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Encyclopedia > Banana Splits
The Banana Splits Adventure Hour

The Banana Splits' 1969 single "Long Live Love"
Also known as The Banana Splits and Friends Show
Genre Children's
Developed by Sid and Marty Krofft
Directed by Richard Donner (Season 1)
Tom Boutross (Season 2)
Starring Jeffrey Winkless (as Jeffrey Brock)
Terence H. Winkless (as Terence Henry)
Dan Winkless (as Daniel Owen)
James "Jimmy" Dove
Robert Towers
Voices of Paul Winchell
Daws Butler
Allan Melvin
Theme music composer Nelson B. Winkless, Jr. (credited to Ritchie Adams & Mark Barkan)
Opening theme "The Tra La La Song (One Banana, Two Banana)"
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
Language(s) English
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 31
Production
Executive producer(s) William Hanna
Joseph Barbera
Producer(s) Edward J. Rosen (Season 1)
Running time 60 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Original run September 7, 1968September 5, 1970
Chronology
Related shows The Skatebirds
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

The Banana Splits Adventure Hour, syndicated as The Banana Splits and Friends Show, was an hour-long package television program featuring both live action and animated segments, that ran for 31 episodes on NBC Saturday mornings from September 7, 1968 to September 5, 1970. The series was produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions, the Banana Splits characters were designed by Sid and Marty Krofft and the series' sponsor was Kellogg's Cereals. The Banana Splits. ... Sid and Marty Krofft are a sibling team of prolific television producers who were influential in childrens television and variety show programs, particularly throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ... Terence H. Winkless is a producer, director, and writer of motion pictures and television. ... Paul Winchell (December 21, 1922 – June 24, 2005), born Pinkus Wilchinski (the family later shortened it to Wilchin), was an American ventriloquist and voice actor from New York City whose career flourished in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Daws Butler in 1976. ... Allan Melvin (born February 18, 1922) is an American actor with a long history of sitcom and voice-over work. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... hello i am godWilliam Denby Bill Hanna (July 14, 1910 – March 22, 2001) was an American animator, director, producer, cartoon artist, and co-founder, together with Joseph Barbera, of Hanna-Barbera. ... Joseph Roland Joe Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an American animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, director, producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Skatebirds was a 60-minute show on CBS Saturday mornings from 1977 to 1978, produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the television network. ... Saturday morning cartoon is the colloquial term for the animated television programming which was typically scheduled on Saturday mornings on the major American television networks from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... Sid and Marty Krofft are a sibling team of prolific television producers who were influential in childrens television and variety show programs, particularly throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. ... For other things with Kellogg in the name, see Kellogg (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Television series

The wraparounds featured the adventures of a musical quartet, meant to be reminiscent of The Beatles and The Monkees, consisting of Fleegle, a beagle; Bingo, a gorilla; Drooper, a lion, and Snorky (called "Snork" in the theme song lyrics), an elephant. Fleegle would often assume the role as leader of the Banana Splits. The characters were played by actors in fleecy costumes similar to later Sid and Marty Krofft series such as H.R. Pufnstuf. (Krofft Enterprises designed the costumes and sets for The Banana Splits Adventure Hour, and their work impressed NBC-TV executives, who picked up the Krofft's own H.R. Pufnstuf for the following season.) The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... This article is about the dog breed. ... Type species Troglodytes gorilla Savage, 1847 distribution of Gorilla Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling omnivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... H.R. Pufnstuf is a childrens television series produced by Sid and Marty Krofft in the United States. ...


The Splits' segments, including songs-of-the-week and comedy skits, served as wraparounds for a number of individual segments. In the United States, The Banana Splits Adventure Hour featured the first appearances of the animated segments The Arabian Knights, The Three Musketeers, and Micro Ventures. In the second season, The Three Musketeers segments were replaced with repeats of The Hillbilly Bears, a cartoon segment that previously appeared on The Atom Ant Show (1965-1968). This movie should not be confused with The Arabian Knights, an animated segment of the Hanna-Barbera series United States as The Princess and the Cobbler) is a 1995 animated movie starring the voices of Vincent Price, Jennifer Beals, Matthew Broderick and Jonathan Winters. ... The Hillbilly Bears The Hillbilly Bears is an animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... Atom Ant is a cartoon ant and superhero, created by Hanna-Barbera in 1965. ...


