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Encyclopedia > Barsoom
A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1917
A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1917

Barsoom is a fictional version of the planet Mars invented by author Edgar Rice Burroughs for a series of action adventure stories. In 1911, Burroughs, now better known as the creator of the character Tarzan, began his writing career with A Princess of Mars, a rousing tale of pulp adventure set on the planet. Several sequels followed, filling out his vision of Barsoom and developing it in more detail. A Princess of Mars was possibly the first fiction of the 20th century to feature a constructed language; although Barsoomian was not particularly developed, it did add verisimilitude to the narrative. Image File history File links Princess_of_Mars. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... A. C. McClurg was a Chicago based publisher made famous by their publishing of the Tarzan of the Apes novels and stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. ... A constructed or artificial language — known colloquially as a conlang — is a language whose phonology, grammar, and/or vocabulary have been devised by an individual or group, instead of having naturally evolved as part of a culture. ... For other uses, see Verisimilitude (disambiguation). ...


Richard A. Lupoff has advanced the theory that Burroughs was influenced in writing his Martian stories by Edwin Lester Arnold's earlier novel Lieutenant Gullivar Jones: His Vacation (1905), also known as Gullivar of Mars, though this has been disputed. Lupoff also speculates that Burroughs derived characteristics of his main protagonist John Carter from Phra, hero of Arnold's The Wonderful Adventures of Phra the Phoenician (1890). A 1957 photo of Dick Lupoff in what he has described as full Army regalia. ... Edwin Lester Linden Arnold (1857-1935) was an English author. ... In 1911, Edgar Rice Burroughs, now best known as the creator of the character Tarzan, began his writing career with A Princess of Mars, a rousing tale of pulp adventure on the planet Barsoom or Mars. ...

Contents

Environment

While Burroughs' Barsoom tales never aspired to being anything other than exciting escapism, his vision of Mars was loosely inspired by astronomical speculation of the time, especially that of Percival Lowell, that pictured the planet as a formerly Earthlike world now becoming less hospitable to life. Once a wet world with continents and oceans, Barsoom's seas gradually dried up, leaving it a dry planet of highlands interspersed with moss covered dead sea bottoms. Abandoned cities line the former coastlands. The last remnants of the former bodies of water are the Great Toonolian Marshes and the antarctic Lost Sea of Korus. Barsoomians distribute scarce water supplies via a worldwide system of canals, controlled by quarreling city-states which have grown up at the junctures of the canals. The thinning Martian atmosphere is artificially replenished from an "atmosphere plant" on whose smooth functioning all life on the planet is dependent. For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Percival Lowell (March 13, 1855 – November 12, 1916) was an author, mathematician, and esteemed astronomer who fueled speculation that there were canals on Mars, founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and formed the beginning of the work and theories that led to the discovery of Pluto 14 years after... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... In the popular imagination lost cities were real, prosperous, well-populated areas of human habitation that fell into terminal decline and whose location was later lost. ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... Map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli. ...


Burroughs derived his concept of the Martian canals from the theories of Lowell and his predecessor Giovanni Schiaparelli. The few coordinates provided for Burroughs' canals differ from theirs, as their own differ from each other; in fact, the linear channel-like features Schiaparelli and Lowell mapped have been proven illusory. Some of Barsoom's other major physical features do correspond to albedo features of Mars known at the time, flipped upside-down in reflection of the images of the planet as seen through telescopes. For instance, Burroughs' snow-covered Artolian Hills can be roughly equated to the bright feature Hellas (actually a huge impact crater), and the Great Toonolian Marshes to the dark feature represented by the Valles Marineris. Map of Mars by Giovanni Schiaparelli. ... Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli (March 14, 1835 – July 4, 1910) was an Italian astronomer. ... An albedo feature is a large area on the surface of a planet (or other solar system body) which shows a contrast in brightness or darkness (albedo) with adjacent areas. ... NASA image of Hellas Planitia Hellas Planitia, also known as the Hellas Impact Basin, is a roughly circular impact crater located in the southern hemisphere of the planet Mars. ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... Valles Marineris cuts a wide swath across the face of Mars Valles Marineris (Latin for Mariner Valley, named after the Mariner 9 Mars orbiter of 1971-72 which discovered it. ...


