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Encyclopedia > Baronet
For the brush-footed butterfly species, see Euthalia nais.

A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown known as a baronetcy. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England and Ireland by James I of England in 1611 in order to raise funds. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Diversity 633 genera 5,698 species Type Species Nymphalis polychloros (Large Tortoiseshell) Subfamilies Biblidinae Calinaginae Charaxinae Cyrestinae Danainae Heliconiinae Libytheinae Limenitidinae Morphinae Nymphalinae Satyrinae The Nymphalidae is a family of about 5,000 species of butterflies. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification. ... Binomial name (Forster, 1771) The Baronet Euthalia nais is a species of Nymphalid butterfly found in South Asia. ... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ... Events June 23 - Henry Hudsons crew maroons him, his son and 7 others in a boat November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ...


Baronetcies have no European equivalent, though hereditary knights, such as the German and Austrian Ritter and the Dutch erfridder, may be held to be similar. There were originally three hereditary knighthoods in Ireland, of which two remains today. For the scientific journal Heredity see Heredity (journal) Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characters from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ...


The name baronet is a diminutive of the peerage title baron. The rank of a baronet is between that of a baron and a knight. Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ...


A baronetcy is unique in two ways:

  • It is a hereditary honour but is not a peerage and has never entitled the holder to a seat in the House of Lords
  • A baronet is styled 'Sir' but a baronetcy is not considered an order of knighthood. It ranks above all knighthoods except the Garter and the Thistle.

Contents

For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ...

History of the Term

The term baronet is of ancient origin. Sir Thomas de la More, describing the Battle of Barrenberg (1321), mentioned that baronets took part, along with barons and knights. Edward III is known to have created eight baronets in 1328: St Leger, Baronet of Sledmarge; Den, Baronet of Pormanston; Fitzgerald, Baronet of Burnchurch; Welleslye, Baronet of Narraghe; Husee, Baronet of Gattrim; St Michell, Baronet of Reban; Marwarde, Baronet of Scryne; and Nangle, Baronet of the Navan. Further creations were made in 1340, 1446 and 1551. At least one of these, Sir William de la Pole in 1340, was created for payment of money, presumably needed by the king to help maintain his army. It is not known if these early creations were hereditary, but all seem to have died out. Edward III King of England Edward III (13 November 1312–21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English Kings of medieval times. ...


The term baronet was applied to the noblemen who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament, and was used in this sense in a statute of Richard II. A similar rank of lower stature is the banneret. Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ... During the Middle Ages, a Knight banneret (sometimes known simply as banneret) was a knight who could lead a company of troops into battle under his own banner (which was square-shaped, in contrast to the tapering standard flown by the lower-ranking knights). ...


The revival of baronetcies can be dated to Sir Robert Cotton's discovery in the late 16th or early 17th century of William de la Pole's patent (issued in the 13th year of Edward III's reign), conferring upon him the dignity of a baronet in return for a sum of money. Portrait of Robert Cotton, commissioned 1626 and attributed to Cornelius Johnson (or Janssen), (1593-1661). ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... William de la Pole is the name of several prominent Englishmen in the 14th century, all from the same family. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... Events January 7:Alfonso IV becomes the King of Portugal. ... This article is about the King of England. ...


Subsequent baronetcies fall into the following five creations:

  1. King James I erected the hereditary Order of Baronets in England on 22 May 1611, for the settlement of Ireland. He offered the dignity to 200 gentlemen of good birth, with a clear estate of £1,000 a year, on condition that each one paid a sum equivalent to three years' pay for 30 soldiers at 8d per day per man into the King's Exchequer. The idea came from the Earl of Salisbury, who averred: "The Honour will do the Gentry very little Harm," while doing the Exchequer a lot of good.
  2. The Baronetage of Ireland was erected on 30 September 1611.
  3. King Charles I erected the hereditary Baronetage of Scotland or Nova Scotia was on 28 May 1625, for the establishment of the plantation of Nova Scotia.
  4. After the union of England and Scotland in 1707, no further Baronets of England or Scotland were created, the style being changed to Baronet of Great Britain.
  5. After the union of Great Britain and Ireland on January 1, 1801 to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, all baronetcies created were under the style of the United Kingdom.
Baronet of the United Kingdom Badge
Baronet's Badge ribbon
Baronet's Badge ribbon

