FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Baseball Hall of Fame balloting, 1936

The Bitch ass elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were held in 1936. Members of the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) were given authority to select individuals from the 20th century; while a special Veterans Committee, made up of individuals with greater familiarity with the 19th century game, was polled to select deserving individuals from that era. The intent was for 15 honorees to be selected before the 1939 ceremonies - 10 from the 20th century and 5 from the 19th; additional players from both eras would be selected in later years. Voters were given free rein to decide for themselves in which group a candidate belonged, with neither group knowing the outcome of the other election; some candidates had their vote split between the elections as a result - Cy Young, the winningest pitcher in history, finished 8th in the BBWAA vote and 4th in the Veterans vote. In addition, there was no prohibition on voting for active players, a number of whom received votes. Individuals who had been thrown out of baseball - such as Shoeless Joe Jackson and Hal Chase - were also not formally excluded, though few voters chose to include them on ballots. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... See also: 1935 in sports, 1937 in sports and the list of years in sports. Events May 12: Jockey Ralph Neves was involved in a racing accident at Bay Meadows Racetrack in San Mateo, California and mistakenly pronounced dead. ... Founded in 1908 as the Baseball Writers Association of America, the BBWAA is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... Denton True Young (March 29, 1867 – November 4, 1955) He was the pre-eminent baseball pitcher during the 1890s and 1900s. ... Shoeless Joe Jackson, 1919 Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1889 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ...


In the BBWAA election, voters were instructed to cast votes for 10 candidates, the same number of desired selections; in the Veterans' election, voters were also instructed to vote for 10, although the desire for only 5 initial selections led to revisions in the way the votes were counted. Any candidate receiving votes on at least 75% of the ballots in either election would be honored with induction to the Hall upon its opening in the sport's supposed centennial year of 1939. See also: 1938 in sports, other events of 1939, 1940 in sports and the list of years in sports. Many sporting events did not take place because of World War II. // Auto Racing August 11 - Jean Bugatti, automobile designer and the 30-year-old son of Ettore Bugatti, died in...


The BBWAA vote

A total of 226 ballots were cast, with 2231 individual votes for 47 specific candidates; 170 votes were required for election. Initial ballots included 33 players listed as suggestions, although revised ballots were later sent with an additional 7 names; when questions arose about players who had been omitted, voters needed to be reminded that these names were simply intended as suggestions rather than the entire field of possibilities, and that write-in votes were fully allowed. Candidates who were listed on the ballot as suggestions are indicated here with a †. The five candidates who received at least 75% of the vote and were elected are indicated in bold italics; candidates who have since been selected in subsequent elections are indicated in italics:

Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed the Georgia Peach, was an American baseball player generally considered to be the greatest player of the dead ball era (1900 – 1920). ... For the band named Babe Ruth, see Babe Ruth (band). ... Honus Wagner John Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955) is considered by many to have been the greatest shortstop ever to play major league baseball. ... Christy Mathewson of the New York Giants at West Side Park in Chicago, Illinois. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Nap Lajoie on a 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player considered to be the best defensive center fielder to ever play the game. ... Denton True Young (March 29, 1867 – November 4, 1955) He was the pre-eminent baseball pitcher during the 1890s and 1900s. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball who played most of his career in St. ... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... George Harold Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... James Joseph Collins (January 16, 1870 - March 6, 1943) was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century who was widely regarded as being the American Leagues best third baseman prior to Brooks Robinson. ... Grover Cleveland Alexander of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1915. ... yam| birthdate= June 19, 1903 | birthplace= playboy mansion | dead=dead | deathdate= June 2, 1941 | deathplace= Riverdale, New York | debutdate= June 15, 1923 | debutteam= New York Yankees | debutopponent= St. ... Roger Philip Bresnahan (June 11, 1879 - December 4, 1944), nicknamed The Duke of Tralee, was an American player in Major League Baseball who starred primarily as a catcher. ... Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... George Edward Waddell (October 13, 1876 - April 1, 1914) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Ed Walsh of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... Edward James Delahanty (October 30, 1867 - July 2, 1903) was a Hall of Fame Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903. ... Harold Joseph Pie Traynor (November 11, 1899 - March 16, 1972) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played his entire career with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1920-37). ... Frank Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973) was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century. ... Robert Moses (Lefty) Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ... Ross Youngs Ross Middlebrook Youngs (April 10, 1897 - October 22, 1927) was a Major League Baseball outfielder best known for his superb defense and consistent hitting. ... William Harold Terry (October 30, 1898 _ January 9, 1989) was a Major League Baseball first baseman and manager. ... Categories: 1875 births | 1947 deaths | Baseball players | Boston Braves players | Chicago Cubs players | Cincinnati Reds players | Baseball stubs ... Lou Criger, catcher for the Boston Americans, at South Side Park. ... Mordecai Brown of the Chicago Cubs at the West Side Grounds in 1903. ... Johnny Evers baseball card, 1911 John Joseph Evers (July 21, 1881 - March 28, 1947) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Frank Chance baseball card, 1909-11 Frank Leroy Chance (September 9, 1877 - September 15, 1924) was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century. ... John McGraw on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Ray Schalk of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius Szymanski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Bender in 1911 Charles Albert Chief Bender (May 5, 1884 - May 22, 1954) was one of the great pitchers in major league baseball in the first two decades of the 20th century, and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Shoeless Joe Jackson, 1919 Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1889 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Edd Roush of the Cincinnati Reds at Weeghman Field in 1919. ... Frank Home Run Baker (March 13, 1886 - June 28, 1963) was an American baseball player who played Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922. ... Categories: 1878 births | 1954 deaths | Major league third basemen | Brooklyn Tip-Tops players | Chicago Cubs players | Cleveland Indians players | Kansas City Packers players | Baseball stubs ... Fred Clarke of the Pittsburgh Pirates at the West Side Grounds in 1903. ... Sam Crawfords 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Kid Elberfeld on a 1909 American Tobacco Company baseball card (Ramly Cigarettes (T204)). Norman Arthur Kid Elberfeld (April 13, 1875 in Pomeroy, Ohio - January 13, 1944 in Chattanooga, Tennessee) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Phillies (1898), Cincinnati Reds (1899), Detroit Tigers (1901-1903), New York... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... Rube Marquard of the New York Giants at the West Side Grounds in 1909. ... Categories: 1884 births | 1970 deaths | Baseball players | Brooklyn Robins players | Brooklyn Superbas players | Baseball stubs ... Clarence Arthur Dazzy Vance (March 4, 1891 - February 16, 1961) was a star Major League Baseball pitcher during the 1920s. ... Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 - January 21, 1993) was a Major League Baseball second baseman who played his entire career for the Detroit Tigers (1924_1942). ... Charles Leo Gabby Hartnett (December 20, 1900 - December 20, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball catcher and manager who played nearly his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... Billy Sullivan of the Chicago White Sox in 1909. ...

The Veterans vote

A total of 78 ballots were cast by players, writers, managers and officials who had first-hand familiarity with 19th century baseball, resulting in 371 individual votes for 57 specific candidates; 59 votes were required for election. No candidates were elected, possibly because of a great deal of confusion regarding the voting procedure. The ballots which were issued in this vote also featured a list of suggested candidates, which was amended after complaints that Ed Delahanty, Willie Keeler and Cy Young should be on this ballot as well as that for the 20th century; but when some voters expressed doubts regarding the possibility of write-in votes, a letter including clearer instructions specifically allowing for write-ins had to be mailed. Many voters were also under the impression that they were to select an "All-Star team" of 10 players, with one at each position; 58 ballots cast in this manner were sent back to the voters to be re-cast, although 10 voters returned the ballots unaltered, stating that was the way they wished to vote regardless of the instructions. The results were delayed for several days until early February while these reminders and revisions took place. Edward James Delahanty (October 30, 1867 - July 2, 1903) was a Hall of Fame Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903. ... Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... Denton True Young (March 29, 1867 – November 4, 1955) He was the pre-eminent baseball pitcher during the 1890s and 1900s. ...


It was further decided, during the tabulations and after the voting, that voters would each be restricted to 5 total votes in order to limit the initial 19th century selections to 5 players; but since most voters had cast votes for 10, it was ruled that each vote would only count as 1/2 in the total for that candidate - making a 75% tally nearly mathematically impossible. When the votes were tabulated with this method, only two candidates had totals reaching even 50% of the required number. Plans for a runoff election featuring only the top 12 finishers, to be held prior to the 1939 opening of the Hall, never materialized; even with all the problems, the 1936 vote would remain the Hall's most successful attempt to seek a wide vote from experts on the era regarding candidates from that period.


Candidates who were listed as suggestions on the ballot are indicated here with a †. Candidates who have since been selected in subsequent elections are indicated in italics, as is Honus Wagner, who was elected in the BBWAA vote: Honus Wagner John Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955) is considered by many to have been the greatest shortstop ever to play major league baseball. ...


