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Encyclopedia > Bard College

Bard College

Motto Dabo tibi coronam vitae (I shall give thee the crown of life)
Established 1860
Type Private, liberal arts college
Endowment US$180 million
President Leon Botstein
Faculty 224
Undergraduates 1,458
Postgraduates 223
Professional students key holder
Location Annandale-on-Hudson, New York
Campus Rural, 600 acres
Nickname Raptors
Website www.bard.edu

Bard College, founded in 1860, is a small, selective, four-year liberal arts college located in Annandale-on-Hudson in New York's Hudson Valley region. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Leon Botstein, as photographed during a February 2004 interview with WXBC Radio Bard. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... A professional degree or professional membership is an academic degree designed to prepare the holder for a particular career or profession, fields where scholarly research and academic activity are not the work, but rather a profession such as law, medicine, logistics, optometry, architecture, accounting, engineering, religious ministry, or education. ... Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the Town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston. ... This article is about the state. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Look up bard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the Town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston. ... This article is about the state. ... For the magazine, see Hudson Valley (magazine). ...

Contents

Location

Bard has a 600-acre (2.4-km²) campus in Annandale-on-Hudson, near the town of Red Hook, overlooking the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains. The village of Annandale-on-Hudson consists of the college, as well as nine other non-associated houses, and has no downtown center; across the Hudson river from the small cities of Kingston and Saugerties, it is neighbored by the villages of Red Hook and Tivoli. Shuttles run between the college and the two villages. Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, USA. The population was 10,408 at the 2000 census. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. ... Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... Saugerties is a town located in Ulster County, New York. ... Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, USA. The population was 10,408 at the 2000 census. ... Tivoli is a village in Dutchess County, New York, United States. ...


History

John Bard, founder of St. Stephen’s College
John Bard, founder of St. Stephen’s College

The college was originally founded under the name St. Stephen's, in association with the Episcopal church of New York City, and changed its name to Bard in 1934 in honor of its founder, John Bard. The college does not remain officially affiliated with the church, and pursues a far more secular mission today. Between 1928 and 1944, Bard/St. Stephen's operated as an undergraduate school of Columbia University, severing ties with the University when it became a fully coeducational college.[1] Image File history File links John_Bard,_1893. ... Image File history File links John_Bard,_1893. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...


By the 1930s, unlike many of its contemporaries, Bard had begun placing a heavy academic emphasis on the performing and fine arts. During that time, a substantive examination period was introduced for students in their second year, as well as what the dean at the time called the "final demonstration." These two periods would come to be known as Moderation and Senior Project, respectively (see below).[2] For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ...


During the 1940's, Bard provided a haven for intellectual refugees fleeing Europe. These included Hannah Arendt, the political theorist, Stefan Hirsch, the precisionist painter; Felix Hirsch, the political editor of the Berliner Tageblatt; the violinist Emil Hauser; the noted psychologist Werner Wolff; and the philosoper Heinrich Blücher.[3] Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... The Berliner Tageblatt was a newspaper founded by publisher Rudolf Mosse in Berlin and first brought out on January 1, 1872. ... Image:Arendt-blucher. ...


In 1975, after serving as the youngest college president in history at Franconia College, Leon Botstein was elected president of Bard. He is generally credited with reviving the academic and cultural prestige of the College, having overseen the acquisition of Simon's Rock College, the construction of a Frank Gehry-designed performing arts center, and the creation of a large number of other associated academic institutions. Franconia College was a small experimental liberal arts college in Franconia, New Hampshire, United States. ... Leon Botstein, as photographed during a February 2004 interview with WXBC Radio Bard. ... Simons Rock College of Bard Simons Rock College of Bard, also abbreviated as Simons Rock College and Simons Rock or, simply, The Rock , is a small liberal arts college located in the small town of Great Barrington (population 7,527), in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ...

Bard's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts.
Bard's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (989x581, 295 KB) Summary The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (989x581, 295 KB) Summary The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College. ...

