FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Barnstaple" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Barnstaple
Barnstaple
Statistics
Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est.)
Ordnance Survey
OS grid reference: SS5633
Administration
District: North Devon
Shire county: Devon
Region: South West England
Constituent country: England
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: Devon
Historic county: Devon
Services
Police force: Devon and Cornwall Constabulary
Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}}
Ambulance: South Western
Post office and telephone
Post town: BARNSTAPLE
Postal district: EX31, EX32
Dialling code: 01271
Politics
UK Parliament: North Devon
European Parliament: South West England
Arms of Barnstaple Town Council
Enlarge
Arms of Barnstaple Town Council
Barnstaple Clock Tower, erected in 1862 as a memorial to Prince Albert (the husband of Queen Victoria)
Barnstaple Clock Tower, erected in 1862 as a memorial to Prince Albert (the husband of Queen Victoria)
A view of Barnstaple Long Bridge
A view of Barnstaple Long Bridge

Barnstaple is a town in the county of Devon in the south west of England. It is the main town in the local government district of North Devon and claims to be the oldest borough in the United Kingdom. It was founded at the lowest crossing point of the River Taw, about 5 kilometres from the Taw's seafall at the Bristol Channel. By the time of the Domesday Book, Barnstaple had its own mint. Its size and wealth in the Middle Ages was based on it being 'wool staple', a town licensed to export wool, and its importance is still obvious in the town's name. The wool trade was further aided by the town's excellent port, with five ships being sent in 1588 to aid the fight against the Spanish Armada. Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Categories: Stub | Devon ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent country is an official term used to describe three of the four principal component parts of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK): England; Scotland; Wales. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... A fire engine belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... This is a list of ambulance services in the United Kingdom: Ambulance services in England, after July 1, 2006 are A few deviations from the above have been made for operational reasons. ... The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset (including the Bournemouth, Plymouth, Poole, Torbay and Isles of Scilly unitary authorities) in South West England. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... North Devon (or sometimes Devon North) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sign in the entrance of the European Parliament building in Brussels, written in all the official languages used in the European Union as of July 2006 The European Parliament building in Strasbourg The debating chamber, or hemicycle, in Strasbourg The European Parliament building in Brussels The European Parliament (formerly European... South West England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Arms of Barnstaple Town Council. ... Arms of Barnstaple Town Council. ... Download high resolution version (750x1033, 101 KB)Barnstaple Clock Tower, erected in 1862 as a memorial to Prince Albert (Queen Victoria’s husband). ... Download high resolution version (750x1033, 101 KB)Barnstaple Clock Tower, erected in 1862 as a memorial to Prince Albert (Queen Victoria’s husband). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Barnstaplelongbridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Barnstaplelongbridge. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Categories: Stub | Devon ... A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. ... River Taw rises at Taw Head, a spring on the central northern flanks of Dartmoor. ... The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Spanish Armada or Great/Grand Armada (Old Spanish: Grande y Felicísima Armada, great and most fortunate navy; but dubbed by the Spanish, with ironic intention, la Armada Invencible, the Invincible Fleet) refers to the Spanish-controlled fleet which sailed against England in 1588, with the intention of escorting...


It was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Reform Act 1835. Since 1974, it has been a civil parish with a town council. [1] The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ...

Contents

Barnstaple past and present

Barnstaple's population in the 1801 census was 3,748, in the 1901 census 9,698, and in the 2001 census 30,765. The town has subsumed the neighbouring villages of Pilton and Newport through ribbon development in the 1930s–1950s. In April 2006 the population was 34,000. Pilton is a suburb of Barnstaple. ... Ribbon development means building houses along the roads radiating from a town. ...


In 1989 the A361 North Devon Link Road was constructed, linking Barnstaple with the M5 motorway, approximately 65 kilometres to the east. Because Barnstaple is the main shopping area for North Devon, retail work is a contributor to the economy. Many chain stores are located in the town centre and on the Roundswell business park located on the western fringe of the town. The A361 is a major road in England. ... This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ...


