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Encyclopedia > Barium
56 caesiumbariumlanthanum
Sr

Ba

Ra
General
Name, Symbol, Number barium, Ba, 56
Chemical series alkaline earth metals
Group, Period, Block 2, 6, s
Appearance silvery white
Standard atomic weight 137.327(7) g·mol−1
Electron configuration [Xe] 6s2
Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 18, 8, 2
Physical properties
Phase solid
Density (near r.t.) 3.51 g·cm−3
Liquid density at m.p. 3.338 g·cm−3
Melting point 1000 K
(727 °C, 1341 °F)
Boiling point 2170 K
(1897 °C, 3447 °F)
Heat of fusion 7.12 kJ·mol−1
Heat of vaporization 140.3 kJ·mol−1
Heat capacity (25 °C) 28.07 J·mol−1·K−1
Vapor pressure
P(Pa) 1 10 100 1 k 10 k 100 k
at T(K) 911 1038 1185 1388 1686 2170
Atomic properties
Crystal structure cubic body centered
Oxidation states 2
(strongly basic oxide)
Electronegativity 0.89 (scale Pauling)
Ionization energies 1st: 502.9 kJ/mol
2nd: 965.2 kJ/mol
3rd: 3600 kJ/mol
Atomic radius 215 pm
Atomic radius (calc.) 253 pm
Covalent radius 198 pm
Miscellaneous
Magnetic ordering paramagnetic
Electrical resistivity (20 °C) 332 n Ω·m
Thermal conductivity (300 K) 18.4 W·m−1·K−1
Thermal expansion (25 °C) 20.6 µm·m−1·K−1
Speed of sound (thin rod) (20 °C) 1620 m/s
Young's modulus 13 GPa
Shear modulus 4.9 GPa
Bulk modulus 9.6 GPa
Mohs hardness 1.25
CAS registry number 7440-39-3
Selected isotopes
Main article: Isotopes of barium
iso NA half-life DM DE (MeV) DP
130Ba 0.106% Ba is stable with 74 neutrons
132Ba 0.101% Ba is stable with 76 neutrons
133Ba syn 10.51 y ε 0.517 133Cs
134Ba 2.417% Ba is stable with 78 neutrons
135Ba 6.592% Ba is stable with 79 neutrons
136Ba 7.854% Ba is stable with 80 neutrons
137Ba 11.23% Ba is stable with 81 neutrons
138Ba 71.7% Ba is stable with 82 neutrons
References