Admissions

For the class of 2011, 27.1% of applicants were accepted, while the median SAT and ACT scores for matriculating students were 1330 (math plus verbal) and 30, respectively. Sixty-three percent of matriculating students ranked in the top 10% of their high school class.[4][5] The Princeton Review rated Bard a 95 out of 99 in its selectivity rating,[6] and US News & World Report categorized Bard as "most selective."[7] Bard students represent 38 states and 36 different countries.[8]


Programs and associated institutes

Bard has developed several innovative graduate programs and research institutes, including the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, the Levy Economics Institute, the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, the ICP-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies in Manhattan, the Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT), the Bard College Clemente Program, and the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan. The college's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts was designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry, and was completed in the spring of 2003. Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts Founded in 1981 as the first of its kind, the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts (otherwise known as the Bard M.F.A. program) is a nontraditional school for interdisciplinary study in the visual and creative arts. ... The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College is located on the campus of Bard College, in Annanadale-on-Hudson, NY. The Institute is housed in Blithewood, a mansion originally designed by an alumnus of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White for Andrew Zabriskie in 1899. ... The Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, often abbreviated to CCS, was founded in 1990 by the collector Marieluise Hessel at Bard College. ... The Bard College Conservatory of Music is a program of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. Founded in 2005, the program is unique among music conservatories in that all students are required to participate in a five-year dual-degree program, in which both a B.M. in music... The ICP-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies, at the International Center for Photography in Manhattan, is one of eight graduate programs affiliated with Bard College. ... Officially referred to as the Bard College Clemente Course in the Humanities, the program is a community-based academics outreach to economically disadvantaged individuals with low expectation of attaining post-secondary (i. ... The Bard Graduate Center (aka BGC) for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture was founded in 1993 by Susan Weber Soros (wife of George Soros). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College (commonly known on campus as the PAC) offers an architecturally dynamic environment for artistic presentations in the Hudson Valley. ... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Bard Prison Initiative provides a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals in two different prisons in New York state, and currently enrolls more than 100 students. [9] Since federal funding for prison education programs was eliminated in 1994,[10] the BPI is one of the only programs in the country of its kind.[11] Prison education involves vocational training or academic education supplied to prisoners as part of their rehabilitation and preparation for life outside prison. ...


Bard College is also affiliated with Bard College at Simon's Rock, the nation's oldest and most prestigious early college entrance program, Bard High School Early College in New York City, as well as Bard Center for Environmental Policy. Bard also helped construct a curriculum for Smolny College, Russia's first liberal arts college, with St. Petersburg State University. Additionally, the college hosts the Bard Globalization and International Affairs (BGIA) Program in New York City, which is focused on the specialized study of human rights law, international relations ethics, civil society, humanitarian action, and global political economy. Students attend seminar classes in the evenings and work at a substantive international affairs internship during the day. BGIA publishes BardPolitik, a semiannual international affairs journal featuring contributions from students and academics. Bard College at Simons Rock[1], also known as Simons Rock College of Bard, Simons Rock College, and Simons Rock or, simply, The Rock (see below), is a small liberal arts college located in the small town of Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Early college entrance programs are educational opportunities for groups of gifted students that allow them to be accelerated into college one or more years before the traditional age of college entrance. ... Bard High School Early College (BHSEC), is an alternative public secondary school in New York City that allows five to six hundred highly motivated and scholastically strong students (approximately 65% of whom are female) to begin their college studies two years early. ... Smolny College (Russian: ) is a liberal arts college located in St. ...


Bard publishes Conjunctions, a semi-annual literary quarterly.


Recently, Bard College acquired, on permanent loan, art collector Marielouise Hessel's substantial collection of important contemporary artwork. Hessel also contributed eight million dollars for the construction of a new wing at Bard's Center for Curatorial Studies building, in which the collection is exhibited.


Student life

Over 60 student clubs are financed through Bard's Convocation Fund, which is distributed once a semester by an elected student body and ratified during a rowdy public forum in the dining commons.


Bard students publish three newspapers, the Bard Observer, the Bard Naked News and the Bard Free Press. In 2003, the Free Press won Best Campus Publication in SPIN Magazine's first annual Campus Awards. [12] Literary magazines include the semiannual Verse Noire, the annual Bard Papers, and Sui Generis, a journal of translations and of original poetry in languages other than English. The Bard Journal of the Social Sciences, which publishes undergraduate work, is also produced by students on campus.


