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Encyclopedia > Bari
Comune di Bari
Coat of arms of Comune di Bari
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Apulia
Province Bari (BA)
Mayor Michele Emiliano
Elevation m (3 ft)
Area 116 km² (45 sq mi)
Population (as of December 31, 2005)
 - Total 328,458
 - Density 2,832/km² (7,335/sq mi)
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 41°8′N, 16°52′E
Gentilic Baresi
Dialing code 080
Postal code 70121. 70122, 70123, 70124, 70125, 70126, 70127, 70128, 70129, 70131
Patron San Nicola
 - Day May 8

Location of Bari in Italy
Website: www.comune.bari.it

Bari is the capital city of the province of Bari and of the Apulia (or, in Italian, Puglia) region, on the Adriatic sea, in Italy. It is the second economic centre of southern Italy and is well known as a port and university city, as well as the city of Saint Nicholas of Bari. The city itself has a decreasing population of 328,458 over 116 km², while the fast-growing urban area counts 653,028 inhabitants over 203 km². Another 500,000 people live in the metropolitan area. Bari may refer to: Bari, the second largest continental city of southern Italy Bari Province, whose capital is the above city Bari, Somalia, a region (gobolka) of northern Somalia Bari (ethnic group), an ethnic group in the Sudan. ... Image File history File links Bari-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... The stemma of Provincia di Bari Bari (It. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... For other uses, see Nicholas. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The stemma of Provincia di Bari Bari (It. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... For other uses, see Nicholas. ...


Bari consists of four different parts. On the north, the closely built old town on the peninsula between two modern harbours, with the splendid Basilica of San Nicola (Saint Nicholas), the Cathedral of San Sabino (1035 - 1171) and the Castello Svevo of Frederick II, is now also one of the major nightlife districts. The Murattiano section to the south, the modern heart of the city, is laid out on a rectangular plan with a promenade on the sea, and the major shopping district (the via Sparano and via Argiro). The more modern city surrounding this center was the result of chaotic development during the 1960s and 1970s over the old suburbs that had developed along roads splaying outwards from gates in the city walls. Finally, the outer suburbs have been in rapid development during the 1990s. The city has a redeveloped airport named after Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla Airport, with connections to many European destinations. For other uses, see Nicholas. ... Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...

Contents

History

Ancient Bari

Barion (Latin Barium), in the region of the Peucetii, does not seem to have been a place of great importance in Greater Greece; only bronze coins struck by it have been found. Once it passed under Roman rule in the third century BC, it developed strategic significance as the point of junction between the coast road and the Via Traiana; a branch road to Tarentum led from Barium. Its harbour, mentioned as early as 181 BC, was probably the principal one of the district in ancient times, as it is at present, and was the centre of a fishery. The first historical bishop of Bari was Gervasius who was noted at the Council of Sardica in 347. The bishops were dependent on the patriarch of Constantinople until the 10th century. The Peucetii (or Poedicli, according to Strabo[1] were a tribe who were living in Apulia in the country behind Barion (Latin Barium, modern Bari). ... Magna Graecia (Latin for Greater Greece, Megalê Hellas/Μεγάλη Ελλάς in Greek) is the name of an area in ancient southern Italy and Sicily that was colonised by ancient Greek settlers in the 8th century BCE. Originally, Magna Graecia was the... This article is about the metal alloy. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... For Arabian road, see Via Traiana Nova Extension by the emperor Trajan of the Via Appia from Beneventum, reaching Brundisium by a shorter route (ie via Canusium and Barium rather than via Tarentum). ... Taranto is a coastal city in Apulia, southern Italy. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC - 180s BC - 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 186 BC 185 BC 184 BC 183 BC 182 BC - 181 BC - 180 BC 179 BC... Events Council of Sardica Council of Philippopolis Births John Chrysostom, bishop Eunapius, Greek Sophist and historian Deaths Categories: 347 ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...


Middle Ages

After the devastations of the Gothic Wars, under Lombard rule a set of written regulations was established, the Consuetudines Barenses, which influenced similar written constitutions in other southern cities. The Gothic War, 535–552, was the expression of Justinians decision in 535 to reverse the course of events of the past century in the West and win back for the Eastern Roman Empire the provinces of Italy that had been lost, first to Odoacer and then to the... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ...