Some of the live action segments (specifically those used during the musical segments) were shot at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington (during the first season) and, the following year, at Coney Island located in Cincinnati. In many episodes The Banana Splits would be seen riding on the Runaway Mine Train rollercoasters, Log Flumes, Bumper Cars, Merry-Go-Rounds, and many other rides. Contrary to popular misconception, the amusement park scenes in the original series were not filmed at Kings Island, which did not open until 1972, while filming for The Banana Splits Adventure Hour wrapped in 1969. However, some of the rides seen in the series eventually were relocated to Kings Island (following a flood which led to the closing of Coney Island; the park later reopened on a smaller scale) and the live-action scenes in the 1972 production The Banana Splits In Hocus Pocus Park were indeed filmed at Kings Island. The first season of The Banana Splits Adventure Hour, including the Banana Splits and Danger Island sequences, was directed by future Superman director Richard Donner. This article is about the theme park. ... Arlington is a city in Tarrant County, Texas (USA) within the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area. ... Coney Island is an amusement park in the California neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio and Anderson Township Hamilton County, on the banks of the Ohio River east of Downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... Kings Island is a 364 acre (1. ... Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Superman Superman, also known as Superman: The Movie, is a 1978 Warner Bros. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ...


The original show, as well as the syndicated package, also contained the live-action segment Danger Island, a cliffhanger serial starring a young Jan-Michael Vincent, billed as Michael Vincent, as Lincoln "Link" Simmons. Also, Ronne Troup, who later joined the cast of My Three Sons, played Leslie Haydn. (Each of the ten-minute chapters was cut into two five-minute segments in syndication.) Danger Island was meant to be a live action equivalent to Jonny Quest, another Hanna-Barbera property. Image is copyright (c)1968, Hanna-Barbera. ... For other uses, see Cliffhanger (disambiguation). ... Serials in television and radio are series, often in a weekly prime time slot, that rely on a continuing plot that unfolds in a serial fashion, episode by episode. ... Jan-Michael Vincent (born July 15, 1944) is an American actor most well-known for his role as helicopter pilot Stringfellow Hawke on the 1980s U.S. television series Airwolf (1984-1986). ... My Three Sons was a situation comedy that ran from September 29, 1960 to August 24, 1972. ... Jonny Quest (often referred to as The Adventures of Jonny Quest) was a science fiction animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and created and designed by comic book artist Doug Wildey, about the adventures of a young boy who accompanies his father on extraordinary adventures. ...


Season 1

During the first season, the Banana Splits segments often concerned the group's confrontations with a rival club, the Sour Grapes Bunch. The Sour Grapes were not seen on camera, but would send notes (usually a challenge or some other kind of threat) delivered by one of the "Sour Grapes messenger girls," who would dance into the Splits' clubhouse wearing purple leotards and go-go boots. Five young actresses appeared as the messenger girls: Debra Thibodeaux, Colette Chenault, Julie Graham, Kathy O'Dare, and Shirley Hillstrom. Their dance instructor was Byron Gilliam. Only one of the girls (always called "Charlie" in the context of the show) would appear at a time, except for the performance of the song "Doin' The Banana Split" (the segment first appeared in show #5, originally telecast October 5, 1968) which featured all five girls dancing with the Banana Splits. The Splits also occasionally were visited by the Mariachi-tuned Dilly Sisters (an actual musical act from Mexico), who would appear at their door playing guitars and singing "The Mexican Hat Dance" or "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay". In other recurring features during the first season, Drooper and Bingo offered advice to viewers in the "Dear Drooper" segment, while Fleegle served as the reporter for Banana Splits News. For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jarabe Tapatío, known in English as the Mexican Hat Dance, is the title of the musical piece and the dance that accompanies it, which is accorded the title of the national dance of Mexico. In the Spanish language, jarabe means syrup or elixir, and the adjective tapatío... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Season 2

In the second season, all new live-action segments were produced with the Banana Splits characters, while the animated segments and Danger Island serial were repeats. For the new season, the set was slightly modified, and the Splits' recurring routines were all new: Fleegle attempted (quite unsuccessfully) to perform magic tricks as alter ego The Great Fleegali, while Super Drooper fought crime and Coach Bingo kept the rest of the group active in sports competitions. Other new elements included School Time, Nursery Rhymes and a Gag Wall segment (reminiscent of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In), as well as Fan Club meetings where the Banana Splits would read viewer mail. Goofy Gopher (voiced by Paul Winchell) would pop out from a flower pot to deliver the occasional one-liner, joining the Cuckoo Clock and Banana Vac as secondary characters. The characters' costume designs also received an overhaul (introduced in the next-to-last Season 1 episode, The Great Banana Splits Buggy Race), with Snorky now sporting a yellow and blue striped vest. Rowan & Martins Laugh-In was an American comedy television program which ran for 140 episodes from January 22, 1968 to May 14, 1973. ...


