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Encyclopedia > Baruch College
Baruch College

Motto: The American Dream Still Works
Established 1919
Type: Public
Endowment: $100,000,000
President: Dr. Kathleen M. Waldron
Provost: Jim McCarthy
Faculty: 500 (full time)
Staff: 700
Undergraduates: 12,500
Postgraduates: 3,000
Location New York City, NY, USA
Campus: Urban
Nickname: The Bearcats
Mascot: Bearcat
Affiliations: City University of New York
Website: www.baruch.cuny.edu

The Bernard M. Baruch College of The City University of New York, known more commonly as Baruch College is a public university and one of the constituent colleges comprising the City University of New York (CUNY). The college is situated on Lexington Avenue near the Flatiron/Gramercy Park district of Manhattan. Baruch is one of CUNY’s flagship and senior colleges, and traces its roots back to the founding of the Free Academy, the first institution of free public higher education in the United States. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. Kathleen M. Waldron is an American author, financial executive and educator. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... This article is about the state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Arctictis binturong (Raffles, 1821) The Arctictis binturong, also known as the Malay civet cat, the binturong, the Asian bearcat, and the Palawan bearcat, is neither a bear nor a cat but is a type of civet of the family Viverridae. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Lexington Avenue is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. ... The famous Flatiron building from which the district is named. ... Gramercy, also called Gramercy Park, is a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, focused around Gramercy Park, a private park between East 20th and 21st Streets. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Baruch, along with Brooklyn College is rated either first or second in admissions selectivity among CUNY colleges. The school has one of the most diverse student bodies in the United States. Its students hail from more than 120 nations. Baruch is particularly noted for its Zicklin School of Business (the largest collegiate school of business in the United States) and named after financier Lawrence Zicklin and his wife. Although the school is most known for its business programs, The Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, named after the former Philip Morris president, George Weissman is also part of Baruch, as well as the Baruch College School of Public Affairs. Brooklyn College is a senior college of the City University of New York, located in Brooklyn, New York. ... The Zicklin School of Business, named after financier and alumni Lawrence Zicklin, is the largest school of business in the United States and one of the most prestigious. ... The Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, is a school within Baruch College of the City University of New York, named after alumni George Weissman, former president of Philip Morris, and his wife, Mildred. ... Altria Group, Inc. ... George Weissman is an American businessman and a former president of Philip Morris (now Altria). ...

Contents

Founding and history

In 1847, the New York State Literature Fund was created in order to support students who could not afford to enroll in New York City’s private colleges, chief among them New York University, known at the time as the University of the City of New York and Columbia University. The Literature Fund led to the creation of the Committee of the Board of Education of the City of New York, led by Townsend Harris, J.S. Bosworth, and John L. Mason. The Committee sought the establishment of what would become the Free Academy, on Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Townsend Harris (1804–1878) was a successful New York City merchant and minor politician, and the first United States Consul General to Japan. ... Lexington Avenue is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. ...


The Free Academy became the College of the City of New York, now City College. In 1919, what would become Baruch College was established as City College School of Business and Civic Administration. On December 15, 1928, the cornerstone was laid on the new building which would house the newly founded school. At this point the school did not admit women. On its opening, it was considered the biggest such school for the teaching of business education in the United States. City College of The City University of New York The City College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as the City College of New York or simply City College) is a senior college of the City University of New York, in New York City. ...


By the 1930’s, women were allowed admission to the School of Business. The total enrollment at City College reached an all-time high of 40,000 students in 1935, and the School of Business had an enrollment of more than 1,700 students in the day session alone. Most of these students were Jewish and Italian immigrants, who could not afford or would not be admitted to private universities. The School of Business was renamed the Baruch School in 1958 in honor of alumni Bernard Baruch, a statesman and financier. In 1961, the New York State Education Law established the City University of New York (CUNY) system, and in 1968 Baruch College became a senior college in the City University system. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Bernard Baruch, 1920 Bernard Mannes Baruch (August 19, 1870–June 20, 1965) was an American financier, stock market speculator, statesman, and presidential adviser. ...


In the CUNY years, Baruch grew drastically and for a time, there was an idea to relocate the college to Harlem in search for more space. The idea was later dropped, and the college acquired property on East 24th Street in Manhattan to expand its campus. The first president of the new college (1969-1970) was the previous federal Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Robert C. Weaver. In 1971, the college named Clyde Wingfield, a noted educator as its president. He was succeeded by economist Joel Edwin Segall, in 1977. Current CUNY Chancellor, Matthew Goldstein was president of the school from 1991 to 1998. From 2000 to 2004 the college was under the leadership of the former Comptroller of New York Edward Regan. Its current president is Dr. Kathleen M. Waldron. For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Robert Clifton Weaver (December 29, 1907 – July 17, 1997) served as the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (also known as HUD) from 1966 to 1968. ... For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... Dr. Matthew Goldstein is the current chancellor of the City University of New York (CUNY). ... Edward V. Ned Regan was a Republican politician and college president, originally from Kenmore, New York. ... Dr. Kathleen M. Waldron is an American author, financial executive and educator. ...