Peoples and culture

The dominant culture of Barsoom is that of the humanoid Red Martians who are organized into a system of major imperial city-states such as Helium, Ptarth and Zodanga which control the planet-wide canals, as well as other, more isolated city-states in the hinterlands. Some of these are effectively lost cities, permitting Burroughs to utilize Barsoom as a stage for the same kind of lost race yarns he favored in earthly settings. The Red people are the interbred descendants of the ancient Yellow Martians, White Martians, and Black Martians, remnants of which continue to persist in isolated areas of the planet, particularly its poles. All of these races resemble Homo sapiens in almost every respect except for their extended lifespans (unless they are killed through violent means, Barsoomians are immortal) and the fact that they reproduce oviparously. The Lost World literary genre is a fantasy or science fiction genre that involves the discovery of a new world out of time, place, or both. ... This article is about modern humans. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ...


The humanoid Martians are harassed and preyed upon by the semi-nomadic Green Martians, a separate species with four arms and tusks who stand approximately four meters tall. The Green Martians are organized into loose hordes ranging over the dead sea bottoms, each horde taking its name from that of a dead city in its territory, such as Thark and Warhoon.


The Chessmen of Mars introduces the Kaldanes of the region Bantoom, whose form is almost all head but for six vestigial legs and a pair of chelae, and whose racial goal is to evolve even further towards pure intellect and away from bodily existence. In order to function in the physical realm, they have bred the Rykors, a complementary species composed of a body similar to that of a perfect specimen of Red Martian but lacking a head; when the Kaldane places itself upon the shoulders of the Rykor, a bundle of tentacles connects with the Rykor's spinal cord, allowing the brain of the Kaldane to interface with the body of the Rykor. Should the Rykor become damaged or die, the Kaldane merely climbs upon another as an earthling might change a horse. fgnfcgnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggggggggggggggggggggggfvfffffffffffffffffffccccccccccccccccchhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh ... The Kaldanes are a (fictitious) sentient species existing in the region of Bantoom on the planet Barsoom ( Mars) in the John Carter series of books by Edgar Rice Burroughs. ... Species of Danionin Danio Danio albolineatus Danio abolineatus var pulcher Danio abolineatus var tweediei Danio choprae Danio dangila Danio feegradei Danio kerri Danio kyathit var spotted Danio kyathit var striped Danio meghalayensis Danio nigrofasciatus Danio roseus Danio rerio Danio rerio var frankei Danio sp aff kerri Danio sp aff kyathit... Intelligence is a general mental capability that involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas and language, and learn. ... The Kaldanes are a (fictitious) sentient species existing in the region of Bantoom on the planet Barsoom ( Mars) in the John Carter series of books by Edgar Rice Burroughs. ... The Spinal cord nested in the vertebral column. ...


A lesser people of Barsoom are the Kangaroo Men of Gooli, so called due to their large, kangaroo-like tails and remarkable ability to hop. Their moral character is not highly developed; they are devout cowards and petty thieves, who only value (aside from their lives) a "treasure" consisting of pretty stones, sea shells, etc. Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus Macropus antilopinus A kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning large foot). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, the Red Kangaroo, the Antilopine Kangaroo, and the Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroo... Moral character or character is an evaluation of an individuals moral qualities. ... The hard, rigid outer calcium carbonate covering of certain animals is called a shell. ...


