FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Baritone" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Baritone
Voice Type (ranges)
Female voices
Soprano
Mezzo-soprano
Alto or Contralto

Male voices Baritone generally refers to the vocal or instrumental part between the tenor and Bass lines. ... Voice type, often called Fach (pl. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... A mezzo-soprano (meaning medium soprano in Italian) is a female singer with a range usually extending from the A below middle C to the F an eleventh above middle C. Mezzo-sopranos generally have a darker (or lower) vocal tone than sopranos, and their vocal range is between that... This article is about the voice-type. ... In music, an alto is a singer with a vocal range somewhere between a tenor and a soprano. ...

Countertenor (Alto, Mezzo or Sopranist)
Tenor
Baritone
Bass-baritone
Bass

edit this - view history A countertenor is an adult male who sings in an alto, mezzo or soprano range, often through use of falsetto, or sometimes natural head voice. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... Mezzo may refer to one of the following: The Mezzo TV cable channel in Spain. ... A sopranist is a male singer who sings in the soprano vocal range. ... This article is about Tenor vocalists in music. ... A bass-baritone is a singing voice that shares certain qualities of both the baritone and the bass. ... A bass (or basso in Italian) is a male singer who sings in the deepest vocal range of the human voice. ...

Baritone (French: baryton; German: Bariton; Italian: baritono) is most commonly the type of male voice that lies between bass and tenor. Originally from the Greek βαρυτονος, meaning 'deep (or heavy) sounding', music for this voice is typically written in the range from the second A below middle C to the F above middle C (i.e. A2-F4) in choral music, and to G above middle C (i.e. A2 - G4) in operatic music, though it can be extended at either end. The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... A basso (or bass) is a male singer who sings in the lowest vocal range of the human voice. ... This article is about Tenor vocalists in music. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ...

Contents

History

The first use of the term "baritone" emerged as baritonans late in the 15th century,[1] usually in French sacred polyphonic music. At this early stage it was frequently used as the lowest of the voices (including the bass), but in 17th century Italy the term was all-encompassing and used to describe the average male choral voice. Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. ... In music, the word texture is often used in a rather vague way in reference to the overall sound of a piece of music. ...


Baritones took roughly the range we know today at the beginning of the 18th century but they were still lumped in with their bass colleagues until well into the 19th century. Indeed, many operatic works of the 18th century have roles marked as bass that in reality are low baritone roles. Examples of this are to be found, for instance, in the operas and oratorios of George Frideric Handel. The greatest and most enduring parts for baritones in 18th century operatic music were composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. They include Figaro and Count Almaviva in Le Nozze di Figaro, Guglielmo in Cosi fan Tutte, Papageno in Die Zauberflote and Masetto and the Don in Don Giovanni. “Handel” redirects here. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Le Nozze di Figaro, is a comic opera composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Beaumarchais. ... Così fan tutte is an opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... Die Zauberflöte (English title: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto in German by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ...


19th century

French baritone Victor Maurel (1848-1923)
French baritone Victor Maurel (1848-1923)

The so-called bel canto style of vocalism which arose in Italy in the early 19th century supplanted the castrato-dominated opera seria of the previous century. It also led to the baritone being viewed as a separate voice category to the bass. Traditionally, basses in operas had been cast as authority figures such as a king or high priest; but with the advent of the more fluid baritone voice, the roles allotted by composers to lower male voices expanded in the direction of trusted companions or even romantic leads - normally the province of tenors. More often than not, however, baritones found themselves portraying villains. Image File history File links VictorMaurel. ... Image File history File links VictorMaurel. ... Victor Maurel (June 17, 1848 in Marseilles-October 22, 1923 in New York City ) was a French baritone. ... The term Bel Canto may refer to: Belcanto, a vocal technique; or Bel Canto, a novel by Ann Patchett. ... A castrato is a male soprano, mezzo-soprano, or alto voice produced either by castration of the singer before puberty or one who, because of an endocrinological condition, never reaches sexual maturity. ...


The principal composers of bel canto opera are considered to be:


The prolific operas of these composers, plus the works of Verdi's maturity, such as Don Carlos, the revised Simon Boccanegra, Aida, Otello and Falstaff, blazed many new and rewarding performance pathways for baritones. Figaro in Il Barbiere is often called the first true baritone role and Donizetti and Verdi in their vocal writing went on to emphasise the top fifth of the baritone voice, rather than its lower notes - thus generating a more brilliant sound. Further pathways opened up when the musically complex and physically demanding operas of Richard Wagner also began to enter the mainstream repertory of the world's opera houses during the second half of the 19th century. Portrait Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 – November 13, 1868)[1] was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... The Barber of Seville is a theatre play by Beaumarchais, written in 1775, and originally entitled Le Barbier de Séville in French. ... William Tell is an opera by Gioacchino Rossini. ... Gaetano Donizetti Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (29 November 1797 – 8 April 1848) was a famous Italian opera composer. ... Don Pasquale is a comic opera (opera buffa) in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ... Lelisir damore (The Elixir of Love) is a comic opera in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani, based on Eugène Scribes Le Philtre. ... Lucia di Lammermoor is a dramma tragico, or opera, in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. ... This article is about the historical person. ... La favorite (The Favorite) is an opera in five acts by Gaetano Donizetti to a French libretto by Alphonse Royer and Gustave Vaëz, based on the play Le comte de Comminges by Baculard dArnaud. ... Vincenzo Bellini Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (November 3, 1801 – September 23, 1835) was an Italian opera composer. ... I puritani (The Puritans) is an opera in three acts, by Vincenzo Bellini. ... Norma can refer to: The coolest person in the world! Norma, a constellation of the southern sky Norma, a city in the province of Latina, southern Lazio (Italy) Norma, an opera by Vincenzo Bellini Norma arm, a spiral arm in the Milky Way galaxy Norma, a Swedish company manufacturing ammunition... Giacomo Meyerbeer Giacomo Meyerbeer (September 5, 1791 – May 2, 1864) was a noted German-born opera composer, and the first great exponent of Grand Opera. ... Les Huguenots is a French opera by Giacomo Meyerbeer. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Nabucco is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the biblical story and the play by Anicet-Bourgeois and Francis Cornu. ... Ernani is an operatic dramma lirico in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Hernani by Victor Hugo. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... La traviata is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... This article refers to the opera Don Carlos by Giuseppe Verdi (and its revised Italian version, known as Don Carlo). ... Simon Boccanegra is an opera with a prologue and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Simón Bocanegra by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... This article is about the opera. ... For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini. ... Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page Sir John Falstaff is a fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare as a companion to Prince Hal, the future King Henry V. A fat, vainglorious, and cowardly knight, Falstaff leads the apparently wayward Prince Hal into trouble, but he... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ...