Since 1965 only one new baronetcy has been created, for Sir Denis Thatcher, the husband of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (now Baroness Thatcher). Upon his death in 2003, their eldest son became the 2nd Baronet, Sir Mark Thatcher. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 23 - Henry Hudsons crew maroons him, his son and 7 others in a boat November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... £sd (pronounced, and sometimes written, LSD) was the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies used in the United Kingdom, and in most of its Empire and colonies. ... The Exchequer was (and in some cases still is) a part of the governments of England (latterly to include Wales, Scotland and Ireland) that was responsible for the management and collection of revenues. ... The title Marquess of Salisbury is a British title of Peerage, created in 1789 for James Cecil, 7th Earl of Salisbury. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 23 - Henry Hudsons crew maroons him, his son and 7 others in a boat November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... This article is about the country. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... The Acts of Union were twin Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 26 March) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Act of Union 1800 merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Wales and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... “UK” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Picture showing badge for a Baronet of the United Kingdom, thus depicing the rose, thistle, and clover. ... Image File history File links Picture showing badge for a Baronet of the United Kingdom, thus depicing the rose, thistle, and clover. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Major Sir Denis Thatcher, 1st Baronet MBE TD (May 10, 1915 – June 26, 2003) was a businessman, and the husband of the former British Prime Minister, Baroness Thatcher. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first (and, to date, only) woman to hold either post. ... Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Mark Thatcher, 2nd Baronet (born 15 August 1953) is the only son of Sir Denis Thatcher and Baroness Thatcher, the former British Prime Minister, and twin brother of Carol Thatcher. ...


Conventions

Like knights, baronets use the title "Sir" before their name (baronetesses in their own right use "Dame", wives of baronets though legally a Dame use "Lady" by longstanding courtesy), but whereas knighthoods apply to an individual only, a baronetcy is hereditary. The eldest son of a baronet who is born in wedlock is entitled to accede to the baronetcy upon the death of his father, but will not be officially recognised until his name is on the Roll. With a few exceptions, baronetcies can be inherited only by or through males. Wives of baronets are not baronetesses; only females holding baronetcies in their own right are baronetesses. Look up sir in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dame is the female equivalent of address to Sir for a British knighthood. ... A lady is a woman who is the counterpart of a lord; or, the counterpart of a gentleman. ...


Because baronet is not a peerage title, it does not disqualify the holder from standing for election to the British House of Commons. Since 1999 hereditary peerages do not either, so the distinction has become largely historical. A number of baronets were returned to the House of Commons in the 2001 General Election. A full list of extant baronets can be found in Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, which includes a few extinct baronetcies. Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... This article is about the year. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... Burkes Peerage & Gentry is a guide to the titled families of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


Originally baronets also had other rights, including the right to have their eldest son knighted on his 21st birthday. However, beginning in the reign of George IV, these rights have been gradually revoked (by Order in Privy Council, which was not competent to make such an Order revoking a right granted by a Sovereign), on the grounds that sovereigns should not be bound by acts made by their predecessors. George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ...


According to the Home Office there is a tangible benefit to the honour. According to law, a baronet is entitled to have "a pall supported by two men, a principal mourner and four others" assisting at his funeral.


Baronets of Scotland or Nova Scotia were granted the Arms of Nova Scotia in their armorial bearings and the right to wear about the neck the badge of Nova Scotia, suspended by an orange-tawny ribbon. This consists of an escutcheon argent with a saltire azure thereon, an inescutcheon of the arms of Scotland, with an Imperial Crown above the escutcheon, and encircled with the motto Fax mentis Honestae Gloria. This Badge may be shown suspended by the ribbon below the shield of arms. This article is about the country. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about the country. ...