Adrian Constantine Cap Anson (April 17, 1852, Marshalltown, Iowa - April 14, 1922, Chicago, Illinois) was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball for the Rockford Forest Citys, Philadelphia Athletics, and Chicago White Stockings. ... Buck Ewing William Buckingham Buck Ewing (October 17, 1859 - October 20, 1906) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player and manager, and is widely regarded as the best catcher of his era and is often argued to be the best player of the 19th century. ... Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... Denton True Young (March 29, 1867 – November 4, 1955) He was the pre-eminent baseball pitcher during the 1890s and 1900s. ... Edward James Delahanty (October 30, 1867 - July 2, 1903) was a Hall of Fame Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903. ... John McGraw on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Charles Radbourn on a 1887-1890 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). Charles Gardner Radbourn (December 11, 1854 - February 5, 1897), nicknamed Old Hoss, was a pitcher in Major League Baseball prior to the turn of the 20th century. ... Categories: Stub | Baseball players | Major league shortstops | Kansas City Cowboys players | Boston Beaneaters players | New York Highlanders players | Detroit Tigers players | Philadelphia Phillies players | 1866 births | 1909 deaths ... $10,000 Kelly baseball card, ca. ... Amos Rusie on a 1895 Mayo Tobacco Works baseball card (Mayos Cut Plug (N300)). Amos Wilson Rusie (May 30, 1871 - December 6, 1942), nicknamed The Hoosier Thunderbolt, was a hard-throwing right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher during the late 19th century. ... Hughie Jennings on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Hugh Ambrose Jennings (April 2, 1869 - February 1, 1928) was an American baseball player and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Fred Clarke of the Pittsburgh Pirates at the West Side Grounds in 1903. ... James Joseph Collins (January 16, 1870 - March 6, 1943) was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century who was widely regarded as being the American Leagues best third baseman prior to Brooks Robinson. ... Charles Comiskey baseball card, 1887 Charles Albert Comiskey (August 15, 1859 - October 26, 1931) was a Major League Baseball player, manager and team owner. ... Categories: Stub | Cleveland Spiders players | Indianapolis Hoosiers players | Louisville Colonels players | New York Giants players | Philadelphia Phillies players | Providence Grays players | St. ... Categories: 1871 births | 1950 deaths | Baseball players | Chicago Colts players | Chicago Orphans players | Baseball stubs ... Wilbert Robinson on a 1895 Mayo Cut Plug (N300) baseball card. ... Harry Stovey on a 1887-1890 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). Harry Duffield Stovey, born Harry Duffield Stowe (December 20, 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - September 20, 1937 in New Bedford, Massachusetts), was a Major League Baseball player for the Worcester Ruby Legs (1880-1882), Philadelphia Athletics (1883-1889... George Wright (January 28, 1847 - August 21, 1937) was one of the earliest stars of professional baseball. ... 1905 photograph of baseball player John Clarkson. ... Honus Wagner John Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955) is considered by many to have been the greatest shortstop ever to play major league baseball. ... Al Spaldings sporting goods company made a lasting impact on baseball. ... Hugh Duffy of the Boston Red Sox at Comiskey Park in 1921. ... Photo of Ross Barnes Ross Barnes (May 8, 1850 - February 5, 1915) was one of the stars of baseballs National Association and the early National League from 1871 to 1881, playing second base and shortstop. ... Categories: Stub | Milwaukee Grays players | Worcester Ruby Legs players | Detroit Wolverines players | Boston Beaneaters players ... Kid Nichols of the Philadelphia Phillies at the West Side Grounds in 1905. ... -1... Categories: Baseball stubs | Baseball players | Cleveland Blues players | St. ... Dan Brouthers on an 1888 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Goodwin Champions (N162)). Dennis Joseph Brouthers (May 8, 1858 - August 2, 1932) was a pre-1900 era Major League Baseball player. ... Categories: Stub | Baseball players | Cleveland Blues players | Cincinnati Outlaw Reds players | St. ... Billy Hamilton on a 1887_1890 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). William Robert Hamilton (February 16, 1866 _ December 16, 1940) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player. ... Nap Lajoie on a 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Ned Williamson on an 1887-90 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge) (N172). ... Bobby Lowe (left) with infield teammates Fred Tenney (top), Herman Long (right) and Jimmy Collins (below) Robert Lincoln Lowe (July 10, 1865 - December 8, 1951), called Bobby Lowe and nicknamed Link, was a Major League Baseball player and manager who played for the Boston Beaneaters (1890-1901), Chicago Cubs (1902... Douglas L. Allison (July, 1845 - December 19, 1916) was a Major League Baseball player for the Washington Olympics (1871), Troy Haymakers (1872), Brooklyn Eckfords (1872), Elizabeth Resolutes (1873), New York Mutuals (1873), Hartford Dark Blues (1875-1877), Providence Grays (1878-1879), and Baltimore Orioles (1883). ... Jacob Peter Beckley (August 4, 1867 - June 25, 1918), nicknamed Eagle Eye, was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century. ... External links Baseball-Reference. ... Lou Criger, catcher for the Boston Americans, at South Side Park. ... William Frederick Dahlen (January 5, 1870 - December 5, 1950), nicknamed Bad Bill for his ferocious temperament, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball in the 1890s and 1900s, and was also a manager in the 1910s. ... Categories: 1884 births | 1924 deaths | Baseball players | Brooklyn Robins players | Brooklyn Superbas players | Cincinnati Reds players | Baseball stubs ... Tim Keefe on an 1888 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Goodwin Champions (N162)). Timothy John Keefe (January 1, 1857 - April 23, 1933) was a 19th century Major League Baseball pitcher noted for his longevity and record-setting strikeout totals. ... Walter Arlington Latham (March 15, 1860-November 29, 1952) was an American baseball player from 1880 -1909. ... James Robert McAleer (July 10, 1864 - April 29, 1931) was an American center fielder and manager in Major League Baseball who spent the majority of his fourteen-year playing career with the Cleveland Spiders. ... Tommy McCarthy on an 1887-90 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). Thomas Francis Michael McCarthy (July 24, 1863 - August 5, 1922) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player. ... Cal McVey (Montrose, Iowa; August 30, 1850 – August 20, 1926) was a professional baseball player during the 1860s and 1870s. ... Lip Pike Lipman Emanuel Pike (May 25, 1845 - October 10, 1893) was one of the stars of 19th century baseball. ... Hardy Richardson (April 21, 1855 - January 14, 1931) was a second basemen and outfielder mostly, in the Major Leagues for a number of teams throughout the 19th century. ... Frederick Tenney (November 26, 1871 - July 3, 1952) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Beaneaters/Doves/Braves (1894-1907, 1911) and New York Giants (1908-1909). ... George Van Haltren (March 30, 1866 - September 29, 1945) was mostly a major league outfielder, but also pitched and played short stop infrequently. ... Bobby Wallace of the St. ... Deacon White (December 7, 1847 - July 7, 1939), born James Laurie White, was an American professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... Candy Cummings William Arthur Candy Cummings (October 18, 1848 - May 16, 1924) was a 19th century professional baseball pitcher in the National Association and National League. ... John Lee Richmond (or simply Lee Richmond) (born May 5, 1857 in Sheffield, Ohio - died October 1, 1929 in Toledo, Ohio) was a left-handed pitcher who threw the first perfect game in major league baseball history. ...

