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Encyclopedia > Baptism of the Holy Spirit

In Christian Pentecostal theology, Baptism with the Holy Spirit is a second baptism, "in fire," spoken of by Jesus in the Gospels. Specifically, it refers to the experience of Pentecost described in the Book of Acts. In most mainstream Christian churches, Pentecost is seen as a single act that spread out the Holy Spirit or paraclete onto all believers. Individuals thereafter might or might not have similar experiences, but the single event of Pentecost itself was sufficient for all time and to ensure that all future baptisms would convey the gift of grace. A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... In various religions, most notably Trinitarian Christianity, the Holy Spirit (also called the Holy Ghost; in Hebrew רוח הקודש Ruah haqodesh) is the third Person of the Holy Trinity. ... Paraclete comes from the Greek word meaning one who consoles or one who intercedes on our behalf, which first appears in the Gospel of John (14:15 and 16:7). ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Divine grace is believed by Christians to be the sovereign favor of God exercised in the bestowment of blessings upon those who do not merit them. ...


However, a belief in a personal experience of revelation and renewal has been a feature of Protestant churches since the time of John Calvin, and a number of Protestant churches have adopted beliefs that might be generally called pentecostal or charismatic. For these churches, believers should experience a gift of the Holy Spirit, either after or even before regular baptism with water. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ...


In contemporary theology, there is a divergence between the two main strains of pentecostal believers, with some organized as Pentecostal and others as Charismatic churches. Both believe that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is spoken of by Jesus in Luke 11:13 and also Acts 1:5 and that it was the outpouring of the Holy Spirit prophesied in the Old Testament books of Ezekiel 36:27 and Joel 2:28-29. Both of these strains of Protestantism diverge from other churches in the essential nature of grace and what grace is granted without an individualized experience of the Holy Spirit. The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... The Charismatic Movement is a movement that began with the adoption of certain Pentecostal beliefs—specifically what are known as the bibilical charisms of Christianity: speaking in tongues, prophesying, etc. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh, but not Old Testament, because it does not recognize the concept of a New Testament. ... This article is about the Book of Ezekiel. ... // Overview of Contents The book of Joel (MEW) is part of the Jewish Hebrew Bible, the Tanakh, and also the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


Pentecostal/Charismatic View

Charismatics and Pentecostals both point to Ephesians 5:18, where the Apostle Paul urges his audience to "be filled with the Spirit" using an imperative mood verb. Pentecostalists see this gift (baptism in the Holy Spirit) as an experience following salvation. Whereas other churches have seen being filled with the Holy Spirit to require piety and grace, Pentecostals and Charismatics have seen it as a requirement that all who are saved must have a pentecostal experience. This belief finds its origin in such verses as John 3:5, in which Jesus refers both to water baptism and Spirit baptism. The Epistle to Ephesians is one of the books of the Bible in the New Testament, written by Paul at Rome about the same time as that to the Colossians, which in many points it resembles. ... Saul, also known as Paul, Paulus, and Saint Paul the Apostle, (AD 3 – 67) is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Judea. ...


Charismatics and Pentecostals differ from one another in the evidence they require for proof of baptism in the Holy Spirit. Charismatics will look for the "fruit of the spirit" spoken of in Galatians 5:22-25, and the Pentecostals will look for glossolalia (speaking in tongues), prophecy, and other "gifts of the spirit" described in 1 Corinthians 12. ... Glossolalia (from the Greek, γλώσσα (glossa), tongue and λαλώ (lalô), to speak) comprises the utterance of what appears (to the casual listener) either as an unknown foreign language (xenoglossia), meaningless syllables, or utterance of an unknown mystical language; the utterances sometimes occur as part of religious worship (religious glossolalia). ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


This was, according to Pentecostals, the normal experience of all in the early Christian Church. With it comes the endowment of power for life and service, the bestowment of the gifts and their uses in the work of the ministry (Luke 24:49; Acts 1:4-8; 1 Corinthians 12:1-31). A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... // Origins of Christian places of worship The architecture of Christian worship space grew out of the regular meetings of the followers of Christianity in private houses (see 1 Cor. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


Not all evangelical Pentecostal churches would accept that all Christians receive the Holy Spirit at the time of their conversion or baptism, for instance the Apostolic Assemblies of Christ, but in the more traditional evangelical point of view, and in non-evangelical churches, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is equated with this reception. Others, even outside the Pentecostal church, consider the Baptism of the Holy Spirit as a separate experience. Even among those who accept this, opinion is divided as to whether all those who receive the Baptism also receive the gift of tongues. The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of conservative Christianity, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ... In various religions, most notably Trinitarian Christianity, the Holy Spirit (also called the Holy Ghost; in Hebrew רוח הקודש Ruah haqodesh) is the third Person of the Holy Trinity. ... The Apostolic Assemblies of Christ, Inc. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of conservative Christianity, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ...


Both Pentecostal and Charismatic churches regard the baptism of the Holy Spirit to be requisite for the apostolic and evangelical mission that they believe is the duty of all Christians.


Other relevant Bible passages include Acts 8:14-17, and Acts 2:1-13. The Gutenberg Bible owned by the United States Library of Congress The Bible (Hebrew: תנ״ך tanakh, Greek: η Βίβλος hē biblos) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Work of God, The Word, The Good Book or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βίβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the name used by Jews and Christians for their... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ...


Development of the Term

John Wesley spoke of the baptism of the Holy Spirit but his followers, the Methodists, have historically disagreed about how Wesley defined this baptism. While "mainstream" Methodists (such as The United Methodist Church and its precedent bodies) have tended to agree with most Christians in the belief that the Holy Spirit is conveyed in some manner to all people, and certainly all Christians (see Prevenient Grace), other Wesleyans have argued that Wesley was referring to Entire sanctification, the belief that after one's sins are forgiven, a Christian can be actually cleansed of sinful corruption. These Wesleyans founded the Holiness movement and are today found in the Church of the Nazarene, the Salvation Army, and other denominations. John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist, the largest mainline, and, after the Southern Baptist Convention, the second-largest Protestant denomination in the United States. ... Prevenient Grace is a Christian theological concept embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... The Church of the Nazarene is a Protestant denomination within the broad tradition of Methodism. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a Protestant evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by Methodist ministers William Booth and Catherine Booth. ...


Members of the Holiness churches have also referred to the baptism of the Holy Spirit as a "second blessing" or "second work of grace". This language and practice eventually evolved into the modern Pentecostal movement, and Pentecostals adapated the Holiness usage of the term as they understood it. The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit, as shown in the Biblical account of the Day of Pentecost. ...


Bible References to Baptism with the Holy Spirit

  • Matthew 3:11
  • Mark 1:8
  • Luke 1:15, 41, 67
  • Luke 3:16
  • John 1:33
  • Acts 1:5

* Acts 2:1-4

  • Acts 4:31
  • Acts 8:17
  • Acts 9:17
  • Acts 11:15-16
  • Eph 5:18

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