Other prominent student groups include the International Students Organization and other cultural organizations, the Student Action Collective, the Bard Film Committee, the Bard Democrats, and college radio station WXBC. College radio (also known as university radio, campus radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college or university. ... WXBC Bard College Radio is a student run radio station, broadcasting out of Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and is Bard Colleges only official radio station. ...


Bard is also home to the Root Cellar, a student-run vegan/anarchist coffeehouse complete with a zine library, which in recent years was touted as "the largest zine library on the East Coast."[citation needed] The Root Cellar is also home to a pirate radio station and a radical literature library. A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ...


More unusual clubs include:

  • P.I.R.A.T.E.S. (or People Interested in Restoring A Tradition of Excellence at Sea) — A group primarily concerned with conducting raids on nearby Vassar College.
  • Surrealist Training Circus — An artistic circus group similar in style to Bread and Puppet of Vermont.
  • The BARDge Society — A project that was involved in building a barge to sail down the Hudson River.
  • The Future World Conquerers Coalition (CWFC) — A school sponsored club which meets in bi-weekly discussion to plot the takeover of the state of New York, eventually leading to the United States, and then the world.
  • K.l.o.u.d.s. (Kids Lying Out Under Daytime Skies) — A club involved with Nephelococcygia.
Bard's Old Gym in February 2004, several months before it was closed as a student space due to fire safety concerns. The building currently houses the offices for campus security and has recently been transformed into a student-run theater.
Bard's Old Gym in February 2004, several months before it was closed as a student space due to fire safety concerns. The building currently houses the offices for campus security and has recently been transformed into a student-run theater.

The Bard Athletics department offers varsity sports in basketball, cross country, soccer, tennis, volleyball, and squash (men), and joined the Skyline Conference, effective 2007-2008. One of the more popular sports on campus is rugby. In the spring of 2006, Bard Women's Rugby joined the men's side, Bard Rugby Football Club, as an official team. The men's basketball team gained some notoriety when they were beaten by Caltech in 2007; it was Caltech's first win against an NCAA Division III opponent since 1996, and stopped a streak of 207 consecutive losses.[13] Bard player Michael Mandlin was named Division III Player of the Year by the multicampus publication The Outside World. [14] Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ... Puppets found in the Bread & Puppet Museum in Glover, Vermont The Bread & Puppet Theater is a politically radical puppet theater, active since the 1960s, currently based in Glover, Vermont. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 368 KB) Summary The Old Gym at Bard College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 368 KB) Summary The Old Gym at Bard College. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Bard has a strong independent music scene considering its isolation and size, and the college's Old Gym was once a popular location for concerts and parties in the 80s, 90s, and early 00s. In 2004, the Old Gym was shut down and in spring 2006 transformed into a student-run theater. Many activities that once took place there now occur in the smaller SMOG building, an autonomous student space. Student-run theater is also popular: on-campus groups include internet sensation Olde English, a sketch and video comedy group, and Flash Monster, a long-form improvisational troupe. Adam Conover, Dave Segal, Ben Popik, Hana Scott-Suhrstedt, Raizin Bob-Waksberg, and Caleb Bark Olde English is a sketch comedy troupe formed in the Fall of 2002. ...


Currently, most on-campus parties are held in the dining commons or at Ward Manor, a 19th century Hudson mansion now used as a dormitory. Furthermore, a social scene for students can be found in the nearby town of Tivoli.


Academics

All first-year students must attend the Language and Thinking (L&T) program, an intensive, writing-centered introduction to the liberal arts, for the three weeks preceding their first semester. Orientation also takes place during this time.


As first-years, all students take the "First-Year Seminar," which begins in the fall, and spans thinkers from Confucius to Galileo. The course ends in the spring, spanning William Blake to Karl Marx. There are nearly thirty sections of the course each semester, taught by a wide variety of professors, including President Botstein and other members of the administration. Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ... Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ...


Another mandatory process of the university is "moderation." Moderation typically takes place in the fourth or fifth semester, as a way of choosing a major. Conditions vary from department to department: all require the preparation of two short papers, one on the moderand's past work in the major subject and one on their plans for the future; most require the completion of a certain set or a certain number of courses; some have additional requirements, such as a concert or recital, the submission of a seminar paper, or the production of a film. To moderate, the student presents whatever work is required to a moderation board of three professors, and is subsequently interviewed, examined, and critiqued.