Barsoomians generally display warlike and honor-bound characteristics. The technology of the tales runs the gamut from dueling sabers to "radium pistols" and aircraft, with the discovery of powerful ancient devices or research into the development of new ones often forming plot devices. The natives also eschew clothing other than jewelry and ubiquitous leather harnesses, which are designed to hold everything from the weaponry of a warrior to pouches containing toiletries and other useful items; the only instances where Barsoomians habitually wear clothing is for need of warmth, such as for travel in the northern polar regions described in The Warlord of Mars. This preference for near-nudity provides a stimulating subject for illustrators of the stories, though art for many mass-market editions of the books feature Carter and native Barsoomians wearing loincloths and other minimal coverings, or use strategically placed shadows and such to cover exposed genitalia and female breasts. General Name, Symbol, Number radium, Ra, 88 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 7, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight (226) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ...


In addition to the naturally occurring races of Barsoom, Burroughs described the Hormads, artifical men created by the scientist Ras Thavas as slaves, workers, warriors, etc. in giant vats at his laboratory in the Toonolian Marsh in Synthetic Men of Mars and John Carter and the Giant of Mars. Although the Hormads were generally recognizable as humanoid, the process was far from perfect, and generated monstrosities ranging from the occasional misplaced nose or eyeball to "a great mass of living flesh with an eye somewhere and a single hand". [1]


Fauna

Animal life is more varied than on Earth; arthropods (including both spiders and insects), fish, reptiles (including both lizards and snakes), and birds are known, but most are rare and poorly described. It should not be assumed that these creatures are precisely equivalent to their terrestrial analogs; Barsoomian "spiders," for instance, while web-spinning arthropods, have twelve legs, which grow out of their backs. The intelligent, crustacean-like Kaldanes are presumably related. Subphyla and Classes Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Trilobita - trilobites (extinct) Subphylum Chelicerata Arachnida - spiders,scorpions, etc. ... For other uses, see Spider (disambiguation). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Reptilia redirects here. ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... For the Dutch band, see Crustacean (band). ...


Representatives of other terrestrial-type animals can be briefly enumerated. The Sith is a giant, venomous hornet-like insect endemic to the Kaolian Forest. Reptiles are described as repulsive and usually poisonous, and include the Darseen, a chameleon-like reptile, the Silian, an Antarctic sea-monster found in the Lost Sea of Korus, and a kind of giant lizard able to consume a human being in one bite. Birds are said to be brilliantly plumed, but the only species described is the enormous Malagor, endemic to the Great Toonolian Marshes.


More common are the many-legged species of large animals unique to Barsoom, some of which sport fur or tufts of hair, making them apparently analogous to Earth mammals. A few are fully analogous, bearing only four limbs; these include the Apt, a large white-furred arctic creature with a hippopotomus-like head, walrus-like tusks, and faceted, insect-like eyes, the Plant Men, blue-skinned, one-eyed monsters found in the Antarctic Valley of Dor, the Rykors, headless but otherwise human-like creatures bred by the Kaldanes, and of course all the human races of Barsoom. Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... The Plant Men are a fictitious species existing in the Valley Dor region on the planet Barsoom ( Mars) in the John Carter series of books by Edgar Rice Burroughs. ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ...


There is also a group of six-limbed creatures, consisting of the Sorak, the Barsoomian "cat," a small, domesticated animal; the White Ape, huge and ferocious, semi-intelligent gorilla-like creatures whose middle limbs, like those of the Green Martians, can be used as either arms or legs; and of course the Green Martians themselves. Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... Type species Troglodytes gorilla Savage, 1847 distribution of Gorilla Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling omnivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. ...


Eight-limbed beasts include the herbivorous Thoat, or Barsoomian "horse." The Greater Thoat is used as a mount by the Green Martians and stands about ten feet at the shoulder; the Lesser Thoat bred by the Red Martians is the size of a large horse. The Thoat is described as a slate-colored animal, with a white underside and yellow lower legs and feet. The huge Zitidar, used as a draft animal, is possibly a larger relative of the Thoat, but is not well enough described in the literature to be certain. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ...


