FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Basij
Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps
Image:Sepah.jpg
IRGC Military Branches

IRGC
Air Force
Army
Navy
Qods Force
Basij
Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ... Image File history File links Sepah. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ... Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (Persian: سپاه پاسداران انقلاب اسلامی - Sepah-e Pasdaran-e Enghelab-e Islami), often shortened to Revolutionary Guards, or called by its Persian name Sepah or Pasdaran, is a military organization of the Islamic Republic of Iran. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ... The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps has its own navy force consisting of 17,000 men and 1,500 ships and fast attack boats. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ... Qods (Jerusalem) Force is an elite unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) that carries out operations outside of Iran. ... Image File history File links Iran_Air_Force_roundel. ...

Personnel

Senior officers
IRGC Ranks Insignia
The following individuals have commanded the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps at one point in their careers. ... See Also Military of Iran The Islamic Republic of Iran ...

Basij (also Bassij or Baseej, Persian: بسيج‎), is an Islamic Republic paramilitary force that was founded by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in November of 1979 to provide volunteers for "human wave" attacks in the Iran-Iraq War. The Basij are currently a branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. Persian, (local name: FārsÄ« or PārsÄ«), is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan and by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Motto: de facto: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ«[]   (Persian for Independence, freedom, (the) Islamic Republic de jure: Allaho Akbar (Arabic for God is Great)[1] Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Capital (and largest city) Tehran Persian Government Islamic Republic  - Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali... A paramilitary organization is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ... Ayatollah redirects here. ... Grand Ayatollah Ruhollah Musavi Khomeini ( ) (Persian: روح الله موسوی خمینی Arabic: روح الله الموسوي الخميني) (May 17, 1900[1] – June 3, 1989) was a Shi`i Muslim cleric and marja, and the political leader of the 1979 Islamic Revolution of Iran which saw the overthrow of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah of Iran. ... Combatants Iran Iraq Commanders Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini Abolhassan Banisadr Ali Shamkhani Mostafa Chamran† Saddam Hussein Ali Hassan al-Majid Strength 305,000 soldiers 500,000 Passdaran and Baseej militia 1,000 tanks 1,000 armored vehicles 3,000 artillery pieces 65 aircraft 720 helicopters[1] 190,000 soldiers 4,500... Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (Persian سپاه پاسداران انقلاب اسلامی - Sepah Pasdaran Enghaleb Islam-e), often shortened to Revolutionary Guards, or called by its Persian name Sepah, tranlated to English as Pasdaran, is a military organization of the Islamic Republic of Iran. ...

Contents

Organisation, personnel number and duties

Female Basij Members
Female Basij Members

Basij commander Brigadier General Mohammad Hejazi estimated the number of Basij personnel at 10.3 million in March 2004 and 11 million in March 2005. On 14 September 2005 he said that the Basij has more than 11 million members across the country. Russian news sources have claimed Iran has plans to make a third ground force consisting of one million basij members. However these plans have not been confirmed by Iran.[1] Image File history File links BasijMembers. ... Image File history File links BasijMembers. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Basij forces often undertake general security checks in urban areas such as setting up street inspection posts to intercept drug smuggling and potential terrorism, although the number of Basij check points dramatically decreased after the Iran-Iraq war and following the disarmament of MKO in Iraq. According to the Jordan Institute of Diplomacy and GlobalSecurity.org Basij forces also enforce Iran's Islamic codes together with other law enforcement entities. The Basij has a quasi-decentralised network with branches in almost every Iranian mosque.[1][2] ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...


Human rights issues

  • The Basij have been criticised as belonging to the paramilitary forces using child soldiers because of their underage recruitment practices and for having relied extensively on "human wave" attacks during the Iran-Iraq War, particularly around Basra.[1][2][3] Many were used as cannon-fodder and for mine-clearing martydom. [2]
  • Following the UNHCR "tens of thousands of Basijis had been ordered to prowl about every factory, office and school to ensure that everyone adhered to the Islamic code. [...] After the summer 1992 riots Basij units were revived, rearmed and sent out into the streets to help enforce Islamic law. The Basijis are reportedly under the control of local mosques. It was further said that the Basijis set up checkpoints around the cities and stopped cars to sniff their occupant's breath for alcohol and check for women wearing make-up or travelling with a man not their close relative or husband. It was reported that the Law of Judicial Support for the Basijis, published in the Official Gazette No. 13946 of 8.10.1371 (December 1992), provided no redress against arbitrary detention by the Basijis." Iran's permanent representative to the U.N. denied these charges.[4]
  • Amnesty International tells that "investigations by Parliament and the National Security Council indicated that actions by Revolutionary Guard officials and Basij (Mobilization) forces, among others, precipitated the unrest and injuries following the July 1999 students demonstrations".[5]
  • In July 1999, Ezzat Ebrahim-Nejad was shot dead in Tehran University dormitory by a member of Basij military force. The event initiated a huge demonstration.
  • In 2001, a member of the Basij, Saeed Asgar attempted to assassinate Saeed Hajjarian a leading reformist and political advisor to reformist Iranian President Mohammad Khatami. Asagar was arrested and sentenced to spend 15 years in jail, but was released after spending only a short term in prison.
  • Human Rights Watch informs that the Basij belong to the "Parallel institutions" (nahad-e movazi), "the quasi-official organs of repression that have become increasingly open in crushing student protests, detaining activists, writers, and journalists in secret prisons, and threatening pro-democracy speakers and audiences at public events." Under the control of the Office of the Supreme Leader these groups set up arbitrary checkpoints around Tehran, uniformed police often refraining from directly confronting these plainclothes agents. "Illegal prisons, which are outside of the oversight of the National Prisons Office, are sites where political prisoners are abused, intimidated, and tortured with impunity." [6]
  • On 13 November 2006, Tohid Ghaffarzadeh, a student at Sabzevar University was murdered by a Basij member at the University. The murderer reportedly said that what he did was according to his religious beliefs. Tohid Ghaffarzadeh was talking to his girl friend when he was approached and stabbed with a knife by the Basij member.[8]