Syndication and cable

In syndication, the show was re-edited into a half-hour format and retitled The Banana Splits And Friends Show. That package consisted of 125 half-hours, including 36 Banana Splits Adventure Hour cutdowns (edited from the 18 original first season shows; 13 additional episodes produced for the 1969-1970 season were not included in the syndicated package; this is the version that continues to air on Boomerang today). Four other Hanna-Barbera series (originally unrelated to The Banana Splits, apart from having been produced by the same studio) were folded into the syndicated series as well: Atom Ant (26 half-hours, also featuring Precious Pupp and The Hillbilly Bears), Secret Squirrel (26 half-hours, also featuring Squiddly Diddly and Winsome Witch), and The Adventures of Gulliver (17 half-hours), as well as The New Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (20 half-hours, originally seen in prime-time and here introduced as The Adventures Of Huck Finn) which combined live-action with animation. The four unrelated shows in question can occasionally be seen on Boomerang in their original, non-Banana Splits configurations. (The syndicated Atom Ant, Secret Squirel and Gulliver episodes had a rotation of eight repeating clips edited into them, with Paul Winchell redubbing Fleegle's voice to introduce various cartoon segments. This footage, all one and a half minutes of it, originated from Season 2 shows, as did the syndicated series' opening and closing titles. It was the only Season 2 material included in the syndicated package.) Boomerang is the name of at least four television networks. ... Atom Ant is a cartoon ant and superhero, created by Hanna-Barbera in 1965. ... Precious Pupp is an animated cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera and first broadcast as part of The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show on October 2, 1965. ... The Hillbilly Bears The Hillbilly Bears is an animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... For other uses, see Secret Squirrel (disambiguation). ... Squiddly Diddly Squiddly Diddly is an anthropomorphic animated squid created by Hanna-Barbera, who featured in his own cartoon segment on The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show. ... The Adventures of Gulliver is a television cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions, created in 1968. ... The New Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was a half-hour live-action/animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions on NBC primetime in 1968, based on the famous Mark Twain characters. ...


Although fewer episodes were produced during the second season (13 compared to 18 in the first season), NBC repeated five Season 1 episodes (re-edited to feature the final five chapters of Danger Island) to maintain continuity of story line immediately following the first run of the 13 Season 2 episodes.


After the cancellation of the original series, the characters were revived in the TV special The Banana Splits in Hocus Pocus Park, which first aired as an hour-long installment of The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie on Saturday, November 25, 1972. Unlike the television show, The Splits spent most of the film in animated form. The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie was a series of one-hour animated TV-movies (some of which also contained live action), broadcast on the ABC television network on Saturday mornings from September 9, 1972, to November 17, 1973. ... Saturday morning cartoon is the colloquial term for the animated television programming which was typically scheduled on Saturday mornings on the major American television networks from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Music

The Banana Splits' bubblegum pop rock and roll was provided by studio professionals, including Joey Levine ("I Enjoy Being a Boy", "It's a Good Day for a Parade"), Al Kooper ("You're the Lovin' End"), Barry White ("Doin' the Banana Split"), and Gene Pitney ("Two Ton Tessie"). The music director was prolific songwriter and producer Mark Barkan along with Ritchie Adams. The main theme, The Tra-La-La song, was written by Nelson B. Winkless, Jr. (on all record releases as well as the TV show's closing credits, the song is credited to Adams and Barkan strictly because of contractual arrangements irrelevant to reality regarding who wrote what.) This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music, youth music, or simply bubblegum) is a genre of pop music. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Joey Levine is a prolific songwriter, producer and performer of pop music starting around 1966. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Barry Eugene White (born Barrence Eugene Carter, September 12, 1944) – July 4, 2003) was a Grammy Award winning American record producer, songwriter and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... Gene Francis Alan Pitney (February 17, 1940 – April 5, 2006) was an American singer and songwriter. ...


Cast

  • Fleegle: actor: Jeffrey Winkless (as Jeffrey Brock); voice: Paul Winchell
  • Bingo: actor: Terrence Henry; voice: Daws Butler
  • Drooper: actor: Dan Winkless (as Daniel Owen); voice: Allan Melvin
  • Snorky: actor: James "Jimmy" Dove, later replaced by Robert Towers (Although Snorky's voice often has been mistakenly credited to Don Messick, the character never actually spoke. Messick did perform Drooper's voice in some portions of The Banana Splits In Hocus Pocus Park, with Allan Melvin voicing the character in other scenes).