Bari was put on the political map of the region in 852 when it became a center of Arab power for a generation, under the emir Kahfun and latter under an emir whose name is unknown and then under Sawdan. By the reign of Sawdan it had become one of the few stable places in Apulia.[citation needed] In 885, it became the residence of the local Byzantine catapan, or governor. The failed revolt (1009-1011) of the Lombard nobles Melus of Bari (d. 1020) and his brother-in-law Dattus, against the Byzantine governorate, though it was firmly repressed at the Battle of Cannae (1018), offered their Norman adventurer allies a first foothold in the region. In 1025, under the Archbishop Byzantius, Bari became attached to the see of Rome and was granted provincial status. Events Boris I Michael succeeds the duumvirate of Malamir and Presian as monarch of Bulgaria. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Events Vikings besiege Paris Stephen VI elected pope Oldest known mentioning of Baky Births Emperor Daigo of Japan Deaths Pope Adrian III April 6: Saint Methodius, bishop and Bible translator Categories: 885 ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Painting of Emperor Basil II, exemplifying the Imperial Crown handed down by Angels. ... Events February 14: First known mention of Lithuania, in the annals of the monastery of Quedlinburg. ... Events Emperor Sanjo ascends to the throne of Japan. ... Melus (also Milus or Meles) (d. ... Events Hospice built in Jerusalem by Knights Hospitaller City of Saint-Germain-en-Laye founded Third Italian campaign of Henry II of Germany Canute the Great codifies the laws of England Births Harold II of England (approximate) Empress Agnes of Poitou, regent of the Holy Roman Empire (d. ... The Second Battle of Cannae took place in 1018 between the Byzantines under the catepan of Italy Basil Boiannes and the Lombards under Melus of Bari. ... Events April 18 - Boleslaw I Chrobry is crowned as the first king of Poland. ... Byzantius or Bisanzio (died 1035) was the archbishop of Bari in the early eleventh century. ...



In 1071, Bari was captured by Robert Guiscard, following a three-year siege. Maio of Bari (d. 1160), a Lombard merchant's son, was the third of the great admirals of Norman Sicily. The Basilica di San Nicola was founded in 1087 to receive the relics of this saint, which were surreptitiously brought from Myra in Lycia, in Byzantine territory. The saint began his development from Saint Nicolas of Myra into Saint Nicolas of Bari and began to attract pilgrims, whose encouragement and care became central to the economy of Bari. In 1095 Peter the Hermit preached the first crusade there. In October 1098, Urban II, who had consecrated the Basilica in 1089, convened the Council of Bari, one of a series of synods convoked with the intention of reconciling the Greeks and Latins on the question of the filioque clause in the Creed, which Anselm ably defended, seated at the pope's side. The Greeks were not brought over to the Latin way of thinking, and the Great Schism was inevitable. Events Byzantine Empire loses Battle of Manzikert to Turkish army under Alp Arslan. ... Robert Guiscard (i. ... The siege of Bari took place 1068–71, during the Middle Ages, when Norman forces under the command of Robert Guiscard laid siege to the city of Bari, a major stronghold of the Byzantines in Italy, in August 5, 1068. ... Maio of Bari (Italian: , French: ) (died 10 November 1160), a Lombard merchants son from Bari, was the third of the great admirals of Sicily. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... The Basilica of San Nicola by night. ... Events May 9 - The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. ... For other uses, see Myra (disambiguation). ... Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycia (in Lycian, Trm̃misa (see List of Lycian place names); in ancient Greek, Λυκία and in modern Turkish, Likya) is a region in the modern-day provinces of Antalya and MuÄŸla on the southern coast of Turkey. ... For other uses, see Nicholas. ... Events The country of Portugal is established for the second time. ... Peter the Hermit shows the crusaders the way to Jerusalem. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... Events First Crusade: end of the siege of Antioch. ... Urban II, né Otho of Lagery (or Otto or Odo) (1042 - July 29, 1099), pope from 1088 to July 29, 1099, was born into nobility in France at Lagery (near Châtillon-sur-Marne) and was church educated. ... Events Northumbria divided by the Normans into the counties of Northumberland, County Durham, Yorkshire, Westmorland and Lancashire August 11, powerful Britain Coronation of Rama Varma Kulasekhara in Kerala Synod of Melfi under Pope Urban II imposes slavery on the wives of priests Palmyra destroyed by earthquake Byzantine conquest of Crete... In Christian theology the filioque clause (and the Son) is a disputed part of the Nicene Creed. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109) was an Italian medieval philosopher and theologian, who held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... The term Great Schism may refer to: The East-West Schism, in 1054 between Western Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. ...