The "capstone" of the Bard undergraduate experience is the Senior Project. As with moderation, this project takes different forms in different departments. Most students in the divisions of Languages and Literature and of Social Sciences write a paper of around eighty pages, which is then, as with work for moderation, critiqued by a board of three professors. Arts students must organize a series of concerts, recitals, or shows, or produce substantial creative work; math and science students, as well as some social science students, undertake research projects.


The college also offers graduate degrees at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan, the Center for Curatorial Studies, the Conductor's Institute, the International Center of Photography (also in Manhattan), the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. Founded in 1974, the International Center for Photography is located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City (United States). ...


Politics

Bard is widely regarded as one of the most left-leaning colleges in the country. In 2005, the Princeton Review ranked it as the second-most liberal college in the United States, declaring that Bard "puts the 'liberal' in 'liberal arts.'"[15] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


In 2003, Bard Professor Joel Kovel drew criticism from controversial conservative columnist Ann Coulter for his book, Red Hunting in the Promised Land: Anticommunism and the Making of America, in which he compared anti-communism to a psychiatric disorder. Coulter, who has described Senator Joseph McCarthy as the deceased person she admires the most, accused Kovel of holding a "lunatic psychological theory" and counted Bard among the colleges and universities that "have become a Safe Streets program for traitors and lunatics."[16] Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joel Kovel (born August 27th 1936) is an American politician, academic, writer and Eco-socialist. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... This article is about the U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1947-1957). ...


Notable faculty

Chinua Achebe (IPA: ), born Albert Chinualumogu Achebe on November 16, 1930, is a Nigerian novelist, poet and critic. ... Theatre director and writer JoAnne Akalaitis is the winner of five Obie Awards for direction (and sustained achievement) and founder of the critically acclaimed Mabou Mines in New York. ... John Ashbery John Ashbery (born July 28, 1927) is an American poet. ... Ian Buruma talks with an attendee at the Texas Book Festival. ... Mary Caponegro is an experimental fiction writer whose collections include Tales from the Next Village, the Star Cafe, Five Doubts, and The Complexities of Intimacy. ... Caleb Carr (born August 2, 1955) is an American novelist and noted military historian. ... Mark David Danner (born November 10, 1958) is a prominent American journalist. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Kyle Gann (born November 21 1955) is a composer and music critic born in Dallas, Texas. ... Apo Hsu in rehearsal Apo Hsu (Apo Ching-Hsin Hsu) (Traditional Chinese: ) is a conductor born in Taiwan and resident of both Taiwan and the United States. ... Still from New York Portrait: Chapter Two Peter Hutton (born 1944 in Detroit, Michigan) is an experimental filmmaker, known primarily for his silent cinematic portraits of cities and landscapes around the world. ... Robert Kelly (born 1935) is an American poet associated with the deep image group. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Ann Lauterbach is an American poet. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Four Boats Stranded: Red and Yellow, Black and White was installed upon the roof of the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2001. ... Norman Manea (born 19 July 1936) is a Romanian writer and intellectual, born in Burdujeni, Suceava County, Bukovina. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... “Walter Mead” redirects here. ... Image:Bradford Morrow. ... Jacob Neusner (born July 28, 1932, Hartford, Connecticut) is an influential as well as controversial academic scholar of Judaism, and the most prolific. ... Ferit Orhan Pamuk (born on June 7, 1952 in Istanbul) is a Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist. ... Francine Prose (born in 1947 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American novelist. ... DVD James Conlon on PBS James Conlon (born Queens, New York 1950),[1] is an American conductor. ... Luc Sante is a writer and critic. ... Stephen Shore (born 1947 in New York City) is an American photographer best known as a pioneer of color photography. ... Mona Simpson (born June 14, 1957 in Green Bay, Wisconsin) is a novelist and essayist. ... Richard Teitelbaum (May 19, 1939 in New York, NY) is a composer, keyboardist, and improvisor. ... Michael Tibbetts is a Professor of Biology at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 12504. ... Joan Tower (born September 6, 1938 in New Rochelle, New York) is a contemporary American composer. ... George Tsontakis (1951-10-24–) is an American composer. ... Dawn Upshaw (born July 17, 1960 in Nashville, Tennessee), is an American soprano. ... Lawrence Weschler (born 1952) is an author of works of creative nonfiction. ...

