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Encyclopedia > Baltic countries
The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania

The terms "Baltic countries", "Baltic Sea countries", "Baltic states", and "Balticum" refer to slightly different combinations of countries in the general area surrounding the Baltic Sea. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x929, 128 KB) Found in http://en. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x929, 128 KB) Found in http://en. ... Map of the Baltic Sea. ...

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Baltic Sea countries and Balticum

Geographically, the Baltic Sea countries are countries that have access to the Baltic Sea: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, and Sweden.


The Baltic Sea countries, together with Norway, Iceland and the European Union form the Council of the Baltic Sea States. The Baltic Sea The Council of the Baltic Sea States (abbrevated CBSS) is an intergovernmental organization formed to handle (mainly environmental) issues concerning the Baltic Sea region. ...


Balticum is the geographic term used in several languages, including Scandinavian and German, which usually denotes the territory corresponding to modern Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. In some contexts, the term Balticum includes the historically or culturally German-dominated lands, or provinces, of Estonia, Livonia, Courland and Latgale (corresponding to modern Estonia and Latvia), as well as sometimes East Prussia, while Lithuania is sometimes excluded. The North Germanic languages (also Scandinavian languages or Nordic languages) is a branch of the Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the Faroe Islands and Iceland. ... Livonia (Latvian: Livonija; Estonian: Liivimaa; German: Livland; Swedish: Livland; Polish: Inflanty; Russian: Лифляндия or Lifljandija) once was the land of the Finnic Livonians, but came in the Middle Ages to designate a much broader territory controlled by the Livonian Order on the eastern coasts of the Baltic Sea in present-day... coat of arms of Courland Courland (Latvian: Kurzeme, German: Kurland, Polish: Kurlandia, Latin: Curonia / Couronia) is a historical Baltic province now part of Latvia. ... Latgale or Latgalia (Polish: Łatgalia; German: Lettgallen) is one of the four cultural regions of Latvia recognised in the Constitution of the Latvian Republic. ... East Prussia (German: Ostpreu en; Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Russian: Восточная Пруссия — Vostochnaya Prussiya) was a province of Kingdom of Prussia, situated on the territory of former Ducal Prussia. ...


Baltic states

The Baltic states refer to Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania were controlled by the Soviet Union during 1940-1941 and 1944(1945)-1991, and have been members of the European Union since 2004. Today the three countries are liberal democracies, parliamentary republics, and very quickly growing market economies. Based on history (especially post-war history) and its political system, Finland is seen as a Nordic country rather than a Baltic state (though was often considered as such before the Second World War). 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... In a broad definition a republic is a state or country that is led by people who do not base their political power on any principle beyond the control of the people of that state or country. ... Overview map of the region. ...

A contemporary transnational Euroregion encompasses the islands of the Baltic countries.
A contemporary transnational Euroregion encompasses the islands of the Baltic countries.

It is often indicated that Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia have little else in common other than their geographic proximity, similar small size, and to lesser degree, a shared recent history. Estonia aspires in direction of their Finnic brethren and the Nordic countries, while Lithuania focuses on its connection to Poland and Central Europe, and Latvia concentrates on the transit between Russia and the Western countries. Some political scientists consider Lithuania as part of Central Europe, due to its historical focus on the European mainland. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x700, 53 KB)Terms of use: All images are the property of Nordregio. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x700, 53 KB)Terms of use: All images are the property of Nordregio. ... In European politics, a Euroregion is a form of transfrontier co-operation structure between two (or more) European countries. ... Finnic peoples (Fennic, sometimes Baltic-Finnic) refers to a group of related ethnic groups and nations speaking Finnic languages (also known as Balto-Finnic languages). ... Overview map of the region. ... Regions of Europe Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Regions of Europe Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ...


In the Cold War context, the four Baltic States were considered to be a part of Eastern Europe, but culturally and historically, it is more appropriate to view Estonia, Finland, and parts of Latvia as part of Northern Europe, Lithuania and parts of Latvia as part of Central Europe, where the historical impact of the Hanseatic League, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire, and the German Empire have been of crucial importance. For Latvia, Estonia, and Finland, historical connections to Denmark and Sweden have also been important. The Cold War was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their military alliance partners. ... Current division of Europe into five (or more) regions: one definition of Eastern Europe is marked in orange Eastern Europe is an eastern region of Europe variably defined. ... Northern Europe is marked in dark blue Northern Europe is a name of the northern part of the European continent. ... Regions of Europe Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Carta marina of Baltic Sea (1539). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Official language Russian Official Religion Russian Orthodox Christianity Capital Saint Petersburg (Petrograd 1914-1925) Area Approx. ... Flag of the German Empire, 1871–1918: black-white-red The German Empire is the name conventionally given in English to the German state from the time of the proclamation of Wilhelm I of Prussia as German Emperor (January 18, 1871) to the abdication of Wilhelm II (November 9, 1918). ...