A civil war broke out in Bari in 1117 with the murder of the archbishop, Riso. Control of Bari was seized by Grimoald Alferanites, a native Lombard, and he was elected lord in opposition to the Normans. By 1123, he had increased ties with Byzantium and Venice and taken the title gratia Dei et beati Nikolai barensis princeps. Grimoald increased the cult of St Nicholas in his city. He later did homage to Roger II of Sicily, but rebelled and was defeated in 1132. A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight against each other for the control of political power. ... Events May 3 - Merton Priory (Thomas Becket school) consecrated. ... Grimoald Alferanites was the prince of Bari from 1121 to 1132. ... Events First Council of the Lateran confirms Concordat of Worms and demands that priests remain celibate End of the reign of Emperor Toba of Japan. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Roger II, from Liber ad honorem Augusti of Petrus de Ebulo, 1196. ... Events Diarmaid Mac Murrough has the abbey of Kildare in Ireland burned and the abbess raped. ...


In 1156, Bari was sacked and razed to the ground; Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Sicily, repaired the fortress of Baris but it was subsequently destroyed several times. Bari recovered each time. Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ...


Early modern Bari

Isabella di Aragona, princess of Naples and widow of the Duke of Milan Gian Galeazzo Sforza, enlarged the castle, which she made her residence, 1499-1524. After the death of Bona Sforza, Queen of Poland, Bari came to be included in the Kingdom of Naples and its history contracted to a local one, as malaria became endemic in the region. Bari was wakened from its provincial somnolence by Napoleon's brother-in-law Joachim Murat. As Napoleonic King of Naples Murat ordered the building in 1808 of a new section of the city, laid out on a rational grid plan, which bears his name today as the Murattiano. Under this stimulus, Bari developed into the most important port city of the region. The legacy of Mussolini can be seen in the imposing architecture along the seafront. Isabella di Aragona (1470-1524), was born a Princess of Naples, granddaughter of king Ferrante I of Naples and daughter of the future king Alfonso II of Naples. ... Gian Galeazzo Sforza (June 20, 1469 - October 21, 1494), the third duke of Milan of the Sforza family, was only 7 years old when he became the duke in 1476, after the assassination of his father, Galeazzo Maria Sforza. ... 1499 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Bona Sforza in her youth Bona Sforza in 1517 Bona Sforza (February 2, 1494 - November 19, 1557) was a member of the Milanese Sforza dynasty, was a queen of Poland, Grand Duchess of Lithuania, and became the second wife of Sigismund I of Poland in 1518. ... Capital Naples Government Monarchy King  - 1285-1309 Charles II  - 1815-1816 Ferdinand I History  - Established 1285  - Union with Sicily 1816 The Kingdom of Naples was an informal name of the polity officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily which existed on the mainland of southern Italy after of the secession... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... Joachim Murat, King of Naples, Marshal of France. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mussolini redirects here. ...


The 1943 chemical warfare disaster

Through a tragic coincidence intended by neither of the opposing sides in World War II, Bari gained the unwelcome distinction of being the only European city to experience chemical warfare in the course of that war. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ...


On the night of December 2, 1943, German Junkers Ju 88 bombers attacked the port of Bari, which was a key supply center for Allied forces fighting their way up the Italian peninsula. Several Allied ships were sunk in the overcrowded harbor, including John Harvey, which was carrying mustard gas, mustard gas was also reported to have been stacked on the quayside awaiting transport. The chemical agent was intended for use if German forces initiated chemical warfare. The presence of the gas was highly classified, and authorities ashore had no knowledge of it. This increased the number of fatalities, since physicians — who had no idea that they were dealing with the effects of mustard gas — prescribed treatment proper for those suffering from exposure and immersion, which proved fatal in many cases. Because rescuers were unaware they were dealing with gas casualties many additional casulalties were caused among the rescuers by contact with the contaminated skin and clothing of those more directly exposed to the gas. is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Junkers Ju 88 was a WW2 Luftwaffe twin-engine multi-role aircraft. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... The John Harvey was a World War II Liberty Ship carrying a secret cargo of mustard gas, whose sinking by German planes in December 1943 at the port of Bari in South Italy caused the single (unintentional) use of Chemical Warfare in the course of that war. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ...


