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Encyclopedia > Basil Rathbone
Basil Rathbone

from the trailer for the film Tovarich (1937)
Born 13 June 1892
Johannesburg, South Africa
Died 21 July 1967, age 75
New York, New York, USA

Basil Rathbone (13 June 189221 July 1967), Military Cross, was a British actor most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes and of suave villains in such swashbuckler films as The Mark of Zorro, Captain Blood, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tovarich is a 1937 Warner Bros comedy film based on the 1935 play by Robert E. Sherwood. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday and the summer of 1967 was known as The Summer of Peace and Love (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ... NY redirects here. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday and the summer of 1967 was known as The Summer of Peace and Love (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... For other uses, see Swashbuckler (disambiguation). ... The Mark of Zorro (1940) was a feature film produced by 20th Century Fox based on the Johnston McCulley story The Curse of Capistrano, originally published in 1919, which introduced the masked hero Zorro. ... Captain Blood is an adventure novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1922. ... The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born Philip St. John Basil Rathbone in Johannesburg, South Africa, to English parents Edgar Philip Rathbone and Anna Barbara née George. A younger sister and brother, Beatrice and John, constituted the rest of the family. The Rathbones fled to England when Basil was three years of age after his father was accused by the Boers of being a British spy near the onset of the Second Boer War. Johannesburgs skyline as seen from the observation deck of the Carlton Centre. ... This article is about the Boer people (Boerevolk). ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


Basil was educated at Repton School and was engaged with the Liverpool and Globe Insurance Companies. In 1916, he enlisted for the duration of The Great War, joining the London Scottish Regiment ([1]) as a private, serving alongside Claude Rains, Herbert Marshall and Ronald Colman. He later transferred with a commission as a lieutenant to the Liverpool Scottish. In September 1918, he was awarded the Military Cross. Repton School, founded in 1557, is one of the most famous co-educational public schools in the UK, located in the village of Repton, in Derbyshire, England. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... For other uses, see London Scottish. ... Claude Rains (November 10, 1889 – May 30, 1967) was a British-born theatre and film actor, who later held American citizenship, best known for his many roles in Hollywood films. ... Herbert Marshall (1890-1966) was a popular English cinema and theatre actor who overcame the loss of a leg during World War I, to enjoy a long career, initially as a romantic lead and then in character roles. ... Ronald Colman (February 9, 1891 – May 19, 1958) was an Oscar-winning British actor. ... The Liverpool Scottish, known diminutively as the Scottish, is a unit of the British Territorial Army formed in 1900 as an infantry battalion of the Kings (Liverpool Regiment). ...


Acting career

On April 22, 1911, he made his first appearance on stage at the Theatre Royal, Ipswich, as Hortensio in The Taming of the Shrew, with Sir Frank Benson's No. 2 Company, under the direction of Henry Herbert. In October 1912, he went to America with Benson's company, playing such parts as Paris in Romeo and Juliet, Fenton in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Silvius in As You Like It, etc. Returning to England, he made his first appearance in London at the Savoy Theatre on July 9, 1914, as Finch in The Sin of David. In December that year, he appeared at the Shaftesbury Theatre as the Dauphin in Shakespeare's Henry V. During 1915, he toured with Benson and appeared with him at London's Court Theatre in December as Lysander in A Midsummer Night's Dream. is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced ) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Savoy Theatre London, December 2003 The Savoy Theatre, which opened on 10 October 1881, was built by Richard DOyly Carte (1844 - 1901) on the site of the old Savoy Palace in London as a showcase for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, which became known as the Savoy Operas... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Shaftesbury Theatre is located on Shaftesbury Ave in London, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the Summer Festival of 1919, he appeared at Stratford-upon-Avon with the New Shakespeare Company playing Romeo, Cassius, Ferdinand in The Tempest, Florizel in The Winter's Tale etc; in October he was at London's Queen's Theatre as the Aide-de-Camp in Napoleon, and in February 1920, he was at the Savoy Theatre in the title role in Peter Ibbetson with huge success. Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... Prospero and Ariel from a painting by William Hamilton The Tempest is a play written by William Shakespeare. ... The musical Les Misérables transferred to the Queens Theatre in March 2004 after its run at the Palace Theatre The Queens Theatre is a theatre in Shaftesbury Avenue in the West End of London, next to the Gielgud Theatre, as whose twin it was designed by W. G... Savoy Theatre London, December 2003 The Savoy Theatre, which opened on 10 October 1881, was built by Richard DOyly Carte (1844 - 1901) on the site of the old Savoy Palace in London as a showcase for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, which became known as the Savoy Operas...