Ten-limbed animals include (possibly) the Ulsio or Barsoomian "rat," described as a "many-legged" dog-sized burrower; the Calot, or Barsoomian "dog," a large beast with a frog-like mouth and three rows of teeth (easily the most famous of which was John Carter's own Calot, Woola); and the Banth, or Barsoomian "lion," which has a hairless, yellow hide, a maned neck, and many rows of teeth in a wide mouth. Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ...


Some Martian creatures are difficult to classify based on the available descriptions; in addition to the Zitidar and the Ulsio these would include the Orluk, an Arctic predator with a black and yellow striped coat, whose legs are not enumerated.


Protagonists

Earthman John Carter and Martian Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium, are the protagonists of the first three novels; Carter also headlines the eighth, tenth and eleventh, and is a major secondary character in the fourth and ninth novels. Other books tell the stories of his descendants Carthoris, Tara of Helium, and Llana of Gathol, native Martians Tan Hadron and Vor Daj, and Ulysses Paxton, another Earthman. Carter is initially transported to the planet Mars by a form of astral projection. There, on the world its natives call Barsoom, he encounters both formidable alien creatures resembling the beasts of ancient myth and various humanoids, wins the hand of Dejah Thoris, and rises to the position of Warlord of Mars. John Carter and Dejah Thoris from the cover of the first edition of A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1917 John Carter is a fictional character, created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, who appears in the Martian series of novels. ... John Carter and Dejah Thoris from the cover of the first edition of A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1917 Dejah Thoris is a major character in Edgar Rice Burroughss series of Martian novels. ... This article is about the paranormal concept. ...


The series

Order Title Published as serial Published as novel Fictional narrator
1 A Princess of Mars February-July 1912, All-Story October 1917, McClurg John Carter
2 The Gods of Mars January-May 1913, All-Story September 1918, McClurg John Carter
3 The Warlord of Mars December 1913-March 1914, All-Story September 1919, McClurg John Carter
4 Thuvia, Maid of Mars April 1916, All-Story October 1920, McClurg third person
5 The Chessmen of Mars February-March 1922, Argosy All-Story Weekly November 1922, McClurg third person
6 The Master Mind of Mars July 15, 1927, Amazing Stories Annual March 1928, McClurg Ulysses Paxton
7 A Fighting Man of Mars April-September, 1930, Blue Book May 1931, Metropolitan Tan Hadron
8 Swords of Mars November 1934-April 1935, Blue Book February 1936, Burroughs John Carter
9 Synthetic Men of Mars January 1939, Argosy Weekly March 1940, Burroughs Vor Daj
10 Llana of Gathol March-October 1941, Amazing Stories March 1948, Burroughs John Carter
11 John Carter of Mars: John Carter and the Giant of Mars
(by John Coleman Burroughs)
January 1941, Amazing Stories July 1964, Canaveral third person
John Carter of Mars: Skeleton Men of Jupiter February 1943, Amazing Stories John Carter

A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. ... The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, McClurg, 1918 The Gods of Mars is a 1918 Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the second of his famous Barsoom series. ... The Warlord of Mars is a Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the third of his famous Barsoom series. ... In 1911, Edgar Rice Burroughs, now best known as the creator of the character Tarzan, began his writing career with A Princess of Mars, a rousing tale of pulp adventure on the planet Barsoom or Mars. ... fgnfcgnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggggggggggggggggggggggfvfffffffffffffffffffccccccccccccccccchhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh ... Argosy was an American pulp magazine, published by Frank Munsey. ... The Master Mind of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the sixth of his famous Barsoom series. ... A Fighting Man of Mars is the seventh novel in the Barsoom series of Edgar Rice Burroughs, published in 1931. ... Blue Book was a popular 20th-century magazine which had a lengthy 70-year run under various titles from 1905 to 1975. ... Swords of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the eighth of his famous Barsoom series. ... Blue Book was a popular 20th-century magazine which had a lengthy 70-year run under various titles from 1905 to 1975. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ... John Coleman Burroughs All of Edgar Rice Burroughs children ~ Joan, Hulbert, and John Coleman ~ were fans of their fathers writing, but only John Coleman Burroughs actually added significantly to ERBs works with new creative material, although Hulbert was very involved in photography and ERB, Inc. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ...

