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Encyclopedia > Barry John

Barry John (born 6 January 1945 in Cefneithin, Wales) is a Welsh rugby union footballer, considered by many to be the greatest fly-half in the sport's history. In a relatively short career, he took the fly-half game to a new peak and in the process became known simply as "the King". January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... General phase play in rugby union. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. ...


John arrived at international level in circumstances that would have crippled a lesser player with nerves. He replaced the mercurial David Watkins in 1967, who went north to rugby league when still a student at Trinity College, Carmarthen. He formed a devastating combination in the Welsh team with the scrum-half Gareth Edwards. Within a year a combination of John's cocksure confidence and ability to destroy defences saw Barry become a Lion in South Africa. Rugby league is a team sport, played by two teams of 13 players. ... Trinity College, Carmarthen Trinity College, Carmarthen is a higher education college in Carmarthen, West Wales. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. ... Gareth Edwards, born 12 July 1947 in Pontardawe, Wales, is a former Welsh rugby union footballer who plays scrum-half, considered by many to be the greatest player in the history of the game. ... The official 2005 Lions logo The British and Irish Lions (formerly British Isles and then the British Lions; commonly the Lions) is a Rugby Union side comprising a pick of the best players from the British Isles international teams - ( England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales). ...


In the first test he broke his collarbone and was forced to return home. He would more than make up for his disappointment four years later on the 1971 tour to New Zealand. The British Lions series victory over the All Blacks made them the first (and so far only) Lions to win a series in New Zealand and stemmed from Barry John's boots. In 1971 the British Lions toured New Zealand, also playing two matches in Australia. ... First International Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand (15 August 1903) Largest win New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan (4 June 1995) Worst defeat Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 5 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 The international rugby union team of New Zealand are...


In the First Test, under the orders of the Lions coach Carwyn James (also from Cefneithin), John terrorised New Zealand's fullback Fergie McCormick with ruthless tactical kicking. McCormick crumbled under the pressure and the Lions won the vital first test. McCormick never played for the All Blacks again. Despite losing the second test, the Lions won the third test and drew the fourth to win the series. John was given his regal nickname, scoring 30 of the Lions 48 points over the four matches and cementing his reputation as one of the game's greatest players. Carwyn James (1929–1983) won two Welsh international Rugby Union caps but is most famous for his coaching achievements for both Llanelli and the British and Irish Lions. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. ...


One year later, at the age of only 27, with only 25 Welsh caps, Barry John retired from the game. Such was the strength of Welsh rugby union in the '70s that John's premature departure could easily, but wrongly, be forgotten. The pressure of fame was cited as the reason for his decision to quit, somewhat surprisingly for a man of such swaggering confidence on the field.


How does he compare to modern greats such as Jonny Wilkinson? Such comparisons are always difficult. Jonny is perceived to be a much more successful kicker but it must be remembered that Barry John played with and kicked leather rugby balls, which are not as aerodynamically amenable to a kicker as today's rugby balls. Rodney Webb, the man who developed the modern rugby ball, also believes that John was the greatest kicker of all time. As he points out, these days the balls are coated in a laminate used on the hulls of giant oil tankers, have dimpled surfaces, unobtrusive lacing and multi panels. In the Seventies the balls soaked up water, swerved all over the place and were placed on muddy and sometimes uneven pitches (unlike many of today's professional rugby pitches) without the use of tees. Most people remember Barry John for his ghostly runs through the heart of the toughest defences. Aficionados also remember with relish his unmatched tactical two-footed kicking and his ability to launch his centres (Mike Gibson played the best Rugby of his career outside Barry). In Bill Samuel's book Body and Soul Barry John is mentioned, with reference to his considerable array of precise attacking kicks, chips, grubbers, etc. which created tries in many schoolboy matches for Gwendraeth Grammar. he has now played for falcons and they won 31-26 ...


Barry John was inducted into the International Rugby Hall of Fame in the first draft. (1997) // History The Rugby Union Hall of Fame was created in 1997. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Commodore John Barry (3381 words)
John Barry was born in Ireland in 1745, went to sea while still a young boy and in 1760 adopted Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as his permanent residence.
Barry was held in such high esteem that, after the Delaware crossing, and the subsequent victories at Trenton and Princeton, in which he served as an aide to Washington, Lord Howe made a flattering offer to Barry to desert the patriot cause.
Commodore John Barry had many firsts in his remarkable career, from being the first to fly the new American flag in battle to escorting America's famous ally, General Lafayette, back to France, but the first that he should always be remembered for is his position as Father of the American Navy.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: John Barry (1014 words)
Barry immediately volunteered his services, and he was assigned to the first vessel purchases, the "Lexington".
In this fight Barry was severely wounded in the shoulder by a grape shot.
Barry has often been referred to as "Commodore"; there was no such grade in the United States navy until 17 July 1862.
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