Traffic congestion can be severe, especially at peak times and in the summer. To relieve this congestion, a new bypass is due to be completed in Spring 2007. The project consists of 2.7 km of new road and a 409 metre long five-span Downstream Bridge, and is projected to cost £42 million. The Barnstaple Western Bypass is congestion scheme to take traffic away from Barnstaple town centre. ...


Barum

Barnstaple is still sometimes referred to as Barum. The origin of this name is obscure, but has been in use since pre-Saxon times, and probably of Roman origin. Mentioned by Shakespeare, the name Barum was revived and popularised in Victorian times, featuring in several novels of the time. The name is retained in the names of a football team, brewery, and several other local businesses. William Shakespeare—born April 1564; baptised April 26, 1564; died April 23, 1616 (O.S.), May 3, 1616 (N.S.)—has a reputation as the greatest of all writers in English. ...


Butcher's Row

Built in 1855, Butchers Row consists of 10 shops with pilasters of Bath Stone, and wrought iron supports to an overhanging roof. Only two of the shops remain as butchers although the new shops still continue to sell local agricultural goods. There is one baker, one delicatessen, two fishmongers and a florist. There is also a greengrocer. In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ... Bath Stone is an Oolitic Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. ...


Pannier Market

Barnstaple has been the major market for North Devon since Saxon times. Demands for health regulation of its food market in Victorian times saw the construction in 1855-6 of the town's Pannier Market. The building has a high glass and timber roof on iron columns. At 320 ft long, it runs the length of Butchers Row. Market days are Tuesday, Friday and Saturday. According to the UK newspaper 'The Independent' the Pannier Market is voted one of the top ten food markets in Britain. The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ...


Railways

A map of Barnstaple from 1937
A map of Barnstaple from 1937

Barnstaple has had a number of mainline railway stations, although since the Beeching Axe fell in the 1960s, only one of these is still in use: Image File history File links Barnstablemap. ... Image File history File links Barnstablemap. ... Many railway lines were closed as a result of the Beeching Axe The Beeching Axe was an informal name for the British Governments attempt in the 1960s to control the spiralling cost of running the British railway system by closing what it considered to be little-used and unprofitable...

  • Also built by the North Devon Railway in 1854, Barnstaple Quay was renamed Barnstaple Town in 1886. In 1898, the station was relocated to its present site, at North Walk, to accommodate passenger exchange to the narrow gauge Lynton & Barnstaple Railway. The station building still exists, and can be viewed on-line from a webcam mounted on Barnstaple Civic Centre.
  • Barnstaple Town (1847–1970), situated close by the Castle Mound was a through station on the Ilfracombe line, running along the north bank of the Taw. Between 1898 and 1935, it was also the terminus of the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway, with the narrow gauge line's main depot and operating centre at nearby Pilton.
  • Barnstaple (Victoria Road) (1873–1970) (just Barnstaple until 1949) was built to broad gauge standards as a terminus of the Devon and Somerset Railway (later the Great Western Railway) to the east of the town, with a connection to Barnstaple Junction.