It should be noted that although politically the present-day Baltic countries are republics, the term "Baltic republics" often refers to something different: the Soviet republics of Baltic countries. In a broad definition a republic is a state or country that is led by people who do not base their political power on any principle beyond the control of the people of that state or country. ... The Baltic Sea The term Baltic Republics referred to the three Soviet Republics of Estonian SSR, Latvian SSR, and Lithuanian SSR. The sovereign nations of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, who had gained sovereignty in 1918, were occupied and annexed by the Soviet Union in 1940. ... Evolution of the Soviet Republics from 1922 to 1958. ...


The term "state" is used as a synonym of "sovereign country", which is distinct from non-sovereign states (the kind to be found in federations and confederations). Before the fall of the Soviet Union, the term "Baltic state" was used by some English speakers to hint that the four countries were under Soviet influence or occupation. In Finland the term "Finlandisation" was used to describe the heavy Soviet influence on her politics. A state is an organized political community, occupying a territory, and possessing internal and external sovereignty, that enforces a monopoly on the use of force. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... The term state may refer to: Look up state in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


The Baltic states are the only three former Soviet Republics that are not affiliated in any way with the Commonwealth of Independent States. Headquarters Minsk, Belarus Member states 11 member states 1 associate member Working language Russian Executive Secretary Vladimir Rushailo Formation December 21, 1991 Official website http://cis. ...


History of the Baltic states

See also: Baltic Republics

The histories of today's Baltic countries took a first "common turn" in the 13th century when Christianity and feudalism were effectively introduced to the region by the invasion of the crusaders from the west (German Sword Brethren, Denmark) and the conversion of Lithuania's rulers from Paganism to Christianity. Over the subsequent centuries, these lands became a battlefield between the Teutonic Order, the Hanseatic League, Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Muscovy, and other Russian principalities. However, Lithuania became the only of the current three to establish its own state as Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1252, which later evolved into a political superpower of the region (in personal union with Poland). The Baltic Sea The term Baltic Republics referred to the three Soviet Republics of Estonian SSR, Latvian SSR, and Lithuanian SSR. The sovereign nations of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, who had gained sovereignty in 1918, were occupied and annexed by the Soviet Union in 1940. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as recounted in the Gospels. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... The Teutonic knights in Pskov in 1240. ... The Livonian Brothers of the Sword (Latin Fratres militiae Christi, literally the brothers of the army of Christ), also known as the Christ Knights, Sword Brethren or The Militia of Christ of Livonia, was a military order started in 1202 by Albert von Buxhövden, bishop of Riga (or Prince-Bishop... Paganism (from Latin paganus, meaning a country dweller or civilian) is a blanket term which has come to connote a broad set of spiritual or religious beliefs and practices of natural or polytheistic religions, as opposed to the Abrahamic monotheistic religions. ... Teutonic Knights, charging into battle. ... Carta marina of Baltic Sea (1539). ... Muscovy (Moscow principality (княжество Московское) to Grand Duchy of Moscow (Великое Княжество Московское) to Russian Tsardom (Царство Русское)) is a traditional Western name for the Russian state that existed from the 14th century to the late 17th century. ... The presumable banner of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania with the coat of arms, called Пагоня in Belarusian, Vytis in Lithuanian and PogoÅ„ in Polish Another version of the Lithuanian banner The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos Didžioji KunigaikÅ¡tystÄ—, Belarusian: Вялі́кае Кня́ства Літо́ўскае (ВКЛ), Ukrainian: Велике Князівство Литовське (ВКЛ), Polish: Wielkie KsiÄ™stwo Litewskie) was an... A personal union is a political union of two or more entities that, internationally, are considered separate states, but through established law, share the same head of state —hence also whatever political actions are vested in the head of state, but no (or very few) others. ...