The comic strip

With the Tarzan comic strip a popular success, newspapers began a comic strip adaptation of A Princess of Mars drawn by Edgar Rice Burroughs' son, John Coleman Burroughs. Never as popular as Tarzan, it ran in only four Sunday newspapers, from December 7, 1941 to March 28, 1943. This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... John Coleman Burroughs All of Edgar Rice Burroughs children ~ Joan, Hulbert, and John Coleman ~ were fans of their fathers writing, but only John Coleman Burroughs actually added significantly to ERBs works with new creative material, although Hulbert was very involved in photography and ERB, Inc. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


John Carter appeared in one of the last Sunday Tarzan comic strip stories, drawn by Gray Morrow. Gray Morrow (March 7, 1934 - November 6, 2001) was an American illustrator of paperback books and comics. ...


The comic books

The comic book The Funnies included a John Carter serial drawn by John Coleman Burroughs, which ran for 23 issues. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The is about the 1930s proto-comic book series The Funnies. ...


Then, in 1952, Dell Comics published three John Carter comic books, adapting the first three books, drawn by Jesse Marsh, who was the Dell Tarzan artist at the time. They were Four Color Comics #375, 437, and 488. They were later reprinted by the successor of Dell, Gold Key Comics as John Carter of Mars #1-3. Dell Comics was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publications, which got its start in pulp magazines. ... Jesse Marsh (July 27, 1915 - April 28, 1966) was a comic book and animation artist. ... One of the earlier issues of Four Color, featuring Walt Disneys Donald Duck. ... Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ...


DC Comics published John Carter as a backup feature in its Tarzan series, issues 207 — 209, after which it was moved to Weird Worlds, sharing main feature status alongside an adaptation of Burroughs' "Pellucidar" stories in issues #1-7; it again became a backup feature in Tarzan Family #62-64. (A non-John Carter Barsoom story also appeared in Tarzan Family issue #60.) DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Weird Worlds was a short-lived science fiction anthology title from DC Comics that was published between 1972 and 1974. ... Pellucidar is a fictional Hollow Earth milieu invented by Tarzan creator Edgar Rice Burroughs for a series of action adventure stories. ...


Marvel Comics began a John Carter series in 1977, which lasted for 27 issues (and saw three annuals published). This article is about the comic book company. ...


In the Tarzan comic strip, in 1995, writer Don Kraar set a story on Barsoom featuring Tarzan, David Innes, and John Carter. This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


John Carter also made a notable cameo in the second League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series written by Alan Moore and published by DC Comics. Promotional still for The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin ONeill, published under the Americas Best Comics imprint of DC Comics. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


The movie

For multiple decades, one movie-maker after another (including Bob Clampett, Ray Harryhausen and The Walt Disney Company) has attempted to bring Burroughs' Mars to the screen. So far, none has been successful. Robert Emerson Bob Clampett (May 8, 1913–May 4, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... Ray Harryhausen, with creations from Clash of the Titans. ... Disney redirects here. ...


Until January 2007, the film, John Carter of Mars, had been in pre-production by Paramount Pictures. Tentatively scheduled for release in 2008, Jon Favreau had been signed to direct this movie, taking over from Kerry Conran. The original script by Mark Protosevich was re-written by Ehren Kruger. This article is about motion pictures. ... John Carter of Mars is a planned film adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughss 11-volume Barsoom series under development at Pixar as of 2007. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Jonathan K. Favreau (born on October 19, 1966) is an American actor and director. ... Kerry Conran is an American filmmaker. ...


This production was halted when it was announced by Variety Magazine and at SciFi.com on January 17, 2007 that the Disney Corporation had optioned the rights to the series as an intended franchise for the studio.