Combatants Iran Iraq Commanders Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini Abolhassan Banisadr Ali Shamkhani Mostafa Chamran† Saddam Hussein Ali Hassan al-Majid Strength 305,000 soldiers 500,000 Passdaran and Baseej militia 1,000 tanks 1,000 armored vehicles 3,000 artillery pieces 65 aircraft 720 helicopters[1] 190,000 soldiers 4,500... Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (established December 14, 1950) protects and supports refugees at the request of a government or the United Nations and assists in their return or resettlement. ... Amnesty International symbol Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) comprising a worldwide movement of people who campaign for internationally recognized human rights.[1] Essentially it compares actual practices of human rights with internationally accepted standards and demands compliance where these have not... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... Hajjarian, a former secret agent, was widely believed to be the main strategist behind the 1997 reform movement of Iran Hajjarian was shot in the head on the doorsteps of Tehran city council in March 2000 Hajjarian escaped almost certain death, but he has been paralyzed for life. ... Seyyed Mohammad Khatami (Persian : سید محمد خاتمی), born September 29, 1943 in Ardakan city of Yazd province, is an Iranian intellectual, philosopher and political figure. ... Human Rights Watch Banner Human Rights Watch is a United States-based international non-government organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. ... Ayatollah Sayyed Ali Khamenei, Supreme Leader of Iran. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... International Womens Day 2006 logo. ...

See also

Human rights in Iran face the issues of governmental impunity, restricted freedom of speech, torture, and other excesses. ... Ansar-e-Hezbollah (Persian: انصار حزب‌الل) is a militant ultraconservative Islamist group in Iran. ... Government-organized demonstrations or state demonstrations are demonstrations whereat government employees march and protest on behalf and at the behest of the government in civilian clothes. ... The Mutaween (مطوعين in Arabic) (variant English spellings: mutawwain, muttawa, mutawallees, mutawa’ah, mutawi’) are the government-authorized or -recognized religious police (or clerical police or public order police) within Islamist theocracies which adhere to varied interpretations of Sharia Law in which governments are either directly controlled by or significantly under...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Mobilisation Resistance Force, GlobalSecurity.org, February 19 2006
  2. ^ a b The Use of Children as Soldiers in the Middle East and North Africa Region, Jordan Institute of Diplomacy, August 2001
  3. ^ Coalition to stop the use of child soldiers, Amnesty International, April 7 2001
  4. ^ Final report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, UNHCR, (E/CN.4/1994/50)
  5. ^ Report 2001, Islamic Republic of Iran, Amnesty International
  6. ^ hrw.org, Overview of human rights issues in Iran, December 31, 2004
  7. ^ Confronting State Terrorism, Asian Centre for Human Rights Review, Special Issues for 60th Session of the UNHCR, March 24 2004
  8. ^ [1]

GlobalSecurity. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Amnesty International symbol Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) comprising a worldwide movement of people who campaign for internationally recognized human rights.[1] Essentially it compares actual practices of human rights with internationally accepted standards and demands compliance where these have not... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Asian Centre for Human Rights is a non-governmental organization dedicated to the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the Asian region. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in leap years). ...

External links

  • Basij Students Organization official website
  • The Bassij, Israel’s Enemy from Iran
  • Heavy Weapons for Baseej Volunteer Militia from Rooz Online

  Results from FactBites:
 
Khatami: Islamic Revolution will not attain its goals without Basij (527 words)
Addressing commanders of the Basij forces of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC), President Khatami said that though the Basij took shape in the course of the (Iraqi) imposed war, but, it is rooted in the essence of the Islamic Revolution.
A Basij member is not only an individual, he or she is the symbol of a specific culture, the culture of "faith, awareness and sacrifice," he said.
Basij is a popular entity, the symbol of participation in the social affairs and law-abiding, he said adding that basij stands against the law breakers.
Basij - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (716 words)
Basij (or Baseej, Persian: بسيج‎), is an Iranian paramilitary force that was founded by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in November of 1979 to provide soldiers for human wave attacks in the Iran-Iraq War; an Iranian tactic that proved successful during the absence of an organised national army following the 1979 revolution.
Basij forces together with the IRGC played a crucial role in stopping the invading Iraqi army under the command of Saddam Hussein in the early months of the Iran-Iraq War.
Basij commander Brigadier General Mohammad Hejazi estimated the number of Basij personnel at 10.3 million in March 2004 and 11 million in March 2005.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m