Barium (IPA: /ˈbɛːɹiəm/) is a chemical element. It has the symbol Ba, and atomic number 56. Barium is a soft silvery metallic alkaline earth metal. It is never found in nature in its pure form due to its reactivity with air. Its oxide is historically known as baryta but it reacts with water and carbon dioxide and is not found as a mineral. The most common naturally occurring minerals are the very insoluble barium sulfate, BaSO4 (barite), and barium carbonate, BaCO3 (witherite). Benitoite is a rare gem containing barium. Barium may refer to: Barium, the chemical element Barium meal, a medical procedure Barium Springs, North Carolina, United States The Latin name for Bari, Italy Category: ... General Name, Symbol, Number caesium, Cs, 55 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 6, s Appearance silvery gold Standard atomic weight 132. ... General Name, Symbol, Number lanthanum, La, 57 Chemical series lanthanides Group, Period, Block 3, 6, f Appearance silvery white Atomic mass 138. ... General Name, Symbol, Number strontium, Sr, 38 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 5, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight 87. ... General Name, Symbol, Number radium, Ra, 88 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 7, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight (226) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... Image File history File links Original image: media:Ba-TableImage-BIG.png File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This is a standard display of the periodic table of the elements. ... An extended periodic table was suggested by Glenn T. Seaborg in 1969. ... This is a list of chemical elements, sorted by name and color coded according to type of element. ... A table of chemical elements ordered by atomic number and color coded according to type of element. ... A group, also known as a family, is a vertical column in the periodic table of the chemical elements. ... The alkaline earth metals are a series of elements comprising Group 2 (IUPAC style) of the periodic table: beryllium (Be), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). ... A group, also known as a family, is a vertical column in the periodic table of the chemical elements. ... In the periodic table of the elements, a period is a horizontal row of the table. ... A block of the periodic table of elements is a set of adjacent groups. ... The alkaline earth metals are the series of elements in Group 2 of the periodic table: beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium and radium (not always considered due to its very short half-life). ... A period 6 element is one of the chemical elements in the sixth row (or period) of the periodic table of the elements, including the Lanthanides. ... The s-block of the periodic table of elements consists of the first two groups: the alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, plus hydrogen. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... Barium sample. ... The atomic mass (ma) is the mass of an atom at rest, most often expressed in unified atomic mass units. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude we list here masses between 60. ... Hydrogen = 1 List of Elements in Atomic Number Order. ... Electron atomic and molecular orbitals In atomic physics and quantum chemistry, the electron configuration is the arrangement of electrons in an atom, molecule, or other physical structure (, a crystal). ... General Name, Symbol, Number xenon, Xe, 54 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 5, p Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 131. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... Example of a sodium electron shell model An electron shell, also known as a main energy level, is a group of atomic orbitals with the same value of the principal quantum number n. ... In the physical sciences, a phase is a set of states of a macroscopic physical system that have relatively uniform chemical composition and physical properties (i. ... For other uses, see Solid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Room temperature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The melting point of a crystalline solid is the temperature range at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... The melting point of a crystalline solid is the temperature range at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Italic text This article is about the boiling point of liquids. ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Standard enthalpy change of fusion of period three. ... The joule per mole (symbol: J·mol-1) is an SI derived unit of energy per amount of material. ... The standard enthalpy change of vaporization, ΔvHo, also (less correctly) known as the heat of vaporization is the energy required to transform a given quantity of a substance into a gas. ... The joule per mole (symbol: J·mol-1) is an SI derived unit of energy per amount of material. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vapor pressure is the pressure of a vapor in equilibrium with its non-vapor phases. ... Enargite crystals In mineralogy and crystallography, a crystal structure is a unique arrangement of atoms in a crystal. ... The oxidation number of an element in a molecule or complex is the charge that it would have if all the ligands (basically, atoms that donate electrons) were removed along with the electron pairs that were shared with the central atom[1]. It means that the oxidation number is the... Acids and bases: Acid-base reaction pH Self-ionization of water Buffer solutions Systematic naming Acid-base extraction Acidity function Proton affinity Acids: Strong acids Weak acids Superacids Lewis acids Mineral acids Organic acids Bases: Strong bases Weak bases Superbases Lewis bases Organic bases edit In chemistry, a base is... Electronegativity is a measure of the ability of an atom or molecule to attract electrons in the context of a chemical bond. ... The ionization energy (IE) of an atom or of a molecule is the energy required to strip it of an electron. ... Kilojoule per mole are an SI derived unit of energy per amount of material, where energy is measured in units of 1000 joules, and the amount of material is measured in mole units. ... Atomic radius: Ionic radius Covalent radius Metallic radius van der Waals radius edit Atomic radius, and more generally the size of an atom, is not a precisely defined physical quantity, nor is it constant in all circumstances. ... You have big harry skanky balls ... One picometre is defined as 1x10-12 metres, in standard units. ... You have big harry skanky balls ... Atomic radius: Ionic radius Covalent radius Metallic radius van der Waals radius edit The covalent radius, rcov, is a measure of the size of atom which forms part of a covalent bond. ... You have big harry skanky balls ... For other senses of this word, see magnetism (disambiguation). ... Simple Illustration of a paramagnetic probe made up from miniature magnets. ... // Headline text POOP!! Danny Hornsby (also known as Gnome) is a measure indicating how strongly a Gnome can opposes the flow of electric current. ... In physics, thermal conductivity, k, is the intensive property of a material that indicates its ability to conduct heat. ... During heat transfer, the energy that is stored in the intermolecular bonds between atoms changes. ... This page is about the physical speed of sound waves in a medium. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... In solid mechanics, Youngs modulus (E) is a measure of the stiffness of a given material. ... In materials science, shear modulus, G, or sometimes S or μ, sometimes referred to as the modulus of rigidity, is defined as the ratio of shear stress to the shear strain:[1] where = shear stress; force acts on area ; = shear strain; length changes by amount . ... The bulk modulus (K) of a substance essentially measures the substances resistance to uniform compression. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... Barium (Ba) Standard atomic mass: 137. ... For other uses, see Isotope (disambiguation). ... Natural abundance refers to the prevalence of different isotopes of an element as found in nature. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... The decay energy is the energy released by a nuclear decay. ... The electronvolt (symbol eV) is a unit of energy. ... In nuclear physics, a decay product, also known as a daughter product, is a nuclide resulting from the radioactive decay of a parent or precursor nuclide. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Synthetic radioisotope is a radionuclide that is not found in nature: no natural process or mechanism exists which produces it, or it is so unstable that it decays away in a very short period of time. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Electron capture is a decay mode for isotopes that will occur when there are too many protons in the nucleus of an atom, and there isnt enough energy to emit a positron; however, it continues to be a viable decay mode for radioactive isotopes that can decay by positron... General Name, Symbol, Number caesium, Cs, 55 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 6, s Appearance silvery gold Standard atomic weight 132. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stable isotopes are chemical isotopes that are not radioactive. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Recommended values for many properties of the elements, together with various references, are collected on these data pages. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... See also: List of elements by atomic number In chemistry and physics, the atomic number (also known as the proton number) is the number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... The alkaline earth metals are a series of elements comprising Group 2 (IUPAC style) of the periodic table: beryllium (Be), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). ... Reactivity refers to the rate at which a chemical substance tends to undergo a chemical reaction in time. ... “Air” redirects here. ... Barium hydroxide is a basic chemical compound, with the chemical formula Ba(OH)2. ... Baryte with Cerussite from Morocco Baryte with Galena and Hematite from Poland Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. ... In organic chemistry, a carbonate is a salt of carbonic acid. ... Witherite is a barium carbonate mineral, BaCO3, in the aragonite group. ... Benitoite is a rare blue silicate mineral, found in hydrothermally altered serpentinite. ...