By about 1582, almost the whole territory of the Baltic states (other than northern Estonia) was under the overlordship of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Events January 15 - Russia cedes Livonia and Estonia to Poland February 24 - Pope Gregory XIII implements the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Baltic provinces (Curonia, Livonia, Estonia and Ingria) and Lithuania in the 19th century, albeit with names and borders different from the present-day countries, were part of the Russian Empire. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Courland, Kurland, Couronia, or Curonia, a former Baltic province of the Teutonic Order state in Livonia (ca. ... Livonia (Latvian: Livonija; Estonian: Liivimaa; German: Livland; Swedish: Livland; Polish: Inflanty; Russian: Лифляндия or Lifljandija) once was the land of the Finnic Livonians, but came in the Middle Ages to designate a much broader territory controlled by the Livonian Order on the eastern coasts of the Baltic Sea in present-day... The Ingrian flag Map of Karelia giving an idea of where Ingria lies. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language Russian Official Religion Russian Orthodox Christianity Capital Saint Petersburg (Petrograd 1914-1925) Area Approx. ...


Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania became sovereign nations in the aftermath of World War I. They declared independence in 1918, fought independence wars against German freikorps and Bolshevist Russia, and were recognized as independent countries in 1920. Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Independence war can refer to: A war of independence of a country. ... The designation of Freikorps (German for Free Corps, i. ... Bolshevist Russia is a common term that refers to the Red side in the Russian government between the Bolsheviks October Revolution (November 7, 1917) and the constitution of the Soviet Union (December 30, 1922). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 3 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time. ...


Prior to World War II, Finland was occasionally considered a fourth Baltic state. For example, in the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of August 1939, Finland was mentioned as one of the Baltic states when relinquished by Nazi Germany to the Soviet "sphere of interest" (quotation required). Since 1917, after the country's independence, Finland and Scandinavia re-established their former connections and a community of similar states known in the English language as the Nordic countries emerged. Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian... Molotov signs the German-Soviet non-aggression pact. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Overview map of the region. ...


Following the Nazi-Soviet pact of 1939, the Soviet Army entered eastern Poland as well as military bases in the Baltic states which were granted after USSR had threatened the three countries with military invasion. In June 1940, the Red Army occupied the whole territory of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and installed new, pro-Soviet governments in all three countries. Following rigged elections, in which only pro-communist candidates were allowed to run, the newly "elected" parliaments of the three countries formally applied to "join" USSR in August 1940 and were annexed into it as the Estonian SSR, the Latvian SSR, and the Lithuanian SSR. 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... State motto: Kõigi maade proletaarlased, ühinege (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Official language Estonian, Russian (de facto) Capital Tallinn Chairman of the Supreme Council Arnold Rüütel (at the time of regaining independence) Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until July 21, 1940 August 6, 1940 August 20, 1991... State motto: Visu zemju proletārieÅ¡i, savienojieties! Official language Latvian, Russian (de facto). ... State motto: Visų Å¡alių proletarai, vienykitÄ—s! (Workers of all countries, unite) Official language Lithuanian, Russian (de facto). ...


The Soviet control of the Baltic states was interrupted by Nazi German invasion of the region in 1941. The German occupation lasted until late 1944 (in Courland, until early 1945), when the countries were re-occupied by the Soviet Army. National Socialism redirects here. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


The three Baltic nations re-declared their independence between 1990 and 1991, and their independence was recognized by the Soviet Union on September 6, 1991. An integration with the Western world and with Western Europe was chosen as the main strategic goal. This article is about the year. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... The term Western world or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... A common understanding of Western Europe in modern times. ...


Rather than new states, they declared themselves to be restorations of the pre-war republics, thus further emphasizing their contention (adhered to worldwide, but contested by some Russian governments) that Soviet domination over the Baltic nations during the Cold War period had been an illegal occupation and annexation. The Stimson Doctrine is a policy of the United States government, enunciated in a note of January 7, 1932 to Japan and China, of non-recognition of international territorial changes effected by force. ... The Cold War was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their military alliance partners. ...


In 2002 the Baltic nations applied to become members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) and the European Union (EU). Membership of NATO was duly achieved on March 29, 2004, and accession to the EU took place on May 1, 2004. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Language and Culture in the Baltic states

Despite the three nations' similarities in culture and history, their languages belong to two distinct language families. The Latvian and Lithuanian languages make up the group of Baltic languages which belongs to the Indo-European language family. The Estonian language belongs to the Baltic-Finnic subgroup of the Finno-Ugric languages, sharing close cultural and historical ties with the Finnish language and culture. The Baltic languages are a group of related languages belonging to the Indo-European language family and spoken mainly in areas extending east and southeast of the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many in Southwest Asia, Central Asia and South Asia. ... The Estonian language (Estonian: eesti keel) is spoken by about 1. ... Baltic-Finnic languages are a subgroup of Finno-Ugric languages, spoken around the Baltic Sea by about 6 million people. ... Approximate geographical distribution of areas where indigenous Finno-Ugric languages are spoken. ... Finnish ( ) is the language spoken by the majority of the population in Finland (92%[2]) and by ethnic Finns outside Finland. ...