On July 13, 2007, the Sci-Fi Channel website announced that Pixar would most likely release the movie in 2011 or 2012. SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... Pixars studio lot in Emeryville Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California (USA) notable for its seven Academy Awards. ...


Legacy

It can be said that the series prefigured much science fiction to come. Its influence can clearly be seen in franchises such as Star Trek and Farscape. While Burroughs no doubt borrowed liberally from the pulp fiction of his day, particularly westerns and swashbuckling tales, the pacing and themes set the tone for the soft science fiction genre. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... Broncho Billy Anderson, from The Great Train Robbery The Western movie is one of the classic American film genres. ... A Swashbuckler is a term that came about in the 16th century and was applied to rough, noisy, boastful swordsman. To swash is to swagger and swing about, making a lot of noise and a buckler is a shield. The stock character Miles Glorioso is a swashbuckler. ... Soft science fiction, or soft SF, like its complementary opposite hard science fiction, is a descriptive term that points to the role and nature of the science content in a science fiction story. ...


The tales seem somewhat dated today, but they showed great innovation for the time of writing, and the exciting stories caught the interest of many readers, helping to inspire serious interest in Mars and in space exploration. The John Carter books enjoyed another wave of popularity in the 1970s, with Vietnam War veterans who said they could identify with Carter, fighting in a war on another planet. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Numerous novels and series by others were inspired by Burroughs' Mars books: the Radio Planet trilogy of Ralph Milne Farley; the Mars and Venus novels of Otis Adelbert Kline; Almuric by Robert E Howard; Warrior of Llarn and Thief of Llarn by Gardner Fox; Tarzan on Mars, Go-Man and Thundar, Man of Two Worlds by John Bloodstone; the Michael Kane trilogy of Michael Moorcock; the Gor series of John Norman; the Callisto series and Green Star series of Lin Carter; The Goddess of Ganymede and Pursuit on Ganymede by Mike Resnick; and the Dray Prescot series of Alan Burt Akers (Kenneth Bulmer). In addition, Leigh Brackett, Ray Bradbury, Andre Norton, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Alan Dean Foster show Burroughs' influence in their development of alien cultures and worlds. Sword and Planet is a subgenre of speculative fiction that features rousing adventure stories set on other planets, and usually featuring Earthmen as protagonists. ... Planet of Peril by Otis Adelbert Kline, Ace Books, 1963 Otis Adelbert Kline (1891-1946) was an adventure novelist and literary agent during the pulp era. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936) was a writer of fantasy and historical adventure pulp stories published mainly in Weird Tales magazine in the 1930s. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... Hunters of Gor (1974), 1980 Star paperback edition. ... John Norman, pen name of John Frederick Lange, Jr. ... Jandar of Callisto by Lin Carter, Dell Books, 1972 The Callisto series is a sequence of eight science fiction novels by Lin Carter, of the sword and planet subgenre, first published by Dell Books from 1972-1978. ... Linwood Vrooman Carter (June 9, 1930 - February 7, 1988) was an American author of science fiction and fantasy, as well as an editor and critic. ... Michael Diamond Resnick (born Chicago, March 5, 1942), better known by his published name Mike Resnick, is a popular and prolific American science fiction author. ... Transit to Scorpio by Kenneth Bulmer, DAW Books, 1972 The Dray Prescot series is a sequence of fifty-three science fiction novels and a number of associated short stories of the subgenre generally classified as sword and planet, written by Kenneth Bulmer under the pseudonym of Alan Burt Akers. ... Henry Kenneth Bulmer, (January 14, 1921 – December 16, 2005), born in London, England, was a British author, primarily of science fiction. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915 - March 18, 1978), was a writer of fantasy and science fiction, mystery novels and - best known to the general public - Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... Andre Alice Norton (February 17, 1912 – March 17, 2005), science fiction and fantasy author (with some works of historical fiction and contemporary fiction), was born Alice Mary Norton in Cleveland, Ohio, in the United States. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, often with a feminist outlook. ... Alan Dean Foster (born November 18, 1946) is a prolific American writer of science fiction and fantasy novels and movie novelizations. ...


