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Encyclopedia > Barry Goldwater
Barry Morris Goldwater
Barry Goldwater

In office
January 3, 1953January 3, 1965
January 3, 1969January 3, 1987
Preceded by Ernest McFarland
Carl T. Hayden
Succeeded by Paul Fannin
John McCain

Born January 1, 1909
Phoenix, Arizona Territory, USA
Died May 29, 1998 (aged 89)
Flag of Arizona Paradise Valley, Arizona, USA
Political party Republican
Spouse Margaret Johnson (1934–1985)
Susan Shaffer Wechsler (1992–1998)
Profession businessman, soldier
Religion Episcopalian

Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Party's nominee for president in the 1964 election. He is the American politician most often credited for sparking the resurgence of the American conservative political movement in the 1960s. http://bioguide. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Ernest William McFarland (1894 - 1984), an American politician and the Father of the G.I. Bill, is the only American to serve in the highest office in all three branches of government--two at the state level, one at the federal level. ... Carl Trumbull Hayden (October 2, 1877 – January 25, 1972) was the first United States Senator to serve seven terms. ... Paul Fannin Paul Jones Fannin (January 29, 1907–January 13, 2002) was Governor of the U.S. state of Arizona from 1959 to 1965 and subsequently a U.S. Senator from Arizona. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Arizona. ... Paradise Valley is a town in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. According to 2005 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 14,558. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... This article is about a military rank. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... The Republican Party of the United States was established in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military, opposition to internationalism,[4] and promotion of states rights. ...


Goldwater rejected the legacy of the New Deal and fought inside the Conservative coalition to defeat the New Deal coalition. Goldwater lost the 1964 presidential election in a landslide to incumbent Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson. The Johnson campaign and other critics painted him in 1964 as a reactionary, while supporters praised his crusades against the federal government, labor unions, and the welfare state. His defeat allowed American liberals to pass their Great Society programs. However, the defeat of so many older Republicans in 1964 also cleared the way for a younger generation of American conservatives to mobilize. Goldwater was much less active as a national leader of conservatives after 1964. His followers mostly rallied behind Ronald Reagan, who became Governor of California in 1966, and President of the United States in 1981. The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocks who supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, which made the Democratic Party the majority party during the Fifth Party System. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... “LBJ” redirects here. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969). ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military, opposition to internationalism,[4] and promotion of states rights. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ...


By the 1980s, the increasing influence of the Christian Right on the Republican Party so conflicted with Goldwater's libertarian views that he became a vocal opponent of the religious right on issues such as abortion and gay rights. Goldwater concentrated on his Senate duties, especially passage of the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. The term Christian Right is used by scholars and journalists, to refer to a spectrum of right-wing Christian political and social movements and organizations characterized by their strong support of conservative social and political values. ... This article or section relies largely or entirely upon a single source. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ...

Contents

Personal life

Goldwater was born Barry Morris Goldwater in Phoenix in 1909 in what was then the Arizona Territory. His grandfather, Michel Goldwasser, was a Jewish immigrant from Konin, Poland who founded a department store in Phoenix, Goldwater's Department Store. His paternal grandmother, Sarah Nathan, was from London, England and married Goldwasser in the Great Synagogue of London.[1] Goldwater's father, Baron Goldwater, converted to the Episcopal Church from Judaism when he married his fiancée, Hattie Josephine Williams, in Phoenix, Arizona. The family name had been changed from Goldwasser to Goldwater at least as early as the 1860 census in Los Angeles, California. These details led the Jewish essayist Harry Golden to famously remark of Goldwater, "I have always thought that if a Jew ever became President, he would turn out to be an Episcopalian."[2] Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... St Andrews Church in Konin Konin is a town on the Warta river in central Poland with 82,700 inhabitants (1995). ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Goldwaters Department Store was a department store chain based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... The Great Synagogue of London was, for centuries, the centre of synagogue and Jewish life in London. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State California County Los Angeles County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Only in America (1958) paperback Harry Lewis Golden (né Harry Goldhirsch) (May 6, 1902–October 2, 1981) was born in the Jewish ghetto in what is now Mikulintsy, Ukraine, then part of Austria-Hungary. ...


The family department store made the Goldwaters comfortably wealthy. Goldwater graduated from Staunton Military Academy and attended the University of Arizona for one year, where he joined the Sigma Chi fraternity. Staunton Military Academy The History of Staunton Military Academy[1] September 1860 - June 1976 Staunton Military Academy was founded in September 1860, by William Hartman Kable (1837-1912) at Charles Town, Virginia, in Jefferson County (now West Virginia). ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ...


Goldwater took over the family business after his father's death in 1930. In this capacity he was both a supporter of "progressive" business practices and anti-union. The strain of running the family business led to nervous breakdowns in 1937 and 1939. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


With the onset of World War II, Goldwater received a reserve commission in the United States Army Air Forces. He became a pilot assigned to the Ferry Command, a newly formed unit that delivered aircraft and supplies to war zones worldwide; he spent most of the war flying between the USA and India, via the Azores and North Africa or South America, Nigeria, and Central Africa. He also flew "the hump" over the Himalayas to deliver supplies to the Republic of China. Remaining in the reserves after the war, he retired with a rank of Major General. By that time, he had flown 165 different types of aircraft. Following World War II, Goldwater was a major proponent of building the United States Air Force Academy, and later served on the Academy's Board of Visitors. The Visitor Center at the Academy is named in his honor. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was a part of the U.S. Army during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... Himalaya, see Himalaya (film). ... Motto none Anthem National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital Taipei (formerly and de jure Nanking) Largest city Taipei Official languages Standard Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Government Semi-presidential system  -  President Chen Shui-bian  -  Vice President Annette Lu  -  Premier Chang Chun-hsiung Establishment Xinhai Revolution   -  Independence declared October 10, 1911... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, (), is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ...