The supreme baritone of the first half of the 19th century was Antonio Tamburini (1800-1876). He was a famous Don Giovanni in Mozart's eponymous opera as well as being a Bellini and Donizetti specialist. Commentators praised his voice for its beauty, flexibility and smooth tonal emission - the hallmarks of a bel canto singer. The most important of Tamburini's immediate successors were: Giorgio Ronconi, who created the title role in Verdi's Nabucco; Francesco Graziani, who created Don Carlo in Verdi's La Forza del Destino; and Leone Giraldoni, who created Renato in Verdi's Un Ballo in Maschera and was the first Simon Boccanegra. Antonio Tamburini (March 28, 1800 - November 8, 1876) was an Italian baritone. ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... Giorgio Ronconi (6 August 1810 - 8 January 1890) was an Italian baritone, the first singer of the title-role in Giuseppe Verdis Nabucco (1843). ... Francesco Ciccio Graziani (born December 16, 1952 in Subiaco, Rome) is a football manager and former player. ... La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny) is an Italian opera by Giuseppe Verdi. ... Leone Giraldoni, photographed circa 1865 Leone Giraldoni (born circa 1824, Paris; died September 19, 1897, Moscow) was a celebrated Italian operatic baritone. ... Un ballo in maschera, or A Masked Ball, is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. ...


Luckily, the gramophone was invented early enough to capture on disc the elegant voices of the top Italian Verdi and Donizetti baritones of the last two decades of the 19th century, whose operatic performances were marked by a degree of re-creative freedom and technical finish not encountered today. They included the dazzling Mattia Battistini (known as the "King of Baritones"), Giuseppe Kaschmann (who, atypically for his kind, sang Wagner's Telramund and Amfortas in German at Bayreuth in the 1890s), Giuseppe Campanari, Antonio Magini-Coletti, Mario Ancona (the first Silvio in Pagliacci), Giuseppe Pacini and Antonio Scotti, (who came to the Met from Europe in 1899 and remained on the roster of singers until 1933!). Meanwhile, Antonio Pini-Corsi was the dominant Italian buffo (comic) baritone between the 1880s and WW1. Notable among their contemporaries were those suave and technically adroit French baritones Jean Lassalle (described as the "best schooled" baritone of his era), Victor Maurel (the creator of Iago, Falstaff and Tonio in Pagliacci) and Maurice Renaud (a compelling singing-actor) - each of whom enjoyed an illustrious career on either side of the Atlantic. They made valuable records, too. Three other significant Francophone baritones who left a legacy of early recordings are Leon Melchissedec and Jean Note of the Paris Opera and Gabriel Soulacroix of the Opera-Comique. Mattia Battistini, Italian operatic baritone, born Rome, 27 February 1856, died Collebaccaro di Contigliano, Rieti, 7 November 1928. ... Mario Ancona (1860-1931) was a Italian baritone, born in Livorno, Italy, and died in Florence. ... Cover of the first edition of Pagliacci published by E. Sonzogno, Milan, 1892 Pagliacci (Clowns) is an opera consisting of a prologue and two acts written and composed by Ruggero Leoncavallo. ... Antonio Scotti Antonio Scotti (January 25, 1866-February 26, 1936) was an Italian baritone. ... Antonio Pini-Corsi (June, 1859-April 21, 1918) was an Italian bass. ... Opera buffa (comic opera), also known as Commedia per musica (musical comedy), or Dramma giocoso per musica (musical dramatic comedy), is a form of opera. ... Jean Lassalle (born 3 May 1955 in Lourdios-Ichère, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Aquitaine, Occitania, France) is a French Occitan politician and UDF deputy in the National Assembly. ... Victor Maurel (June 17, 1848 in Marseilles-October 22, 1923 in New York City ) was a French baritone. ... Maurice Renaud, French operatic baritone, born on 24 July 1860? in Bordeaux died 16 October 1933, Paris. ...


The Quaker baritone David Bispham, who sang in London and New York between 1891 and 1903, was the leading American male singer of this period. He, too, recorded for the gramophone. Portrait of David Bispham David Scull Bispham (January 5, 1857–October 2, 1921), was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to William Danforth Bispham and Jane Lippincott Scull, who were Quakers. ...


Whilst on the subject of ancient recordings, the oldest-born star baritone known for sure to have made solo gramophone discs was the Englishman Sir Charles Santley (1834-1922). Santley made his operatic debut in Italy in 1858 and was still giving critically acclaimed concerts in London in the 1890s. The composer of Faust, Charles Gounod, penned the aria "Even bravest heart" for him in 1864. A couple of primitive cylinder recordings dating from about 1900 have been attributed by collectors to the incomparable French baritone of the 1860s and '70s, Jean-Baptiste Faure (1830-1914) - the creator of Posa in Verdi's Don Carlos. This attribution is not certain, however. A contemporary of Faure's, Antonio Cotogni, (1831-1918) - the foremost Italian baritone of his generation - can be heard, briefly and dimly, at the age of 77, on a duet recording with the tenor Francesco Marconi. (Cotogni and Marconi had sung together in the first London performance of Amilcare Ponchielli's La Gioconda in 1883, performing the roles of Barnaba and Enzo respectively.) Charles Santley in Aubers opera Fra Diavolo. ... For other uses, see Faust (disambiguation). ... Charles Gounod. ... Jean-Baptiste Faure (born 15 January 1830 in Moulins - died 9 November 1914 in Paris)[1] was a celebrated French baritone and composer. ... Amilcare Ponchielli (August 31, 1834 – January 17, 1886) was an Italian composer, largely of operas. ... La Gioconda can refer to: A famous painting by Leonardo da Vinci, better known as Mona Lisa; An opera by Amilcare Ponchielli. ...