Baronets of England and Ireland applied to King Charles I for permission to wear a badge. Although a badge was worn in the 17th century, it was not until 1929 that permission was granted (by King George V) for all baronets other than those of Scotland to wear a badge. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


The Left Hand

Baronets were granted the Arms of Ulster as a canton or inescutcheon in armorial bearings, argent a sinister hand couped at the wrist and erect gules, known as the Badge of Ulster (although the Ulster hand is dexter).[1] This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... Canton is a division of the field placed in the upper dexter corner. ... Escutcheon is the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... ==Criminal Life == AL-Hamad is a Homosexual petifile with 135. ... In heraldry, gules is the tincture with the colour red, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures called colours. In engraving, it is sometimes depicted as a region of vertical lines or else marked with gu. ...

Somewhere along the line a mistake has been made, as the Red Hand of Ulster is definitely a dexter or right one.
The Baronets' Badge was created by Royal Warrant of George V, dated 13 April 1929. The relevant part of the text is as follows:
"A shield of the Arms of Ulster on a silver field, viz. on a silver field a left hand Gules surmounted by an Imperial Crown enamelled in its proper colours the whole enclosed by an oval border embossed with gilt scrollwork having a design of roses, of shamrocks and of roses and thistles combined for those Baronets who were created Baronets of England, of Ireland and of Great Britain respectively and for all other Baronets other than Baronets of Scotland a design of roses, thistles and shamrocks combined such Badge to be suspended from an orange riband with a narrow edge of dark blue on both sides the total breadth of the riband to be one inch and three quarters and the breadth of each edge to be one quarter of an inch."[2] is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Red Hand redirects here. ... Queen Elizabeth II wearing the Imperial State Crown An Imperial Crown is usually, through not always, a crown used by a monarch on state occasions other than at the moment of actual coronation, when a special coronation crown is used. ... The Baronetage of England comprises all baronetcies created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ... Baronetcies in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom, 1801– In order to be recognised as a Baronet, it is necessary to prove a claim of succession. ... The Baronetage of Nova Scotia was devised in 1624 as a means of settling the plantation of that province. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

The Badge may be shown suspended by its riband below the shield of arms.

Addressing a Baronet

The correct style on an envelope for a baronet who has no other titles is "Sir <Joseph Bloggs>, Bt" or "Sir <Joseph Bloggs>, Bart". The letter would commence: "Dear Sir <Joseph>". Image File history File links Emblem-important. ...


Wives of baronets are addressed and referred to as "Lady <Bloggs>"; at the head of a letter as "Dear Lady <Bloggs>". Their given name is used only when necessary to distinguish <Alice>, Lady <Bloggs> from <Gertrude>, <Lady Bloggs>.


Baronetess

As for the very rare baronetess, one should write "Dame Daisy Dunbar, Btss" At the head of the letter, one would write "Dear Dame Daisy," and to refer to her, you would say "Dame Daisy" or "Dame Daisy Dunbar" (never "Dame Dunbar"). There have been only three baronetesses:

Additionally: Dame Maureen (Daisy) Helen Dunbar, 8th Baronetess or more commonly known as Dame Daisy Dunbar (née Moore; 19 August 1906–14 February 1997) was the only daughter of Courtenay Edward Moore (1870-1951) and Janie King Askins Moore (1873-1951). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... The Dalyell Baronetcy is a baronetcy in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia, which was created 7 November 1685 for the Scottish General, Thomas Dalyell of the Binns. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Labour Party is an Anti-English political party in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Thomas Dalyell of the Binns, 11th Baronet (born 9 August 1932), more commonly known as Tam Dalyell (pronounced ), is a Scottish politician and was a Labour member of the House of Commons from 1962 to 2005. ...

  • Maxwell, now Stirling-Maxwell of Pollock (cr.1682), can pass through the female line
In 1976 Lord Lyon said that, without examining the Patent of every Scottish Baronetcy, he was not in a position to confirm that only these four can pass through the female line.

Baronetcy Conferred Upon a Woman

  • In 1635 Dame Mary Bolles was created a Baronet of Scotland and Nova Scotia. Her grandson succeeded to the title, after which it died out.