Goldwater was married to his first wife, Margaret "Peggy" Johnson, from September 22, 1934 until her death on December 11, 1985. The couple had four children: Joanne (born January 1, 1936), Barry (born July 15, 1938), Michael (born March 15, 1940), and Peggy (born July 27, 1944). On February 9, 1992, at age 83, Goldwater married nurse Susan Shaffer Wechsler, 32 years his junior; they were married until his death. September 22 is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Barry Morris Goldwater, Jr. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


One of his favorite hobbies was amateur radio and he held the call K7UGA. From his home station in Arizona he handled many "phone patches" that permitted U.S. Service personnel to be able to talk to their families back home from Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) stations located in Viet Nam.


Goldwater's son, Barry Goldwater, Jr., served as a United States House of Representatives member from California from 1969 to 1983. Barry Morris Goldwater, Jr. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Political career

Goldwater entered Phoenix politics in 1949 when he was elected as a city councilman. He first won a US Senate seat in 1952, when he upset veteran Democrat and Senate majority leader Ernest McFarland. He defeated McFarland again in 1958, but would step down from the Senate in 1964 for his presidential campaign. Goldwater had a strong showing in his first reelection in 1958, a year in which the Democrats picked up thirteen seats in the Senate. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1952 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower to the presidency by a large margin. ... Ernest William McFarland (1894 - 1984), an American politician and the Father of the G.I. Bill, is the only American to serve in the highest office in all three branches of government--two at the state level, one at the federal level. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1958 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of President Dwight D. Eisenhowers second term. ...


Goldwater soon became most associated with labor-union reform and anti-Communism; he was an active supporter of the Conservative coalition in Congress. However, he rejected the wilder fringes of the anti-communist movement; in 1956 he sponsored the passage through the Senate of the final version of the Alaska Mental Health Enabling Act, despite vociferous opposition from opponents who claimed that the Act was a communist plot to establish concentration camps in Alaska. His work on labor issues led to Congress passing major anti-corruption reforms in 1957, and an all-out campaign by the AFL-CIO to defeat his 1958 reelection bid. He voted against the censure of Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1954, but himself was much more prudent than McCarthy and never actually charged any individual with being a Communist/Soviet agent. Goldwater emphasized his strong opposition to the worldwide spread of Communism in his 1960 book The Conscience of a Conservative. The book became an important reference text in conservative political circles. The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Alaska Mental Health Enabling Act of 1956 (Public Law 84-830) was an Act of Congress passed to improve mental health care in Alaska. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... The Conscience of a Conservative was a book written by L. Brent Bozell in 1960, but attributed solely to Barry Goldwater Categories: United States politics stubs | Controversial books | Political books ...


Goldwater supported the Arizona NAACP and was involved in desegregating the Arizona National Guard. Nationally, he supported the Civil Rights Acts of 1957 and 1960 and the constitutional amendment banning the poll tax. However, he opposed the much more comprehensive Civil Rights Act of 1964; he argued that, among other things, it unconstitutionally extended the federal government's commerce power to private citizens in its drive to "legislate morality" and restrict the rights of employers. Since conservative Southern Democrats were the main opponents to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and previous civil rights legislation, Goldwater's opposition to the 1964 Act, in which he was joined by only four other non-Southern Republican senators, strongly boosted Goldwater's standing among white Southerners who opposed such federal legislation. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... Several United States laws have been called the Civil Rights Act: Civil Rights Act of 1866[1] aimed to buttress Civil Rights Laws to protect freedmen and to grant full citizenship to those born on U.S. soil except Indians. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ...


In 1964, he fought and won a bitterly contested, multi-candidate race for the Republican Party's presidential nomination. His main challenger was New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, whom he defeated in the California primary. His nomination was challenged by liberal Republicans who thought Goldwater's hardline foreign policy stances would bring about a deadly confrontation with the Soviet Union. He would eventually lose to President Lyndon Johnson by one of the largest margins in the history of U.S. Presidential elections. Consequently, the Republican Party suffered a significant setback nationally, losing many seats in both houses of Congress. Goldwater carried only his home state and five (formerly Democratic) Southern states. Many Republicans at the time angrily turned against Goldwater, claiming that his defeat had significantly set back the party's chances of future national success. (There was a minor controversy over Goldwater's having been born in Arizona when it was not yet a state.) The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 - January 26, 1979) was a Governor of New York and the 41st Vice President of the United States of America from December 19, 1974 to January 20, 1977. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


He remained popular in Arizona, though, and in the 1968 Senate election he was elected again (this time to the seat of Carl Hayden, who was retiring). He was subsequently reelected in 1974 and 1980. The 1974 election saw Goldwater easily reelected. This occurred in a year in which Republicans lost three Senate seats because of the party's unpopularity over the Watergate scandal. Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1968 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the 1968 presidential election. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1974 was an election for the United States Senate held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixons resignation from the presidency, and Gerald Fords subsequent pardon of Nixon. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ...


Goldwater seriously considered retirement in 1980 before deciding to run for reelection. Peggy Goldwater had hoped that her husband's Senate term that was due to end in January 1981 would be his last, as she was looking forward to spending more time with her husband in retirement. However, Goldwater decided to run, planning on making the term his last in the Senate. Goldwater faced a suprisingly tough battle for reelection. First, he was viewed as out of touch for several reasons. One was the fact that because he had planned to retire in 1981, Goldwater had not visited many areas of Arizona outside of Phoenix and Tucson. Second, he was challenged by a particularly tough opponent. Bill Schulz was a former Republican turned Democrat who was a wealthy real estate developer. Schulz was able to infuse massive amounts of money into the campaign from his own fortune. And finally, Arizona's changing population hurt Goldwater. The state's population had exploded, with a huge portion of the electorate having not lived in the state when Goldwater was last elected in 1974, and were not familiar with the Senator. Goldwater was on the defensive for much of the campaign. Early returns on election night seemed to indicate that Schulz would win. The counting of votes continued through the night and into the next morning. Around daybreak Goldwater learned that he had been reelected. Goldwater's margin could be traced to his winning a high percentage of absentee votes, which were among the last to be counted.[3] Goldwater's surprisingly close victory in 1980 is interesting given that Ronald Reagan won the Presidency in a large victory over Jimmy Carter, and that the Republicans regained control of the Senate, electing twelve new Senators who rode Reagan's coattails. Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1980 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald W. Reagans election to the presidency. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Absentee may refer to one of the following: Absentee (band) is a band in the UK The Absentee is a novel by Maria Edgeworth, published in 1812 in Tales of Fashionable Life. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States in the 1980 election, his victory was accompanied by the change of 12 seats in the U.S. Senate from Democratic to Republican hands. ...