The peoples of the Baltic countries also belong to different Christian denominations. Believers in Latvia and Estonia are mostly Lutheran (except for Russian minorities in these countries, which are predominantly Orthodox), while Lithuania is principally Catholic. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Russian Orthodox Church (also known as the Orthodox Catholic Church of Russia) (Русская Православная церковь) is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ...


Due to a long period of Germanic domination, starting in the middle ages, German language also has an important role. Its role has somewhat diminished after World War II, but it remains one of three main foreign languages taught in schools (the other two being English and Russian). The Baltic states have historically also been in the Swedish and Russian spheres of influence. Following the period of Soviet domination, ethnic Russian immigrants from former USSR and their descendants today make up a sizable minority in the Baltic states, particularly in Latvia (about one-third of the population) and Estonia (one-fourth of the population). Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Baltic states and the Baltic Sea The Baltic states or the Baltic countries is a term which nowadays refers to three countries in Northern Europe: Estonia Latvia Lithuania Prior to World War II, Finland was sometimes considered, particularly by the Soviet Union, a fourth Baltic state. ... Baltic Russians are ethnic Russians who live in the previously Soviet-controlled Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. ...


Tourism of the Baltic states

The Baltic states are in fact very different, despite being frequently grouped together. They are considered to be sparsely-populated countries, known for unspoilt nature, amber and medieval cities, mostly former members of the Hanseatic League. Today, the Baltic states are dynamic countries with a young population and cities offering great cultural opportunities, and cozy pubs and restaurants. The Baltic countries are known to offer affordable vacations. The deepest visible-light image of the universe, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. ... Amber pendants. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Carta marina of Baltic Sea (1539). ...


A favourite place to visit in Estonia is the capital city Tallinn (Reval), an old, walled medieval town with several cathedrals and churches, romantic little streets, and a harbour with ferry lines to Sweden and Finland. The tourist area of the city can be awash with foreign visitors. In Southern Estonia, there is the famous old university town of Tartu (Dorpat). Estonia offers beautiful islands such as Saaremaa and Hiiumaa, and lakes such as Lake Peipus. Estonia is ideal for recreation in free nature and in the woods. Long distance buses provide frequent and affordable links within Estonia. County Harju County Mayor Jüri Ratas Area 159. ... County Tartu County Mayor Laine Jänes Area 38. ... This article is about the island. ... Tahkuranna the northern most part of Hiiumaa, Estonia Hiiumaa (Swedish, German: Dagö) is the second largest island belonging to Estonia. ... Lake Peipsi - Landsat satellite photo Lake Peipus (Estonian: Peipsi järv, Russian: Чудское озеро (Chud Lake), German: Peipussee) is a large lake, on the border between Estonia and Russia in Eastern Europe. ...


The Latvian capital, Riga, is the largest city of the Baltics, with about 800,000 inhabitants. Riga is famous for its Art Nouveau architecture, broad boulevards, and cosmopolitan flair. The Latvian countryside is similar to that found in Scandinavia, but is much more affordable. Latvia offers a long Baltic Sea coastline with harbour towns like Liepāja and Ventspils, and seaside resorts like Jūrmala. The countryside offers picturesque little towns, often with medieval centres. Riga (Latvian: RÄ«ga), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of the River Daugava, at . ... Art nouveau /É‘Ê€ nuvo/ (French for new art) is a style in art, architecture and design that peaked in popularity at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Liepāja Liepāja (German: Libau, Lithuanian: Liepoja, Polish: Lipawa, Russian: Либава / Libava or Лиепая / Liyepaya, Yiddish: ליבאַװע / Libave) is a city in western Latvia on the Baltic sea. ... Ventspils (Russian: , formerly Виндава; German: Windau, Polish: Windawa, Livonian: VÇŸnta) is a city in northwestern Latvia on the coast of the Baltic Sea. ... Beach at Majori. ...