During the 1920s, Rathbone appeared regularly in Shakespearean and other roles on the English stage. He began to travel and appeared at the Cort Theatre, New York in October 1923, and toured in the United States in 1925, appearing in San Francisco in May and the Lyceum Theatre, New York in October. He was in the US again in 1927 and 1930, and in 1931 when he appeared on stage with Ethel Barrymore. He continued his stage career in England, returning to the US late in 1934 where he appeared with Katharine Cornell in several plays. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... NY redirects here. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... NY redirects here. ... Ethel Barrymore (August 15, 1879 – June 18, 1959) was an Academy Award-winning American actress and a member of the famous Barrymore family. ... Katharine Cornell, as Lucrece Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893-June 9, 1974) was born on February 16, 1893 (although most sources cite the incorrect year of 1898) in Berlin, Germany to American parents, and raised in Buffalo, New York. ...


He commenced his film career in 1925 in The Masked Bride, appeared in a few silent movies, and played the detective Philo Vance in the 1930 movie The Bishop Murder Case, based on the best-selling novel. Like George Sanders and Vincent Price after him, Rathbone made a name for himself in the 1930s by playing suave villains in costume dramas and swashbucklers, including David Copperfield (1935) as the cruel stepfather Mr. Murdstone, Anna Karenina (1935) as her distant husband, Karenin, The Last Days of Pompeii (1935) portraying a surprisingly sympathetic Pontius Pilate, Captain Blood (1935), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), as the sneering Marquis St. Evremonde, The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) playing his best remembered villain, Sir Guy of Gisbourne, The Adventures of Marco Polo (1938), and The Mark of Zorro (1940) as Captain Esteban Pasquale. He also appeared in several early horror films: Tower of London (1939) and Son of Frankenstein (1939), portraying Baron Wolf von Frankenstein, the son of Dr. Frankenstein. A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Philo Vance was a fictional American detective created by S. S. Van Dine in the 1920s who appeared in 12 novels. ... The Bishop Murder Case (1928), was commonly cited it as S. S. Van Dines best book, but seems labored and pointless today. ... Do you mean: George Sanders (1906-1972), the British actor George Sanders, who was awarded the Victoria Cross on the first day of the Battle of the Somme This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... The Personal History, Adventures, Experience, & Observation of David Copperfield the Younger (aka David Copperfield) is a 1935 film based upon the Charles Dickens novel. ... Anna Karenina is a critically acclaimed 1935 drama film, directed by Clarence Brown. ... The Last Days of Pompeii was written by Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1834. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... Captain Blood is a 1935 swashbuckling film. ... A Tale of Two Cities is a 1935 film directed by Jack Conway and Robert Z. Leonard (uncredited), adapted by W.P. Lipscomb and S.N. Behrman from Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities. ... Errol Flynn as Robin Hood. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Mark of Zorro (1940) was a feature film produced by 20th Century Fox based on the Johnston McCulley story The Curse of Capistrano, originally published in 1919, which introduced the masked hero Zorro. ... June 1948 (rerelease) April 16, 1944 September 5, 1952=hiddenStructure Tower of London (1939) is a historical horror film released by Universal Pictures and directed by Rowland V. Lee. ... Son of Frankenstein is a horror film made by Universal Studios in 1939 and directed by Rowland V. Lee. ...