Goldwater retired in 1987, serving as chair of the Senate Intelligence and Armed Services Committees in his final term. Despite his reputation as a firebrand in the 1960s, by the end of his career he was considered a stabilizing influence in the Senate, one of the most respected members of either major party. Yet Goldwater remained staunchly anti-Communist and "hawkish" on military issues. He led the unsuccessful fight against ratification of the Panama Canal Treaty in the 1970s, which ceded U.S. control of the canal to the government of Panama. His most important legislative achievement may have been the Goldwater-Nichols Act, which reorganized the U.S. military's senior-command structure. Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Torrijos-Carter Treaties (sometimes referred to in the singular as the Torrijos-Carter Treaty), are a pair of treaties signed by the United States and Panama in Washington, D. C. on September 7, 1977, abrogating the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty signed in 1903. ... The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ...


Goldwater was an unwavering supporter of Wisconsin's Republican Senator Joseph McCarthy to the end (one of only 22 Senators who voted against McCarthy's censure). He was also friends with Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts; in fact, Goldwater anticipated that a contest for the presidency between John F. Kennedy and Goldwater himself would have been an enjoyable experience, with lively debates between them, one of which was to be held on board a plane in flight. Goldwater was grief-stricken by the assassination of Kennedy and was greatly disappointed that his opponent in the race would be Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas. Goldwater disliked Johnson (who he said "used every dirty trick in the bag"), and Richard M. Nixon of California, whom he later called "the most dishonest individual I have ever met in my life." It is believed Goldwater, then a Senator, forced Nixon to resign at the height of Watergate by threatening to vote in favor of removing him from office if he did not. The term "Goldwater moment" has been used to describe a moment when members of Congress from the President's party disagree and go against the wishes of the President. Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the 35th President of the United States. ... President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas Governor John Connally in the presidential limousine just moments before his assassination The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, USA at 12:30 p. ... “LBJ” redirects here. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


His 1984 Cable Franchise Policy and Communications Act allowed local governments to require the transmission of public access television, also called PEG (Public, Education, and Government) access channels, barred cable operators from exercising editorial control over content of programs carried on PEG channels, and absolved them from liability for their content. A piece of legislation sponsored by Senator Barry Goldwater passed into law that allowed a monopolies on Cable Television in each community in exchange for 3% of all revenues to be granted to the communities themselves. ... Look up public access television in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 2006, his political ideals were revived in the "Jackson Stephens Campaign" in which Republican groups in law schools (namely, the University of Florida) sought to republish widely Goldwater's basic conservative political tenets in graduate school environments.


U.S. presidential election, 1964

Time Magazine cover featuring Goldwater accepting 1964 nomination

At the time of Goldwater's presidential candidacy, the Republican Party was split between its conservatives (with their base in the West and Midwest) and liberals (strongest in the Northeast). He alarmed even some of his fellow partisans with his brand of staunch fiscal conservatism and militant anti-Communism. He was viewed by many traditional Republicans as being too far on the right wing of the Republican spectrum to appeal to the mainstream majority necessary to win a national election. As a result, more liberal Republicans recruited a series of opponents, including New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton, to challenge Goldwater. Goldwater would defeat Rockefeller in the winner-take-all California primary and secure the nomination. Goldwater boldly (and famously) declared in his acceptance speech at the 1964 Republican Convention: "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue." This paraphrase of Cicero was included at the suggestion of Harry V. Jaffa, though the speech was primarily written by Karl Hess. Due to President Johnson's popularity, however, Goldwater held back from attacking the president directly; he did not even mention Johnson by name in his convention speech. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962 William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. ... Cicero at about age 60, from an ancient marble bust Marcus Tullius Cicero (IPA:Classical Latin pronunciation: , usually pronounced in American English or in British English; January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, lawyer, political theorist, philosopher, widely considered one of Romes greatest orators... Harry V. Jaffa is an author, and director of the Claremont Institute, a California-based Conservative think tank. ... Karl Hess Karl Hess (May 25, 1923–April 22, 1994), was a speechwriter, editor, political philosopher, hippie, welder, motorcycle racer, tax resister and libertarian. ...


