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Encyclopedia > Baltic Cable

The Baltic Cable is a HVDC power line running beneath the Baltic Sea that interconnects the electric power grids of Germany and Sweden. HVDC or high-voltage, direct current electric power transmission systems contrast with the more common alternating-current systems as a means for the bulk transmission of electrical power. ... This article is on a political subject, specifically a conservative blog in the United States. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53 deg. ... Electric power is the amount of work done by an electric current in a unit time. ...


The Baltic Cable uses a transmission voltage of 450 kV – the highest operating voltage of all facilities for energy transmission in Germany. 250 kilometres long, it is the longest high voltage cable on earth. It is a monopolar HVDC system with a maximum transmission facility of 600 megawatts. Potential difference is a quantity in physics related to the amount of energy that would be required to move an object from one place to another against various types of force. ... The volt (symbol: V) is the SI derived unit of electric potential difference. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer) (symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the one we all live on. ...

Contents


Route

The course of the Baltic Cable starts at the inverter station at Lübeck-Herrenwyk, which is situated on the site of a former coal-fired power station. It crosses the river Trave in a channel 6 metres below the bottom of the river and then follows its course as sea cable laid at the Eastern side of this river. After crossing the peninsula at Priwall the cable runs at first parallel to the coast of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, in order to turn behind Rostock north-easterly toward Sweden. An inverter is a circuit for converting direct current to alternating current, they are used in a wide range of applications, from small power supplys for a computer to large industrial applications to transport bulk power. ... Herrenwyk is a part of Lübeck. ... Oil power plant in Iraq Coal power plant in China A power station or power plant is a facility for the generation of electric power. ... Mouth of river Trave The Trave is a river of Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... Peninsula A peninsula (from Latin paene insula, almost island) is a geographical formation consisting of an extension of land from a larger body, surrounded by water on three sides. ... Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (German: Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) is a Bundesland (federal state) in northern Germany. ... Rostock is a city in northern Germany. ...


From the point on the southern coast of Sweden where it reaches land, the Baltic Cable runs for a further 5 kilometres as an underground cable. The last 12 kilometres of the 262 kilometre long Baltic Cable power line are built as overhead lines hung on 40 pylons. For pylons of overhead lines, see Electricity pylon Pylon Noun from Greek πυλώνας gateway tower like structure, usually one of a series, used to support high voltage electricity cables. ...


Although the Baltic Cable is a monopolar line, which would only require one conductor on the pylons, two conductors were installed along the whole overhead section. These conductors are permanently connected in parallel in the inverter station at Kruseborg and at the termination of the overhead line.


Operation

Because this overhead line can generate radio interference, there is a highly effective active filter system installed at the Kruseborg inverter station. In the Lübeck-Herrenwyk inverter station, there is no requirement for such a system, because there is no overhead powerline section on the German side of the Baltic Sea.


The cable cannot be operated at the maximum transmission rating of 600 megawatts, because the 380 kV line which begins at the converter station of Lübeck-Herrenwyk ends at the Lübeck-Siems substation. From there power flows on 220 kV and 110 kV lines, which reduces the maximum transmission rate and increases the losses of the transmission. The Baltic Cable is a HVDC power line running beneath the Baltic Sea that interconnects the electric power grids of Germany and Sweden. ...


Expansion schemes

Of the two originally planned 380 kV lines to Lübeck (from Krümmel Nuclear Power Station to Lübeck-Siems and from Schwerin substation to Lübeck-Herrenwyk), the 380 kV line between Krümmel and Lübeck-Siems was cancelled according to speakers from the E.ON AG. A nuclear power plant (NPP) is a thermal power station in which the heat source is one or more nuclear reactors generating nuclear power. ... Schwerin is a town in northern Germany. ... Herrenwyk is a part of Lübeck. ...


There is still the option to build a 380 kV line from Lübeck to another 380 kV substation in Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg or Niedersachsen. The construction of the 380 kV link between Lübeck-Herrenwyk and Schwerin is not progressing due to opposition from ecologists. Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... Alster Lake at dusk Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with the Hamburg Harbour, its principal port. ... With an area of 47,618 km² and nearly eight million inhabitants, Lower Saxony (German Niedersachsen) lies in north-western Germany and is second in area and fourth in population among the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... Ecology is the branch of science that studies the distribution and abundance of living organisms, and the interactions between organisms and their environment. ...


A transmission rate of 600 megawatts should be possible via a new 220 kV cable and a SVC (static var compensator) in Lübeck-Siems after 2005. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • Technical information
  • Circuit diagrams and track of cable
  • Baltic Cable HVDC project (www.abb.com/hvdc)

  Results from FactBites:
 
The ABB Group: Baltic Cable (107 words)
The owner is Baltic Cable AB, a company owned by Sydkraft AB, Sweden and Statkraft, Norway.
The Baltic Cable HVDC project has made it possible to postpone the construction of new power production plants and that existing production plants can be used more efficiently by the owners.
Both the converter stations and the submarine cable were delivered by ABB.
Baltic Cable - Definition, explanation (533 words)
The Baltic Cable is a HVDC power line running beneath the Baltic Sea that interconnects the electric power grids of Germany and Sweden.
The Baltic Cable uses a transmission voltage of 450 kV – the highest operating voltage of all facilities for energy transmission in Germany.
The cable cannot be operated at the maximum transmission rating of 600 megawatts, because the 380 kV line which begins at the converter station of Lübeck-Herrenwyk ends at the Lübeck-Siems substation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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