (see Pentarchy). Thus St John Lateran was associated with Rome, St Peter's with Constantinople, St Paul's with Alexandria, St Mary Major with Antioch, and St Lawrence with Jerusalem. The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... St Peter redirects here. ... Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — known in English as the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls or St Paul-without-the-Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... St. ... The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is the largest church in Rome dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Liberius, pope from May 17, 352 to September 24, 366, was the earliest pope who did not become a saint. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... The Basilica of St. ... The Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura is a shrine to the martyred Roman deacon, Saint Lawrence. ... For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ... The Pentarchy, a Greek word meaning government of five, designates the Five Great Sees or early Patriarchates, which were the five major centres of the Christian church in Late Antiquity. ...


Other basilicas

The Basilica in Marija Bistrica, Croatia.
The Basilica in Marija Bistrica, Croatia.


There are four "pontifical" (a word that in this context means "papal") basilicas in Italy: Coat of arms Marija Bistrica is a village in central Croatia, located on the Medvednica mountain in Hrvatsko Zagorje, not far away from Zagreb. ...

The title "patriarchal" is officially given to two churches associated with Saint Francis of Assisi situated in or near his home town: For the Roman ruins, see Pompeii Pompei is a city in the province of Naples (Campania, Italy). ... The Basilica of San Nicola by night. ... For other uses, see Bari (disambiguation). ... The Basilica of SantAntonio da Padova. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Façade of the Basilica della Casa Santa. ... Loreto is a hilltown and comune of the Italian province of Ancona, in the Marche. ... Saint Francis of Assisi, St. ...

The description "patriarchal" also applies to basilicas associated with bishops who have the title of patriarch, such as the Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica of St. Mark in Venice and the Patriarchal Basilica of Aquileia, which with its archaeological area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Basilica of San Francesco dAssisi (St Francis), the mother church of the Franciscan Order, is a World Heritage Site in Assisi, Italy. ... Santa Maria degli Angeli in Assisi. ... the Porziuncola Porziuncola, also called Portiuncula (in Latin) or Porzioncula, is a town and parish situated about three-quarters of a mile from Assisi. ... St Marks Basilica (Italian: Basilica di San Marco a Venezia), the cathedral of Venice, is the most famous of the citys churches and one of the best known examples of Byzantine architecture. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Aquileia (Friulian Aquilee, Slovene Oglej) is an ancient Roman town of Italy, at the head of the Adriatic at the edge of the lagoons, about 10 km from the sea, on the river Natiso (modern Natisone), the course of which has changed somewhat since Roman times. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ...

The Basilica of St Mary in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
The Basilica of St Mary in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ...

Other minor basilicas

The lesser minor basilicas are the vast majority, including some cathedrals, many technically parish churches, some shrines, some abbatial or conventual churches. Some oratories, semi-private places of worship, have been raised to the status of minor basilica, such as Saint Joseph's Oratory in Canada. In the Roman Catholic Church, an oratory is a semi-public place of worship, other than a parish church, constructed for the benefit of a group of persons (Code of Canon law, canon 1223). ... Saint Josephs Oratory of Mount Royal, (French: Oratoire Saint-Joseph du Mont-Royal), is a Roman Catholic basilica on the northern slope of Mount Royal in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


Cathedral Basilica of Notre-Dame de Québec in Quebec City was the first basilica in North America, designated by Pope Pius IX in 1874. St. Adalbert's Basilica in Buffalo, New York was the first Basilica in the United States of America in 1907 by Pope Pius X. In Colombia, the Las Lajas Cathedral has been a minor basilica since 1954. Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro, in Cote d'Ivoire (West Africa) is reported slightly larger than St Peter's Basilica. The Cathedral-Basilica of Notre-Dame de Québec (Our Lady of Quebec City), in Quebec City, Quebec, is the primate church of Canada and seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Quebec, the oldest see in the New World north of Mexico. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Adalberts Basilica, (referred to in Polish as Bazylika Swietego Wojciecha is a historic church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Buffalo located in the East Side] area of Buffalo, New York. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the state. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pope St. ... Las Lajas Cathedral Las Lajas Cathedral or Las Lajas Sanctuary (in Spanish Catedral de Las Lajas or Santuario de Las Lajas) is a cathedral located in the southern Colombian Department of Nariño, municipality of Ipiales and built inside the canyon of the Guaitara River. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... The Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro, also known as Basilique de Notre Dame de la Paix de Yamoussoukro, is a Roman Catholic church in Yamoussoukro, the administrative capital of Côte dIvoire (Ivory Coast). ...