Former faculty

Artine Artinian (Born Dec. ... Alfred Jules Ayer (October 29, 1910 _ June 27, 1989), better known as simply A. J. Ayer (and called Freddie by friends), was a philosopher who helped popularise logical positivism in English-speaking countries in his books Language, Truth and Logic (1936) and The Problem of Knowledge (1956). ... Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows, (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915 – April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts) was an acclaimed Canadian-born American writer. ... Image:Arendt-blucher. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... Benjamin Boretz is a twentieth- and twenty-first-century music theorist and composer. ... James Chace (October 16, 1931-2004) was an eminent historian, writing on American diplomacy and statecraft. ... Jacob Druckman (June 26, 1928 – May 24, 1996) was an American composer born in Philadelphia. ... Ralph Ellison (March 1, 1913[1] – April 16, 1994) was a scholar and writer. ... Heinz Insu Fenkl is an author, editor, translator, and mythic scholar. ... William Gaddis (December 29, 1922 - December 16, 1998) was an American novelist. ... Garry L. Hagberg is an author, professor, philosopher, and jazz musician. ... Daron Aric Hagen Daron Aric Hagen (born November 4, 1961, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American composer of contemporary classical music and opera. ... Bob Holman Bob Holman is a poet and poetry activist in the United States. ... Mat Johnson (born in Philadelphia August 19, 1970) is the author of Drop and Hunting in Harlem. ... Roy Fox Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family... Mary McCarthy may refer to: Mary McCarthy (author), novelist, critic, and memoirist (1912-1989) Mary McCarthy (CIA), a former CIA employee accused of leaking information Mary McCarthy (screenwriter) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Collection of One Hundred Plaster Surrogates, 1982/90. ... Adolfas Mekas (born 1925 in Lithuania) is a Lithuanian film director. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Munizs, Paparazzi, cibachrome print of chocolate sauce on paper, 1998. ... Elizabeth Murray (born 1940) is an American artist. ... Albert Jay Nock (October 13, 1870 or 1872 - August 19, 1945) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. ... Arthur Penn (born September 27, 1922 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a film director of thoughtful films that dont always find an audience. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey) is an American novelist. ... Roswell Rudd (born Roswell Hopkins Rudd, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Sollmann (1881-1951) was a German journalist, politician, and interior minister of the Weimar Republic. ... William Fense Weaver (b. ... Dr. Werner Wolff was a musicologist and founder of the Chattanooga Opera Association. ...

Notable alumni/ae

Walter Carl Becker (born February 20, 1950 in New York, New York) is the guitarist (and sometimes electric bassist) half of the duo at the core of the jazz-rock group Steely Dan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sadie Benning is a video maker, visual artist, and musician. ... Harvey Bialy Harvey Bialy is an American molecular biologist and AIDS dissident. ... Laszlo Z. Bito László Z. Bitó (born 7 September 1934, Budapest) is a physiologist and a writer. ... Ran Blake (April 20, 1935 - ). Eccentric pianist and faculty member at the New England Conservatory of Music, Ran Blake has spearheaded the Third Stream movement which effectively infuses all musical genres into one. ... Anne Bogart is an American director of theatre. ... Jordan Bridges on The WB television series Charmed Jordan Bridges (born November 13, 1973 in California, USA) is an American actor. ... Mary Caponegro is an experimental fiction writer whose collections include Tales from the Next Village, the Star Cafe, Five Doubts, and The Complexities of Intimacy. ... For other uses, see Chevy Chase (disambiguation). ... Phyllis Chesler (Ph. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Babalon riding The Beast, as depicted on the Lust card of Crowleys Thoth Tarot. ... Join My Cult is a subversive, satirical novel written by James Curcio and released by New Falcon Publications (publisher of some notable counter-culture authors such Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, and Aleister Crowley). ... Blythe Katherine Danner (born February 3, 1943) is a prolific two time Emmy-winning American actress who has appeared in numerous stage, screen, and film roles. ... Rikki Ducornet was born Erika DeGre on April 19, 1949 in Canton, New York. ... Donald Jay Fagen (born January 10, 1948 in Passaic, New Jersey) is an American musician and songwriter, best known as co-writer, co-founder, singer, and pianist with the jazz-rock band Steely Dan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ronan Seamus Farrow was born Satchel OSullivan Farrow on December 19, 1987, son of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow. ... Mark L. Feinsod (born March 7, 1972) is an American film and music video director, based in New York City, whose work straddles an odd line between the experimental and narrative modes. ... Lola Glaudini, born November 24, 1972 is an American actress. ... This article is about the television series. ... Joanne Greenbaum (b. ... Kenneth Milton Grimwood (February 27, 1944 - June 6, 2003) was an American author of fantasy fiction combining themes of life-affirmation and hope with metaphysical concepts, themes found in his best-known novel, the highly popular Replay. ... For the Lord of Appeal in Ordinary, see Christopher Guest, Baron Guest. ... This Is Spin̈al Tap (which is officially spelled with a non-functional umlaut symbol over the N) is a 1984 mockumentary directed by Rob Reiner and starring members of the semi-fictional heavy-metal glam rock band Spinal Tap. ... Waiting for Guffman is a mockumentary written,starring, and directed by Christopher Guest that was released in 1997. ... Best in Show can refer to the following: The overall winner among many competitors, usually based on appearance or quality, such as at a dog show The mockumentary movie about dog shows, Best in Show This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... 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Notable dropouts