He was admired for his athletic cinema swordsmanship (he listed fencing amongst his favourite recreations). He fought and lost to Errol Flynn in a duel on the beach in Captain Blood and in an elaborate fight sequence in The Adventures of Robin Hood. He was involved in noteworthy sword fights in Tower of London; The Mark of Zorro and The Court Jester (1956). Despite his real-life skill, Rathbone only won once onscreen, in Romeo and Juliet (1936). Rathbone earned Academy Award nominations for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for his performances as Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet (1936), and as King Louis XI in If I Were King (1938). In "The Dawn Patrol" (1938), about the Royal Flying Corps in France in 1915, he gave an outstanding performance (one of his few good-guy roles in the 30s) as a squadron commander brought to the brink of a mental breakdown by the strain and guilt of sending his battle-weary pilots off to near-certain death. Errol Flynn, Rathbone's perennial foe, starred in the film as his successor when Rathbone's character is promoted. Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian-born film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... The Court Jester is a 1956 comedy film starring Danny Kaye, Glynis Johns, Basil Rathbone, and Angela Lansbury. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Louis XI Louis XI the Prudent (French: Louis XI le Prudent) (July 3, 1423 - August 30, 1483), also informally nicknamed luniverselle aragne (old French for universal spider), was a King of France (1461 - 1483). ... If I Were King is a 1938 film with Basil Rathbone. ... For the BBC Radio 2 show often referred to as the Dawn Patrol, see Sarah Kennedy The Dawn Patrol is a 1930 World War I film starring Richard Barthelmess and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ...


A Hollywood legend is that Rathbone was Margaret Mitchell's first choice to play Rhett Butler in the film version of her novel Gone with the Wind. The reliability of this story may be suspect, however, as on another occasion, Mitchell chose Groucho Marx for the role, apparently in jest. For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ... Rhett Butler is a handsome, dashing hero of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. ... Gone with the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... Julius Henry Marx, AKA Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. ...


Despite his film success, Rathbone always insisted that he wished to be remembered for his stage career, which was also legendary. He said that his favorite role was that of Romeo.


The Sherlock Holmes Years

Main article: Rathbone-Bruce Sherlock Holmes Films

Rathbone is most widely recognized for his starring role as Sherlock Holmes in fourteen movies between 1939 and 1946, all of which co-starred Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson. The first two films, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (both 1939) were set in the late-Victorian times of the original stories. Both of these were made by Twentieth Century Fox. Later installments, made at Universal Studios, beginning with Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror (1942), were set in contemporary times, and some had World War II-related plots. Rathbone and Bruce also reprised their film roles in a radio series, The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939 - 1946). Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce made 14 films as Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson between 1939 and 1946. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Nigel Bruce (left) with Basil Rathbone in a promotional photo for their Sherlock Holmes film series William Nigel Ernle Bruce (September 4, 1895 – October 8, 1953), usually credited as Nigel Bruce, was a British character actor, best known as Dr. Watson in a series of films and a radioseries starring... Dr. John H. Watson is a fictional character, the sidekick of Sherlock Holmes, the fictional 19th century detective created by Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a 1939 mystery film based on the novel of the same name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and is directed by Sidney Lanfield and produced by 20th Century Fox. ... The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a 1939 film featuring the characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... Universal Studios (sometimes called Universal Pictures or Universal City Studios), a subsidiary of NBC Universal, is one of the major American film studios. ... Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror is the third film in the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce series of Sherlock Holmes movies. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes was an old-time radio show which aired from October 2, 1939 to July 7, 1947. ...


Despite the questionable quality of some of the later Holmes films, Rathbone has a strong claim to being the definitive Sherlock Holmes. Indeed, Rathbone bore a striking resemblance to Sidney Paget's conception in the original Strand Magazine illustrations for the Holmes stories. (By contrast, Nigel Bruce's portrayal of Watson as a doddering old fool was far from Conan Doyle's original.) A Paget illustration of Sherlock Holmes (right) and Dr. Watson. ... The Strand Magazine was a monthly fiction magazine founded by George Newnes. ...