Current campus

Throughout its history, Baruch used the landmarked Free Academy building, which is still in use by the college. The building is now named the Lawrence and Eris Field Building and is often referred to as the “23rd Street Building,” because of its location on East 23rd Street and Lexington Avenue. In 1998, after decades of renting space for classrooms, Baruch began construction of what would later be called the Newman Vertical Campus, after businessman William Newman. Inaugurated on August 27, 2001, the 17-story building is now home to the Zicklin School of Business, the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Public Affairs (SPA). The street bordering the Vertical Campus is now called “Bernard Baruch Way,” and the college now uses the address of the Vertical Campus as its official address.


In 2004, a proposal was made to integrate the Vertical Campus with the 23rd Street Building and to refurbish this landmark building for modern classrooms.


The College has the Newman Library, as well as the Undergraduate Information Center, healthcare facilities, as well as the office of financial aid, the office of the Registrar, and computer labs, across the street from the Vertical Campus, in a series of buildings that take almost the entire block of Bernard Baruch Way. In education outside the United Kingdom, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ...


The Administration Building, a short walk from the Vertical Campus or the Newman Library, houses other administrative offices, but not the Office of the President, which is housed on the fourth floor of the Vertical Campus.


Student body diversity

Baruch is recognized as being one of the most diverse institutions of higher education in the United States. Its student body comes from more than 120 different nations. Baruch is ranked #1 overall for minorities, #4 for Hispanics and Asian-Americans, and #5 for African-Americans as a producer of graduates in business and its related fields. In 2005, the magazine Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education reported that Baruch College ranked 53rd in a list of the top 100 colleges offering undergraduate degrees to Hispanics.


Baruch has a large Asian student population, including many new immigrants. It has one of the highest percentages of matriculated Asian students in the nation. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Student Organizations

There are 132 Undergraduate and 18 Graduate student run clubs/organizations at Baruch College. The Ticker has been the student voice since 1932.


Rankings

  • Baruch ranks among the top 40 universities in the Northeast that offer a full range of undergraduate and master's programs and is among the top 6 of those institutions that are public (U.S. News & World Report, "America's Top Colleges 2007").
  • Baruch’s undergraduate business programs ranked 51st nationally, the second most highly regarded in the NY/NJ metropolitan area. The undergraduate business program was also ranked among the top 30 of public institutions (U.S. News & World Report, "America's Top Colleges 2007").
  • Baruch's Zicklin School of Business is included in the 2007 edition of The Princeton Review's annual "Best Business Schools" listing.
  • The 2006 edition of the Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive Business School Survey ranked Baruch 50th among the nation's top 50 regional undergraduate business colleges.
  • Baruch’s Part-Time MBA is ranked 17th in the nation by U.S. News & World Report ("America's Best Graduate Schools 2007"), making it second in New York City. The Full-Time MBA was ranked in the top three of New York programs. Both were the only ranked public programs in New York State.
  • A joint survey by Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review ranked Baruch 18th out of the top 25 undergraduate entrepreneurial colleges in the nation in 2006.
  • Baruch is one of the nation’s best value undergraduate institutions according to the Princeton Review’s America’s Best Value Colleges (2007).
  • For eight years, Baruch has topped the list of the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher education in the United States (U.S. News & World Report, "America's Top Colleges 2007").
  • In the 24th Annual Survey of Accounting Professors in the U.S., conducted by the Public Accounting Report (2005), Baruch's undergraduate accounting program ranked 15th; Baruch's graduate accounting program was 22nd.
  • Baruch’s School of Public Affairs is ranked in the top 20 percent in the nation for its Master of Public Administration program by U.S. News & World Report (2006).