There are 19th century references to certain baritone sub-types. They include the tenorish baryton-Martin, named after French singer Jean-Blaise Martin (1768/69-1837)[2], and the deeper, dramatic-voiced Heldenbariton of Wagnerian opera.


Perhaps the most accomplished Heldenbaritons of Wagner's day were Franz Betz and Theodor Reichmann. The former created Hans Sachs in Die Meistersinger and undertook Wotan in the first Der Ring des Niebelungen cycle at Bayreuth, while the latter created Amfortas in Parsifal, also at Bayreuth. Lyric German baritones sang lighter Wagnerian roles such as Wolfram in Tannhauser, Kurwenal in Tristan und Isolde or Telramund in Lohengrin. They made large strides, too, in the performance of art song and oratorio, with Franz Schubert favouring several baritones for his music, in particular Johann Michael Vogl.[3] Hans Sachs (November 5, 1494 - January 19, 1576) was a German meistersinger (mastersinger), poet, playwright and shoemaker. ... Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (The Master Singers of Nuremberg) is an opera in three acts, written and composed by Richard Wagner. ... For other meanings of Odin and Wotan see Odin (disambiguation) Odin (Old Norse Óðinn, Swedish Oden) is usually considered the supreme god of Germanic and Norse mythology. ... Valkyrie Warrior Maiden by artist Arthur Rackham (1912) Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly translated into English as The Ring of the Nibelung or The Nibelungs Ring, is a series of four epic music dramas based loosely on figures and elements of Germanic paganism, particularly from the Icelanders sagas and... Bayreuth [pronounced by-royt] is a town in northern Bavaria, Germany, on the Red Main river in a valley between the Frankish Alb and the Fichtelgebirge. ... Parsifal is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... In the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento for soft-core High Culture. ... Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. ... In some German Arthurian literature, Lohengrin is the son of Parzival (Percival). ... Schubert redirects here. ... Johann Michael Vogl (August 10, 1768–November 19, 1840) was an Austrian baritone singer and composer. ...


Nineteenth century operettas became the preserve of lightweight baritone voices. They were given comic parts in the tradition of the previous century's comic bass by Gilbert and Sullivan in many of their productions. This did not prevent the French master of operetta, Jacques Offenbach, from assigning the villain's role in Les Contes d'Hoffmann to a big-voiced baritone for the sake of dramatic effect.[4] Other 19th century French composers like Meyerbeer, Hector Berlioz, Camille Saint-Saens, Georges Bizet and Jules Massenet wrote juicy parts for baritones, too. These included Nelusko in L'Africaine (Meyerbeer's last opera), Mephistopheles in La Damnation de Faust (a role also sung by basses), the Priest of Dagon in Samson et Dalila, Escamillo in Carmen, Zurga in Les Pecheurs de Perles, Lescaut in Manon, Athanael in Thais and Herod in Herodiade. Russian composers also included substantial baritone parts in their operas. Witness the title roles in Peter Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin (which received its first production in 1879) and Alexander Borodin's Prince Igor (1890). W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880) was a French composer and cellist of the Romantic era with German-Jewish descent and one of the originators of the operetta form. ... Les contes dHoffmann (Tales of Hoffmann) is an opera by Jacques Offenbach. ... Painting of Berlioz by Gustave Courbet, 1850. ... Charles Camille Saint-Sa ns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ... Georges Bizet Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875) was a French composer and pianist of the romantic era. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... LAfricaine (The African Woman) is an opera by Giacomo Meyerbeer. ... The Damnation of Faust (French: La damnation de Faust) is work for orchestra, voices, and chorus written by Hector Berlioz (he himself called it a légende dramatique). The libretto was adapted by Berlioz from Goethes Faust. ... This article or section should be merged with Samson and Delilah (opera) Samson et Dalila is an opera in three acts (or four tableaux) composed by Camille Saint-Saëns, initially in 1866 to 1868, and reworked from 1873 to 1877. ... For other uses, see Carmen (disambiguation). ... Les Pêcheurs de Perles (The Pearlfishers) is a three-act opera by Georges Bizet, to a libretto by Eugène Cormon and Michael Carré. While not nearly as popular as his far more famous Carmen, it contains a wealth of attractive music and has found some popularity despite its... Manon is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Henri Meilhac and Philippe Gille, based on L’histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut by Abbé Prévost. ... Hérodiade is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Paul Milliet and Henri Grémont, based on the novella Hérodias by Gustave Flaubert. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Eugene Onegin (Russian: Евгений Онегин, BGN/PCGN: Yevgeniy Onegin) is a novel in verse written by Aleksandr Pushkin. ... Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin (Russian: , Aleksandr Porfirevič Borodin) (31 Oct. ... For the historical figure, see Igor Svyatoslavich. ...


Mozart continued to be sung throughout the 19th century although, generally speaking, his operas were not revered to the same extent that they are today by music critics and audiences. Back then, baritones rather than high basses normally sang Don Giovanni - arguably Mozart's greatest male operatic creation. Famous Dons of the late 19th/early 20th centuries included Scotti and Maurel (see the photograph accompanying this article) - as well as Portugal's Francisco d'Andrade and Sweden's John Forsell.