Past comments came back to haunt Goldwater throughout his campaign. Once he called the Eisenhower administration "a dime-store New Deal," and the former president never fully forgave him. Eisenhower did, however, film a TV commercial with Goldwater.[4] Eisenhower qualified his voting for Goldwater in November by remarking that he had voted not specifically for Goldwater, but for the Republican Party. In December 1961, Goldwater told a news conference that "sometimes I think this country would be better off if we could just saw off the Eastern Seaboard and let it float out to sea." That comment boomeranged on him during the campaign in the form of a Johnson television commercial, as did remarks about making Social Security voluntary, and statements in Tennessee about selling the Tennessee Valley Authority (a large local New Deal employer.) Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Goldwater campaign spotlighted Ronald Reagan, who gave a stirring, nationally televised speech, "A Time for Choosing," in support of Goldwater.[5] The speech prompted Reagan to seek the California Governorship in 1966 and jump-started his political career. Conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, later well-known for her fight against the Equal Rights Amendment, first became known for writing a pro-Goldwater book, A Choice, Not an Echo, attacking the liberal Republican establishment. Senator Prescott S. Bush (1895–1972), a liberal Republican from Connecticut, was a friend of Goldwater's and supported him in the general election campaign. Bush's son, George H.W. Bush (then running for the Senate from Texas against Democrat Ralph Yarborough), was also a strong Goldwater supporter in both the nomination and general election campaigns. Goldwater was painted as a dangerous figure by the Johnson campaign, which countered Goldwater's slogan "In your heart, you know he's right" with the lines "In your guts, you know he's nuts," and "In your heart, you know he might" (that is, might actually use nuclear weapons, as opposed to merely subscribing to deterrence). Johnson himself did not mention Goldwater in his own acceptance speech at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... A Time for Choosing, also known as The Speech, was presented on a number of speaking occasions during the 1964 U.S. presidential election campaign by (later President) Ronald Reagan on behalf of Republican candidate Barry Goldwater. ... Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority... Phyllis Schlafly (born on August 15, 1924, in St. ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that was intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of sex. ... Prescott Sheldon Bush (May 15, 1895, Columbus, Ohio - October 8, 1972, New York City) was a U.S. Senator from Connecticut and a Wall Street executive banker with Brown Brothers Harriman. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Texas politician Ralph Yarborough Ralph Webster Yarborough (June 8, 1903 – January 27, 1996) was a Texas Democratic politician who served in the United States Senate (1957 until 1971) and was a leader of the progressive or liberal wing of the Democratic Party in Texas in his many races for statewide... Deterrence theory is a defensive strategy developed after World War II and used throughout the Cold War. ... The 1964 Democratic National Convention took place at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 24 - 27, 1964. ...


Goldwater's provocative advocacy of aggressive tactics to prevent the spread of Communism in Asia led to effective counterattacks from Lyndon Johnson and his supporters, who feared that Goldwater's militancy would have dire consequences, possibly even nuclear war. Regarding Vietnam, Goldwater charged that Johnson's policy was devoid of "goal, course, or purpose," leaving "only sudden death in the jungles and the slow strangulation of freedom."[6] Goldwater's own rhetoric on nuclear war was viewed by many as quite uncompromising, a view buttressed by off-hand comments such as, "Let's lob one into the men's room at the Kremlin."[7] Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Московский Кремль) is a historic fortified complex at the very heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moskva River (to the south), Saint Basils Cathedral (often mistaken by westerners as the Kremlin) and Red Square (to the east) and the Alexander Garden (to the west). ...


Goldwater did his best to counter the Johnson attacks, criticizing the Johnson administration for its perceived ethical lapses, and stating in a commercial that "…we, as a nation, are not far from the kind of moral decay that has brought on the fall of other nations and people…I say it is time to put conscience back in government. And by good example, put it back in all walks of American life." Goldwater campaign commercials included statements of support by actor Raymond Massey and moderate Republican senator Margaret Chase Smith. Raymond Massey photographed by Carl Van Vechten Raymond Hart Massey (August 30, 1896 – July 29, 1983) was a Canadian actor. ... Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ...


Before the 1964 election, the muckraking magazine Fact, published by Ralph Ginzburg, ran a special issue entitled ‘The Unconscious of a Conservative: A Special Issue on the Mind of Barry Goldwater.’ The two main articles contended that Goldwater was mentally unfit to be president. The magazine attempted to support this claim with the results of an unscientific poll of psychiatrists it had conducted. Fact had mailed questionnaires to 12,356 psychiatrists, and published a ‘sampling’ of the comments made by the 2,417 psychiatrists who responded, of which 1,189 said Goldwater was unfit to be president.[8] After the election, Goldwater sued the publisher, the editor and the magazine for libel. "Although the jury awarded Goldwater only $1.00 in compensatory damages against all three defendants, it went on to [396 U.S. 1049, 1050] award him punitive damages of $25,000 against Ginzburg and $50,000 against Fact magazine, Inc."[9] According to Warren Boroson, then-managing editor of Fact and now a financial columnist, the main biography of Goldwater in the magazine was written by David Bar-Illan, the Israeli pianist. He went on to say "Goldwater sued me for $2 million. (He collected 33 cents.)"[10] Ralph Ginzburg is a Jewish-American author, editor, publisher and photo-journalist. ... David Bar-Illan (7 February 1930—5 November 2003) was a professional pianist and later executive editor of the Jerusalem Post before becoming the Israeli government spokesman under Benjamin Netanyahu. ...


Influence of television

  • The Republican National Convention had a vibrant mix of candidates, reporters, delegates, relatives, and others, crowding together in a somewhat aggressive atmosphere.
  • A campaign advertisement known as Daisy showed a young girl counting daisy petals, from one to ten. Immediately following this scene, a voiceover counted down: ten, nine, eight,…three, two, one. The child's face was shown as a still photograph followed by images of nuclear explosions and mushroom clouds. The campaign advertisement ended with a plea to vote for Johnson, implying that Goldwater would provoke a nuclear war if elected. The advertisement, which featured only a few spoken words of narrative and relied on imagery for its emotional impact, was one of the most provocative moments in American political campaign history, and many analysts credit it as being the birth of the modern style of "negative political ads" on television. The ad only aired once, and was immediately pulled, but then was shown numerous times by television stations.[citation needed]

Daisy, sometimes known as Daisy Girl, or Peace Little Girl is perhaps the most famous campaign commercial of all time. ...