A. Bertram Chandler's pulp novels The Alternate Martians and The Empress of Outer Space overtly borrow a number of characters and situations from Burroughs's Barsoom series. Arthur Bertram Chandler (March 28, 1912 _ June 6, 1984) was an Australian science fiction author most well-known for his John Grimes novels and the Rim World series. ...


Robert A. Heinlein's novels Glory Road and The Number of the Beast, and Alan Moore's graphic novels of Allan and the Sundered Veil and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume II directly reference Barsoom. Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Number of the Beast is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1980. ... Allan and the Sundered Veil was a six-part story written in the style of a boys periodical by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin ONeill, included at the back of each issue of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume I and collected at the back of that... The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume II is a comic book limited series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin ONeill, published under the Americas Best Comics imprint of DC Comics. ...


In Philip José Farmer's World of Tiers series (1965-1993) Kickaha, the series' adventurer protagonist, asks his friend The Creator of Universes to create for him a Barsoom. The latter agrees only to make an empty world, since "It would go too far for me to create all these fabulous creatures only for you to amuse yourself by running your sword through them". Kickaha visits from time to time the empty Barsoom, complete with beautiful palaces in which nobody ever lived, but goes away frustrated. Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... World of Tiers is a series of connected science fiction/fantasy novels by Philip José Farmer. ...


L. Sprague de Camp's story "Sir Harold of Zodanga" recasts and rationalizes Barsoom as a parallel world visited by his dimension-hopping hero Harold Shea. De Camp accounts for Burrough's departures from physics or logic by portraying both Burroughs and Carter as having a tendency to exaggerate in their storytelling, and Barsoomian technology as less advanced than usually presented. Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... The Roaring Trumpet in Unknown, May 1940 The Harold Shea Stories is a name given to a series of five fantasy stories by the collaborative team of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt and to its later continuation by de Camp alone, Christopher Stasheff, Holly Lisle, John Maddox Roberts...


Furthermore, his Viagens Interplanetarias series of novels and short stories, especially those set on Krishna, one of Tau Ceti's inhabited planets, owe much to the premise of feudal co-existence alongside advanced technology pioneered within the Barsoom series. The Continent Makers and Other Tales of the Viagens by L. Sprague de Camp, Twayne Publishers, 1953 The Viagens Interplanetarias series is a sequence of science fiction stories by L. Sprague de Camp, begun in the late 1940s and written under the influence of contemporary space opera and sword and... Tau Ceti (Ï„ Cet / Ï„ Ceti) is a star commonly mentioned by science fiction authors since it is similar to the Sun in mass and spectral type in addition to being relatively close to us. ...


In 1989 Larry Niven and Steven Barnes published "The Barsoom Project", where a futuristic form of live action role-playing games (LARPs) is based on the Barsoom books. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Steven Barnes photo by Beth Gwinn Steven Barnes (born March 1, 1952 in Los Angeles, CA) is a self-titled writer, lecturer, creative consultant, and human performance technician. ... “Larp” redirects here. ...


Many other science fiction works, from the Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers film serials of the 1930s, to the Star Wars films, to the Mars trilogy of Kim Stanley Robinson, also offer nods in Burroughs's direction. DC Comics character Adam Strange's method of transportation, the Zeta Beam, recalls the way Carter is transported to Mars. As well as this in the Commonwealth Saga novels by Peter F. Hamilton a group of humans who undertake unprecedented and often illegal genetic modifications of their own bodies are known as the Barsoomians, in apparent reference to Burrough's creation. For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel, one of the most celebrated serials for both Republic Pictures and of the sound era in general. ... This article is about the series. ... The Mars trilogy is a series of award-winning science fiction novels by Kim Stanley Robinson, chronicling the settlement and terraforming of the planet Mars. ... For the late American actress, see Kim Stanley. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... The Commonwealth Saga is a series of science fiction novels by British science fiction writer Peter F. Hamilton. ... Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton Peter F. Hamilton (born 1960, Rutland, England), is a British science fiction author. ...