The many sequels typecast Rathbone, and he was unable to remove himself completely from the shadow of Holmes. However, in later years, Rathbone willingly made the Holmes association, as in a TV sketch with Milton Berle in the early 1950s, in which he donned the deerstalker cap and Inverness cape. Rathbone also brought Holmes to the stage in a play written by his wife Ouida. Thomas Gomez, who had appeared as a Nazi ringleader in Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror, played the villainous Dr. Moriarty. Nigel Bruce was too ill to take the part of Dr. Watson, and it was played by Jack Raine. Bruce's absence depressed Rathbone, particularly after Bruce died -- on 8 October 1953 -- while the play was in rehearsals. The play ran only three performances. Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger according to his birth certificate. ... A deekstalker (right) along with typically associated paraphenailia of Sherlock Holmes A deerstalker is a type of hat that is typically worn in rural areas, often for hunting. ... Gomez publicity photo Thomas Gomez (July 10, 1905 – June 18, 1971) was an American actor. ... Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror is the third film in the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce series of Sherlock Holmes movies. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Later career

In the 1950s, Rathbone excelled in two spoofs of his earlier swashbuckling villains: Casanova's Big Night (1954) opposite Bob Hope and The Court Jester (1956), with Danny Kaye. He appeared frequently on TV game shows, and had a substantive role in John Ford's political drama The Last Hurrah (1958). Casanovas Big Night is a comedy film starring Bob Hope, which is a spoof of swashbuckling historical adventure films. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... The Court Jester is a 1956 comedy film starring Danny Kaye, Glynis Johns, Basil Rathbone, and Angela Lansbury. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... John Ford (February 1, 1894 – August 31, 1973) was an American film director famous for westerns such as Stagecoach and The Searchers and adaptations of such classic 20th century American novels as The Grapes of Wrath. ... The Last Hurrah is a 1958 film adaptation of the novel The Last Hurrah by Edwin OConnor that was directed by John Ford. ...


Rathbone also acted on Broadway numerous times. In 1948, he won a Tony Award for Best Actor for his performance as the unyielding Dr. Austin Sloper in the original production of The Heiress, which featured Wendy Hiller as his timid, spinster daughter. He also received accolades for his performance in Archibald Macleish's J.B., a modernization of the Biblical trials of Job. The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Dame Wendy Margaret Hiller DBE (August 15, 1912 – May 14, 2003) was a distinguished English film and stage actress. ... Archibald MacLeish Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ...


Through the 1950s and 1960s, he continued to appear in several dignified anthology programs on television. To support his second wife's lavish tastes, he also took roles in films of far lesser quality, such as The Black Sleep (1956), Queen of Blood (1966), Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966) with comic Harvey Lembeck joking "That guy looks like Sherlock Holmes," Hillbillies in a Haunted House (1967, also featuring Lon Chaney Jr.), and his last film, a Mexican low-budget horror picture called Autopsy of a Ghost (1968). The Black Sleep is an 83-minute, 1956, American black-and-white science fiction film, scripted by John Higgins from a story by Gerald Drayson Adams developed for producers Aubrey Schenck and Howard Koch, who had a four-picture finance-for-distribution arrangement with United Artists Corp. ... Queen of Blood is a 1966 horror/science fiction film released by American International Pictures. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ...


He is also known for his readings of the stories and poems of Edgar Allan Poe, which are collected together with readings by Vincent Price. Especially powerful and striking is his reading of Poe's "The Raven." Price and Rathbone appeared together, along with Boris Karloff, in Tower of London (1939) and Comedy of Terrors (1964). Rathbone also appeared with Price in the final segment of Roger Corman's 1962 anthology film Tales of Terror, a loose dramatization of Edgar Allan Poe's "Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar." Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (London, November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor, who immigrated to Canada in the 1910s, best known for his roles in horror films and the creation of Frankensteins monster in 1931s Frankenstein. ... June 1948 (rerelease) April 16, 1944 September 5, 1952=hiddenStructure Tower of London (1939) is a historical horror film released by Universal Pictures and directed by Rowland V. Lee. ...


