FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Baseball statistics

Statistics play an important role in summarizing baseball performance and evaluating players in the sport. Since the flow of baseball has natural breaks to it, the game lends itself to easy record keeping and statistics. This makes comparisons between players' on field performance relatively easy, and therefore gives statistics more importance in baseball than in most other sports. Statistics have been kept for professional baseball since the creation of each league. Many statistics are also available from outside of Major League Baseball, from leagues such as the National Association and the Negro Leagues. This article is about the sport. ... Baseball is a team sport which is played by several professional leagues throughout the world. ... The National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP), or simply the National Association (NA), was founded in 1871 and lasted through the 1875 season. ... Part of the History of baseball series. ...

Contents

Development of statistics

The practice of keeping records of player achievements was started in the 19th century by Henry Chadwick.[1] Based on his experience with cricket, Chadwick devised the predecessors to modern day statistics including batting average, runs scored, and runs allowed. Henry Chadwick (October 5, 1824 – April 20, 1908), often called the father of baseball, was a sportswriter, baseball statistician and historian. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball, an earned run is any run for which the pitcher is held accountable (i. ...


Traditionally, statistics such as batting average (the number of hits divided by the number of at bats) and earned run average (approximately the number of runs allowed by a pitcher per nine innings) have dominated attention in the statistical world of baseball. However, the recent advent of sabermetrics has created statistics drawing from a breadth of player performance measures and playing field variables. Sabermetrics and comparative statistics attempt to provide an improved measure of a player's performance and contributions to his team from year to year, frequently against a statistical performance average. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Comprehensive, historical baseball statistics were difficult for the average fan to access until 1951, when researcher Hy Turkin published The Complete Encyclopedia of Baseball. In 1969, Macmillan Publishing printed its first Baseball Encyclopedia, using a computer to compile statistics for the first time. Known as "Big Mac", the encyclopedia became the standard baseball reference until 1988, when Total Baseball was released by Warner Books using more sophisticated technology. The publication of Total Baseball led to the discovery of several "phantom ballplayers", including Lou Proctor, who did not belong in official record books and were removed.[2] 1952 Baseball Encyclopedia Hy Turkin (born May 9, 1915 in New York, New York, died June 24, 1955) was a sportswriter best known for co-editing the first baseball encyclopedia. ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ... This article is about the machine. ... Lou Proctor is an example of a phantom ballplayer, an American baseball player listed in the baseball encyclopedias by mistake. ...


Use of statistics

Throughout much of modern baseball, several core statistics have been traditionally referenced—batting average, RBIs, and home runs. To this day, a player who leads the league in these three statistics is referred to as the "Triple Crown" winner. For pitchers, wins, ERA, and strikeouts are the most often cited traditional statistics, with a pitcher leading a league in these statistics referred to as a "Triple Crown" winner. General managers and baseball scouts have long used the major statistics, among other factors and opinions, to understand player ability. Managers, catchers and pitchers use statistics of batters against opposing teams to develop pitching strategies and set defensive positioning on the field. Managers and batters study opposing pitcher performance and motion in attempts to improve hitting. Managers often base personnel decisions for a game on statistics, such starting lineups or relief pitcher substitutions.[citation needed] Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... Homerun redirects here. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... Professional sports scouts are trained talent evaluators who travel extensively for the purposes of watching athletes play their chosen sports and determining whether their set of skills and talents represent what is needed by the scouts organization. ... Normal depth In baseball, while there are nine named fielding positions, players may move around freely. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Some sabermetric statistics have entered the mainstream baseball world that measure a batter's overall performance including On-base plus slugging, commonly referred to as OPS. OPS adds the hitter's on base percentage (number of times reached base by any means divided by total plate appearances) to his slugging percentage (total bases divided by at bats). Some argue that the OPS formula is flawed and that more weight should be shifted towards OBP (on base percentage).[2] Sabermetrics is the analysis of baseball through objective evidence, especially baseball statistics. ... In baseball statistics, on-base plus slugging (denoted by OPS) incorporates on base percentage (OBP) and slugging percentage (SLG). ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ...


OPS is also useful when determining a pitcher's level of success. "Opponent On-base Plus Slugging" (OOPS) is becoming a popular way to evaluating a pitcher's actual performance. When analyzing a pitcher's statistics, some useful categories to consider include K/9IP (strikeouts per nine innings), K/BB (strikeouts per walk), HR/9, WHIP (walks plus hits per inning pitched) and OOPS (opponent on-base plus slugging). In baseball statistics, strikeouts per 9 innings pitched (K/9IP) is the mean of strikeouts, (or Ks) by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ...