Richard Corben's Den series also appears to be inspired by the Barsoom series. It features a hero, Den, who mysteriously arrives naked on a (largely) desert planet where he becomes a great warrior and where the humanoids wear no clothes. Many of the creatures resemble the description of the white apes of the Gods of Mars. Like John Carter, he also receives great physical prowess from arriving in Neverwhere, although Carter's prowess stems from gravity, whereas Den undergoes a complete physical transformation. Heavy Metal Magazine cover by Corben featuring three of his Neverwhere characters: The Queen, Den and Catherine Wells Richard Corben (born November 1, 1940) is an American comic book artist best known for his illustrated fantasy stories in Heavy Metal (HM) magazine. ... Heavy Metal Magazine cover featuring the strips main early characters: The Queen, Den and Catherine Wells Den is a fantasy comic book series by Richard Corben. ... Heavy Metal Magazine cover featuring the strips main early characters: The Queen, Den and Catherine Wells Den is a fantasy comic book series by Richard Corben. ...


In interviews, James Cameron has invoked Burroughs as one of the primary inspirations behind his 2009 space adventure, Avatar, whose lead character indeed has a strongly Carter-esque name: "John Sully". [reference to be provided; site down]. For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... Avatar is an upcoming science fiction film to be directed by James Cameron. ...


In the science fiction television series Babylon 5, Amanda Carter - a Martian citizen and advocate of Mars' independence from Earth - is revealed to have had a grandfather named John who was one of the first people on Mars. This has been confirmed by the series creator J. Michael Straczynski as a reference made by the episode writer Larry DiTillio to John Carter of Mars.[2] Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ...


Copyright

The American copyright of the five earliest novels has expired in the United States, and they appear on a number of free e-text sites. However, because they were separately copyrighted in Great Britain, these works remain protected under the Berne Copyright Convention in the UK and throughout much of the world. The Australian copyright of the remainder, not including John Carter of Mars (1964), has also expired and they too appear online. Not to be confused with copywriting. ...


References

  1. ^ Synthetic Men of Mars, Chapter VII
  2. ^ J. Michael Straczynski, (1994), "JMS usenet posting", rec.arts.sf.tv.babylon5.moderated. Retrieved August 23, 2007.

Roy, John Flint (October 1976). A Guide to Barsoom. New York: Ballantine Books. ISBN 0-345-24722-1-175.  {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ...


External links

There is a board for the Paramount endeavor at the Internet Movie Database as well as an unofficial fan site. The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ... Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ... Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ... Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ... Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Barsoom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2152 words)
Barsoom is a fictional version of the planet Mars invented by author Edgar Rice Burroughs for a series of action adventure stories.
While Burroughs' Barsoom tales never aspired to being anything other than exciting escapism, his vision of Mars was loosely inspired by astronomical speculation of the time, especially that of Percival Lowell, that pictured the planet as a formerly Earthlike world now becoming less hospitable to life.
Some of these are effectively lost cities, permitting Burroughs to utilize Barsoom as a stage for the same kind of lost race yarns he favored in earthly settings.
ERBzine 1498: Barsoom, History Before The Warlord (7593 words)
Barsoom's seeming prosperity, despite the withering of the oceans, would be the planet literally eating its seed corn, a one way process.
On Barsoom, it first hit the Green Men of the Highlands, then devastated the Okars of the north, moved south to disrupt the First Born and Orovars of the lowlands and coasts, and then crossed the equator to finally destroy the Orovars of Hellas.
The sea of Torquas in the Hellas basin was the deepest on Barsoom, and surrounded by highlands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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