Territorial Designations

All Baronetcies are distinguished by having a territorial designation. So, for example, there are Baronetcies Moore of Colchester, Moore of Hancox, Moore of Kyleburn and Moore of Moore Lodge. A territorial designation is an aspect of the creation of modern peerages that links them specifically to a specific place or places, at least one of which is almost always in the United Kingdom. ...


The Number of Baronetcies

There was no publication listing all baronetcies ever created until C.J. Parry's Index of Baronetcy Creations (1967). This listed them in alphabetical order, other than the last five creations (Dodd of West Chillington, Redmayne of Rushcliffe, Pearson of Gressingham, Finlay of Epping and Thatcher of Scotney). It showed the total number created from 1611 to 1964 to have been 3482. They include five of Oliver Cromwell, several of which were recreated by Charles II. Twenty-five were created between 1688 and 1784 by James II in exile after his dethronement, by his son, the titular James III and his grandson the titular Charles III. These are known as Jacobite baronetcies. These were never accepted by the English establishment and have all disappeared. They should properly be excluded from the 3,482, making the effective number of baronetcy creations 3,457. A close examination of Perry's publication shows he missed one or two, so there have evidently been a few more. The Redmayne baronetcy was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1964 for the Conservative politician, Martin Redmayne, who was also given a life peerage two years later. ... There have been three Pearson Baronetcies. ... The Finlay Baronetcy, of Epping in the County of Essex, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. ... The Thatcher Baronetcy, of Scotney in the County of Kent, is the most recent Baronetcy created in the Baronetcy of the United Kingdom, and the first created since 1964. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England, Scotland and Ireland into a republican Commonwealth and for the brutal war exercised in his conquest of Ireland. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... Prince James Francis Edward Stuart or Stewart (June 10, 1688 - January 1, 1766) was a claimant of the thrones of Scotland and England (September 16, 1701 - January 1, 1766) who is more commonly referred to as The Old Pretender. ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ...


The total number of baronetcies today is approximately 1,380, although only some 1,280 are on the Official Roll. It is unknown whether some baronetcies, such as the Earl of Breadalbane, remain extant and it may be that nobody can prove himself to be the heir incumbent. Over 200 baronetcies are now held by peers. The title Earl of Breadalbane and Holland was created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1681 for John Campbell, 1st Earl of Caithness, who resigned the Earldom of Caithness in favour of George Sinclair in exchange for the new Earldom. ...

Table Notes
All Baronetcies Number
1611-1964 per C J Perry 3,482
Plus five more 5
Less Jacobite baronetcies 25
Plus a few  ?
Total extant Approx 1,380