20th century

The dawn of the 20th century opened up more opportunities for baritones than ever before as a taste for strenuously exciting vocalism and lurid, "slice-of-life" operatic plots took hold in Italy and spread elsewhere. The most prominent verismo baritones included such major singers in Europe and America as the polished Giuseppe De Luca (the first Sharpless in Madama Butterfly), Mario Sammarco (the first Gerard in Andrea Chenier), Eugenio Giraldoni (the first Scarpia in Tosca), Pasquale Amato (the first Rance in La Fanciulla del West), Riccardo Stracciari (noted for his richly attractive timbre) and Domenico Viglione-Borghesi, whose voice was exceeded in size only by that of the lion-voiced Titta Ruffo. Ruffo was the most commanding Italian baritone of his era or, arguably, any other era. He was at his prime from the early 1900s to the early 1920s and triumphed in Italy, England and America (in Chicago and later at the Met). Giuseppe de Luca, an Italian baritone, was born in Rome in 1876 and died in New York in 1950. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. ... Mario Sammarco (December 13, 1868 - January 24, 1930) was an Italian operatic baritone. ... Andrea Chénier is an opera in four acts by Umberto Giordano to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica, based on the life of the French poet André Chénier (1762-1794). ... For other uses, see Tosca (disambiguation). ... La Fanciulla del West (The Girl of the Golden West) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Guelfo Civinini and Carlo Zangarini, based on the play The Girl of the Golden West by David Belasco. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Titta Ruffo, Italian opera singer (Pisa, June 9, 1877 - Florence, July 5, 1953), was generally regarded as the greatest Italian baritone of his generation - or any generation since. ...


Between them, these baritones established the echt performance style for baritones undertaking roles in verismo operas. The chief verismo composers were Giacomo Puccini, Ruggero Leoncavallo, Pietro Mascagni, Alberto Franchetti, Umberto Giordano and Francesco Cilea. Verdi's works continued to remain popular, however, with audiences in Italy, the Spanish-speaking countries, the United States and the United Kingdom and, interestingly enough, Germany, where there was a major Verdi revival in Berlin between the Wars. Verismo was an Italian literary movement born approximately between 1875 and 1895. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Ruggiero Leoncavallo (April 23, 1857- August 9, 1919) was an Italian opera composer. ... Pietro Mascagni (Livorno December 7, 1863 – Rome August 2, 1945) is one of the most important Italian opera composers of the turn of the 20th century. ... Alberto Franchetti (18 September 1860 – 4 August 1942) was an Italian opera composer. ... Umberto Giordano Umberto Giordano (August 28, 1867 - November 12, 1948) was an Italian composer, mainly of opera. ... Francesco Cilea, (Palmi, near Reggio Calabria, July 26, 1866 - Varazze, near Savona, November 20, 1950) was an Italian opera composer, whose early success was not sustained, as taste in music changed. ...


Outside the field of Italian opera, an important addition to the Austro-German repertory occurred in 1905. This was the premiere of Richard Strauss's Salome, with the pivotal part of John the Baptist assigned to a baritone. (The enomous-voiced Dutch baritone Anton van Rooy - a Wagner specialist - sang John when the opera reached the Met in 1907). Then, in 1925, Germany's Leo Schützendorf created the title baritone role in Alban Berg's harrowing Wozzeck.[5]. In a separate development, the French composer Claude Debussy's post-Wagnerian masterpiece Pelleas et Melisande featured not one but two lead baritones at its 1902 premiere. These two baritones, Jean Perier and Hector Dufranne, possessed contrasting voices. (Dufranne had a darker, more powerful instrument than Perier, who was a true baryton-Martin.) This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Coin of Salome (daughter of Herodias), queen of Chalcis and Armenia Minor. ... Anton van Rooy (January 1, 1870-November 28, 1932) was a Dutch baritone. ... Bust of Alban Berg at Schiefling, Carinthia, Austria Alban Maria Johannes Berg (February 9, 1885 – December 24, 1935) was an Austrian composer. ... Wozzeck is the first opera by the Austrian composer Alban Berg (1885-1935). ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Pelléas et Mélisande is a famous Symbolist play by Maurice Maeterlinck about the forbidden, doomed love of the title characters. ...


Characteristic of the Wagnerian baritones of the 20th century was a general progression of individual singers from higher-lying baritone parts to lower-pitched ones. This was the case with Hans Hotter. Hotter made his debut in 1929. As a young singer he appeared in Verdi and created the Commandant in Richard Strauss's Friedenstag and Olivier in Capriccio. By the 1950s, however, he was being hailed as the top Wagnerian bass-baritone in the world. His Wotan was especially praised by critics for its muscianship. Other great Wagnerian baritones have included Hotter's predecessors Leopold Demuth, Anton van Rooy, Hermann Weil, Clarence Whitehill, Friedrich Schorr, Rudolf Bockelmann and Hans Hermann Nissen. Demuth, van Rooy, Weil and Whitehill were at their peak in the late 1800s and early 1900s in Europe and/or America while Schorr, Bockelmann and Nissen were stars of the 1920s and '30s, when the art of Wagner singing attained a level of excellence not matched since at the Met, Covent Garden, Berlin, Bayreuth and Vienna. Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Hans Hotter (January 19, 1909 – December 8, 2003) was a German operatic bass-baritone, admired internationally after World War II for the power, beauty and intelligence of his singing, especially in Wagners masterpieces. ... Friedenstag (Peace Day) is an opera in one act by Richard Strauss to a German libretto by Joseph Gregor. ... A capriccio or caprice is a piece of music, usually fairly free in form and of a lively character. ... Friedrich Schorr (1888 - 1953) was a Hungarian bass-baritone who sang in opera. ...


In addition to their heavyweight Wagnerian cousins, there was a plethora of superlative baritones with more lyrical voices active in Germany and Austria during the period between the outbreak of WW1 in 1914 and the end of WW2 in 1945. The finest of them were the technically brilliant Joseph Schwarz, Heinrich Schlusnus (a master of smooth-toned legato singing), Herbert Janssen, Willi Domgraf-Fassbaender, Karl Schmidt-Walter and Gerhard Husch. Their inter-war Italian counterparts included, among others, Carlo Galeffi (who possessed a particularly beautiful voice), Giuseppe Danise, Enrico Molinari, Cesare Formichi, Luigi Montesanto, Apollo Granforte, Benvenuto Franci, Mario Basiola, Giovanni Inghilleri, Carlo Morelli (a Chilean by birth) and Carlo Tagliabue. (The last named baritone did not retire until 1958.) Heinrich Schlusnus (August 6, 1888-June 19, 1952) was a German baritone. ... Herbert Janssen (* September 22, 1895 in Cologne; † June 3, 1965 in New York) was a german baritone. ... Carlo Tagliabue (Mariano Comense, January 13, 1898 – Monza, April 5, 1978) was an Italian baritone. ...