Baseball Hall of Fame balloting
1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1942 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953 | 1954 | 1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 | 1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963 | 1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 | 1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973 | 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007
Alphabetical listing of members | Chronological listing of members

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baseball Hall of Fame balloting, 1936 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (646 words)
Members of the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) were given authority to select individuals from the 20th century; while a special Veterans Committee, made up of individuals with greater familiarity with the 19th century game, was polled to select deserving individuals from that era.
Any candidate receiving votes on at least 75% of the ballots in either election would be honored with induction to the Hall upon its opening in the sport's supposed centennial year of 1939.
Initial ballots included 33 players listed as suggestions, although revised ballots were later sent with an additional 7 names; when questions arose about players who had been omitted, voters needed to be reminded that these names were simply intended as suggestions rather than the entire field of possibilities, and that write-in votes were fully allowed.
Baseball Hall of Fame balloting, 2006 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1883 words)
The 2006 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001, augmented by a special election; the result was the largest class of inductees (18) in the Hall's history, including the first woman ever elected.
In July 2000, the Hall was given a $250,000 grant from Major League Baseball to begin a comprehensive study on African Americans in baseball from 1860-1960, with the hope of enhancing the Hall's collections in these areas.
Former Commissioner of Baseball Fay Vincent served as the non-voting chairman of both committees, and Hall of Famer Frank Robinson served as an advisor and assistant to Vincent and the committees.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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