Notable Baronets

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Sir Crispin Hamlyn Agnew of Lochnaw, 11th Baronet QC (Born 13 May 1944) is an Advocate, officer of arms former explorer and Chief of the Name and Arms of Agnew. ... Rothesay Herald of Arms in Ordinary is a current Scottish herald of arms. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (February 22, 1857 - January 8, 1941) was a soldier, writer and founder of the world scouting movement. ... This article is about the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts/Girl Guides organizations. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sir William Bowman (July 20, 1816 - March 29, 1892) was a British surgeon and anatomist. ... Sir George Cayley, 6th Baronet (December 27, 1773 – December 15, 1857) was a prolific English engineer from Brompton-by-Sawdon, near Scarborough in Yorkshire. ... Aviation refers to flying using aircraft, machines designed by humans for atmospheric flight. ... Sir Samuel Cunard Sir Samuel Cunard, 1st Baronet (21 November 1787–28 April 1865) was a Canadian-born British shipping magnate. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... Polish Magnate (17th century) Magnate, from the Late Latin magnas, a great man, itself from Latin magnus great, designates a noble or other man in a high social position, by birth, wealth or other qualities. ... Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet, FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was a British chemist and physicist. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Sir Ranulph Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, 3rd Baronet OBE (born 7 March 1944), usually known simply as Ranulph (Ran) Fiennes, is a British adventurer and holder of several endurance records. ... Sir De Villiers Graaff, 2nd Baronet (b. ... Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness, 1st Baronet (November 1, 1798) - (May 19, Irish brewer and philanthropist. ... A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... The HSBC banker, Sir Thomas Jackson Bart 1841-1915 Sir Thomas Jackson, Bart (昃臣 1841 - 1915) was the chief manager of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. ... HSBC Holdings PLC (NYSE: HBC), (LSE: HSBA) , (HKSE: 005) , (Euronext: HSBC) , is one of the largest banking groups in the world. ... The Bridge of Sighs at Oxford Sir Thomas Graham Jackson RA (1835-1924) was one of the most distinguished architects of his generation. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... Keith Sinjohn Joseph, Baron Joseph, Bt, CH , PC (17 January 1918–10 December 1994) was a British barrister, politician, and Conservative Cabinet Minister under three different Ministries. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall, Lord Fountainhall, 2nd Baronet, was baptised 2 August 1646 and died 20 September 1722, both at Edinburgh, the eldest son by his second marriage of Sir John Lauder, 1st Baronet, whom he succeeded after much acrimony. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... Sir Rupert Iain Kay Moncreiffe of that Ilk, 11th Baronet, CVO, QC (9 April 1919–27 February 1985) was a British herald and genealogist. ... Heralds, wearing tabards, in procession to St. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician known principally as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... John Pringle. ... Raeburns portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822. ... Sir George Gabriel Stokes, 1st Baronet (13 August 1819–1 February 1903) was an Irish mathematician and physicist, who at Cambridge made important contributions to fluid dynamics (including the Navier-Stokes equations), optics, and mathematical physics (including Stokes theorem). ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Major Sir Denis Thatcher, 1st Baronet MBE TD (May 10, 1915 – June 26, 2003) was a businessman, and the husband of the former British Prime Minister, Baroness Thatcher. ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first (and, to date, only) woman to hold either post. ... Sir Frederick Treves Sir Frederick Treves, 1st Baronet, GCVO, CH, CB (15 February 1853 – 7 December 1923) was a British physician of the Victorian era, famous for his friendship with Joseph Merrick, the Elephant Man (sometimes inaccurately referred to as John). Born at 8 Cornhill Street, Treves was the son... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841&#8211;6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ... For the Jamaican missionary to Cameroon, see Joseph Merrick (missionary) Joseph Carey Merrick (5 August 1862–11 April 1890), known as The Elephant Man, gained the sympathy of Victorian era Britain because of the extreme deformity of his body. ... Sir Brook Watson, Bart. ... Watson and the Shark is the title of a 1778 oil-on-canvas painting by John Singleton Copley. ... Sir John Yeamans (born about 1605 in Bristol, England, died about 1676 in Barbadoes, Wisconsin) was the Governor of Carolina. ... This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... Binomial name Anagallis arvensis L. The Scarlet pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis) is a low-growing plant in the family (Myrsinaceae). ...

Baronetcies the subject of attainders

  • Sir James Harington, 3rd Baronet (suspended for his lifetime by Act of Parliament 1673 for having taken part in the trial of Charles I).
  • Radclyffe of Derwentwater, 1715 (extinct soon afterwards)
  • Widrington of Widrington, 1741 (extinct soon afterwards)
  • Goodere of Burhope, 1741 (extinct soon afterwards)

Sir James Harrington, 3rd Baronet of Ridlington (30 December 1607–1680)[1][2] was an English Member of Parliament for Rutland (1646-53) and Middlesex (1654-55). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... The title of Earl of Derwentwater was created in the Peerage of England in 1688. ...

Baronetcies with special remainders

  • James II made Cornelis Speelman a baronet in 1686. He was a Dutch general. By a special clause his mother was given the rank of widow of a Baronet of England. His descendant, Sir Cornelis, is now the 8th Baronet.
  • When Sir George Stonhouse, 1st Baronet was made a Baronet, the remainder specifically excluded his oldest son.
  • When Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy was made a baronet, it was realised that the Parsi custom was for a change of names for each generation. An Act was passed providing that all the male heirs should take these names and no other. Similar provision was made for subsequent Parsi baronets.