Results

In the end, Goldwater received 38.4% of the popular vote, and carried six states: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and his home state of Arizona, which itself gave Goldwater 242,536 votes (50.4%) to Johnson's 237,765 (49.5%). In all, Johnson won an overwhelming 486 electoral votes, to Goldwater's 52. Goldwater, with his customary bluntness, remarked: "We would have lost even if Abraham Lincoln had come back and campaigned with us." Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


Goldwater's poor showing, plus the tendency at the time for most people to vote a "straight ticket" (that is, loyally voting for every candidate from the same party as their Presidential choice), was associated with the defeat of many other long-time Republican officeholders from Congress through local races.


Goldwater maintained later in life that he would have won the election if the country had not been in a state of extended grief (referring to the assassination of John F. Kennedy), and that it was simply not ready for a third President in just fourteen months. It has frequently been argued that Goldwater's strong performance in Southern states previously regarded as Democratic strongholds foreshadowed a larger shift in electoral trends in the coming decades that would make the South a Republican bastion (an end to the "Solid South") — first in presidential politics and eventually at the congressional and state levels, as well.[citation needed] John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...


Goldwater and the revival of American conservatism

Although Goldwater was not as important in the American conservative movement as Ronald Reagan after 1965, from the late 1950s to 1964 he redefined and shaped the movement. Arizona Senator John McCain summed up Goldwater's legacy thus: he transformed the Republican Party from an Eastern elitist organization to the breeding ground for the election of Ronald Reagan.” The columnist George Will remarked after the 1980 Presidential election that “it took 16 years to count the votes [of the 1964 election], and Goldwater won.” The American Conservative magazine. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...

Think of a senator winning the Democratic nomination in the year 2000 whose positions included halving the military budget, socializing the medical system, reregulating the communications and electrical industries, establishing a guaranteed minimum income for all Americans, and equalizing funding for all schools regardless of property valuations — and who promised to fire Alan Greenspan, counseled withdrawal from the World Trade Organization, and, for good measure, spoke warmly of adolescent sexual experimentation. He would lose in a landslide. He would be relegated to the ash heap of history. But if the precedent of 1964 were repeated, two years later the country would begin electing dozens of men and women just like him. And not many decades later, Republicans would have to proclaim softer versions of those positions to get taken seriously for their party's nomination.

—Historian Rick Perlstein in his book Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus[11] Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Alan Greenspan (born March 6, 1926) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The expression ash heap of history was coined by Leon Trotsky. ... Rick Perlstein is a political commentator for the Village Voice and popular historian. ...

The Republican Party recovered from the 1964 election debacle, picking up 47 seats in the House of Representatives in the mid-term election of 1966. Further Republican successes ensued, including Goldwater's return to the Senate in 1968. Throughout the 1970s, as the conservative wing under Reagan gained control of the party, Goldwater concentrated on his Senate duties, especially in military affairs. He played little part in the election or administration of Richard Nixon, but he helped force Nixon's resignation in 1974.[12] In 1976 he helped block Rockefeller's renomination as Vice President. When Reagan challenged Ford for the presidential nomination in 1976, Goldwater endorsed Ford, looking for consensus rather than conservative idealism. As one historian notes, "The Arizonan had lost much of his zest for battle."[13] The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The U.S. House election, 1966 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966 which occurred in the middle of President Lyndon Johnsons second term. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


In 1979, When President Jimmy Carter normalized relations with Communist China, Goldwater and some other senators sued him in the Supreme Court, arguing the president cannot break its relation with Taiwan without the approval of Congress. The case was known as Goldwater v. Carter, which was dismissed by the court, as the court asserted it was a political question. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is a communist state, comprising most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as China. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... Congress in Joint Session. ... Holding The issue at hand, whether President Carter could unilaterally break a defense treaty with the Republic of China without Senate approval, was essentially a political question and could not be reviewed by the court, as Congress had not issued a formal opposition. ... In United States law, a ruling that a matter in controversy is a political question is a statement by a federal court, declining to rule in a case because: 1) the U.S. Constitution has committed decision-making on this subject to another branch of the federal government; 2) there...


Centrist and libertarian views

By the 1980s, with Ronald Reagan as president and the growing involvement of the religious right in conservative politics, Goldwater's libertarian views on personal issues were revealed, which he believed were an integral part of true conservativism. Goldwater viewed abortion as a matter of personal choice, not intended for government intervention. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ...


As a passionate defender of personal liberty, he saw the religious right's views as an encroachment on personal privacy and individual liberties. In his 1980 Senate reelection campaign, Goldwater won support from religious conservatives but in his final term voted consistently to uphold legalized abortion and, in 1981, gave a speech on how he was angry about the bullying of American politicians by religious organizations, and would "fight them every step of the way".[14] Goldwater also disagreed with the Reagan administration on certain aspects of foreign policy (e.g. he opposed the decision to mine Nicaraguan harbors). Notwithstanding his prior differences with Dwight Eisenhower, Goldwater in a 1986 interview rated him the best of the seven Presidents with whom he had served. Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


After his retirement in 1987, Goldwater described the conservative Arizona Governor Evan Mecham as “hardheaded” and called on him to resign, and two years later stated that the Republican Party had been taken over by a “bunch of kooks.” In a 1994 interview with the Washington Post the retired senator said, Evan Mecham Evan Mecham (pronounced []) (born May 12, 1924) is a former American politician and the 19th governor of Arizona. ... ...

When you say “radical right” today, I think of these moneymaking ventures by fellows like Pat Robertson and others who are trying to take the Republican Party and make a religious organization out of it. If that ever happens, kiss politics goodbye.