One of the best known Verdi baritones of the 1920s and '30s, Mariano Stabile, sang Iago and Rigoletto and was a celebrated La Scala Falstaff under the baton of Arturo Toscanini. Stabile appeared also in London, Chicago and Salzburg. He was noted more for his histrionic skills than for his voice, however. Stabile was followed by Tito Gobbi - a versatile singing-actor capable of unforgettable comic and tragic performances during the years of his prime in the 1940s, '50s and early '60s. He learned more than 100 roles in his lifetime and was mostly known for his roles in Verdi and Puccini operas, including gripping appearances as Scarpia opposite soprano Maria Callas as Tosca at Covent Garden. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Tito Gobbi (October 24, 1913 – March 5, 1984) was an Italian baritone. ... Maria Callas in a casual moment, 1960s Maria Callas (Greek: Μαρία Κάλλας) (December 2, 1923 – September 16, 1977) was an American born, Greek dramatic coloratura soprano and perhaps the best-known opera singer of the post-World War II period. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ...


Gobbi's competitors included Gino Bechi, Giuseppe Valdengo, Paolo Silveri, Giuseppe Taddei, Ettore Bastianini and Giangiacomo Guelfi. Another of Gobbi's contemporaries was the Welshman Sir Geraint Evans, who famously sang Falstaff at Glyndebourne and created the roles of Mr. Flint and Mountjoy in works by Benjamin Britten. Some considered his best role to have been Wozzeck, however. The next significant Welsh baritone was Bryn Terfel, who made his premiere at Glyndebourne in 1990 and has gone on to build an international career as Falstaff and, more generally, in the operas of Mozart and Wagner.[6] Gino Bechi (16 October 1913 - 2 February 1993) was an Italian operatic bass-baritone. ... Giuseppe Valdengo (born 24 May 1914) was an Italian operatic baritone. ... Giuseppe Taddei (born June 26, 1916) was an Italian baritone known for his work in Italian opera, particularly the works of Giuseppe Verdi, as well as for his work in Wolfgang Amadeus Mozarts and Richard Wagners operas. ... Ettore Bastianini (September 24, 1922–January 25, 1967) was an Italian opera singer who began his professional career as a bass, then earned worldwide acclaim as a baritone, particularly in Verdi roles, before dying of throat cancer at the age of forty-four. ... The Welsh baritone Geraint Llewellyn Evans (16 February 1922 – 19 September 1992) was a well-known opera singer, noted for such roles as Papageno in The Magic Flute, Falstaff, and title-role of Wozzeck, among others. ... Glyndebourne Festival Opera is a opera festival held at Glyndebourne House near Lewes, in southern England. ... Billy Budd is an English language opera by Benjamin Britten, first performed at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London on December 1, 1951. ... Gloriana is an opera in three acts by Benjamin Britten to an English libretto by William Plomer, based on historical incidents. ... Britten redirects here. ... Bryn Terfel The Welsh baritone Bryn Terfel, CBE (born November 9, 1965) is one of the best-known contemporary opera and concert singers. ...


Despite the European dominance of classical singing, an outstanding dynasty of virile-voiced American baritones arose in the 1920s. This dynasty persisted as an unbroken chain into the 1960s. Outstanding among its members were the Met-based Verdians Lawrence Tibbett (a superb singing-actor), Richard Bonelli, John Charles Thomas, Leonard Warren and Robert Merrill. They were fine exponents of French opera, too - as was that excellent Paris-based American baritone of the 1920s and '30s, Arthur Endreze. Look up Met in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lawrence Tibbett Lawrence Mervil Tibbett (November 16, 1896 - July 15, 1960) is acknowledged as one of the greatest American singers of opera. ... John Charles Thomas was an American baritone known for his exuberant singing style and powerful voice. ... The American opera singer Leonard Warren (April 21, 1911 - March 4, 1960) was a famous baritone who was associated for many years with the Metropolitan Opera in New York. ... Robert Merrill (June 4, 1917 – October 23, 2004) was an American opera baritone. ...


Also to be found singing Verdi roles at the Met, Covent Garden and the Vienna Opera during the late 1930s and the 1940s was the expansive-voiced Hungarian baritone, Sandor (Alexander) Sved.


Turning to more recent times, the leading Italian Verdi baritones of the 1970s and '80s were Italy's Renato Bruson and Piero Cappuccilli, America's Sherill Milnes and Sweden's Ingvar Wixell. At the same time, Britain's Sir Thomas Allen was considered to be the most versatile baritone of his generation in regards to repertoire, which ranged from Mozart to Verdi, through French and Russian opera, to modern English music. Another British baritone, Norman Bailey, established himself internationally as perhaps the most impressive Wotan and Hans Sachs since Hotter. He had, however, a distinguished if lighter-voiced rival during the 1960s and '70s in the person of Thomas Stewart from America. Other notable post-War Wagnerian baritones have been Canada's George London, Germany's Hermann Uhde and, more recently, America's James Morris. Renato Bruson (born January 13, 1936) is an Italian operatic baritone. ... Piero Cappuccilli in the title role of Simon Boccanegra The Italian baritone Piero Cappuccilli (1929 - 12 July 2005) was a famous opera singer, best know for his Verdi roles, particularly Macbeth and Simon Boccanegra. ... Milnes as Scarpia in Tosca Sherrill Milnes (born January 10, 1935) is an American baritone famous for his Verdi roles. ... Ingvar Wixell born May 7, 1931 in Luleå is a Swedish baritone opera singer. ... Sir Thomas Allen is an English opera singer from Seaham Harbour, County Durham. ... Thomas Stewart was an illegitimate son of King Robert II of Scotland. ... George London could refer to two different people: George London: American operatic baritone George London: Landscape architect. ... Hermann Uhde (July 20, 1914–October 10, 1965 was a German Wagnerian baritone. ... There have been several people named James Morris: James Morris, (1893-01-02–1980-07-20) Justice of the Supreme Court of North Dakota (1935–1964), a trial judge for the IG Farben Trial. ...