Contents

Notable characteristics

Barium is a metallic element that is chemically similar to calcium but more reactive. This metal oxidizes very easily when exposed to air and is highly reactive with water or alcohol, producing hydrogen gas. Burning in air or oxygen produces not just barium oxide (BaO) but also the peroxide. Simple compounds of this heavy element are notable for their high specific gravity. This is true of the most common barium-bearing mineral, its sulfate barite BaSO4, also called 'heavy spar' due to the high density (4.5 g/cm³). This article is about metallic materials. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ... For other uses, see Chemical reaction (disambiguation). ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... Look up air in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... ... A peroxide is a compound containing an oxygen-oxygen single bond. ... Relative density (also known as specific gravity) is a measure of the density of a material. ... The sulfate anion, SO42− The structure and bonding of the sulfate ion In inorganic chemistry, a sulfate (IUPAC-recommended spelling; also sulphate in British English) is a salt of sulfuric acid. ... Baryte with Cerussite from Morocco Baryte with Galena and Hematite from Poland Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. ...


Applications

Barium has some medical and many industrial uses:

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An oil well is seen in Texas. ... Granulated Barium Sulfate Barium sulfate (or barium sulphate) is the white crystalline solid with the formula BaSO4. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... Preprepared Barium Sulfate suspension for oral consumption A barium meal is a procedure in which barium sulfate is ingested by a patient and, in conjunction with X-rays, images depicting the digestive system: the distal esophagus, stomach and duodenum, are obtained. ... A barium enema, also called a lower gastrointestinal series, is a medical procedure used to examine and dignose problems with the human large intestines. ... Barium carbonate (BaCO3), also known as witherite, is a chemical compound used in rat poison, bricks and cement. ... A rat in urban environment Rat poisons are a category of pest control chemicals intended to kill rats. ... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... This article or section should include material from Spark gap A spark plug is an electrical device that fits into the cylinder head of some internal combustion engines and ignites compressed aerosol gasoline by means of an electric spark. ... ... An electrode is an electrical conductor used to make contact with a metallic part of a circuit (e. ... Fluorescent lamps in Shinbashi, Tokyo, Japan Assorted types of fluorescent lamps. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... To prevent any remaining gases from remaining in a free state in a vacuum tube, modern tubes are constructed with getters, which are usually small, circular troughs filled with metals that oxidize quickly, with barium being the most common. ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... Barium carbonate (BaCO3), also known as witherite, is a chemical compound used in rat poison, bricks and cement. ... This article is about the material. ... The refractive index (or index of refraction) of a medium is a measure for how much the speed of light (or other waves such as sound waves) is reduced inside the medium. ... Baryte with Cerussite from Morocco Baryte with Galena and Hematite from Poland Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Barium Nitrate chemical formula Ba (NO3)2 is a salt of barium and nitrate. ... Barium sulfide is the chemical compound with the formula BaS. This material was once known as Bologna Stone, the first synthetic phosphor. ... Phosphorescent powder under visible light, ultraviolet light, and total darkness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lithopone is a white pigment, a mixture of barium sulphate and zinc sulphide. ... Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ... Granulated Barium Sulfate Barium sulfate (or barium sulphate) is the white crystalline solid with the formula BaSO4. ... Zinc sulfide (or zinc sulphide) is a chemical compound with the formula ZnS. Zinc sulfide is a white to yellow colored powder or crystal. ... Barium peroxide is a grey-white compound and oxidising agent. ... Aluminothermic reactions are exothermic chemical reactions using aluminium as the reducing agent at high temperature. ... Tracers from M16 rifles on U.S. Army firing range Tracer ammunition (tracers) use special bullets that are modified to accept a small pyrotechnic charge in their base. ... Barium titanate is an oxide of barium and titanium with the chemical formula BaTiO3. ... An electric vehicle is a vehicle that is propelled by electric motors. ... Yttrium barium copper oxide, or YBCO, chemical formula YBa2Cu3O7-δ, is a high-temperature superconductor with a superconducting temperature of 94K. Its discovery by C.W. Chu in 1987 launched the era of high-temperature superconductors. ...

History

Barium (Greek "barys" meaning "heavy") was first identified in 1774 by Carl Scheele and extracted in 1808 by Sir Humphry Davy in England. The oxide was at first called barote, by Guyton de Morveau, which was changed by Antoine Lavoisier to baryta, from which "barium" was derived to describe the metal. Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Carl Wilhelm Scheele Scheeles house with his pharmacy in Köping. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet, FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was a British chemist and physicist. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Louis-Bernard Guyton de Morveau (also Guyton-Morveau after the French Revolution; 1737-01-04 – 1816-01-02) was a French chemist and politician. ... Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (August 26, 1743 – May 8, 1794), the father of modern chemistry [1], was a French nobleman prominent in the histories of chemistry, finance, biology, and economics. ...


Occurrence

Because barium quickly becomes oxidized in air, it is difficult to obtain this metal in its pure form. It is primarily found in and extracted from the mineral barite which is crystalized barium sulfate. Barium is commercially produced through the electrolysis of molten barium chloride (BaCl2) Isolation (* follow):
For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Baryte with Cerussite from Morocco Baryte with Galena and Hematite from Poland Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. ... This article is about the chemical process. ... Barium chloride is the chemical compound with the formula BaCl2. ...

(cathode) Ba2+* + 2e- → Ba (anode) Cl-* → ½Cl2 (g) + e-

See also barium minerals. Diagram of a copper cathode in a Daniells cell. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... Diagram of a zinc anode in a galvanic cell. ... For other uses, see Gas (disambiguation). ...