On the direct orders of Churchill records were destroyed and the whole affair was kept secret for many years after the war. Indeed, even today, many "Baresi" are still unaware of what happened and why. Up to the present, there is a considerable dispute as to the number of fatalities. In one account: "[s]ixty-nine deaths were attributed in whole or in part to the mustard gas, most of them American merchant seamen" [1]; others put it as high as "more than one thousand Allied servicemen and more than one thousand [Italian] civilians" [2]. Part of the confusion and controversy derives from the fact that the German attack, which became nicknamed "The Little Pearl Harbor", was highly destructive and lethal in itself, apart from the effects of the gas. Attribution of the causes of death to the gas, as distinct from the direct effects of the German attack, have proved far from easy.


The affair is the subject of two books: Disaster at Bari by Glenn B. Infield and Nightmare in Bari: The World War II Liberty Ship Poison Gas Disaster and Coverup by Gerald Reminick.

Bari (Lungomare Perotti, old town view).

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Bari today

Bari is now mostly a modern industrial city. Nevertheless, some of Italy's most interesting and undiscovered areas lie within the province of Bari, and the region of Puglia. Bari itself is a proud and hard-working port city with strong traditions based on its Saint Nicholas. Bari is known throughout Italy for its strong, often crude, spoken dialect, particularly in the Old Town, parts of which originated from a pidgin between Italian and Greek fishermen in the past, and which fishermen in Greece can still understand today. Bari is also known for culinary traditions, in particular Orecchiette with Cime di rape, little ear-shaped pasta with turnip tops, and its common Sunday dish "pasta al forno", which varies from family to family including anything from eggs to Octopus.


Main sights

Basilica di San Nicola

The Basilica di San Nicola (Saint Nicholas) was founded in 1087 to receive the relics of this saint, which were brought from Myra in Lycia, and now lie beneath the altar in the crypt, where are buried the Topins, which are a legacy of old thieves converted to good faith. The church is one of the four Palatine churches of Apulia (the others being the cathedrals of Acquaviva delle Fonti and Altamura, and the church of Monte Sant'Angelo sul Gargano.
The Basilica of San Nicola by night. ... Events May 9 - The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. ... For other uses, see Myra (disambiguation). ... Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycia (in Lycian, Trm̃misa (see List of Lycian place names); in ancient Greek, Λυκία and in modern Turkish, Likya) is a region in the modern-day provinces of Antalya and Muğla on the southern coast of Turkey. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Acquaviva delle Fonti is a town and comune with about 21,600 inhabitants in the province of Bari, Puglia, Italy. ... Altamura is a town of Apulia, Italy, in the Bari Province, 28 miles (45 km) southwest of the city of Bari close to the border with Basilicata, currently with about 67,000 inhabitants (Altamurani). ... For the Australian girls college, see Monte Sant Angelo Mercy College. ...


Cathedral of St. Sabinus

Façade of San Sabino cathedral.
Façade of San Sabino cathedral.

The church of St. Sabinus (the current Duomo of the city) was begun in Byzantine style in 1034, but was destroyed in the sack of the city of 1156. A new building was thus built between 1170-1178, partially inspired by that of San Nicola. Of the original edifice, only traces of the pavement are today visible in the transept. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1181 × 787 pixel, file size: 187 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bari - Città Vecchia - Cattedrale di San Sabino File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1181 × 787 pixel, file size: 187 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bari - Città Vecchia - Cattedrale di San Sabino File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The duomo of Milan. ... Events April 11 - Empress Zoe of Byzantium marries her chamberlain and elevates him to the throne of the Eastern Roman Empire as Michael IV. Franche-Comté becomes subject to the Holy Roman Empire. ... Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Events June 18 - Five Canterbury monks see what was possibly the Giordano Bruno crater being formed The Sung Document written detailing the discovery of Mu-Lan-Pi (suggested by some to be California) by Muslim sailors The Chronicle of Gervase of Canterbury written The Leaning Tower of Pisa begins to...


An important example of Apulian Romanesque architecture, the church has a simple Romanesque façade with three portals; in the upper part is a rose window decorated with monstruous and fantasy figures. The interior has a nave and two aisles, divided by sixteen columns with arcades. The crypt houses the relics of St. Sabinus and the icon of the Madonna Odigitria. South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ...


