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Encyclopedia > Barry Lyndon
Barry Lyndon
Directed by Stanley Kubrick
Produced by Stanley Kubrick
Written by William Makepeace Thackeray (novel)
Stanley Kubrick
Starring Ryan O'Neal
Marisa Berenson
Cinematography John Alcott
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) 18 December 1975
Running time 184 min.
Language English
Budget $11,000,000 (estimated)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Barry Lyndon (1975) is an award-winning period film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844) by William Makepeace Thackeray. It recounts the exploits of an unscrupulous 18th century Irish adventurer (Barry Lyndon né Redmond Barry), particularly his rise and fall within English society. Ryan O'Neal stars as the title character. Image File history File links Barry_Lyndon_A.jpg‎ Barry Lyndon movie oster Copyright: Warner Bros. ... “Kubrick” redirects here. ... “Kubrick” redirects here. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... “Kubrick” redirects here. ... Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Marisa Berenson (born February 15, 1946) is an American actress and former model. ... John Alcott (1931-1986) was an Oscar winning cienmatographer best known for his four collaborations with director Stanley Kubrick: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), for which he took over as lighting camerman from Geoffrey Unsworth in mid-shoot, A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), the film for which he... “WB” redirects here. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // January 28 - George Lucas creates the second draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... In the performing arts, a period piece is a work set in a particular era. ... “Kubrick” redirects here. ... The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in serial form 1844, about a member of the Irish gentry trying to become a member of the English aristocracy. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ...


In recent years, it has come to be regarded not only as one of Kubrick's finest films, but indeed as a classic of world cinema. It was part of Time magazine's poll of the 100 best films as well as the Village Voice poll conducted in 1999 and was ranked #27 in 2002 in a poll of film critics conducted by Sight and Sound. Director Martin Scorsese has cited Barry Lyndon as his favorite Kubrick movie. The work has been hailed by Kubrick fans as the definitive example of a period feature film.[citation needed] Quotations from it appeared in such disparate works as Scorsese's The Age of Innocence, Lars von Trier's Dogville and Wes Anderson's Rushmore. (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ... Sight and Sound is a British monthly magazine about film. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... The Age of Innocence is an Academy Award-winning film released in 1993 by Columbia Pictures, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder. ... Lars von Trier (born Lars Trier, April 30, 1956) is a Danish film director closely associated with the Dogme95 collective, calling for a return to plausible stories in filmmaking and a move away from artifice and towards technical minimalism. ... Dogville is a 2003 movie written and directed by Lars von Trier, starring Nicole Kidman, Paul Bettany, Lauren Bacall, Chloe Sevigny, Stellan Skarsgård and James Caan, among others. ... Wesley Wales Anderson (born May 1, 1969) is an American writer, producer, and director of films and commercials. ... Rushmore is a 1998 movie directed by Wes Anderson about an eccentric teenager named Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) and his friendship with rich industrialist Herman Blume (Bill Murray), and their mutual love for elementary school teacher Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams). ...

Contents

Background

After 2001: A Space Odyssey, Kubrick made plans for a film about Napoleon Bonaparte. During pre-production, however, Sergei Bondarchuk and Dino De Laurentiis' Waterloo was released and subsequently failed at the box office. As a result, Kubrick's financiers pulled their funding for the film. He was furious, having put considerable time and effort into the development of the Napoleon project. Left with no alternative, he turned his attention to his next film, A Clockwork Orange. Barry Lyndon followed, in part to take advantage of the copious research Kubrick had done for the aborted Napoleon. Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Bondarchuk as Pierre Bezukhov in War and Peace Sergei Fedorovich Bondarchuk (IPA: , Russian: Серге́й Фё́дорович Бондарчу́к; Ukrainian: Сергі́й Фе́дорович Бондарчу́к September 25, 1920 – October 20, 1994) was a Soviet film director, screenwriter, and actor. ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ... Waterloo was a Soviet-Italian film of 1970, directed by Sergei Bondarchuk and produced by Dino De Laurentiis. ... This article is about the film. ...


Kubrick was also interested in Thackeray's Vanity Fair but dropped the project when a serialised version for television was produced. He told an interviewer: Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ...

At one time, Vanity Fair interested me as a possible film but, in the end, I decided the story could not be successfully compressed into the relatively short time-span of a feature film...as soon as I read Barry Lyndon I became very excited about it.[1]

The film did not do well at the box office in the United States, but it was a hit in Europe. This mixed reaction factored in Kubrick's filming of Stephen King's The Shining — a project that would not only please him artistically, but also succeed financially. Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... For other uses of this term, see Shining. ...


