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Encyclopedia > Ban (law)

A ban is, generally, any decree that prohibits something. Decree is an order that has the force of law. ... The term Prohibition, also known as Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...


Bans are formed for the prohibition of activities within a certain political territory. Some see this as a negative act (equating it to a form of censorship or discrimination) and others see it as maintaining the "status quo". Bans in commerce are referred to as embargos. Ordinance can mean: A law made by a non-sovereign body such as a city council or a colony. ... Censorship is the removal or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Ku Klux Klan Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights LGBT rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Feminism Mens... Status Quo are an English rock band whose music is characterised by a strong boogie line. ... For delayed access after publication, see Embargo (academic publishing). ...

Contents

Banning marriages

An example of a popular ban in the early 21st century is a marriage ban, used to prevent certain categories of people from marrying each other. For much of the 1800s and 1900s there were bans on marriage between people of different races (interracial marriage). However, the ban on interracial marriage was taken up by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1967 in the landmark civil rights case Loving vs. Virginia, in which the Court ruled Virginia's miscegenation law an unconstitutional violation of the fundamental right to marriage. This should not be confused with banns of marriage. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Othello and Desdemona from William Shakespeares Othello, a play concerning a biracial couple. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Holding The Court declared Virginias anti-miscegenation statute, the Racial Integrity Act of 1924, unconstitutional, thereby ending all race-based legal restriction on marriage in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... It has been suggested that Anti-miscegenation laws be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into constitutionality. ... The banns of marriage or, simply the banns, (from an Old English word meaning to summon) are the public announcement from the pulpit that a marriage is going to take place in that church between two specified persons at a specified time. ...


Banned persons under Apartheid

During the Apartheid régime in South Africa, the National Party government issued banning orders to individuals seen to be threats to its power — often black politicians or organisations — and acted as suppression orders. Individuals banned by the government could not communicate with more than one person at any time unless at home (thus removing them from partaking in political activities), travel to areas without government approval, or leave the country. A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The National Party (Afrikaans: Nasionale Party) (with its members sometimes known as Nationalists or Nats) was the governing party of South Africa from June 4th 1948 until May 9th 1994, and was disbanded in 2005. ...


Banning and perverse incentives

Advocates for a law banning a good or service often present the law as a way of getting rid of the banned thing. However, the enactment of a ban rarely can cause the banned thing to suddenly disappear from society. For instance, prohibition (of alcohol) did not make alcohol use go away; rather, it drove it underground into the black market of speakeasies and moonshiners. Likewise, prostitution is illegal in most nations, but is still widely practiced. In economics, economic output is divided into physical goods and intangible services. ... The term Prohibition, also known as Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into underground economy. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Shine Road The name tells the history of this back road in Hemingway, South Carolina Revenue men at the site of moonshine stills, Kentucky, 1911 or before Moonshine (sometimes known as Poitín, mooney, moon, creek water, hooch, Portuguese grape juice, white lightning, and many others) is a common slang... Whore redirects here. ...


Banning does not make the banned goods or services go away -- all it does is threaten with prosecution those who are caught with the banned good or engaged in the banned service. Law enforcement is never perfect, so some people will be able to get away with breaking the law; this is why a black market is possible. A perverse incentive can arise when banning a good makes it more profitable to supply, by driving up the price. Similarly, the creation of a black market can create a profitable economic niche for organized crime. Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ... For the band, see The Police. ... A perverse incentive is a term for an incentive that has the opposite effect of that intended. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ...


Banning in games

The banhammer is a metaphorical tool used in many Player versus Player games. The host has the power to kick or ban players who do not follow the rules. The term banhammer, sometimes called the ban stick, is a metaphorical item used to punish malicious members of a group, usually through virtual means. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ban (law) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (536 words)
Bans in commerce are referred to as embargos.
An example of a popular ban in the early 21st century is a marriage ban, used to prevent certain categories of people from marrying each otherand performing anal sex once married.
However, the ban on interracial marriage was taken up by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1967 in the landmark civil rights case Loving vs. Virginia, in which the Court ruled Virginia's miscegenation law an unconstitutional violation of the fundamental right to marriage.
Brady Campaign - Assault Weapons Ban (3387 words)
Law enforcement officers are at particular risk from these weapons because of their high firepower and ability to penetrate body armor.
This was the first state law to use a generic definition of assault weapons and its magazine ban was the most restrictive in the nation.
This law was upheld as constitutional in federal court against an NRA challenge and the NRA did not appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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