The interior and the façade were redecorated in Baroque style during the 18th century, but these additions were deleted in the 1950s restoration.


Petruzzelli Theatre

Fire-bombed in the early 1990s, the Petruzzelli theatre had been one of the grandest opera houses in Italy after La Scala in Milan and the San Carlo Theatre in Naples. Host to many famous opera and ballet greats throughout the last century, the shell of the Petruzzelli in Corso Cavour is subject to an ongoing restructuing project. Although seemingly slow, the theatre should re-open its doors before 2010. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... Façade of Teatro San Carlo. ...


Castello Normanno Svevo

The Norman-Hohenstaufen Castle.
The Norman-Hohenstaufen Castle.

The Norman-Hohenstaufen Castle, well-known as Castello Svevo, was built by Roger II of Sicily around 1131. Destroyed in 1156, it was rebuilt by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. The castle now serves as a gallery for a variety of temporary exhibitions in the city. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 442 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer: Riccardo Cambiassi from London, United Kingdom Title: Castello di Bari, Puglia Taken on: January 8, 2006 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 442 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer: Riccardo Cambiassi from London, United Kingdom Title: Castello di Bari, Puglia Taken on: January 8, 2006 Original source: Flickr. ... Roger II, from Liber ad honorem Augusti of Petrus de Ebulo, 1196. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ...


The Russian Church

The Russian Church, in the Carrassi district of Bari was built in the early 20th Century to welcome Russian pilgrims who came to the city to visit the church of Saint Nichlas in the old city where the relics of the saint remain.


Built on a large area of council-owned land, the city council and Italian national government were recently involved in a trade-off with the Putin government in Moscow, exchanging the piece of land on which the church stands, for, albeit indirectly, a military barracks near Bari's central station. The hand over was seen as building bridges between the Catholic and Russian Orthodox churches.


Barivecchia

Barivecchia, or Old Bari, is a sprawl of streets and passageways making up the section of the city to the North of the modern Murat area. Barivecchia was until fairly recently considered a no-go area by many of Bari's residents due to the high levels of petty crime. A large-scale redevelopment plan beginning with a new sewerage system and followed by the development of the two main squares, Piazza Mercantile and Piazza Ferrarese has seen the opening of many pubs and other venues. This has been welcomed by many who claim that the social life of the city, and in particular the experience for tourists in Bari, has been improved and that jobs and revenue have been created. Others point out the effects of late-night noise in the enclosed squares and criticise development based mainly on pubs and other such premises.


Other

The Teatro Piccinni in Bari
The Teatro Piccinni in Bari
  • Teatro Margherita.
  • Teatro Piccinni.
  • Santa Chiara, once church of the Teutonic Knights (as Santa maria degli Alemanni) and now closed. It was restored in 1539.
  • The medieval church of San Marco dei Veneziani, with a notable rose window in the façade.
  • San Giorgio degli Armeni.
  • Santa Teresa dei Maschi, the main Baroque church in the city (1690-1696).
  • Pane e Pomodoro Beach is the main beach within reach of the city. Its reputation has for several years suffered from the apparent presence of asbestos from nearby industrial plants.
  • The eastern seafront skyline of Bari had, until spring 2006, been dominated by the monsterous apartment complex known as Punta Perotti - a creation of the Matarrese construction empire. Clearly in violation of several fundamental Italian building regulations, Punta Perotti became the focus of a political and environmental movement calling for its demolition. After years of legal wrangling between the Matarrese firm, Bari Council and environmental groups such as Save the Earth, the court ruled in favour of its demolition and thousands gathered on the Bari seafront in April 2006 to see the event.
  • The grid-shaped Murat city Centre of Bari is said to be the largest shopping centre in all of Italy and contains a large number of high-street stores and smaller shops with particular attention to high fashion and tailoring. Bari has recently seen a proliferation of out of town hypermarkets with all manner of shops and superstores attached to them.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ... The rose window in Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England, at the western end of the nave. ...

Fiera del Levante

The Fiera del Levante is said to be the largest trade fair in the Adriatic and involves exhibitions from many sectors and industries. Held in September in the Fiera site on the west side of Bari city centre, the Fiera attracts many exhibitors from Italy, around the Mediterranean, its trade corridors to the east and beyond. Mainly focused on agriculture and industry, there are also stalls, exhibitions and presentations by a wide variety of compaines and organisations in many fields. There is also a "Fair of Nations" which displays handcrafted and locally produced goods from all over the world.