There was a pronounced tendency in the twentieth century to add to their number of churches that were granted the title of minor basilica. Examples among the many are the church containing Generalissimo Franco's tomb and those of many others in the monumental Valley of the Fallen near Madrid, the Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo, in Carmel, California (USA) and the Mission Basilica San Juan Capistrano. Towards the end of that century stricter rules were applied and it was decided, for instance, that since cathedrals outrank basilicas in any case, the title of minor basilica would no longer be granted to them. Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), commonly known as Francisco Franco (pronounced ) or Francisco Franco y Bahamonde was leader of Spain from October 1936, as regent of Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Santa Cruz del Valle de los Caídos. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo was first established on June 3, 1770 in Monterey, California, and was named for Charles Borromeo, Archbishop of Milan, Italy. ... Carmel-by-the-Sea is a city located in Monterey County, California. ... Pond inside Mission San Juan Capistrano Mission Basilica San Juan Capistrano was founded on November 1, 1776 by Father Junipero Serra, the seventh mission in the California mission chain. ...


Ranking of churches

The papal or major basilicas outrank in precedence all other churches. Other rankings put the cathedral (or co-cathedral) of a bishop ahead of all other churches in the same diocese, even if they have the title of basilica. If the cathedral is that of a suffragan diocese, it yields precedence to the cathedral of the metropolitan see. The cathedral of a primate is considered to rank higher than that of a metropolitan. Other classifications of churches include collegiate churches, which may or may not also be minor basilicas. For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... A collegiate church was a church served and administered by a body of canons or prebendaries, similar to a cathedral, although they were not the seat of a bishop. ...


Sources and references

Architecture

  • Architecture of the basilica, well illustrated.
  • Basilica Porcia
  • W. Thayer, "Basilicas of Ancient Rome": from Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby), 1929. A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome (London: Oxford University Press)
  • Paul Veyne, ed. A History of Private Life I: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium, 1987
  • [2] Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Ecclesiastical basilicas

References

  1. ^ Basilica Papale di San Giovanni in Laterano - Arcibasilica del SS.mo Salvatore e dei Santi Giovanni Battista ed Evangelista al Laterano - Cattedrale di Roma (Annuario Pontificio 2007, ISBN 98-88-209-7908-9, p. 1332
  2. ^ Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano (Annuario Pontificio 2007, ISBN 98-88-209-7908-9, p. 1330)
  3. ^ Basilica Papale di San Paolo fuori le mura (Annuario Pontificio 2007, ISBN 98-88-209-7908-9, p. 1333)
  4. ^ Basilica Papale di Santa Maria Maggiore (Annuario Pontificio 2007, ISBN 98-88-209-7908-9, p. 1334)
  5. ^ Basilicas

The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

External links

The Basilica of Saint Peter, portrayed by Viviano Codazzi in a 1630 painting, is the largest church in Christendom and often used by the Pope. ... Gozo (Maltese: Għawdex) is an island of the Maltese archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea, the island is part of the Southern European country Malta and is the second largest after the island of Malta itself within the archipelago. ...

See also

This is a list of Roman Catholic basilicas. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The duomo of Milan. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Immaculate Heart of Mary Church on Polish Hill in Pittsburgh The Polish Cathedral style of North-American Catholic church is a genre of church architecture found throughout the Great Lakes and Middle Atlantic regions as well as in parts of New England in North America. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Basilica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1613 words)
The oldest known basilica, the Basilica Porcia, was built in Rome in 184 BC by Marcus Porcius Cato (Cato the Elder).
A Christian basilica of the 4th or 5th century stood behind its entirely enclosed forecourt ringed with a colonnade or arcade, like the stoa or peristyle that was its ancestor or like the cloister that was its descendant.
The Early Christian purpose-built basilica was the basilica of the bishop, on the model of the semi-public basilicas of the secular power elite, and its growth in size and importance signalled the gradual transfer of civic power into episcopal hands, under way in the 5th century.
Basilica - definition of Basilica in Encyclopedia (1333 words)
The Latin word, basilica (derived from Greek basiliké stoà;, royal stoa), was originally used to describe a Roman public building (as in Greece, mainly a tribunal), usually located at the centre of a Roman town (Forum).
Basilicas in this sense are divided into two classes, the greater or patriarchal basilicas, and the lesser basilicas of bishops.
A basilica should not be confused with an Oratory which refers both to a religious society of secular Roman Catholic priests Oratorians and to one of their churches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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