Plot summary

In the opening scene, set in 1750s Ireland, the father of Irishman Redmond Barry (Ryan O'Neal) is killed in a duel over the sale of some horses. The widow (Marie Kean), disdaining offers of marriage, devotes herself to the raising of her son.


When Barry is a young man, he falls in love with his cousin, Nora Brady (Gay Hamilton). She likes him well enough to seduce him, but when the well-off English Captain John Quin (Leonard Rossiter) appears on the scene, the poverty-stricken Barry is quickly dropped. She and her whole family are set on relieving their financial difficulties with an advantageous marriage. Barry refuses to accept the situation and kills Quin in a duel. Gay Hamilton (born 29 April 1943 in Lanarkshire, Scotland) is an actress who had many roles between 1966 and 1980. ... Leonard Rossiter (born Liverpool, England, October 21st 1926 - died London, October 5th 1984) was a distinguished British actor, most widely known for his comedy roles in two British television series of the 1970s. ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ...


Fleeing the law, Barry travels towards Dublin, but is robbed by a famous highwayman, Captain Feeney (Arthur O'Sullivan), and his son Seamus (Billy Boyle), leaving Barry little choice but to join the British army. Later, he is reunited with a family friend, Captain Grogan (Godfrey Quigley), who informs him that the duel was faked. Barry's pistol was not loaded with a real bullet, but one made with tow, and Quin was only stunned. It was staged so as to get him out of the way, so the cowardly Quin could be coaxed into marrying Nora. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Godfrey Quigley is a British actor who has taken small roles in classic British films. ... A tow is an untwisted bundle of continuous filaments. ...


Barry's regiment is sent to fight in the Seven Years' War in Europe. During one skirmish, Grogan is fatally wounded, and Barry deserts at the first opportunity, impersonating a courier. He spends a few pleasant days with Lischen (Diana Körner), a lonely woman whose husband is away fighting. When he resumes his journey, he encounters a Prussian captain, Potzdorf (Hardy Krüger), who sees through his disguise. Given the choice of joining the Prussian army or being taken for a deserter, Barry enlists in his second army. During one battle, he saves Potzdorf's life. Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... Diana Körner (b. ... Born Franz Eberhard August Krüger, April 12, 1928 in Berlin-Wedding, Germany. ...


After the war ends in 1763, Barry is employed by the Minister of Police, Potzdorf's uncle. It is arranged for him to become the servant of the Chevalier de Balibari (Patrick Magee), a professional gambler. The Prussians suspect that he is a spy and Barry is assigned to try to determine if he is. However, when Barry finds out the chevalier is a fellow Irishman, he confesses all to him and they become confederates. Barry assists the chevalier in cheating at card games, but when the Prince of Tübingen (Wolf Kahler) suspects the truth after losing a large sum, they are unceremoniously expelled from Prussia. They wander from place to place, cheating the nobles. Barry proves to be very useful; when a loser refuses to pay his debts, Barry's excellent swordsmanship convinces him otherwise. Patrick Magee (31 March 1922 – 14 August 1982) was a Tony Award winning Irish actor best known for his collaborations with Samuel Beckett and his role as the victimised writer Mr. ... Wolf Kahler (born 26 April 1946) is a German actor. ...


Hardened by his experiences, Barry decides to better himself by marrying well. During the course of his travels, he encounters the beautiful and wealthy Countess of Lyndon (Marisa Berenson). Barry has little difficulty seducing her. Her sickly husband, Sir Charles Lyndon (Frank Middlemass) dies; the following year (1773), she and Barry are married. Marisa Berenson (born February 15, 1946) is an American actress and former model. ... Frank Middlemass (born May 28, 1919 in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, England), is a British actor. ...


Young Lord Bullingdon (Dominic Savage), Countess Lyndon's son by Sir Charles, hates Barry from the beginning. The marriage is initially not a happy one, although they welcome a new son, Bryan Patrick. Bullingdon thinks nothing of alternately ignoring, and venting his pent-up malice on, Bryan. Barry enjoys himself while keeping his wife in dull seclusion. However, when he is caught seducing one of her maids, he begins treating Lady Lyndon better.