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Bard College in media

  • Bard is also described as "My Old School" in the Steely Dan song of the same name in which Fagen remembers "when you put me on The Wolverine up to Annandale." Some inaccurately perceive the song to associate Fagen with another school — the College of William and Mary — because there is a well known lyric in it where Fagen croons: "wo-oh, William and Mary won't do." Fagen sings he will only return to Bard when "California tumbles into the sea". He returned in 1985 as a guest speaker during commencement that year.
  • In the X-Men comics, Jean Grey's father John is mentioned as being a professor of history at Bard. The hamlet of Annandale-On-Hudson is known as Jean Grey's hometown and where her parents have resided for the entire duration of the series. According to the comics, Professor Xavier is also an alum of Bard, where Professor Grey taught him history. The character of Senator Robert Kelly is reportedly named after the famed Bard poetry professor.
  • In the television series The Sopranos, Jennifer Melfi's son, Jason, attends Bard.
  • Mary McCarthy's novel, The Groves of Academe, is ostensibly set in Bard during the late forties, when she taught there.
  • Charles Rosen's book Players and Pretenders: The Basketball Team that Couldn't Shoot Straight chronicles the author's experience coaching basketball at Bard College in 1979-80.
  • In an episode of Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Stewart made a joke about a hypothetical left-wing blog, the address of which ended in "bardcollege.edu."
  • Bard College President Leon Botstein appeared on Comedy Central's The Colbert Report on June 4, 2007.

Originally released in 1973, Countdown To Ecstasy was the second album released by rock group Steely Dan. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Dr. John Grey is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe and the father of Jean Grey. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Robert Kelly is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is about the television series. ... Mary McCarthy may refer to: Mary McCarthy (author), novelist, critic, and memoirist (1912-1989) Mary McCarthy (CIA), a former CIA employee accused of leaking information Mary McCarthy (screenwriter) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ...

Notes

External links

References

  1. USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2007: Liberal Arts Colleges: Top Schools
  2. History of Bard at bard.edu
  3. History of Bard at bard.edu
  4. History of Bard at bard.edu
  5. Bard Prison Initiative Website
  6. Maximum Security Education
  7. Bard Prison Initiative Website
  8. A Brief History of the Bard Free Press
  9. Laws of Probability, Caltech Snaps Losing Streak, Morning Edition
  10. Princeton Review's Top 10 Most Politically Liberal Colleges, via MSN

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bard College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1811 words)
The college was originally founded under the name St. Stephen's, in association with the Episcopal church of New York City, and changed its name to Bard in 1934 in honor of its founder, John Bard.
Bard has developed several innovative graduate programs and research institutes, including the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, the Jerome Levy Economics Institute, the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, the Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT) and the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan.
Bard is also described as "My Old School" in the Steely Dan song of the same name in which Fagen remembers "when you put me on The Wolverine up to Annandale." Fagen sings he will only return to Bard when "California tumbles into the sea".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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