This year's Fiera also saw an "Expo Fishing" which brought together fishing methods, tackle and know-how from across the Mediterranean.


Administrative Divisions of Bari

Bari is separated into nine administrative divisions.

  • I - Palese Macchie, Santo Spirito, Catino, San Pio
  • II - San Paolo, Stanic
  • III - Picone, Poggiofranco
  • IV - Carbonara, Santa Rita, Ceglie del Campo, Loseto
  • V - Japigia, Torre a Mare, San Giorgio
  • VI - Carrassi, San Pasquale, Mungivacca
  • VII - Madonnella
  • VIII - Libertà, Marconi, San Girolamo, Fesca
  • IX - Murat, San Nicola

The Ceglie del Campo, sometimes called simply Ceglie, is a quarter of the capital of the region Apulia, Bari. ... The Marconi-San Girolamo-Fesca, improperly named simply San Girolamo, is a quarter of the capital of the region Apulia, Bari. ...

Sport

Local football team A.S. Bari play in the large Stadio San Nicola, an architecturally innovative 58,000-seater stadium purpose-built for the 1990 world cup. Associazione Sportiva Bari is an Italian football club based in Bari, Apulia. ... Stadio San Nicola is a multi-use stadium in Bari, Italy. ... The 1990 FIFA World Cup, the 14th staging of the World Cup, was held in Italy from June 8 to July 8. ...


Demographics

Bari is a very homogenous city. However, due to legal and illegal migrations, there has been an increasing presence of immigrants chiefly from Albania, who also constitute the nation's largest and fastest growing minority.

  • Italian: 98.1%
  • Albanian: 0.4%
  • Mauritian: 0.3%
  • Greek: 0.2%
  • Chinese: 0.1%

Other notable ethnic groups consist of Indians and Mauritians, Arabs (mostly Palestinian, Jordanian or Egyptian), British, Irish, Filipinos, Ethiopians, Eritreans, Senegalese, Nigerians, Ivory Coast West Africans and South Africans.


Minority languages to be heard on the streets of Bari

English; French; Arabic; Wolof; Afrikaans; Zulu; Igbo; Efik; Banghala; Amharic; Tigrinya; The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Wolof is a language spoken in Senegal, the Gambia, and Mauritania, and it is the native language of the ethnic group of the Wolof people. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Igbo is a language spoken in Nigeria by around 18 million people (1999 WA), the Igbo, especially in the southeastern region once identified as Biafra. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Not to be confused with the Aramaic language. ... Tigrinya (Geez ትግርኛ tigriññā, also spelled Tigrigna) is a Semitic language spoken by the Tigray-Tigrinya people in central Eritrea (there referred to as the Tigrinya people), where it is one of the main working languages (Eritrea does not have official languages), and in the Tigray Region of Ethiopia (whose...


The presence of many foreigners owes itself to the University of Bari and its exchange programmes and also to the number of language schools which are to be found throughout the city. Such a range of language schools bring a small but significant and steady number of English speaking teachers to the area, mostly from the United States, Britain and Ireland but also Canada and other Commonwealth nations- many of these teachers remain resident in the city for at least a couple of years and some stay, thus contributing to an ever present "Anglo-Saxon" and "Celtic" element in the city. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ...


"African" Madonnella

The old "quarter" of Madonnella has experienced a wave of immigrants from West and Southern Africa who make a visible contribution to the multi-culturalism of the old area. An important point of reference is the Awalé Boutique which has, for quite a while, been a common reference point for the African community in the city and where the spices of West Africa add flavour to the rich variety of colourful costumes and exotic hairstyles to be seen. Oware game from Cameroon. ...


See also

Caffes near the coast Center of the city The oldest olive in the world, Stari Bar Bar is coastal city in Serbia and Montenegro on the Adriatic Sea. ... Bari Karol Wojtyla International Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Bari) (IATA: BRI, ICAO: LIBD) is an airport serving the city of Bari in Italy. ... The stemma of Provincia di Bari Bari (It. ... The Basilica of San Nicola by night. ... The Polytechnic of Bari (Italian: Politecnico di Bari) is a university located in Bari, Italy. ... The University of Bari (Italian: Università degli Studi di Bari) is a university located in Bari, Italy. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Further reading

  • Vito Antonio Melchiorre, Note storiche su Bari 2001.

External links


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