Barry brings his mother over from Ireland to live with him. She warns her son that his position is precarious. If Lady Lyndon were to die, all her wealth would go to her son Lord Bullingdon (now a young man played by Leon Vitali); Barry would be left penniless. Barry's mother advises him to obtain a noble title to protect himself. He cultivates the acquaintance of the influential Lord Wendover (André Morell) with this goal in mind, spending much money to grease his way. All this effort is wasted however. One day, Lord Bullingdon announces his hatred of his stepfather and is beaten by Barry in front of many important guests, before Bullingdon leaves the family estate. Barry's public cruelty loses him all the powerful friends he has worked so hard to make and he is shunned socially. André Morell as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the BBC Television serial Quatermass and the Pit (1958-59). ...


As badly as he has treated his stepson, Barry proves to be a doting father to Bryan. However, when he is eight, the boy is thrown from a horse and soon dies. The grief-stricken Barry turns to drink, while Lady Lyndon seeks solace from religion, assisted by the family priest, Reverend Samuel Runt (Murray Melvin). When that does not ease her grief, she tries to commit suicide. Upon hearing this, Lord Bullingdon resurfaces and challenges Barry to a duel. Murray Melvin (born 1932, London, England) is a British stage and film actor. ...


A coin flip gives Bullingdon the privilege of shooting first, but his pistol misfires. Barry magnanimously fires into the ground, but Bullingdon refuses to let the duel end. He fires again, this time hitting Barry in the leg, which has to be amputated. Partial hand amputation Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma or surgery. ...


While Barry is recovering, Bullingdon takes control of the estate. He offers his stepfather an annuity of 500 guineas if he leaves England; otherwise, with his credit exhausted, his creditors will see to it that he is put in jail. Wounded in spirit and body, Barry accepts. He goes first to Ireland with his mother, then to the European continent to resume his former profession of gambler, though without his former success. He never sees Lady Lyndon again. The final scene (set in 1789) shows the middle-aged Lady Lyndon signing Barry's annuity check. An annuity (from Latin annus, a year), is an investment that provides a defined series of payments in the future in exchange for an up-front sum of money. ...


Cast

Actor/Actress Role
Ryan O'Neal Barry Lyndon
Marisa Berenson Lady Lyndon
Patrick Magee The Chevalier de Balibari
Hardy Krüger Capt. Potzdorf
Gay Hamilton Nora Brady
Murray Melvin Rev. Samuel Runt
Frank Middlemass Sir Charles Reginald Lyndon
Leon Vitali Lord Bullingdon
Steven Berkoff Lord Ludd
Leonard Rossiter Capt. John Quinn
André Morell Lord Wendover
David Morley Bryan Patrick Lyndon
Michael Hordern Narrator
Diana Körner Lischen (German Girl)
Dominic Savage Young Bullingdon
Arthur O'Sullivan Capt. Feeny
Billy Boyle Seamus Feeny
Anthony Sharp Lord Hallam
  • After playing the older Lord Bullingdon, Leon Vitali became Kubrick's personal assistant, working as the casting director on his following films, and supervising film-to-video transfers for Kubrick. Their relationship lasted until Kubrick's death.
  • Late cinematographer John Alcott appears at the men's club where Lord Bullingdon confronts and challenges Barry to a duel. Alcott has the non-speaking role of the man sleeping in a chair near Barry.
  • Vivian Kubrick, Stanley's daughter, appears uncredited as a guest at Bryan's birthday party.

Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Marisa Berenson (born February 15, 1946) is an American actress and former model. ... Patrick Magee (31 March 1922 – 14 August 1982) was a Tony Award winning Irish actor best known for his collaborations with Samuel Beckett and his role as the victimised writer Mr. ... Born Franz Eberhard August Krüger, April 12, 1928 in Berlin-Wedding, Germany. ... Gay Hamilton (born 29 April 1943 in Lanarkshire, Scotland) is an actress who had many roles between 1966 and 1980. ... Murray Melvin (born 1932, London, England) is a British stage and film actor. ... Frank Middlemass (born May 28, 1919 in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, England), is a British actor. ... Steven Berkoff (born August 3, 1937) is an English actor, writer and director. ... Leonard Rossiter (born Liverpool, England, October 21st 1926 - died London, October 5th 1984) was a distinguished British actor, most widely known for his comedy roles in two British television series of the 1970s. ... André Morell as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the BBC Television serial Quatermass and the Pit (1958-59). ... Sir Michael Hordern (October 3, 1911-May 2, 1995) was a British actor, knighted in 1983 for his services to the theatre. ... Diana Körner (b. ... Anthony Sharp (16 June 1915 – 23 July 1984) was an English actor on television and film from the 1950s. ... John Alcott (1931-1986) was an Oscar winning cienmatographer best known for his four collaborations with director Stanley Kubrick: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), for which he took over as lighting camerman from Geoffrey Unsworth in mid-shoot, A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), the film for which he... Vivian Vanessa Kubrick (born August 5, 1960, in Los Angeles, California, USA) is a filmmaker and composer, best known for her work with her father, filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. ...