Jeffrey, Terry, and Dan Winkless are brothers, the sons of N. B. Winkless Jr., a jingle writer for the show's sponsor, Kellogg's. Winkless composed some of the memorable Kellogg's cereal jingles, including "The best to you each morning", and also co-wrote (with Hoyt Curtin) "The Beautiful Calliopa", a song used on the series. The actors' names were changed in the show's credits to avoid the appearance of nepotism. (Sadly, Jeff Winkless succumbed to cancer at age 65 on June 26, 2006.) Ironically, James Dove, the original Snorky, was previously a voice-over artist. He was hired as a result of his small stature, and has stated that he was fired as a result of not being able to get along with the Winkless "Kids". Jimmy resented the nepotism in the industry. James Dove currently suffers from end-stage Parkinson's disease. He lives in assisted care in Los Angeles. Paul Winchell (December 21, 1922 – June 24, 2005), born Pinkus Wilchinski (the family later shortened it to Wilchin), was an American ventriloquist and voice actor from New York City whose career flourished in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Daws Butler in 1976. ... Allan Melvin (born February 18, 1922) is an American actor with a long history of sitcom and voice-over work. ... Donald Don Messick (September 7, 1926 – October 24, 1997) was a voice actor, one of the most prolific voice actors of the second half of the 20th century. ...


DVD release

Earl Kress, a reputable source in the animation industry who holds close ties with the Hanna-Barbera crew, posted on his blog that The Banana Splits Adventure Hour was tentatively scheduled to be released on DVD in 2007. After further research had been done on available master materials needed to reconstruct the shows for proper DVD release, the project was cancelled.[1]


Trivia

  • The Banana Buggies were modified Amphicat 6x6 ATV's.[2]
  • Costumes used for touring and personal appearances (not used in the show) appear to have been originally made by Scollon Productions, Inc.
  • Multiple sets of costumes were created for the four Banana Splits; the last version of Snorky's costume (used primarily during Season 2) looked significantly different from the costume seen in earlier episodes. The "Season 2 versions" of the characters became the official models for licensed merchandise long after the original series ceased production.
  • The song "Wait Till Tomorrow" (written and sung by Ritchie Adams and Mark Barkan) appeared in two different episodes during the first season. On one airing (Show #7, first aired October 19, 1968) the footage was filmed in San Francisco, including the Golden Gate Bridge and Fisherman's Wharf area, which is frequented by tourists. The other airing's footage (Show #6, first telecast October 12, 1968) was shot at Six Flags Over Texas, most notably on the Log Flume and the rowboat attraction.
  • The group originally was to be called "The Banana Bunch," but legal concerns resulted in the name being changed to "The Banana Splits" before the show went on the air. (The name was already in use for a show airing in the UK.) This necessitated the scrapping of a sizable number of Kellogg's cereal boxes promoting the show.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Amphicat was a six-wheel-drive, skid steer amphibious vehicle manufactured in the late 1960s through the early 1970s by Mobility Unlimited Inc of Auburn, Michigan. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.mynameisearlkress.com/weblog/?p=151
  2. ^ http://www.route6x6.com/museum/Amphicat/acatphotos/acatpicts.html

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CMT.com : Banana Splits : Biography (642 words)
The Banana Splits were the brainchild of Joseph Barbera, one half of the famed Hanna-Barbera animation team behind such characters as the Flintstones, the Jetsons, Yogi Bear and Scooby Doo.
Essentially, the Banana Splits concept was like the Monkees once removed; clearly modeled on the exuberance and slapstick comedy of the Beatles' film A Hard Day's Night, the show also borrowed heavily from the bright, psychedelic image the Fab Four sported on the cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.
Unlike their human predecessors, however, the Banana Splits were bizarre, anthropomorphic animals: rhythm guitarist Drooper was a lion, lead guitarist Fleegle was a dog, keyboardist Snorky was an elephant, and drummer Bingo was a monkey.
The Banana Splits/Here Come The Beagles - The Banana Splits/The Beagles (327 words)
The Banana Splits were also a band and the shows often featured musical interludes (in a kinda pop video fashion).
This CD brings together music from an original 60's Banana Splits LP together with plus 5 tracks taken from 45's that were from the back of Kelloggs cereal boxes.
God, we loved the Banana Splits so much when we were kids (it played on UK TV in the 80's).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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