Basil Rathbone has three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; one for motion pictures at 6549 Hollywood Boulevard; one for radio at 6300 Hollywood Boulevard; and one for television at 6915 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood. A band plays on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...


Personal life

Rathbone married actress Ethel Marion Foreman in 1914. They had one son, Rodion Rathbone (1915-1996), who had a brief Hollywood career under the name John Rodion. Rathbone was involved briefly with actress Eva Le Gallienne. The couple divorced in 1926. In 1927, he married writer Ouida Bergere. Basil and his second wife adopted a daughter, Cynthia Rathbone (1939-1969). Eva Le Gallienne Eva Le Gallienne (January 11, 1899 – June 3, 1991) was a well-known actress, producer, and director, during the first half of the 20th century. ... Ouida Bergère a. ...


Unlike some of his British actor contemporaries in Hollywood and Broadway, Rathbone never renounced his British citizenship.


He died of a heart attack in New York City in 1967 at age 75. He is interred in a crypt in the Shrine of Memories Mausoleum at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hartsdale is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York. ... NY redirects here. ...


In popular culture

Rathbone and his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes was the inspiration for the children's book series Basil of Baker Street and the later Disney film, The Great Mouse Detective. Basil of Baker Street is a mouse detective created by Eve Titus based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyles famous detective, Sherlock Holmes. ... The Great Mouse Detective is a 1986 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation, and originally released to movie theaters on July 2, 1986 by Walt Disney Pictures. ...


Rathbone's villainous roles inspired the portrayal of the regenerated Master in the Doctor Who Virgin New Adventures novel First Frontier by David McIntee. The Master is a recurring character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who is a long-running award-winning British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC. The series depicts the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor who travels in his TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimension(s) In Space) time ship, which appears from the exterior... The Virgin New Adventures (often referred to simply as NAs within fandom) were a series of novels from Virgin Publishing based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which had been cancelled in 1989, continuing the story of the series from where the television programme had left off. ... First Frontier is an original novel written by David A. McIntee and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... David A. McIntee is a British writer. ...


Trivia

In the "Adventure of Black Peter," a Sherlock Holmes story published in 1904 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes used the name Basil as an alias. Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 - July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. ...


According to the IMDb [2], Basil Rathbone was a distant cousin of Major Henry Rathbone, who was wounded by John Wilkes Booth in his attack on Abraham Lincoln. Henry Reed Rathbone (July 1, 1837 – August 14, 1911) was present at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and was sitting with his fiancée, Clara Harris, next to the President and his wife at the time of its occurence. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor from Maryland, who fatally shot President of the United States Abraham Lincoln at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


References

  • Who's Who in the Theatre - "The Dramatic List," edited by John Parker, 10th edition revised, London, 1947, pps:1183-1184.
  • In the animated Disney movie "The Great Mouse Detective," an actual audio clip of Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes, lifted from the classic 40's series, was used as the lines for the human counterpart of the great detective. Technically, it was his last film appearance--albeit a posthumous one.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Basil Rathbone

  Results from FactBites:
 
Basil Rathbone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (718 words)
Rathbone was married to actress Marion Foreman (married 1914 - divorced 1926), was involved briefly with actress Eva Le Gallienne during his first marriage and was married to writer Ouida Bergere (married 1927 - his death 1967).
Basil Rathbone earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for his performance of Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet (1936), and another nomination for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for his performance of King Louis XI in If I Were King (1938).
Basil Rathbone has three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; one for motion pictures at 6549 Hollywood Boulevard; one for radio at 6300 Hollywood Boulevard; and one for television at 6915 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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