Famous and distinguished alumni

  • William Newman ('47) - Founder and chairman of New Plan Excel Realty Trust, Inc
  • Irwin Engelman ('55) - Director of New Plan Excel Realty Trust, Inc. Director at various other companies
  • Lawrence N. Field ('52) - Founder and principal of NSB Associates
  • Eris Field (’52) - Wife of Lawrence N. Field
  • Marvin Antonowsky (B.B.A. '49, MBA '52) - Media executive
  • Lawrence Zicklin (1957) - Managing principal and chairman of Neuberger Berman (Now part of Lehman Brothers)
  • Fernando Ferrer - New York City mayoral candidate in 2001 and 2005
  • William F. Aldinger III ('69) - Chairman and CEO of HSBC North America Holdings
  • Abraham Briloff (’37, MS, ’41) - Professor of Accounting
  • Nora McAniff - Co-chief operating officer of Time Inc
  • Bill Mccreary - Broadcaster
  • Michael L. Royce - Executive Director, New York Foundation for the Arts
  • Arthur Ainsberg ('68, MBA ‘72) - Director of Independent Research, Morgan Stanley
  • Larry Quinlan - Chief Information Officer, Deloitte & Touche USA LLP
  • Bert Mitchell - Chairman and CEO of Mitchell & Titus, LLP
  • JoAnn F. Ryan ('79, MS '83) - President & CEO, ConEdison Solutions
  • Michael I. Roth ('67) - Chairman & CEO, The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc
  • Craig A. Stanley - member of New Jersey General Assembly since 1996
  • Marcia A. Karrow - member of New Jersey General Assembly
  • Dennis Levine - a prominent player in the Wall Street insider trading scandals of the mid-1980s
  • Ralph Lauren - Chairman and CEO of Polo Ralph Lauren (dropped out)
  • Jennifer Lopez - actress, singer, and dancer (dropped out)
  • Tarkan - Turkish language singer, with world-wide fan-base
  • Burton Kossoff ('46) - Pioneer in packaging business and founder of Burton Packaging Company
  • Sidney Harman ('39) - Founder and executive chairman of Harman Kardon

Famous and distinguished faculty

Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) is a bachelors degree in Business Administration. ... Neuberger & Berman, in later years known as Neuberger Berman LLC, is an investment firm that was founded by Roy R. Neuberger. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ... Fernando Ferrer Fernando James Freddy Ferrer (born April 30, 1950 in the Bronx, New York) was the Borough President of The Bronx from 1987 to 2001, and was a candidate for Mayor of New York in 2001 and the Democratic Party nominee for Mayor in 2005. ... For other uses, see HSBC (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Time Inc. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu is one of the Big Four auditors. ... Consolidated Edison, Inc. ... Assemblyman Craig A. Stanley Craig A. Stanley (born November 20, 1955) has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 1996 and represents the 28th legislative district. ... The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Assemblywoman Marcia A. Karrow Marcia A. Karrow (born March 10, 1959) is a Republican who serves in the New Jersey General Assembly where she represents the 23rd legislative district and took office on January 10, 2006. ... The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Dennis Levine (born 1953) was a prominent player in the Wall Street insider trading scandals of the mid-1980s. ... For the company, see Polo Ralph Lauren. ... Polo Ralph Lauren (NYSE: RL) is American fashion designer Ralph Laurens luxury lifestyle company. ... For the meteorologist of The Weather Channel, see The Weather Channel (United States). ... For other uses, see Tarkan (disambiguation). ... Dr. Sidney Harman, currently chairman of Harman International Industries, Inc. ... A Harman Kardon PC speaker Harman Kardon, a division of Harman International Industries (NYSE: HAR), is a manufacturer of home and car audio equipment. ... Dr. Joel Brind is a pro-life born again Christian and a leading scientific advocate of the Abortion-Breast Cancer (ABC) hypothesis. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... The controversial abortion-breast cancer (ABC) hypothesis posits a causal relationship between having an induced abortion and a higher risk of developing breast cancer in the future. ... Robert J. Myers is the Executive Director of the Association for Business Communication. ... The Association for Business Communication (ABC) is the primary academic organization for the field of business communication scholarship, research, education and practice. ... Yoshihiro Tsurumi is an economist and professor of international business at Baruch College of the City University of New York and serves as President of the Pacific Basin Center Foundation in New York. ... Donna Edna Shalala (surname pronounced IPA: ; born February 14, 1941) has served as president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida, since 2001. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Harry Max Markowitz (born August 24, 1927) is an influential economist at the Rady School of Management at the University of California, San Diego. ...

See also

The Baruch College Alumni Association (BCAA) was founded in 1968 as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that supports the goals of the students, faculty and alumni of Baruch College and its three schools: the Zicklin School of Business (the largest and one of the most respected business schools in... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Von Duprin - Application Solutions - Door security at Baruch College new library (866 words)
Baruch College is one of ten senior colleges of The City College of New York (CUNY), the largest urban public university in the United States.
In 1953, Baruch College was named in honor of Bernard M. Baruch, statesman, financier, and a leader in the College's formation.
As part of a master plan developed for the college by architects Davis, Brody and Associates, the previous antiquated library was targeted as the highest priority for expansion.
baruch_zicklin_new_hires (297 words)
A senior college of The City University of New York (CUNY), Baruch College is a vital academic resource with a historic commitment to providing opportunity to motivated students who have the ability and drive to succeed, many the first in their families to attain higher education.
Baruch’s landmark building at 23rd Street and Lexington Avenue is the site of the Free Academy—the nation’s first institution of free public higher education, founded in 1847.
The College, which offered its first MBA in 1920, was renamed in 1953 in honor of Bernard M. Baruch, noted statesman and financier.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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