Compounds

The most important compounds are barium peroxide, barium chloride, sulfate, carbonate, nitrate, and chlorate. Granulated Barium Sulfate Barium sulfate (or barium sulphate) is the white crystalline solid with the formula BaSO4. ... Barium carbonate (BaCO3), also known as witherite, is a chemical compound used in rat poison, bricks and cement. ... Barium Nitrate chemical formula Ba (NO3)2 is a salt of barium and nitrate. ... Barium Chlorate is a white crystaline solid. ...


See also barium compounds.


Isotopes

Main article: isotopes of barium

Naturally occurring barium is a mix of seven stable isotopes. There are twenty-two isotopes known, but most of these are highly radioactive and have half-lives in the several millisecond to several minute range. The only notable exceptions are 133Ba which has a half-life of 10.51 years, and 137mBa (2.55 minutes). Barium (Ba) Standard atomic mass: 137. ... For other uses, see Isotope (disambiguation). ... Radioactive decay is the set of various processes by which unstable atomic nuclei (nuclides) emit subatomic particles. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ...


Precautions

All water or acid soluble barium compounds are extremely poisonous. At low doses, barium acts as a muscle stimulant, while higher doses affect the nervous system, causing cardiac irregularities, tremors, weakness, anxiety, dyspnea and paralysis. This may be due to its ability to block potassium ion channels which are critical to the proper function of the nervous system. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Solution. ... The skull and crossbones symbol (Jolly Roger) traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... The nervous system of an animal coordinates the activity of the muscles, monitors the organs, constructs and also stops input from the senses, and initiates actions. ... Weakness can mean: The opposite of strength Weakness (medical) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... what up?? Anxiety is a physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components (Seligman, Walker & Rosenhan, 2001). ... Dyspnea (R06. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bacterial potassium channels shut (left, PDB code=1k4c) and open (right, 1lnq). ...


Barium sulfate can be used in medicine only because it does not dissolve, and is eliminated completely from the digestive tract. Unlike other heavy metals, barium does not bioaccumulate.[1] However, inhaled barium dust can accumulate in the lungs, a benign condition called baritosis. Granulated Barium Sulfate Barium sulfate (or barium sulphate) is the white crystalline solid with the formula BaSO4. ... A heavy metal is any of a number of higher atomic weight elements, which has the properties of a metallic substance at room temperature. ... If the input of a toxic substance to an organism is greater than the rate at which the substance is lost, the organism is said to be bioaccumulating that substance. ... Look up Benign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Baritosis is a benign type of pneumoconiosis, which is caused by deposition of inhaled barium dust in the lungs. ...


Oxidation occurs very easily and, to remain pure, barium should be kept under a petroleum-based fluid (such as kerosene) or other suitable oxygen-free liquids that exclude air. The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ... Kerosene or kerosine, also called paraffin oil or paraffin in British usage (not to be confused with the waxy solid also called paraffin wax or just paraffin) is a flammable hydrocarbon liquid. ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ...


Barium acetate could lead to death in high doses. Marie Robards poisoned her father with the substance in 1993 in Texas. She was tried and convicted in 1996.


References

  1. ^ http://www.epa.gov/region5/superfund/ecology/html/toxprofiles.htm#ba

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Look up barium in
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Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Barium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (611 words)
Barium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Ba and atomic number 56.
Barium oxide is used in a coating for the electrodes of fluorescent lamps, which facilitates the release of electrons.
Barium (Greek "barys" meaning "heavy") was first identified in 1774 by Carl Scheele and extracted in 1808 by Sir Humphry Davy in England.
Barium sulfate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (301 words)
The mineral barite is composed largely of barium sulfate and is a common ore of barium.
Although barium is a heavy metal, and its water soluble compounds are often highly toxic, the extremely low solubility of barium sulfate protects the patient from absorbing harmful amounts of the metal.
Barium sulfate is used as a filler in plastics and as a component of oil well drilling fluid to increase the density.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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