Barnstaple railway station is a station on the Tarka Line in Devon serving the town of Barnstaple. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) was a railway company in England from 1840 to 1923. ... Fremington is a village in North Devon three miles west of Barnstaple. ... 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... // The Ilfracombe Branch of the London & South Western Railway (LSWR) ran between Barnstaple and Ilfracombe in North Devon. ... Location within the British Isles Ilfracombe is a seaside resort on the north coast of Devon, England with a small harbour, surrounded by cliffs. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... River Taw rises at Taw Head, a spring on the central northern flanks of Dartmoor. ... The Barnstaple Western Bypass is congestion scheme to take traffic away from Barnstaple town centre. ... Barnstaple Quay was an intermediate station on the L&SWR line to Ilfracombe in Devon, England. ... The Lynton & Barnstaple Railway (L&B) was a narrow-gauge railway running through the rugged and picturesque countryside of Exmoor in North Devon, England. ... A Creative webcam A web camera (or webcam) is a real-time camera whose images can be accessed using the World Wide Web, instant messaging, or a PC video calling application. ... Barnstaple Town railway station was an intermediate station on the L&SWR line to Ilfracombe, and between 1898 and 1935, also the South-western Terminus of the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway, a famously scenic narrow gauge line that ran through Exmoor from Barnstaple to Lynton and Lynmouth in North Devon... // The Ilfracombe Branch of the London & South Western Railway (LSWR) ran between Barnstaple and Ilfracombe in North Devon. ... The Lynton & Barnstaple Railway (L&B) was a narrow-gauge railway running through the rugged and picturesque countryside of Exmoor in North Devon, England. ... Pilton Yard, in the village of Pilton, to the North of Barnstaple was, between 1895 and 1935, the main depot and operating centre of the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway, a narrow gauge line that ran through Exmoor from Barnstaple to Lynton and Lynmouth in North Devon. ... Great Western Railway broad gauge steam locomotives awaiting scrapping in 1892 after the conversion to standard gauge. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ...

Britain in Bloom

Barnstaple won the Britain in Bloom competition, in the category of Town (Population : 6001 - 12,000) [2] in 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2003. The town also won the Abbis Cup in 1996 and 1998 for Regional Supreme Champion (any size town), the Nations in Bloom — Best Town in the World in 1996, the Entente Florale — Best Town in Europe in 1996, and World in Bloom in 1998. Britain in Bloom is a horticultural competition in the United Kingdom; organised by the Royal Horticultural Society, and currently sponsored by B&Q. It is entered by settlements; the winner is the settlement judged to have beautified itself best with the use of flowers and plants. ...


Barnstaple Fair

The ceremonial opening of the fair survives from very ancient times. The Town Council meets in the Guildhall, where various toasts are honoured with a spiced ale which, according to tradition, is made from a jealously guarded recipe handed on from generation to generation. Whilst the toasts are being honoured, "fairings", (a form of sweetmeat) are handed around.


On the reading of the Proclamation a large stuffed gloved hand "garlanded" with flowers is hung from a window of the Guildhall. The gloved hand represents the hand of friendship and the hand of welcome to the thousands that come to the fair. At 12 o'clock, a civic procession forms at the entrance to the Guildhall and the proclamation is read.


The fair begins on the Wednesday before 20 September each year. September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ...


Twin towns

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Barnstable is a city located on Cape Cod in Massachusetts; it is the county seat of Barnstable County6. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Uelzen is a town in Lower Saxony, capital of the district Uelzen. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Trouville-sur-Mer, commonly referred to as Trouville, is a commune and a canton of the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie région, in northern France. ...

Economy

North Devon has an under-developed economy for a number of reasons. Firstly it is situated at a distance from the UK's traditional areas of industrial activity and population. Whilst the 1989 opening of the improved A361 (then trunk roadtrunk) road connection to the motorway network has helped in some ways (notably weekend tourism), it had a detrimental effect on a number of supply-side businesses. The latter previously viewed the town as a base for local distribution networks, a need that was removed with an approximate halving of travelling time to the M5. Categories: Stub | Devon ... The A361 is a major road in England. ... A63(T) trunk road A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road—usually connecting one or more cities, ports, airports, etc. ... This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ...


Barnstaple gained a large amount of industrial activities in the late-1970s due to its receipt of central government grants to allow the construction of factories and their operation on low or zero levels of local taxation. This was only partially successful, with few of these lasting more than a few years that grants were available. One ongoing success from this time was the manufacturing of generic medicines by Cox Pharmaceuticals (now branded Alpharma), who moved in 1980 from their traditional site in Brighton. The most lasting consequence for the town was the development of, or increase to, of the industrial estates at Seven Brethren, Whiddon Valley and Pottington. Statistics Population: 155,919[1] Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ315065 Administration District: Brighton & Hove Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: East Sussex Historic county: Sussex Services Police force: Sussex Police Fire and rescue: East Sussex Fire & Rescue Service [1] Ambulance: South...