In response to Moral Majority founder Jerry Falwell's opposition to the nomination of Sandra Day O'Connor to the Supreme Court, of which Falwell had said, “Every good Christian should be concerned,” Goldwater retorted: “I think every good Christian ought to kick Falwell right in the ass.”[15] Goldwater also had harsh words for his onetime political protege, President Reagan, particularly after the Iran-Contra Affair became public in 1986. Journalist Robert MacNeil, a friend of Goldwater's from the 1964 Presidential campaign, recalled interviewing him in his office shortly afterward. "He was sitting in his office with his hands on his cane...and he said to me, 'Well, aren't you going to ask me about the Iran arms sales?' It had just been announced that the Reagan administration had sold arms to Iran. And I said, 'Well, if I asked you, what would you say?' He said, 'I'd say it's the goddamn stupidest foreign policy blunder this country's ever made!'"[16] Also, in 1988 during that year's presidential campaign, he pointedly told vice-presidential nominee Dan Quayle at a campaign event in Arizona "I want you to go back and tell George Bush to start talking about the issues." [4] Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jerry Lamon Falwell, Sr. ... Italic textInsert non-formatted text here Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was a political scandal in the United States during the 1980s. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Robert Breckenridge Ware MacNeil, sometimes called by his nickname Robin, (born January 19, 1931) is a television news anchor and journalist who paired with Jim Lehrer to create The MacNeil/Lehrer Report in 1975. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ... George H. W. Bush - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Some of Goldwater's statements in the 1990s aggravated many social conservatives. He endorsed Democrat Karan English in an Arizona congressional race, urged Republicans to lay off Clinton over the Whitewater scandal, and criticized the military's ban on homosexuals: “Everyone knows that gays have served honorably in the military since at least the time of Julius Caesar.”[17] He also said, “You don't have to be straight to be in the military; you just have to be able to shoot straight.” A few years before his death he went so far as to address the right wing, "Do not associate my name with anything you do. You are extremists, and you've hurt the Republican Party much more than the Democrats have."[18] For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article needs to be wikified. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men of World history. ...


In 1996 he told Bob Dole, whose own presidential campaign received lukewarm support from conservative Republicans: “We're the new liberals of the Republican Party. Can you imagine that?” In that same year, with Senator Dennis DeConcini, Goldwater endorsed an Arizona initiative to legalize medical marijuana against the will of social conservatives.[19] § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Dennis DeConcini Credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Dennis Webster DeConcini (born May 8, 1937, in Tucson) is a former Democratic U.S. Senator from Arizona. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Cannabis sativa extract. ...


Hobbies and interests

Photography

Goldwater was an accomplished amateur photographer and in his estate left some 15,000 of his images to three Arizona institutions. He was very keen on candid photography. He got started in photography after receiving a camera as a gift from his wife on their first Christmas together. He was known to use a 4x5 Graflex, Rolleiflex camera, and Nikon 35 mm. This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... Candid photography is snapshot photography that focuses on spontaneity rather than technique, on perfecting the immersion of a camera within events rather than focusing on setting up a staged situation, focusing on lengthy camera setup, or focusing on particularly strong lenses. ... Large format describes photographic films, view cameras (including pinhole cameras) and processes that use a film or digital sensor the size of 4 x 5 inches or larger. ... Graflex was a manufacturer, a brand name and several models of cameras. ... Rolleiflex 2. ... Nikon Corporation )   (TYO: 7731 ), also known as Nikon or Nikon Corp. ... 135 Film Size, Kodak Tri-X 400 speed 135 (ISO 1007) is a film format for still photography. ...


For decades, he contributed photographs of his home state to Arizona Highways and was best known for his Western landscapes and pictures of native Americans in the United States. Three books with his photographs are People and Places, from 1967; Barry Goldwater and the Southwest, from 1976; and Delightful Journey, first published in 1940 and reprinted in 1970. Ansel Adams wrote a foreword to the 1976 book.[20] Cover of Arizona Highways, September, 1955. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... The Tetons - Snake River (1942) by Ansel Adams Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer, best known for his black and white photographs of Californias Yosemite Valley. ...


Son Michael Prescott Goldwater formed the Goldwater Family Foundation with the goal of making his father's photography available via the internet. (Barry Goldwater Photographs) was launched in September 2006 to coincide with the HBO documentary "Mr. Conservative", produced by granddaughter CC Goldwater.


Amateur radio

Goldwater was an avid amateur radio operator, with the call signs K3UIG and K7UGA.[21] The latter is now used by an Arizona club honoring him as a commemorative call. During the Vietnam War, he spent many hours giving servicemen overseas the ability to talk to their families at home over the Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS). Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD display and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called Ham radio, is a hobby enjoyed by about six million people[1] throughout the world. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) Logo The Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) is a United States Department of Defense sponsored program, established as a separately managed and operated program by the Army, Navy, and Air Force. ...


Barry Goldwater was also a prominent spokesman for amateur radio and its enthusiasts. Beginning in 1969 up to his death he appeared in numerous educational and promotional films (and later videos) about the hobby that were produced for the American Radio Relay League (the United States national society representing the interests of radio amateurs) by such producers as Dave Bell (W6AQ), ARRL Southwest Director John R. Griggs (W6KW), Alan Kaul (W6RCL), Forrest Oden (N6ENV), Bill Pasternak (WA6ITF) and the late Roy Neal (K6DUE). His first appearance was in Dave Bell's "The World of Amateur Radio" where Goldwater discussed the history of the hobby and demonstrated a live contact with Antarctica. His last on-screen appearance dealing with "ham radio" was in 1994, explaining a then-upcoming, Earth-orbiting ham radio relay satellite. The ARRL Logo. ...


Interest in UFOs

Goldwater was one of the more prominent American politicians to openly show an interest in UFOs. UFO can mean: Unidentified flying object United Future Organization, a Japanese-Brazilian electronic jazz band UFO, the rock band that previously featured Michael Schenker UFO, the Gerry Anderson TV series United Farmers of Ontario, a political party that formed the government in Ontario from 1919 to 1923 U.F.O...