Music

The films period setting allowed Kubrick to indulge his penchant for classical music, and the film score uses pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Giovanni Paisiello, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Franz Schubert. The score also includes Irish folk music performed by The Chieftains. The piece most associated with the film is the main title music, George Friderich Handel's stately Sarabande from the Keyboard suite Vol.2, No.4 in D minor HWV 437, originally for solo harpsichord. Yet, the versions for main and end title are performed very romantically with orchestral strings, harpsichord, and tympani. It is used at various points in the film, in various arrangements, to indicate the implacable working of impersonal fate. “Bach” redirects here. ... “Vivaldi” redirects here. ... Paisiello at the clavichord, by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, 1791. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Irish music is a folk music which has remained vibrant throughout the 20th century, when many other traditional forms worldwide lost popularity to pop music. ... The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... George Frideric Handel, 1733 George Frideric Handel (or Georg Friedrich Händel in German) (February 23, 1685 – April 14, 1759) was a German Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ... In music, the sarabande (It. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... Timpani, or kettledrums, are musical instruments in the percussion family. ...


Leonard Rosenman won a 1975 Academy Award for Best Musical Score for adapting the various pieces of baroque and classical music. Ironically, years later, Rosenman expressed bittersweet memories (both of this movie and of Kubrick): "He would shoot take after take needlessly. He just didn't know what he was looking for, until after he found it. Still, he's one of the best friends I've ever had or will have, and I told him so. Thus, for the sake of that friendship, we both agreed never to work together on the same movie again for as long as we lived." (They never did.) Leonard Rosenman (born September 7, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American film, television and concert composer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the 2000s . ...


Production

Photography

A candlelit scene with Reverend Runt and Lady Lyndon.
A candlelit scene with Reverend Runt and Lady Lyndon.

The film is famous for its cinematography, which was overseen by director of photography John Alcott (who won an Oscar for his work), and for the technical innovations that made some of its most spectacular images possible. Image File history File links Barry12. ... Image File history File links Barry12. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... John Alcott (1931-1986) was an Oscar winning cienmatographer best known for his four collaborations with director Stanley Kubrick: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), for which he took over as lighting camerman from Geoffrey Unsworth in mid-shoot, A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), the film for which he...


Alcott used three f/0.70 lenses developed by Zeiss for NASA for use in the Apollo moon landings, which Kubrick discovered in his search for a lens that could film in low-light situations. The super-fast lens allowed him to shoot scenes lit with actual candlelight with an average lighting volume of only three candlepower. In fact, the film features the largest lens aperture in film history. A 35mm lens set to f/11, as indicated by the white dot above the f-stop scale on the aperture ring In photography the f-number (focal ratio) expresses the diameter of the diaphragm aperture in terms of the effective focal length of the lens. ... Photographic lens One of Canons most popular wide angle lenses - 17-40 f/4 L The zoom lens of the Canon Elph A photographic lens (or more correctly, objective) is an optical lens or assembly of lenses used in conjunction with a camera body and mechanism to make images... Carl Zeiss in middle age. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... Apollo Program insignia Project Apollo was a series of human spaceflight missions undertaken by the United States of America using the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn launch vehicle, conducted during the years 1961–1972. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Companies. ... The candela (symbol: cd, Latin for candle) is one of the seven SI base units. ... a big (1) and a small (2) aperture For other uses, see Aperture (disambiguation). ...


Most shots, however, were achieved with conventional lenses but were lit in a way that mimics natural light. This has the dual result of making the lighting seem more realistic and giving a look to the film similar to 18th century paintings (because, of course, painters of the period were depicting a world devoid of electric lighting). For example, to light a room, rather than placing the lights inside as would be done in a conventional movie, the lights were placed outside and aimed through the windows, which were covered in a diffuse material to scatter the light evenly through the room. Not only did this give the look of natural daylight coming in through the windows, it also protected the historic locations from the damage caused by mounting the lights on walls or ceilings and the heat from the lights. One telltale sign of this method occurs in the scene where Barry duels Lord Bullingdon. Though it appears to be lit entirely with natural light, one can see that the light coming in through the cross-shaped windows in the barn appears blue in color, while the main lighting of the scene coming in from the side is not. This is because the light through the cross-shaped windows is actual daylight (which is blue-tinted compared to electric lights) while the light coming in from the side is not.