Unemployment in North Devon hovers around the 9% mark, and the median per capita wage for North Devon is 73% of the UK national average (2005 data). The level of work in the informal/casual sector is high.


The largest employer in the region by far is local and central Government. The two main central government-owned employers in the area are the Royal Marines Base Chivenor, 5 km west of the town, and North Devon District Hospital, 1.5 km north of the town. Royal Marines Base Chivenor is a British military base used primarily by the Royal Marines. ... North Devon District Hospital is an NHS district general hospital in the town of Barnstaple, North Devon, England. ...


Education

In the county of Devon 55.9% [3] of students achieved 5 GCSEs grade A* to C. The UK average is 55.7%[4].
GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Barnstaple's Secondary Schools

  • The Park Community School - 50% [5]
  • Pilton Community College - 55% [6]

Notable Births

W(ilhelm) N(ero) P(ilate) Barbellion was the nom-de-plume of Bruce Frederick Cummings (September 7, 1889 - October 22, 1919), an English diarist who was responsible for what is usually considered one of the greatest diaries of all time, The Journal of a Disappointed Man. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... See Diary (novel) for the novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Francis Carruthers Gould (December 2, 1844 - 1925), English caricaturist and politician, was born in Barnstaple. ... A caricaturist is an artist who specializes in drawing caricatures. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sir Francis Chichester (September 17, 1901 – August 26, 1972), aviator and sailor, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for becoming the first person to sail single-handed around the world by the clipper route, and the fastest circumnavigator, in nine months and one day. ... An aviator is a person who flies aircraft for pleasure or as a profession. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... Marc Edworthy (born 24 December 1972 in Barnstaple) is an English professional footballer currently playing for Derby County. ... Derby County F.C. is an English football club, currently playing in the Football League Championship. ... Sir Richard Eyre, (born 28 March 1943), is a British film and theatre director. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... John Gay John Gay (30 June 1685 - 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist. ... A poet is someone who writes poetry. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... Tim Mills is the current Lead Guitarist for Iced Earth, he is also the owner of Bare Knuckle Pickups in North Devon, UK. [edit] External Links http://www. ... Iced Earth is an American heavy metal band that combines influences from thrash metal, power metal, progressive metal and NWOBHM. // The central figure of Iced Earth is rhythm guitarist and songwriter Jon Schaffer, who formed the band under the name Purgatory in Indiana in 1984. ... James Parsons (1705-4 April 1770) was an English physician, antiquary and author. ... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... An antiquarian is one concerned with antiquities or things of the past. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Richard Roach Jewell (born 1810 in Devon, England - died 1891 in Perth, Western Australia) was an architect who designed many of the important public buildings in Perth during the latter half of the nineteenth century. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Philip John Vickery MBE (born 14 March 1976) is an English rugby union footballer who plays prop for Wasps and England, and was part of the England side that won the 2003 Rugby World Cup. ...

Around Barnstaple

Tarka Trail — The cycling and walking trails were established by Devon County Council, to celebrate Henry Williamson's 1927 novel Tarka the Otter. The book depicts Tarka's adventure travelling through North Devon's countryside. The Tarka Trail is a series of footpaths around Devon, England. ... Henry Williamson (December 1, 1895 - August 13, 1977), prolific English author known for his natural and social history novels. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Tarka the Otter: His Joyful Water-Life and Death in the Country of the Two Rivers is a novel by Henry Williamson. ... Categories: Stub | Devon ...