On March 28, 1975, Goldwater wrote to Shlomo Arnon: "The subject of UFOs has interested me for some long time. About ten or twelve years ago I made an effort to find out what was in the building at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base where the information has been stored that has been collected by the Air Force, and I was understandably denied this request. It is still classified above Top Secret." Goldwater further wrote that there were rumors the evidence would be released, and that he was "just as anxious to see this material as you are, and I hope we will not have to wait much longer."[22](Also Good, 405) March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force base in Greene and Montgomery counties, adjacent to Riverside, Fairborn, Beavercreek, and Dayton, Ohio. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The April 25, 1988 issue of The New Yorker carried an interview where Goldwater said he repeatedly asked his friend, Gen. Curtis LeMay, if there was any truth to the rumors that UFO evidence was stored in a secret room at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, and if he (Goldwater) might have access to the room. According to Goldwater, an angry LeMay gave him "holy hell" and said, "Not only can't you get into it but don't you ever mention it to me again." April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906 – October 1, 1990) was a General in the United States Air Force and the vice presidential running mate of independent candidate George C. Wallace in 1968. ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force base in Greene and Montgomery counties, adjacent to Riverside, Fairborn, Beavercreek, and Dayton, Ohio. ...


In a 1988 interview on Larry King's radio show, Goldwater was asked if he thought the U.S. Government was withholding UFO evidence; he replied "Yes, I do." He added: Larry King (born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger on November 19, 1933) is an award-winning American writer, journalist and broadcaster. ...

I certainly believe in aliens in space. They may not look like us, but I have very strong feelings that they have advanced beyond our mental capabilities....I think some highly secret government UFO investigations are going on that we don't know about — and probably never will unless the Air Force discloses them."[23]

Death

Goldwater's public appearances stopped in late 1996 after he suffered a stroke; family members then disclosed he was in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. He died on May 29, 1998, at the age of 89 in Paradise Valley, Arizona, of complications from the stroke.[24] May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Paradise Valley is a town in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. According to 2005 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 14,558. ...


Goldwater Scholarship

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was established by Congress in 1986. Its goal is to provide a continuing source of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians, and engineers by awarding scholarships to college students who intend to pursue careers in these fields. The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was established by Congress in 1986. ...


The Scholarship is widely considered the most prestigious award in the U.S. conferred upon undergraduates studying the sciences and is awarded to about 300 students (college sophomores and juniors) nationwide in the amount of $7500 per academic year (for their senior year, or junior and senior years).


Documentary

Goldwater's granddaughter, C.C. Goldwater, has co-produced with long time friend and indie-film producer, Tani L. Cohen, a documentary on Goldwater's life, "Mr. Conservative: Goldwater on Goldwater", first shown on HBO on September 18, 2006.[25] and rebroadcast various times as well as being available on demand. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Electoral history

1964 United States Presidential Election

Lyndon Johnson (D) (inc.) 61.1%
Barry Goldwater (R) 38.5%

1980 Arizona United States Senatorial Election Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ...

Barry Goldwater (R) (inc.) 49.5%
Bill Schulz (D) 48.4%
Fred R. Easer (Libertarian) 1.4%

1974 Arizona United States Senatorial Election

Barry Goldwater (R) (inc.) 58.3%
Johnathan Marshall (D) 41.7%

1968 Arizona United States Senatorial Election

Barry Goldwater {R} 57.2%
Roy Elson (D) 42.8%

1958 Arizona United States Senatorial Election

Barry Goldwater (R) (inc.) 53.9%
Ernest McFarland (D) 46.1%

1952 Arizona United States Senatorial Election Ernest William McFarland (1894 - 1984), an American politician and the Father of the G.I. Bill, is the only American to serve in the highest office in all three branches of government--two at the state level, one at the federal level. ...

Barry Goldwater (R) 51.3%
Ernest McFarland (D) (inc.) 48.7%

Ernest William McFarland (1894 - 1984), an American politician and the Father of the G.I. Bill, is the only American to serve in the highest office in all three branches of government--two at the state level, one at the federal level. ...

Trivia

Goldwater once shaved his face with peanut butter on a camping trip.[26]


Notes

  1. ^ Roots Web, World Connect Project
  2. ^ "The Taboo." Time Magazine. 22 November 1963.
  3. ^ Robert Alan Goldberg, "Barry Goldwater." Yale University Press. 1995. chapter 12.
  4. ^ 1964 Campaign ads
  5. ^ Ronald Reagan, A Time for Choosing, Televised Address on Behalf of Barry Goldwater, Delivered October 27, 1964, Los Angeles, CA.
  6. ^ Matthews 2002
  7. ^ Harper's Magazine. Tentacles of Rage.
  8. ^ "Fact, Fiction, Doubt & Barry", Time. May 17, 1968. Online at [1]
  9. ^ Ginzburg v. Goldwater, 396 U.S. 1049 (1970)
  10. ^ Daily Record. Wikipedia site filled with major mistakes (April 11, 2006).
  11. ^ Rick Perlstein. Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus. New York: Hill & Wang. ISBN 0-8090-2858-1. 
  12. ^ "The Unmaking of the President, Time Aug. 19, 1974 online at [2]
  13. ^ Jonathan Martin Kolkey, The New Right, 1960–1968: With Epilogue, 1969–1980. University Press of America. 1983. quote p. 254; Mary C. Brennan, Turning Right in the Sixties: The Conservative Capture of the GOP. U. of North Carolina Press. 1995. ch. 6; 1976 details in David W. Reinhard, The Republican Right since 1945. U. Press of Kentucky. 1983, p. 230.
  14. ^ Goldwater on personal religious views He is also quoted on p. 39 of The God Delusion
  15. ^ Ed Magnuson, Time Magazine, The Brethren's First Sister, July 20, 1981. Retrieved 1/1/07.
  16. ^ "Archive of American Television Interview with Robert MacNeil Part 5 of 14" (video),
  17. ^ "Ban On Gays Is Senseless Attempt To Stall The Inevitable", Los Angeles Times, Washington Post. Online at [3]
  18. ^ The Betrayal of America by Vincent Bugliosi, 2001
  19. ^ Prescription: Drugs Reason Magazine
  20. ^ Arizona Republic, May 31, 1998
  21. ^ FCC K7UGA record
  22. ^ FOIA documents
  23. ^ UFO Quotations — The United States Congress
  24. ^ Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, GOLDWATER, Barry Morris, (1909–1998). Retrieved 1/1/07.
  25. ^ Deborah Solomon, New York Times, Goldwater Girl (interview with CC Goldwater), Published August 27, 2006. Retrieved January 1, 2007.
  26. ^ Green, Joey (1996). Polish Your Furniture With Panty Hose, and hundreds of offbeat uses for brand-name products.. Hyperion, p. 47. ISBN 0-7868-8108-9. 