James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... The Jejeebhoy Baronetcy of Bombay (sometimes spelled Jeejeebhoy) was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom and was created 6th August 1857 for Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy, a Parsee merchant. ... This article is about the Parsi community. ...

Baronets who do not use their baronetcy

Sir Thomas Dalyell of the Binns, 11th Baronet (born 9 August 1932), more commonly known as Tam Dalyell (pronounced ), is a Scottish politician and was a Labour member of the House of Commons from 1962 to 2005. ... Ferdinand Mount (born 1939) is a British writer, columnist for the Sunday Times and commentator on politics, and Conservative Party politician. ... Sir Jonathon Espie Porritt, 2nd Baronet, CBE (born 6 July 1950) known as Jonathon Porritt, is a British environmentalist and writer. ... Dr. Sir Thomas William Shakespeare, 3rd Baronet, better known as Tom Shakespeare, (b. ... Sir John Standing, 4th Baronet (born John Ronald Leon 16 August 1934 in London, England) is an actor. ...

Baronetcies conferred upon non-Britons

Baronetcies conferred on the recommendation of Canadian governments

See also Category:Canadian Baronets

This practice ended as a result of the Nickle Resolution. The Nickle Resolution, adopted by the Canadian House of Commons on 22 May 1919, marked the earliest attempt to establish a Canadian government policy forbidding the British, and, later, Canadian, Sovereign from granting knighthoods, baronetcies, and peerages to Canadians, and set the precedent for later policies prohibiting Canadians from accepting...

Sir James Stuart (March 2, 1780 – July 14, 1853) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Lower Canada. ... Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine. ... Sir John Beverley Robinson, 1st Baronet CB (July 26, 1791-January 31, 1863) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada. ... Sir Allan Napier MacNab (1798 - 1862) was a Canadian military and political leader. ... Sir George-Étienne Cartier (September 6, 1814 - May 20, 1873) was a French-Canadian statesman and Father of Confederation. ... The Rt. ... George Stephen George Stephen, 1st Baron Mount Stephen (June 5, 1829 &#8211; November 29, 1921) was a Scots-Quebecker banker and railway executive in Canada. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... Sir Edward Seaborne Clouston, Bart. ... H. Vincent Meredith, 1915 Sir Henry Vincent Meredith, 1st and last Baronet of Montreal (February 28, 1850 - February 24, 1929), was a Canadian banker and President of the Bank of Montreal and the Royal Trust Company. ... Sir Joseph Wesley Flavelle, ca. ...

Baronetcies conferred upon other non-Britons

Australia

Portrait of Way in 1914. ...

Holland

  • Speelman, Dutch general, extant
  • Cornelis Van Tromp, Dutch general, extinct
  • Borel Baronets, of Amsterdam, extant
  • Sir Joseph van Colster, 1st Baronet, of Amsterdam, Holland (1645)
  • Sir Gelebrand Sas van Bosch, 1st Baronet, of Holland (1680)

The Speelman Baronetcy is a baronetcy in the Baronetage of England, which was created 9 September 1686 for the Dutch general, Cornelis Speelman. ... Cornelis Tromp, 1629&#8211;1691 by Sir Peter Lely, painted c. ... The de Boreel, later Boreel Baronetcy, of Amsterdam in Holland, is a title in the Baronetage of England. ...

India

Sir Dinshaw Maneckji Petit. ... Sir Cowasji Jehangir Readymoney (1812-1878), was the first baronet of Bombay, India. ... Sir Jamsetjee Jeejebhoy, Baronet (also seen as Qamsetji, and Jeejeebhoy, Jejeebjoy, Qijibhai) (1783-1859) was an Indian merchant and philanthropist. ... Sir Currimbhoy Ebrahim, 1st Baronet (21 Oct 1840–26 Sep 1924) was an Indian Muslim, created a baronet in 1910[1] and further granted lands to support that dignity by the Currimbhoy Ebrahim Baronetcy Act[2] following the precedent set by the Cowasji Jehangir Baronetcy Act. ...