Among the late 20th century baritones noted throughout the opera world for their Verdi performances was Vladimir Chernov, who emerged from the former USSRto become a Met favourite. Chernov followed in the footsteps of such richly endowed East European baritones as Joachim Tartakov, Oskar Kamionsky (called the "Russian Battistini"), Waclaw Brzezinski (called the "Polish Battistini"), Georgy Baklanov and, during a career lasting from 1935 to 1966, the Bolshoi's Pavel Lisitsian. Dmitri Hvorostovsky and Sergei Leiferkus are two other first-rate Russian baritones of the modern era who appear in the West. They sing Verdi and excel in the works of their native composers, including Tchaikovsky (Eugene Onegin, The Queen of Spades). CCCP redirects here. ... Bolshoi Theatre The Bolshoi Theatre is a theatre and theater company in Moscow, Russia, which gives performances of plays, ballet, and opera. ... Pavel Lisitsian (Павел Герасимович Лисициан) (November 6, 1911-July 6, 2004) was an outstanding Soviet baritone opera singer who performed in the Bolshoi Opera, Moscow from 1940 until his retirement from stage in 1966. ... Dmitri Aleksandrovich Hvorostovsky (Russian: , born October 16, 1962), is a top baritone opera singer from Russia. ... Sergei Leiferkus (born April 4, 1946) is an operatic baritone from Russia, known for his dramatic technique and powerful voice particularly in Russian and Italian repertoire. ... The Queen of Spades (Пиковая дама in Russian, Pikovaya dama in transliteration) is an opera in three acts by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to a Russian libretto by the composers brother Modest Tchaikovsky, based on a short story by the poet Aleksandr Pushkin. ...


In the realm of French song, few performers during the post-War era have surpassed the cultivated interpretations of the bass-baritone Jose van Dam and the lighter-voiced Gérard Souzay. Souzay's repertoire extended from the Baroque works of Jean-Baptiste Lully to 20th century composers such as Francis Poulenc. Pierre Bernac, Souzay's teacher, was the quintessential interpreter of Poulenc's songs in the previous generation. Older baritones identified with this style include France's Dinh Gilly and Charles Panzera and Australia's John Brownlee. Another Australian, Peter Dawson, made a small but precious legacy of benchmark Handel recordings during the 1920s and '30s, as well as winning tremendous fame throughout the then British Empire as a singer of popular ballads. (Dawson, incidentally, acquired his impeccable Handelian technique from Sir Charles Santley.) Yet another Australian baritone of distinction between the wars was Harold Williams, who was based in the United Kingdom. The best British-born baritones of the 1930s and '40s were Dennis Noble, who sang Italian and English operatic roles, and the Mozartian Roy Henderson. Both appeared often at Covent Garden. A bass-baritone is a singing voice that shares certain qualities of both the baritone and the bass. ... Baron José van Dam (August 25, 1940) is one of the most prominent and sought-after interpreters of the baritone-bass repertoire. ... Gérard Marcel Souzay (December 8, 1918 – August 17, 2004) was a French baritone singer. ... Jean-Baptiste de Lully, originally Giovanni Battista di Lulli (November 28, 1632 – March 22, 1687), was an Italian-born French composer, who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. ... Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc (IPA: ) (January 7, 1899 - January 30, 1963) was a French composer and a member of the French group Les Six. ... Pierre Bernac was born as Pierre Bertin on 12 January 1899. ... Charles Panzéra, Swiss operatic and concert baritone, born Geneva, February 16, 1896; died Paris, June 6, 1976. ... John Edward Brownlee (August 27, 1884 - July 15, 1961), Canadian politician, was Premier of Alberta between 1925 and 1934. ... Peter Dawson (31 January 1882-27 September 1961) was an Australian bass/baritone in the 1920s and 1930s when he was possibly the most popular singer of that era. ... Dr. Harold Williams, M.Sc, Ph. ... Denis Noble FRS (born November 16, 1936) is an eminent British biologist who held the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology at Oxford University from 1984-2004 and is now Professor Emeritus and co-Director of Computational Physiology. ... Roy Henderson (July 4, 1899 – March 16, 2000) was a popular British baritone in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. ...


Prior to WW2, Germany's Heinrich Schlusnus, Gerhard Hüsch and Herbert Janssen were celebrated for their beautifully sung lieder recitals as well as for their mellifluous operatic performances in Verdi, Mozart and Wagner respectively. After the war's conclusion, Hermann Prey and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau appeared on the scene, donning their predecessors' mantle as the most renowned German baritones of their day. In addition to his interpretations of lieder and the works of Mozart, Prey sang in Strauss operas and tackled lighter Wagner roles such as Wolfram. Fischer-Dieskau sang parts in 'fringe' operas by the likes of Ferruccio Busoni and Paul Hindemith as well as appearing in standard works by Verdi and Wagner. He earned his principal renown, however, as a lieder singer of penetrating intelligence. Talented German and Austrian lieder singers of a younger generation include Olaf Bär, Matthias Goerne, Wolfgang Holzmair, Thomas Quasthoff, Stephan Genz and Christian Gerhaher. Hermann Prey (July 11, 1929 – July 22, 1998) was a German bass-baritone. ... The German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (born May 28, 1925) is regarded by many as the finest Lieder singer of his generation. ... Ferruccio Busoni Ferruccio Busoni (April 1, 1866 – July 27, 1924) was an Italian composer, pianist, music teacher and conductor. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Olaf Bär (born 1957 in Dresden) is a German operatic baritone. ... Matthias Goerne (born 1967) is a German baritone. ... The German bass-baritone Thomas Quasthoff (born November 9, 1959) is generally regarded as one of the finest lieder singers of his generation. ...


