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Encyclopedia > Barque

A barc is a type of sailing vessel. Image File history File links Sail_plan_barque. ...

Contents


History of the term

The word barc appears to have come from Celtic languages so that the form adopted by English, perhaps from Irish, was bark while that adopted by French , perhaps from Gaulish, was barge and barque. Post Conquest French influence in England means that English now uses both words though their meanings are not now the same. Well before the 19th century a barge had become a small vessel of coastal or inland waters. Somewhat later, a bark became a sailing vessel of a distinctive rig as detailed below. In Britain, by the mid-nineteenth century, the spelling had taken on the French form of barque. Francis Bacon used this form of the word as early as 1605 though he will not have had the big late-nineteenth century barques in mind. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Gaulish is name given to the now-extinct Celtic language that was spoken in Gaul before the Romans, the Franks and the British Celts invaded. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ... // Events April 13 - Tsar Boris Godunow dies - Feodor II accedes to the throne May 16 - Paul V becomes Pope June 1 - Russian troops in Moscow imprison Feodor II and his mother. ...

Standing rigging of a 3-masted barque. Click image for more details.
Standing rigging of a 3-masted barque. Click image for more details.

In the 18th century, the British Royal Navy used the term Bark for a nondescript vessel which did not fit any of its usual categories. Thus, when on the advice of Captain James Cook, a collier was bought into the navy and converted for exploration she was called HM Bark Endeavour. She happened to be a ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1273x700, 108 KB)larger png File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1273x700, 108 KB)larger png File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. ... Collier may refer to: a bulk cargo ship that carried coal. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ...


By the end of the 18th century, however, the term barque (sometimes, particularly in the USA, spelled bark) came to refer to any vessel with a particular type of rig. This comprises three (or more) masts, fore-and-aft sails on the aftermost mast and square sails on all other masts. A well-preserved example of a commercial barque is Falls of Clyde; built in 1878, it is now preserved as a museum ship in Honolulu. Another well preserved barque is the Pommern that is the only windjammer in original condition. It's "home" is in Mariehamn outside the åland maritime museum. The United States Coast Guard still has an operational Barque, built in Germany in 1936 and captured as a war prize, the USCGC Eagle. The oldest active sailing vessel in the world, the Star of India, was built in 1863 as a fully square rigged ship then converted into a barque in 1901. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A sail-plan is a formal set of drawings, usually prepared by a marine architect. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) is the smaller of the two education labor unions in the United States, representing 1. ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... Falls of Clyde is the only surviving iron-hulled, four-masted full rigged ship, and the only surviving sail-driven oil tanker, in the world. ... Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai‘i. ... A prize is an award given to a person or a group of people to recognise and reward actions or achievements. ... The USCGC Eagle (WIX-327) (ex-Horst Wessel) is a 295 barque used as a training cutter for members of the US Coast Guard. ... The Euterpe in 1883, later renamed the Star of India. ...


Throughout the period of sail, the word was used also as a shortening of the barca-longa of the Mediterranean Sea. The barca longa was a two or three-masted lugger found on the coasts of Spain and Portugal as well as more widely in the Mediterranean Sea. ... Satellite image The Mediterranean Sea is a part of the Atlantic Ocean almost completely enclosed by land, on the north by Europe, on the south by Africa, and on the east by Asia. ...


Use

The advantage of these rigs was that they needed smaller (therefore cheaper) crews than a comparable ship or brig-rigged vessel. Conversely, the ship rig tended to be retained for training vessels where the larger the crew, the more seamen were trained.


See also

Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... This article is about the ship. ... A jackass-barque, sometimes spelled jackass bark, is a sailing ship with 3 or more masts, of which the foremast is square-rigged and the main is partially square-rigged (topsail, topgallant, etc. ... The USCGC Eagle (WIX-327) (ex-Horst Wessel) is a 295 barque used as a training cutter for members of the US Coast Guard. ... Barque Press is a London-based publisher of experimental poetry. ... Barken Viking The Barque Viking was built in 1907 by Burmeister & Wain in Copenhagen, Denmark. ...

Reference and further reading

Types of sailing vessels and rigs
Barque | Barquentine | Bermuda rig | Bilander | Brig | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Dutch Clipper | Cog | Corvette | Cutter | Dhow | Fifie | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Frigate | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Junk | Ketch | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pink | Pocket Cruiser | Polacca | Pram | Proa | Schooner | Ship of the Line | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall Ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Wherry | Windjammer | Windsurfer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl

  Results from FactBites:
 
Barque - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (418 words)
She happened to be a ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows.
By the end of the 18th century, however, the term barque (sometimes, particularly in the USA, spelled bark) came to refer to any vessel with a particular type of rig.
A well-preserved example of a commercial barque is Falls of Clyde; built in 1878, it is now preserved as a museum ship in Honolulu.
The “ENGLANDS GLORY” 1881, Barque (677 words)
Disaster finally overtook the barque England’s Glory at the end of a long and eventful passage lasting six months when, on November 7, 1881, she was totally wrecked near the entrance to Bluff Harbour.
The barque sailed from London To Bluff, via Nelson, with a general cargo, the principal part of which was iron rails, and had a fair passage until the Cape of Good Hope, when she encountered heavy weather.
The court found that the casualty was caused by an error of judgement on the part of the master in altering the ship’s course in order to pick up the pilot boat, and thus bringing her too close inshore and within the influence of the eddies with her head inshore.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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