The God Delusion is a book written by British ethologist Richard Dawkins, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Betrayal of America is a book by Vincent Bugliosi (Thunders Mouth Press, 2001, ISBN 156025355X), arguing that the U.S. Supreme Courts December 12, 2000 5‑4 decision in Bush v. ... Vincent Bugliosi (born August 18, 1934 in Hibbing, Minnesota) is an American attorney and author, best known for prosecuting Charles Manson and other defendants accused of the Tate-LaBianca murders. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Origin Hyperion is a Titan from Greek mythology. ...

Primary sources

  • Goldwater, Barry. The Conscience of a Conservative (1963) speeches. ISBN 0-89526-540-0
  • Goldwater, Barry. Why Not Victory? A fresh look at American policy (1963) OCLC 25326755
  • Conscience of a Majority (1971) ISBN 0-671-78096-4
  • Goldwater, Barry. Arizona (1977) ISBN 0-938379-04-6
  • Goldwater, Barry. With No Apologies: The Outspoken Political Memoirs of America's Conservative Conscience (1979) ISBN 0-425-04663-X
  • Goldwater, Barry. Goldwater (1988) ISBN 0-385-23947-5, autobiography
  • George H. Gallup, ed., The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion, 1935–1971, vol. 3. (1972)
  • Karl Hess, In A Cause That Will Triumph: The Goldwater Campaign and the Future of Conservatism (1967), memoir by BG's speechwriter

The Conscience of a Conservative was a book written by L. Brent Bozell in 1960, but attributed solely to Barry Goldwater Categories: United States politics stubs | Controversial books | Political books ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ...

Secondary sources

  • Mary C. Brennan, Turning Right in the Sixties: The Conservative Capture of the G.O.P. (University of North Carolina Press, 1995)
  • Edwards, Lee. Goldwater (1995). biography
  • Goldberg, Robert Alan. Barry Goldwater (1995), the standard scholarly biography
  • Godfrey Hodgson, The World Turned Right Side Up: A History of the Conservative Ascendancy in America (1996).
  • Jeffrey J. Matthews. "To Defeat a Maverick: The Goldwater Candidacy Revisited, 1963–1964." Presidential Studies Quarterly. 27#1 1997. pp 662+.
  • Perlstein, Rick. Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus (2001) New York: Hill and Wang. ISBN 0-8090-2859-X. On the 1964 campaign.
  • White, Theodore, The Making of the President: 1964 (1965)
  • The New Yorker, April 25, 1988, p 70

April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also

Holding The issue at hand, whether President Carter could unilaterally break a defense treaty with the Republic of China without Senate approval, was essentially a political question and could not be reviewed by the court, as Congress had not issued a formal opposition. ... Barry Morris Goldwater, Jr. ... Don Goldwater is a Republican Party activist, and the nephew of former U.S. presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. ... The Goldwater Institute is a Phoenix, Arizona-based public policy think-tank established in 1988. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
Ernest McFarland
United States Senator (Class 1) from Arizona
1953–1965
Served alongside: Carl T. Hayden
Succeeded by
Paul Fannin
Preceded by
Styles Bridges
New Hampshire
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1955–1957
Succeeded by
Everett Dirksen
Illinois
Preceded by
Andrew F. Schoeppel
Kansas
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1961–1963
Succeeded by
Thurston Morton
Kentucky
Preceded by
Richard Nixon
Republican Party Presidential candidate
1964 (lost)
Succeeded by
Richard Nixon
Preceded by
Carl T. Hayden
United States Senator (Class 3) from Arizona
1969–1987
Served alongside: Paul Jones Fannin, Dennis DeConcini
Succeeded by
John McCain
Preceded by
Birch Bayh
Indiana
Chairman of Senate Intelligence Commmittee
1981–1985
Succeeded by
David Durenberger
Minnesota
Preceded by
John Tower
Texas
Chairman of Senate Armed Services Commmittee
1985–1987
Succeeded by
Sam Nunn
Georgia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Barry Goldwater (0 words)
Goldwater also believed that Eisenhower was too soft on trade unions and complained that his failure to balance the budget.
Goldwater loyally defended Nixon during the Watergate Scandal and it was not until 5th August, 1974, that he joined the campaign to have him impeached.
Goldwater continued in the Senate where he opposed the policies of Jimmy Carter but was an enthusiastic supporter of Ronald Reagan.
Washingtonpost.com: Barry Goldwater Dead at 89 (3540 words)
Goldwater was an incurable gadgeteer who loved such devices as the electronically operated flagpole at his Arizona home that was rigged to raise the flag at the precise moment it was struck by the rays of the morning sun.
Goldwater observed that his run for the presidency in 1964 "was like trying to stand up in a hammock." He said he knew that his chances of winning were slim and contended that his fellow Republicans cost him any chance he might have had during the battle for the Republican nomination.
Goldwater was bitterly critical of what he considered to be a "no win" policy in Vietnam, and he was an early advocate of bombing Hanoi and laying mines in the harbor at Haiphong, positions that were called outrageous at the time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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