Well-known non-Germanic baritones of recent times have included the Italians Giorgio Zancanaro and Leo Nucci and the versatile American Thomas Hampson. Unfortunately, as the 21st century unfolds, there is a dearth of genuine Donizetti, Verdi and verismo baritones when compared to the vocal abundance of past eras. Gallic baritones with voices suited to the works of Meyerbeer, Massenet, Gounod and Hector Berlioz, not to mention the French operas of Rossini, Donizetti and Verdi, are also distressingly scarce nowadays. Big-voiced yet technically adroit Wagnerians are almost as uncommon. High standards of musicianship generally prevail among today's baritones, however, in the performance of the works of Mozart and other 18th century operatic composers. Giorgio Zancanaro, born 9 May 1939 in Verona, Italy is an Italian baritone. ... Leo Nucci (Born in Castiglione dei Pepoli, Bologna on April 16, 1942) is arguably the worlds greatest living Verdi and Verisimo baritone. ... Thomas Hampson is the name of: Thomas Hampson, the British athlete. ... Painting of Berlioz by Gustave Courbet, 1850. ...


Classification

Lyric baritone

  • Common Range: From the B below low C to the G above middle C (B2 to G4).
  • Description: A sweeter, milder sounding baritone voice, lacking in harshness; lighter and perhaps mellower than the dramatic baritone. It is probably the most common of the baritone voice types and is typically assigned to comic roles.
Common vocal ranges represented
on a musical keyboard
  • Singers:
    • Nmon Ford
    • Frank Guarrera

Le nozze di Figaro ossia la folle giornata (Trans: ), K. 492, is an opera buffa (comic opera) composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro (1784). ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Così fan tutte is an opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Human voices may be classified according to their vocal range — the highest and lowest pitches that they can produce. ... The layout of a typical musical keyboard A musical keyboard is the set of adjacent depressible levers on a musical instrument which cause the instrument to produce sounds. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the voice-type. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about Tenor vocalists in music. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A bass (or basso in Italian) is a male singer who sings in the deepest vocal range of the human voice. ... Nmon Ford is a Panamanian-American born two-time Grammy award winning baritone noted primarily for his numerous appearances in opera houses around the world. ... Frank Guarrera (Dec. ...

Bel Canto (coloratura) baritone

Note: Its ambitus is greater than the lyric baritone's. Fioritura is the name given to the flowery, embellished vocal line found in many arias from nineteenth-century opera. ... Coloratura is an old word meaning colouring. ... The term Bel Canto may refer to: Belcanto, a vocal technique; or Bel Canto, a novel by Ann Patchett. ... For the Beaumarchais play, see The Barber of Seville (play). ... Gioachino Rossini. ... La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo is an operatic dramma giocoso by Gioacchino Rossini. ... Gioachino Rossini. ... Gaetano Donizetti Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (29 November 1797 – 8 April 1848) was a famous Italian opera composer. ...


The kavalierbariton

  • Common Range: From the A below low C to the G above middle C (A2 to G4).
  • Description: A metallic voice, that can sing both lyric and dramatic phrases, a manly noble baritonal color, with good looks. Not quite as powerful as the Verdi baritone who is expected to have a powerful appearance on stage, perhaps muscular or physically large.

Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Wakondas Dream is an English-language opera written by Anthony Davis with a libretto by Yusef Komunyakaa. ... Anthony Davis (born February 20, 1951 in Paterson, New Jersey) is an American composer and jazz pianist. ... Cover of the first edition of Pagliacci published by E. Sonzogno, Milan, 1892 Pagliacci (Clowns) is an opera consisting of a prologue and two acts written and composed by Ruggero Leoncavallo. ... Ruggiero Leoncavallo (April 23, 1857- August 9, 1919) was an Italian opera composer. ... A capriccio or caprice is a piece of music, usually fairly free in form and of a lively character. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... La traviata is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Dmitri Aleksandrovich Hvorostovsky (Russian: , born October 16, 1962), is a top baritone opera singer from Russia. ... Eberhard Waechter - sometimes spelled Wächter - (July 9, 1929–March 29, 1992) was an Austrian baritone, particularly celebrated for his performances in the operas of Mozart, Wagner, and Strauss. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Dramatic baritone

  • Common Range: From the F half an octave below low C to the F above middle C (F2 to F4).
  • Description: A voice with a somewhat heavier, darker quality. This category corresponds roughly to the Heldenbariton in the German fach system except the Verdi baritones have been separated. Roles for this voice are also called bass-baritone and are typically dramatic in their tone. Roles such as these tend not to rise above an F so as not to extend past the accepted top of the baritone range.

The German Fach (pl. ... For other uses, see Tosca (disambiguation). ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Nabucco is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the biblical story and the play by Anicet-Bourgeois and Francis Cornu. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Norman Bailey is an operatic bass-baritone, who was born in South Africa and studied in Vienna. ... Sergei Leiferkus (born April 4, 1946) is an operatic baritone from Russia, known for his dramatic technique and powerful voice particularly in Russian and Italian repertoire. ...

Verdi baritone

  • Common Range: From the A below low C to the G above middle C (A2 to G4).
  • Description: A more specialized voice category, Verdi baritone refers to a voice capable of singing consistently and with ease in the highest part of the baritone range, sometimes even up to the B flat above middle C.

This article refers to the opera Don Carlos by Giuseppe Verdi (and its revised Italian version, known as Don Carlo). ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... La traviata is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Titta Ruffo, Italian opera singer (Pisa, June 9, 1877 - Florence, July 5, 1953), was generally regarded as the greatest Italian baritone of his generation - or any generation since. ... Ettore Bastianini (September 24, 1922–January 25, 1967) was an Italian opera singer who began his professional career as a bass, then earned worldwide acclaim as a baritone, particularly in Verdi roles, before dying of throat cancer at the age of forty-four. ... Piero Cappuccilli in the title role of Simon Boccanegra The Italian baritone Piero Cappuccilli (1929 - 12 July 2005) was a famous opera singer, best know for his Verdi roles, particularly Macbeth and Simon Boccanegra. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Renato Bruson (born January 13, 1936) is an Italian operatic baritone. ...