References

  1. ^ Barnstaple History Website
  2. ^ Britain in Bloom Website
  3. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4626172.stm
  4. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4358208.stm
  5. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/bsp/hi/education/05/school_tables/secondary_schools/html/878_4059.stm
  6. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/bsp/hi/education/05/school_tables/secondary_schools/html/878_4060.stm

External links


 
Towns and Villages in north Devon
Appledore | Barnstaple | Berrynarbor | Bideford | Braunton | Clovelly | Combe Martin | Croyde | Dolton | Fremington | Georgeham | Great Torrington | Hele Bay | Ilfracombe | Instow | Kentisbury | Knowle | Saunton | Landkey | Lee Bay | Little Torrington | Lynmouth | Lynton | Mortehoe | Northam | Parracombe | West Down | Westward Ho! | Woolacombe | Yelland


Coordinates: 51°05′N 4°03′W Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... A village is a human residential settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Devon. ... External link Appledore (DMOZ.org) Categories: Stub | Towns in Devon ... Berrynarbor is a village and civil parish in the North Devon district of Devon, England. ... Location within the British Isles Arms of Bideford Town Council Bideford is a small port town on the northern coast of the county of Devon in south-west England. ... Braunton is situated 4 miles west of Barnstaple in north Devon, and is claimed to be the largest village in England (although Kidlington is several times bigger). ... Clovelly is a village on the north Devon coast, England near Bideford. ... Combe Martin is a village in the English county of Devon. ... Croyde is a village in the north-west of Devon south of Woolacombe and near the towns of Braunton and Ilfracombe. ... Dolton is a small village in North Devon in the South West of England. ... Fremington is a village in North Devon three miles west of Barnstaple. ... Georgeham is a village near Croyde, North Devon. ... The old Town Hall (now the town museum) in the centre of Great Torrington. ... Hele Bay is a small village located between Combe Martin and Ilfracombe in North Devon. ... Location within the British Isles Ilfracombe is a seaside resort on the north coast of Devon, England with a small harbour, surrounded by cliffs. ... Instow is a village in north Devon, near the end of the River Torridge. ... Kentisbury is a civil parish in North Devon, England. ... Knowle is a village near Braunton located on the road between Ilfracombe and Barnstaple in North Devon Category: ... Saunton is a village located approximately two miles from Braunton, on the North Devon coast in the South West of England. ... Landkey is a small village in the county of Devon in the south-west of England with a population of 2274. ... Lee Bay is a small village on the North Devon coast near Woolacombe. ... Little Torrington is a small village near Great Torrington in north Devon, England. ... Lynmouth is a village in Devon, England. ... Location within the British Isles Lynton is a small town in Devon, England. ... Map sources for Mortehoe at grid reference SS457452 Mortehoe is a village on the north coast of Devon near Woolacombe. ... Northam is a small town in Devon, England, lying north of Bideford and south of Westward Ho!. It is thought to have been the site of an Anglo-Saxon castle, and is said to have been where Hubba the Dane attacked Devon and was repelled (perhaps by Alfred the Great... Parracombe is a very small village near Lynton, in Devon, England. ... West Down is a small village on the route between Braunton and ilfracombe in North Devon. ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... Woolacombe is a seaside resort on the coast of North Devon, England with a long sandy beach and lies at the mouth of a valley. ... Yelland is a megalithic site in Devon. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Barnstaple - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1104 words)
Barnstaple is a town in the county of Devon in the South West of England.
Up until 1987, Barnstaple was a small isolated town, with a populating of around 10,000, with the mainstays of the economy being the RAF base at Chivenor, just north of the town, which was used as a base for Hawk jets up until the mid 90's, and agriculture.
Barnstaple Town (1847-1970), situated close by the Castle Mound was a through station on the LSWR line, running along the North bank of the Taw.
Lynton and Barnstaple Railway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1951 words)
The Lynton and Barnstaple Railway was a narrow-gauge railway running through the rugged and picturesque countryside of Exmoor in North Devon, England.
Following the opening of the Devon and Somerset Railway to Barnstaple, there were calls for the railway to be extended to serve the twin villages of Lynton and Lynmouth which were popular with holiday-makers.
The Lynton and Barnstaple Railway Bill was passed by the United Kingdom Parliament on 27th June 1895, and the first train ran on 11 May 1898.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m