However, since 2001, more emphasis has been placed on Defense-Independent Pitching Statistics, including Defense-Independent ERA (dERA), in an attempt to evaluate a pitcher performance regardless of the strength of the defensive players behind him. In baseball, Defense Independent Pitching Statistics (DIPS) are statistics which measure a pitchers effectiveness based only on plays which do not involve fielders: home runs allowed, strikeouts, hit batters and walks. ...


Also important are all of the above statistics in certain in-game situations. For example, a certain hitter's ability to hit left-handed pitchers might incline a manager to provide increased opportunities to face left handed pitchers. Other hitters may have a history of success against a given pitcher (or vice versa), and the manager may use this information to create a favorable match up.


The use of performance-enhancing anabolic steroids in Major League Baseball has affected the value of statistics, according to the Mitchell Report, released 13 December 2007, which concluded, in part Crystal structure of human sex hormone-binding globulin, transporting 5α-dihydrotestosterone. ...

The illegal use of performance enhancing substances poses a serious threat to the integrity of the game. Widespread use by players of such substances unfairly disadvantages the honest athletes who refuse to use them and raises questions about the validity of baseball records.[3]

Commonly used statistics

Most of these terms also apply to softball. Commonly used statistics with their abbreviations are explained here. The explanations below are for quick reference and do not fully or completely define the statistic; for the strict definition, see the corresponding article for each statistic. Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... An abbreviation (from Latin brevis short) is a shortened form of a word or phrase. ...


Batting statistics

  • 1B—Single: hits on which the batter reached first base safely without the contribution of a fielding error.
  • 2B—Double: hits on which the batter reached second base safely without the contribution of a fielding error.
  • 3B—Triple: hits on which the batter reached third base safely without the contribution of a fielding error.
  • AB—At bat: Batting appearances, not including bases on balls, hit by pitch, sacrifices, interference, or obstruction
  • AB/HR At bats per home run: at bats divided by home runs
  • BA—Batting average (also abbreviated AVG): hits divided by at bats
  • BB—Base on balls (also called a "walk"): times receiving four balls and advancing to first base
  • BABIP Batting average on balls in play: frequency of which a batter reaches a base after putting the ball in the field of play. Also a pitching category.
  • BB/K—Walk-to-strikeout ratio: number of base on balls divided by number of strikeouts
  • XBH—Extra base hits: doubles plus triples plus home runs
  • FC—Fielder's choice: times reaching base when a fielder chose to try for an out on another runner
  • GO/AO—Ground ball fly ball ratio: number of ground ball outs divided by number of fly ball outs
  • GDP or GIDP—Ground into double play: number of ground balls hit that became double plays
  • GPA—Gross Production Average: 1.8 times on-base percentage plus slugging percentage, divided by four
  • GS—Grand Slam: a home run with the bases loaded, resulting in four runs scoring, and four RBI credited to the batter.
  • H—Hits: times reached base because of a batted, fair ball without error by the defense
  • HBP—Hit by pitch: times touched by a pitch and awarded first base as a result
  • HR—Home runs: hits on which the batter successfully touched all four bases, without the contribution of a fielding error.
  • IBB—Intentional base on balls: times awarded first base on balls (see BB above) deliberately thrown by the pitcher. Also known as IW (intentional walk).
  • K—Strike out: number of times that strike three is taken or swung at and missed, or bunted foul
  • LOB—Left on base: number of runners not out nor scored at the end of an inning.
  • OBP—On base percentage: times reached base (H + BB + HBP) divided by at bats plus walks plus hit by pitch plus sacrifice flies (AB + BB + HBP + SF).
  • OPS—On-base plus slugging: on-base percentage plus slugging average
  • PA—Plate appearance: number of completed batting appearances
  • RC—Runs created: statistic that attempts to measure how many runs a player has contributed to his team
  • RP—Runs produced: statistic that attempts to measure how many runs a player has contributed
  • RBI—Run batted in: number of runners who scored due to a batters' action, except when batter grounded into double play or reached on an error
  • RISP—Runner In Scoring Position: the batter's batting average with runners in scoring position
  • SF—Sacrifice fly: number of fly ball outs to the outfield which allow a runner already on base to score
  • SH—Sacrifice hit: number of sacrifice bunts which allows another runner to advance on the basepaths or score
  • SLG—Slugging average: total bases divided by at-bats
  • TA—Total average: total bases, plus walks, plus hit by pitch, plus steals, minus caught stealing divided by at bats, minus hits, plus caught stealing, plus grounded into double play
  • TB—Total bases: one for each single, two for each double, three for each triple, and four for each home run
  • TOB—Times on base: times reaching base as a result of hits, walks, and hit-by-pitches
  • BsR—Base Runs: Another run estimator, like Runs Created; a favorite of writer Tom Tango
  • XR—Extrapolated Runs: A linear run estimator developed by Jim Furtado