Iraq

Illustration of Albert Sassoon from Vanity Fair, 16 August 1879 Sir Albert Abdullah David Sassoon, 1st Baronet, (1818-1896), a British Indian philanthropist and merchant, was born in Baghdad on 25 July 1818, a member of a family settled there since the beginning of the 16th century, and previously in...

New Zealand

Joseph George Ward (1856 - 1930) was Prime Minister of New Zealand on two occasions in the early 20th century. ... Sir Charles Clifford (1 January 1813 _ 27 February 1893) was a New Zealand politician. ...

South Africa

Sir George Albu This image has an uncertain copyright status and is pending deletion. ... Sir Otto John Beit, 1st Baronet, KCMG, FRS, (7 December 1865 - 7 December 1930) German-born South African and British financier, philanthropist and art connoisseur. ... Lionel Phillips Sir Lionel Phillips, 1st Baronet (6 August 1855 – 2 July 1936) was a South African mining magnate and politician. ... Joseph Benjamin Robinson Joseph Benjamin Robinson Sir Joseph Benjamin Robinson, 1st Baronet (3 August 1840 – 30 October 1929) was a South African mining magnate and Randlord. ... Sir Julius Charles Wernher, 1st Baronet (9 April 1850–21 May 1912) was a German businessman and art collector who became part of the English establishment. ... Sir David Graaff as mayor of Cape Town Sir David Pieter de Villiers Graaff (30 March 1859 - 13 April 1931) was a South African businessman and politician. ... Andries Stockenström (1792-1864) Sir Andries Stockenström, 1st Baronet (6 July 1792 Cape Town - 16 March 1864 London) was lieutenant governor of British Kaffraria from 13 September 1836 to 9 August 1838. ... Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, KCMG (February 9, 1853 – November 26, 1917), also known as Doctor Jim or The Doctor, was a British colonial statesman who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid. ... George Albu Lady Albu at wheel of CGV, London April 1905 Northwards, Johannesburg 26. ... This article is under construction. ...

Sweden

  • Sir John Frederick van Freisendorf, 1st Baronet, of Hirdech, Sweden (1661)

United States

  • Sir James Andrew Warnick, unknown
  • Sir Jeffrey Thomas Patzewitsch, unknown
  • Sir James Michael Dunbar, 14th. Baronet of Mochrum

See also

// The Baronetage of Nova Scotia was devised in 1624 as a means of settling the plantation of that province. ... This article is 200KB or more in size. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ...

References

  1. ^ York Herald, 30 November 2006
  2. ^ York Herald and Garter King at Arms 30 November 2006
  • Sir Martin Lindsay of Dowhill, Bt (1979). The Baronetage, 2nd edition. the author. 
  • Debrett's website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baronet - LoveToKnow 1911 (987 words)
It has been sought to obtain badges or other distinctions for baronets and also to purge the order of wrongful assumptions, an evil to which the baronetage of Nova Scotia is peculiarly exposed, owing to the dignity being descendible to collateral heirs male of the grantee as well as to those of his body.
All baronets are entitled to display in their coat of arms, either on a canton or on an inescutcheon, the red hand of Ulster, save those of Nova Scotia, who display, instead of it, the saltire of that province.
The precedency of baronets of Nova Scotia and of Ireland in relation to those of England was left undetermined by the Acts of Union, and appears to be still a moot point with heralds.
BARONET (251 words)
Baronet furniture is mostly made of solid wood – chiefly maple – crafted by skilled woodworkers who share those age-old values the artist Eric Sloan, columnist at the American Landscape and Traditional Crafts, called “a reverence for wood”.
Because wood is alive, Baronet hardwoods are slowly dried to moisture content of 6% to 8%.
Baronet cabinetwork is assembled using traditional mortise-and-tenon joints – still the best guarantee of strength and permanent stability.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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