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Encyclopedia > Bangor Cathedral
Bangor Cathedral from Bangor Mountain
Bangor Cathedral from Bangor Mountain

Bangor Cathedral is a place of Christian worship situated in Bangor in North Wales in the United Kingdom. It is dedicated to Saint Deiniol. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1087x774, 321 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Bangor, Wales ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1087x774, 321 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Bangor, Wales ... Bangor Mountain is a the scarp face of a hill below which the city of Bangor in Wales, UK sits. ... Bangor, in Gwynedd, North Wales, UK, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... North Wales is the northernmost region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... Saint Deiniol (died c. ...


The present building of Bangor Cathedral is not particularly old, but the site has been in use since the 6th century. The cathedral is built on a low-lying and inconspicuous site, possibly so as not to attract the attention of raiders from the sea. Visitors to Bangor often assume that the Gothic style building on the hill is the cathedral, but this is actually part of the University. This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... See also Gothic art. ... The University of Wales, Bangor (UWB) is a constituent institution of the University of Wales based in the small city of Bangor in the county of Gwynedd in North Wales, United Kingdom. ...

Contents


History

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the 6th century on land given by the king of Gwynedd, Maelgwn Gwynedd. Deiniol is said to have been consecrated as a bishop by Saint David, making him the first Bishop of Bangor. This monastery was sacked in 634 and again in 1073. Nothing of the original building survives. Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ... Maelgwn ap Cadwallon (480-547, reigned from 520s?) (Latin: Maglocunus; English: Malcolm), also known as Maelgwn Gwynedd and Maelgwn Hir (the Tall), was king of Gwynedd, and a character from Celtic mythology. ... The Flag of Saint David. ... The Bishop of Bangor heads the Church in Wales diocese of Bangor centred upon Bangor Cathedral. ... Events The Arabs invade Palestine. ... Events Cardinal Hildebrand elevated to papacy as Pope Gregory VII, succeeding Pope Alexander II Emperor Shirakawa ascends the throne of Japan Rabbi Yitchaki Alfassi finishes writing the Rif, an important work of Jewish law. ...


The Synod of Westminster in 1102 is recorded as taking measures to restore Bangor Cathedral, but the earliest part of the present building was built during the episcopate of Bishop David (1120-1139) with the assistance of the king of Gwynedd, Gruffydd ap Cynan who donated money towards the project and was buried by the high altar on his death in 1137. This was a cruciform building in the Norman style, about 130 feet in length. Gruffydd's son, Owain Gwynedd was also buried here, as was his brother Cadwaladr. Giraldus Cambrensis describes a service held here in 1188 when the Archbishop of Canterbury celebrated mass. A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... Gruffydd ap Cynan (c. ... Events Louis VII is crowned King of France. ... Norman may refer to: the Normans, the Norman people. ... Giraldus Cambrensis (c. ... Events Saladin unsuccessfully besieges the Hospitaller fortress of Krak des Chevaliers in modern Syria. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


In the 13th century the original apse was removed and the choir was extended to its present length. The church was badly damaged when King Edward I of England invaded Gwynedd in 1282, and in 1284 the Dean and Chapter were given £60 in compensation for the damage. There was extensive rebuilding in this period, under the first Bishop Anian, with the transepts and crossing rebuilt. The nave was rebuilt in the late 14th century. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to...


The cathedral was said to have been burnt to the ground in 1402 during the rebellion of Owen Glendower, but there is no contemporary evidence for this, though it may well have been damaged. There was extensive reconstruction from the end of the 15th century, completed in 1532. There is a Latin inscription over the tower doorway recording that Bishop Skevington built the tower in 1532, though it was not complete when Skevington died in 1533. Some work was done during the 18th century and £2,000 was spent on repairs in 1824, followed by the altering and refitting of the interior in 1825 at a cost of a further £3252. Events September 14 - Battle of Homildon Hill. ... Seal of Owain Glyndŵr The Banner of the Arms of Owain Glyndŵr showing his parentage Owain Glyndŵr, sometimes anglicised as Owen Glendower (1359–c. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Events January 25 - King Henry VIII of England marries Anne Boleyn, his second Queen consort. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Architecture

The building as seen today is the result of extensive work carried out under the supervision of Sir Gilbert Scott begun in 1868. Scott's design originally called for a high central tower and spire, but this was never completed as cracks appeared which were thought to indicate subsidence of the foundations. The tower was therefore left as a low structure. Gilbert Scott may refer to several of a family of British architects: Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811 - 1878), who was principally known for his work on the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and St Pancras Station George Gilbert Scott Junior (1839 - 1897), son of the above Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1880... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Features of Interest

The cathedral contains the "Mostyn Christ", a figure of Christ carved in oak thought to date from the late 15th century. It is unusual in that it depicts Christ prior to the crucifixion, seated on a rock and wearing the crown of thorns. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


In the grounds of the cathedral, the "Bible Garden" was planted with an example of every plant mentioned in the Bible although only relatively few remain (2005). 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

M.L. Clarke (1969) Bangor Cathedral (History of Bangor Diocese Vol. 1) (University of Wales Press)


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bangor, Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (401 words)
Bangor, in Gwynedd, North Wales, UK, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom.
Bangor is largely contained to the south by Bangor Mountain although the large estate of Maesgeirchen, originally built as social housing, is to the east of the toe of the mountain near to Porth Penrhyn.
Bangor railway station, which serves the city, is located on the North Wales Coast Line from Crewe to Holyhead.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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