In baseball, a single is the most common type of base hit, accomplished through the act of a batter safely reaching first base by striking the ball and getting to first before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... In baseball statistics, at bats per home run (AB/HR) is a way to measure how frequently a batter hits a home run. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... In baseball statistics, walk-to-strikeout ratio (BB/K) is a measure of plate discipline and great knowledge of the strike zone. ... In baseball, an extra base hit (EB, EBH or XBH) is a statistic credited to a batter for hitting a double, triple, or home run. ... In baseball, a fielders choice is the act of a fielder, upon fielding a batted ball, choosing to try put out one runner while in so doing allowing the batter to advance to first base. ... In baseball statistics, ground ball fly ball ratio (denoted by G/F), also known as ground outs per fly outs (denoted by GO/AO), is a measure of: how frequently a pitcher gets batters out on ground balls versus fly balls; calculated as: (ground outs) / (fly outs). ... After stepping on second base, the fielder throws to first to complete a double play In baseball, a double play (denoted on statistics sheets by DP) for a team or a fielder is the act of making two outs during the same continuous playing action. ... Gross Production Average or GPA is a baseball statistic created in 2003 by Aaron Gleeman as a refinement of On-Base Plus Slugging (OPS). ... In the sport of baseball, a grand slam (or just slam for short) is a home run hit with all the bases occupied by baserunners, thereby scoring 4 runs - the most possible on a single play. ... Homerun redirects here. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ... Homerun redirects here. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... An Intentional base on balls (denoted by IBB), often called an intentional walk, is a walk that was issued with no intent of ever allowing a hit. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... In baseball, a baserunner is said to be left on base (abbreviated LOB) when the half-inning ends, he has not scored, and he has not been put out. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, on-base plus slugging (denoted by OPS) incorporates on base percentage (OBP) and slugging percentage (SLG). ... In baseball statistics, a player is credited with a plate appearance (denoted by PA) each time he completes a turn batting. ... Runs created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... In baseball, a batted ball is considered a sacrifice fly (denoted by SF) if the following four criteria are met: There are fewer than two outs when the ball is hit. ... In baseball, a sacrifice hit (also called a sacrifice bunt) is the act of deliberately bunting the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... Total average is a baseball statistic devised by sportswriter Thomas Boswell in the 1970s. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball statistics, the term times on base, also abbreviated as TOB, is the cumulative total number of times a batter has been awarded for reaching base as a result of hits, walks and hit by pitches. ... Base Runs (BsR) is a baseball statistic invented by sabermetrician David Smyth to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. ... Tom Tango, who has as an online presence as TangoTiger, is an expert in baseball sabermetrics and ice hockey statistical analysis, and runs the Tango on Baseball sabermetrics website. ...

Baserunning statistics

  • CS—Caught stealing: times tagged out while attempting to steal a base
  • SB—Stolen base: number of bases advanced other than on batted balls, walks, or hits by pitch
    • DI—Defensive Indifference: if the catcher does not attempt to throw out a runner (usually because the run would be insignificant), the runner is not awarded a steal
  • R—Runs scored: times reached home base legally and safely

In baseball, a player is charged with a caught stealing when, as a runner, the player attempts to advance from one base to another without the ball being struck by a batter, but is put out by a fielder while making the attempt. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ...