A scene featuring Barry, Nora Brady, and Captain Quin. Kubrick looked toward paintings of the era for inspiration.

Principal photography took 300 days, from spring 1973 through early 1974, with a break for Christmas. Image File history File links Barry_Lyndon_screenshot. ... Image File history File links Barry_Lyndon_screenshot. ...


Locations

Several of the interior scenes were filmed in Powerscourt House, a famous 18th century mansion in County Wicklow, Republic of Ireland. The house was destroyed in an accidental fire several months after filming (November 1974), so the movie serves as a record of the lost interiors. Other locations included Castle Howard in England (exteriors of the Lyndon estate), Dublin Castle in Ireland (the chevalier's home), Petworth House, West Sussex and Frederick the Great's administration buildings at Potsdam near Berlin. Irish Palladianism. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Wicklow Code: WW Area: 2,024 km² Population (2007) 114,676 Website: www. ... The garden front of Castle Howard John Vanburghs complete project for Castle Howard, which was not all built. ... Dublin Castle. ... A distant view of Petworth House across the lake in Petworth Park by JMW Turner. ... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...


Themes

Barry Lyndon departs from its source novel in several ways. In Thackeray’s writings, events are related in the first person by Barry himself. A comic tone pervades the work, as Barry proves both a raconteur and an unreliable narrator. Kubrick’s film, by contrast, presents the story objectively. Though the film contains voice-over (by actor Michael Hordern), the comments expressed are not Barry's, but those of an omniscient, although not entirely impartial, narrator. This change in perspective alters the tone of the story; Thackeray tells a jaunty, humorous tale, but Kubrick's telling is essentially tragic, with many subtle humorous jabs toward 18th century society, such as how Barry tries to learn the correct behavior for a gentleman, and pays a huge price when he does so. Illustration by Gustave Doré for Baron Münchhausen: tall tales, such as those of the Baron, often feature unreliable narrators. ... Sir Michael Hordern (October 3, 1911-May 2, 1995) was a British actor, knighted in 1983 for his services to the theatre. ... In literature, an omniscient narrator is a narrator who appears to know everything about the story being told, including what all the characters are thinking. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ...


Kubrick also changed the plot. The novel does not include a final duel. By adding this episode, Kubrick establishes dueling as the film’s central motif. The movie begins with a duel where Barry’s father is shot dead, and duels recur throughout the film.


Source

Stanley Kubrick based his original screenplay on William Makepeace Thackeray's The Luck of Barry Lyndon (republished as the novel Memoirs of Barry Lyndon, Esq.), a picaresque tale written and published in serial form in 1844. The serial, which is told in the first person and "edited" by the fictional George Savage FitzBoodle, concerns a member of the Irish gentry trying to become a member of the English aristocracy. William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in serial form 1844, about a member of the Irish gentry trying to become a member of the English aristocracy. ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ...


The source novel is written by Lyndon while imprisoned looking back on his life. Lyndon is a notable example of the literary device - the unreliable narratorand throughout the novel the reader is constantly asked to question the veracity of the events described by him. Although later editions dropped the frame device of FitzBoodle's (Thackeray's pseudonym) editions, it is crucial in unmasking Lyndon's narcissism through occasional notes inserted at the bottom of the page noting information that is contradictory or inconsistent in relation to what Lyndon writes elsewhere. Andrew Sanders mentions in his introduction for the Oxford Classics edition, these annotations were relevant to the novel as an ingenious narrative device as Thackeray constantly invites the reader to question Lyndon's version of the events.


Kubrick however felt that using a first-person narrative would not be useful in a film adaptation :

I believe Thackeray used Redmond Barry to tell his own story in a deliberately distorted way because it made it more interesting. Instead of the omniscient author, Thackeray used the imperfect observer, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say the dishonest observer, thus allowing the reader to judge for himself, with little difficulty, the probable truth in Redmond Barry's view of his life. This technique worked extremely well in the novel but, of course, in a film you have objective reality in front of you all of the time, so the effect of Thackeray's first-person story-teller could not be repeated on the screen. It might have worked as comedy by the juxtaposition of Barry's version of the truth with the reality on the screen, but I don't think that Barry Lyndon should have been done as a comedy.[2]

As in the case of most literary adaptations, Kubrick shortens or in some cases omits characters who were significant in the novel. The time period constituting his escape from the Prussian army to his marriage is given greater detail in the novel than the film.