The baryton-noble

  • Description: French for noble baritone and describes a part that requires a noble bearing, smooth vocalisation and forceful declamation, all in perfect balance. This category originated in the Paris Opéra, but it greatly influenced Verdi (Don Carlo in Ernani and La forza del destino; Count Luna in Il trovatore; Simon Boccanegra) and Wagner as well (Wotan; Amfortas).

Exterior of the Palais Garnier. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Ernani is an operatic dramma lirico in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Hernani by Victor Hugo. ... La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny) is an Italian opera by Giuseppe Verdi. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... Simon Boccanegra is an opera with a prologue and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Simón Bocanegra by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ...

Bariton/Baryton-Martin

  • Common Range: From the low C to the Ab above middle C (C3 to Ab4)[7]
  • Description: The Bariton-Martin lacks the lower G2-B2 range a heavier baritone is capable of. Has a lighter, almost tenor-like quality. Generally seen only in French repertoire, this fach was named after the French singer Jean-Blaise Martin. Associated with the rise of the baritone in the 19th century, Martin was well known for his fondness for falsetto singing, and the designation 'Baryton Martin' has been used (Faurre, 1866) to separate his voice from the 'Verdi Baritone', which carried the chest register further into the upper range.[8]

Pelléas et Mélisande (Pelléas and Mélisande) is an opera in five acts by Claude Debussy to a French libretto by Maurice Maeterlinck that almost exactly follows his famous symbolist play Pelléas et Mélisande. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Maurice Ravel. ... Camille Maurane (born Camille Moreau November 29, 1911) is a French baritone singer. ... Pierre Bernac was born as Pierre Bertin on 12 January 1899. ...

Barbershop baritone

In barbershop music, the baritone part sings in a similar but somewhat lower range to the lead (singing the melody), but has a specific and specialized role in the formation of the four-part harmony that characterizes the style. Because barbershop singers can also be female, there is consequently such a singer (at least in barbershop singing) as a female baritone. The baritone singer is often the one required to support or 'fill' the bass sound (typically by singing the fifth above the bass root). On the other hand, the baritone will occasionally find himself harmonizing above the melody, which calls for a tenor-like quality. The Dapper Dans, a barbershop quartet at Disney World Barbershop harmony, as codified during the barbershop revival era (1940s-present), is a style of a cappella, or unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... The perfect fifth or diapente is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees; the others being the diminished fifth, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented fifth, which is one semitone larger. ...


In bluegrass music, the melody line is called the lead. Tenor is sung an interval of a third above the lead. Baritone is the fifth of the scale that has the lead as a tonic, and may be sung below the lead, or even above the lead (and the tenor), in which case it is called "high baritone."


See also

This is a list of roles in opera, operetta and Broadway musicals written for the Baritone voice. ... // Famous baritones Soprano Alto Tenor Basso Classical music Henri Albers Thomas Allen Robert Allman Pasquale Amato Mario Ancona Georges Baklanoff Ettore Bastianini Mattia Battistini Gino Becchi Pierre Bernac John Brownlee Renato Bruson Piero Cappuccilli Jorge Chaminé Vladimir Chernov Robert Couzinou Armand Crabbé Emilio de Gogorza Giuseppe De Luca Michel Dens... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Franchino Gaffurio, Practica musicae, liber tertius, 1496
  2. ^ Dolmetsch Online, Music Dictionary Vm-Vz, accessed May 28, 2006
  3. ^ Charles K. Moss, Franz Peter Schubert: Master of Song, accessed May 28, 2006
  4. ^ OPERA-L, Tenor buffo - Offenbach, accessed May 29, 2006
  5. ^ Lebrecht Music and Art Library, Outside theatre before premiere of Wozzeck, accessed May 29, 2006
  6. ^ Deutsche Grammophon, Bryn Terfel's Biographical Timeline, accessed May 28, 2006
  7. ^ The OXFORD DICTIONARY OF OPERA. JOHN WARRACK AND EWAN WEST, ISBN 0-19-869164-5
  8. ^ THE NEW GROVE Dictionary of MUSIC & MUSICIANS. Edited by Stanley Sadie, Volume 2. Back to Bolivia. ISBN 1-56159-174-2, Copyright Macmillan Publishers Limited 1980.

Franchinus Gaffurius (January 14, 1451 – June 25, 1522) was an Italian music theorist and composer of the Renaissance. ...

References

  • -.-Owen Jander, J.B. Steane, Elizabeth Forbes/Ellen T. Harris (with Gerald Waldman): 'Baritone', Grove Music Online ed. L. Macy (Accessed 24 Jan 2006), http://www.grovemusic.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baritone or Euphonium? (1794 words)
Some are: a euphonium has four valves, a baritone three; if it’s in a bass clef it’s a euphonium, if it’s in treble clef it’s a baritone; a baritone is little euphonium; a baritone has the bell pointed forward, a euphonium points up; and (attributed to Robert King) a euphonium is a baritone played well.
Also, the name baritone is sometimes confused with baritone saxophone or the baritone voice.
While the early samples of this type of "hybrid" instrument may have had a sound nearly centered between a baritone and a euphonium tone, the desire for a smoother, fuller sound has led the manufacturers to gradually change the instrument’s characteristics.
Encyclopedia4U - Baritone - Encyclopedia Article (211 words)
In music, a baritone is a male singer whose vocal range falls somewhere between that of a bass and a tenor.
A typical baritone's range will extend from around the A a tenth below middle C to the F above middle C. Many singers in popular music have been baritones, such as Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby.
The word "baritone" is often applied to instruments to indicate their range in relation to other instruments of the same group.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m