Pitching statistics

  • BB—Base on balls (also called a "walk"): times pitching four balls, allowing the batter-runner to advance to first base
  • BB/9: Base on balls times nine divided by innings pitched (Bases on balls per 9 innings pitched)
  • BF—Total batters faced: opponent's total plate appearances
  • BK—Balk: number of times pitcher commits an illegal pitching action or other illegal action while in contact with the pitching rubber, thus allowing baserunners to advance
  • BS—Blown save: number of times entering the game in a save situation, and being charged the run (earned or not) which eliminates his team's lead
  • CERA—Component ERA: an estimate of a pitcher's ERA based upon the individual components of his statistical line (K, H, 2B, 3B, HR, BB, HBP)
  • CG—Complete game: number of games where player was the only pitcher for his team
  • DICE—Defense-Independent Component ERA: an estimate of a pitcher's ERA based upon the defense-independent components of his statistical line (K, HR, BB, HBP)
  • ER—Earned run: number of runs that did not occur as a result of errors or passed balls
  • ERA—Earned run average: total number of earned runs (see "ER" above), multiplied by 9, divided by innings pitched
  • ERA+—Adjusted ERA+: earned run average adjusted for the ballpark and the league average
  • G—Games (AKA "appearances"): number of times a pitcher pitches in a season
  • GF—Games finished: number of games pitched where player was the final pitcher for his team
  • G/F—Ground ball fly ball ratio: ground balls allowed divided by fly balls allowed
  • GS—Starts: number of games pitched where player was the first pitcher for his team
  • H/9—Hits per nine innings: hits allowed times nine divided by innings pitched (also known as H/9IPHits allowed per 9 innings pitched)
  • H—Hits Allowed: total hits allowed
  • HB—Hit batsman: times hit a batter with pitch, allowing runner to advance to first base
  • HLD (or H)—Hold: number of games entered in a save situation, recorded at least one out, did not surrender the lead, and did not complete the game
  • HR—Home runs allowed: total home runs allowed
  • IBB: Intentional base on balls allowed
  • IP—Innings pitched: number of outs recorded while pitching divided by three
  • IP/GS: Average number of innings pitched per game
  • IR—Inherited runners: number of runners on base when the pitcher enters the game
  • IRA—Inherited runs allowed: number of inherited runners allowed to score
  • K—Strikeout: number of batters who received strike three
  • K/9—Strikeouts per nine innings: strikeouts times nine divided by innings pitched (Strikeouts per 9 innings pitched)
  • K/BB—Strikeout-to-walk ratio: number of strikeouts divided by number of base on balls
  • L—Loss: number of games where pitcher was pitching while the opposing team took the lead, never lost the lead, and went on to win
  • OBA—Opponents batting average: hits allowed divided by at-bats faced
  • PIT: Pitches thrown (Pitch count)
  • QS—Quality start: a game in which a starting pitcher completes at least six innings and permits no more than three runs
  • RA—Run average: number of runs allowed times nine divided by innings pitched
  • R.R.A—Relief Run Average: A function of how many inherited base runners a relief pitcher allowed to score.
  • SHO—Shutout: number of complete games pitched with no runs allowed
  • SO: Strikeout Also may be notated as "K".
  • SV—Save: number of games where the pitcher enters a game led by the pitcher's team, finishes the game without surrendering the lead, is not the winning pitcher, and either (a) the lead was three runs or less when the pitcher entered the game; (b) the potential tying run was on base, at bat, or on deck; or (c) the pitcher pitched three or more innings
  • W—Win: number of games where pitcher was pitching while his team took the lead and went on to win (also related: winning percentage)
  • WHIP—Walks and hits per inning pitched: average number of walks and hits allowed by the pitcher per inning
  • WP—Wild pitches: charged when a pitch is too high, low, or wide of home plate for the catcher to field, thereby allowing one or more runners to advance or score

Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... Walks may refer to: Base on balls Walking This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In baseball statistics, bases on balls per 9 innings pitched (BB/9IP) is the mean of bases on balls, (or walks) given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, total batters faced  (denoted by TBF), also known as batters faced (denoted by BF), is the number of batters a pitcher has pitched to in a game or in a season. ... This article is about the illegal actions in baseball. ... To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ... To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ... Component ERA (ERC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James. ... In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game himself, without the benefit of a relief pitcher. ... Abbreviated DICE, Defense-Independent Component ERA is a recent (21st century) variation on Component ERA, one of an increasing number of baseball sabermetrics that fall under the umbrella of defense independent pitching statistics. ... In baseball, an earned run is any run for which the pitcher is held accountable (i. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Busch Stadium, opened in 2006, is currently the newest ballpark in Major League Baseball. ... In baseball statistics, games pitched (denoted by GP) is the number of games in which a pitcher appears. ... In baseball statistics, a relief pitcher is credited with a game finished (denoted by GF) if he is the last pitcher to pitch for his team in a game. ... In baseball statistics, ground ball fly ball ratio (denoted by G/F), also known as ground outs per fly outs (denoted by GO/AO), is a measure of: how frequently a pitcher gets batters out on ground balls versus fly balls; calculated as: (ground outs) / (fly outs). ... In baseball statistics, games started (denoted by GS) is credited to a pitcher who throws the very first pitch to the opposing team of a single game. ... In baseball statistics, hits per nine innings (denoted by H/9) is the average number of hits allowed by a pitcher in a nine inning period; calculated as: (hits allowed x 9) / innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, hits per nine innings (denoted by H/9) is the average number of hits allowed by a pitcher in a nine inning period; calculated as: (hits allowed x 9) / innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, hits per nine innings (denoted by H/9) is the average number of hits allowed by a pitcher in a nine inning period; calculated as: (hits allowed x 9) / innings pitched. ... In Baseball statistics, hits allowed (HA) signifies the total number of hits a pitcher allowed. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ... In baseball, a hold is awarded to a relief pitcher if he enters in a save situation, records at least one out, and leaves the game without having reliquished that lead. ... In Baseball statistics, home runs allowed (HRA) signifies the total number of home runs a pitcher allowed. ... An Intentional base on balls (denoted by IBB), often called an intentional walk, is a walk that was issued with no intent of ever allowing a hit. ... In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is in the game. ... In baseball statistics, inherited runners, or inherited baserunners, are the runners on base when a relief pitcher enters the game. ... In baseball statistics, inherited runs allowed (denoted by IRA) is a measure of the effectiveness of a relief pitcher who enters a game with runners on base; a pitcher is charged with an inherited runner scored when a player who was on base when he entered the game scores a... For the typographical mode indicating deleted text, see Strikethrough. ... In baseball statistics, strikeouts per nine innings  (denoted by SO/9) is a measure of the strikeout ability of a pitcher; calculated as the number of strikeouts obtained for every nine innings pitched: (9 x number of strikeouts) / (innings pitched). ... In baseball statistics, strikeouts per 9 innings pitched (K/9IP) is the mean of strikeouts, (or Ks) by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, strikeout-to-walk ratio (SO/BB) is a measure of a pitchers ability to control pitches; calculated as: strikeouts / bases on balls. ... In Major League Baseball, a loss (denoted L) is charged to the pitcher of the losing team who allows the run that gives the opposing team the lead which the game is won with (the go-ahead run). ... In baseball statistics, opponents batting average (denoted by AVG) is a statistic that measures a pitchers ability to prevent hits; calculated from players at bats against a particular pitcher and adjusted for base runners put out while stealing or attempting extra bases; calculated as: (base hits by opponents) / [(innings... In baseball or softball, a starting pitcher, often abbreviated as starter, is the pitcher who pitches the first pitch to the first batter of a game. ... In the statistics of the team sport baseball, a quality start is awarded to a starting pitcher who completes at least six innings and permits no more than three earned runs. ... In baseball statistics, run average (RA) refers to measures of the rate at which runs are allowed or scored. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the typographical mode indicating deleted text, see Strikethrough. ... To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ... In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In baseball, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of how many baserunners a pitcher is responsible for allowing per inning pitched. ... In baseball, a wild pitch (WP) is charged to a pitcher when a pitch is too high, too low, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to field capably, thereby allowing one or more runners to advance or to score. ...

Fielding statistics

  • A—Assists: number of outs recorded on a play where a fielder touched the ball, except if such touching is the putout
  • DP—Double plays: one for each double play during which the fielder recorded a putout or an assist.
  • E—Errors: number of times a fielder fails to make a play he should have made with common effort, and the offense benefits as a result
  • FP—Fielding percentage: total plays (chances minus errors) divided by the number of total chances
  • INN—Innings: number of innings that a player is at one certain position
  • PB—Passed ball: charged to the catcher when the ball is dropped and one or more runners advance
  • PO—Putout: number of times the fielder tags, forces, or appeals a runner and he is called out as a result
  • RF—Range factor: ([putouts + assists]*9)/innings played. Used to determine the amount of field that the player can cover
  • TC—Total chances: assists plus putouts plus errors
  • TP—Triple play: one for each triple play during which the fielder recorded a putout or an assist

A number of sports have a statistic known as an assist: An assist (hockey) goes to the player or players who helped set up a goal. ... After stepping on second base, the fielder throws to first to complete a double play In baseball, a double play (denoted on statistics sheets by DP) is the act of making two outs during the same continuous playing action. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or runner to reach one or more additional bases, on a play that would normally be completed successfully with ordinary effort. ... In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player handles a batted ball properly. ... An innings, or inning, is a fixed-length segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which one team attempts to score while the other team attempts to prevent the first from scoring. ... In baseball, a catcher shall be charged with a passed ball when he fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball which should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance. ... In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly-ball when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods: tagging a runner with the ball touching a base that a runner on a force play is trying to reach catching... Range Factor (commonly abbreviated RF) is a baseball statistic developed by Bill James. ... In baseball statistics, total chances (denoted by TC) represents the number of plays that a defensive player participated in. ... In baseball, a triple play (denoted by TP) is the act of making three outs during the same continuous play. ...