Its also interesting to note that the film ends much before the novel's ending. At the end of the film, Barry Lyndon survives with an amputated leg from a duel (an incident absent in the novel) and returns to his gambling lifestyle with lesser success while Lady Lyndon pays the debts accumulated during her marriage to Barry, including the sum promised to Redmond in return for leaving the country. Though these events occur in the novel as well, it also shows that upon Lady Lyndon's death, the sum promised to Barry is cancelled and he becomes destitute eventually winding up in prison for his confidence schemes. It is at this place where Barry writes his memoirs, which end noting that he has to 'eke out a miserable existence, quite unworthy of the famous and fashionable Barry Lyndon'.


At this point Fitz-Boodle writes an epilogue of sorts about Barry's final days where his only visitor was his mother. He died after spending nineteen years in prison.


Thackeray based the novel on the life and exploits of the Irish rakehell and fortunehunter Andrew Robinson Stoney, who married (and subsequently was divorced by) Mary Eleanor Bowes, the Countess of Strathmore, who became known as "The Unhappy Countess" due to the tempestuous liaison. The Countess of Strathmore is one of the ancestors of Queen Elizabeth II. The Tavern Scene from A Rakes Progress by William Hogarth. ... Andrew Robinson Stoney (later styled Andrew Robinson Stoney Bowes) was an Irish adventurer who married Mary Eleanor Bowes, the Countess of Strathmore, one of the ancestors of Queen Elizabeth II. She became known as The Unhappy Countess due to the tempestuous relationship, which ended in scandal. ... Mary Eleanor Bowes, Countess of Strathmore (1749 - 1800), also known as The Unhappy Countess, was the daughter of George Bowes. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The...


The revised version, which is the novel that the world generally knows as "Barry Lyndon", was shorter and tighter than the original serialization, and dropped the FitzBoodle, Ed. device. It generally is considered the first "novel without a hero" or novel with an antihero in the English language. Upon its publication in 1856, it was entitled by Thackeray's publisher The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon, Esq. Of The Kingdom Of Ireland Containing An Account of His Extraordinary Adventures; Misfortunes; His Sufferings In The Service Of His Late Prussian Majesty; His Visits To Many Courts of Europe; His Marriage and Splendid Establishments in England And Ireland; And The Many Cruel Persecutions, Conspiracies And Slanders Of Which He Has Been A Victim.[3] In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ...


Academy Awards

The film received Academy Awards for Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design and Best Musical Score. It was additionally nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Director, and Best Picture. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ...


DVD feature

Although the original print did not provide translations of the small bits of French and German dialogue, by activating English subtitles on the DVD version, they are displayed as English captions.


References

  1. ^ Ciment, Michel. Kubrick on Barry Lyndon. Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  2. ^ visual-memory.co.uk
  3. ^ victorianweb.org

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Barry Lyndon (1530 words)
An underappreciated masterpiece, Barry Lyndon is a film about one man's (perhaps Everyman's) struggle to attain for himself and his heirs a station of security in life, to become the master of his fate, the captain of his soul....
But Redmond Barry (known, for a time, by the title of Barry Lyndon) is consistently thwarted in the pursuit of his goal for the simple reason that he has been written into existence by William Makepeace Thackeray and framed by Stanley Kubrick: Barry is a prisoner of mise-en-scene, trapped in a work of art.
Barry, who was so moved by the aesthetic splendor of the Chevalier's appearance, here displays a kind of aesthetic style and grace that, even without an officially recognized title, is the mark of a gentleman.
Barry Lyndon (1535 words)
Barry Lyndon rende tale tematica il cuore stesso della lunga narrazione delle gesta di Redmond Barry, riprese dal romanzo di Thackeray, The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon (1844), il cui tono sarcastico e tagliente ben si sposa con la fredda scrittura filmica kubrickiana.
Il futuro Barry Lyndon amera' raccontare una versione edulcorata ed eroica, insomma completamente inventata, di queste sue esperienze militari, all'amato figlio Bryan; in tale manipolazione per fanciulli K allude alle falsificazioni di tante vicende militari contenute in testi retorici e pseudostorici, volti sempicemente a propagandare un'ideologia e i suoi eroi-martiri.
Barry entra nella cerchia degli aristocratici giocando sul desiderio sessuale di lady Lindon, sposata a un uomo anziano e bloccato su una sedia a rotelle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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