General statistics

  • G—Games played: number of games where the player played, in whole or in part
  • GB—Games back: number of games a team is behind the division leader
  • Pythagorean expectation: estimates a team's expected winning percentage based on runs scored and runs allowed.

In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... Pythagorean expectation is a formula invented by Bill James to estimate how many games a baseball team should have won based on the number of runs they scored and allowed. ...

MLB statistical standards

It is difficult to determine quantitatively what is considered to be a "good" value in a certain statistical category, and qualitative assessments may lead to arguments. It is interesting to look at recent results for some typical statistics and let the reader draw their own conclusions. Using full-season statistics available at the Official Site of Major League Baseball[4] for the 2000 through 2006 seasons, the following tables show top ranges in various statistics, in alphabetical order. For each statistic, two values are given: The following are the baseball events of the year 2000 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2006 throughout the world. ...

  • Top5: the top five players bettered this value in all of the reported seasons
  • Best: this is the best of all of the players for all of the reported seasons

Arguably, a statistic that falls within the range shown might be considered as good.

Batting Statistics
Statistic Top5 Best
BA .321 .372
HR 43 73
RBI 124 150
SLG .595 .863
Pitching Statistics
Statistic Top5 Best
CG 4 9
ERA 3.19 1.74
G 77 94
GS 34 36
IP 231⅔ 266
K 207 372
SHO 2 5
SV 38 55
W 18 24

See also

Strike zone boundaries (MLB) Definition In baseball, the strike zone is a conceptual rectangular area over home plate which defines the boundaries through which a pitch must pass in order to count as a strike when the batter does not swing. ... The Cy Young Award of the American League, 1983. ... Evolution of baseball player evaluation has taken place over many years. ... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is given to the best first-year players in the American and National Leagues. ... The Official Baseball Rules govern all professional play in the United States and Canada. ... The typical motion of a pitcher In baseball, a pitch is the act of throwing a baseball toward home plate to start a play. ... Retrosheet is a non-profit organization whose website features major league baseball box scores and play-by-play narratives for almost every contest from 1957-2005. ... Strike zone boundaries (MLB) Definition In baseball, the strike zone is a conceptual rectangular area over home plate which defines the boundaries through which a pitch must pass in order to count as a strike when the batter does not swing. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Palmer, Pete; Paul Adomites, David Nemec, Matthew D. Greenberger, Dan Schlossberg, Dick Johnson, Mike Tully [2001]. "Birth of the Game", Cooperstown: Hall of Fame Players. Lincolnwood, Illinois: Publications International, pg. 21. ISBN 0-7853-4530-2. 
  2. ^ a b "Introduction". The 2005 ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia (1st Edition). (2005). Ed. Pete Palmer and Gary Gillette. New York: Sterling, ISBN 1-4027-2568-X. 
  3. ^ "Excerpts from the Mitchell Report", The Wall Street Journal, 13 December 2007.
  4. ^ Major League Baseball Historical Statistics

Pete Palmer is an American baseball [statistician]], and one of the leading creators of the mathematical system referred to as sabermetrics. ... Pete Palmer is an American baseball [statistician]], and one of the leading creators of the mathematical system referred to as sabermetrics. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

References

Alan Schwarz (b. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baseball Statistics - MSN Encarta (1362 words)
Baseball statistics focus on the offensive, defensive, and pitching performances of players, making it possible to compare the contributions of players on different teams and to assess their part in the team’s success or failure.
Baseball statistics for individual games are recorded in two main forms: the scorecard and the box score.
Baseball’s scoring and statistical practices developed rapidly during the 20th century, and new statistics were introduced over the years as the game evolved.
Baseball Statistics: MLB Baseball Statistics (545 words)
Statistics is a key part baseball in which the professional evaluators assess teams, players, managers, catchers, pitchers and all the other members of the team.
Since statistics, numerical facts and data is the lifeblood of baseball, all the teams and both leagues maintain their own statistical records.
General managers and baseball surveyors study player statistics to decide what players to try to get for their team, and managers, catchers, pitchers also study statistics of batters on opposing teams to find out how best to pitch to them and position the players.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m