Most visits to Lithuania start with capital, Vilnius (Polish/Jewish: Wilno/Wilna), which is also known as "Northern Jerusalem" because of its many churches and its formerly significant Jewish minority. Remains of Polish, Jewish, and Lithuanian cultures can be found in the old town, which is one of the largest in Central Europe and recognized as UNESCO World Heritage site. Close to the capital is the historical capital of Trakai with its lake island-castle, as well as country's early capital Kernavė, a prominent archeological site, often refered to as "Baltic Troy", and also included into the UNESCO World Heritage list. Besides, the site of the geographic Centre of Europe as defined by the French Geographical Institute (Institut géographique national) lies in the vicinity of the capital. The country offers unspoiled nature with its many forests, lakes and the sandy seaside. The stunning Curonian Spit sand peninsula at the Baltic Sea is also in the UNESCO World Heritage list. On the way from the capital to the sea-side is Lithuania's interwar capital Kaunas. The city boasts a Hanseatic old town, while the modern area contains probably the densest concentration of pre-war functionalist architecture in Europe. In the north, on the way to Riga and close to the city of Siauliai lies the unique Hill of Crosses - an impressive site of Catholic pilgrimage and faith. In the south, near the spa-town of Druskininkai, is "Stalin's World" (Grutas park) site which packs monuments to Lenin and other Soviet leaders, which were erected all over Lithuania by Soviets and removed after they left. Location Ethnographic region DzÅ«kija County Vilnius County Municipality Vilnius city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 20 Coordinates General information Capital of Lithuania Vilnius County Vilnius city municipality Vilnius district municipality Population (rank) 540,318 in 2005 (1st) First mentioned 1323 Granted city rights 1387 Vilnius ( (help· info), Belarusian: , Russian... Jews (Hebrew: יהודים, Yehudim) are followers of Judaism or, more generally, members of the Jewish people (also known as the Jewish nation, or the Children of Israel), an ethno-religious group descended from the ancient Israelites and converts who joined their religion. ... UNESCO logo UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... The castle in Trakai was recently rebuilt to a fanciful design. ... Birds eye view of KernavÄ— KernavÄ— is a tourist and archeological resort in southeast Lithuania, and was once the medieval capital of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. ... Curonian Spit map The Curonian Spit (Lit. ... Location Ethnographic region AukÅ¡taitija County Kaunas County Municipality Kaunas city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 11 Coordinates General information Capital of Kaunas County Kaunas city municipality Kaunas district municipality Population (rank) 361,274 in 2005 (2nd) First mentioned 1361 Granted city rights 1408 Kaunas ( (help· info), approximate English transcription... The foundations of the Hanseatic League (German: Hanse), an alliance of trading cities that for a time in the later Middle Ages and the Early Modern period maintained a trade monopoly over most of Northern Europe and the Baltic, can be seen as early as the 12th century, with the... The article is about functionalism in sociology; for other uses, see functionalism. ... Riga (Latvian: RÄ«ga), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of the River Daugava, at . ... Šiauliai (approximate English transcription [ʃǝʊ. ... General view of the Hill of Crosses Crosses on crosses on crosses . ... Location Ethnographic region DzÅ«kija County Alytus County Municipality Druskininkai municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Druskininkai municipality Population (rank) 20000 in 2005 (20th) First mentioned 1596 Granted city rights 1893 Druskininkai ( (help· info), Belarusian: ; Polish: ) is a spa town on Nemunas River in Lithuania, close... Grutas Park is home to only one monument of Stalin, originally set up in Vilnius. ...


Related statistics

The largest cities in Baltic states, by population, are:

The largest cities in Baltic states, by population of indigenous peoples (Lithuanians, Latvians and Estonians), are: Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Riga (Latvian: Rīga), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of the River Daugava, at . ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Dzūkija County Vilnius County Municipality Vilnius city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 20 Coordinates General information Capital of Lithuania Vilnius County Vilnius city municipality Vilnius district municipality Population (rank) 540,318 in 2005 (1st) First mentioned 1323 Granted city rights 1387 Vilnius ( (help· info), Belarusian: , Russian... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Harju County Mayor Jüri Ratas Area 159. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Aukštaitija County Kaunas County Municipality Kaunas city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 11 Coordinates General information Capital of Kaunas County Kaunas city municipality Kaunas district municipality Population (rank) 361,274 in 2005 (2nd) First mentioned 1361 Granted city rights 1408 Kaunas ( (help· info), approximate English transcription... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Lithuania minor County Klaipeda County Municipality Klaipeda city municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates 55°42′N 21°08′E General information Capital of Klaipėda County Klaipėda city municipality Population (rank) 188,767 in (3nd) First mentioned Granted city rights 1252 Klaipėda (approximate English... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Samogitia County Šiauliai County Municipality Šiauliai city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 2 Coordinates General information Capital of Šiauliai County Šiauliai city municipality Šiauliai district municipality Population (rank) 129,075 in 2005 (4th) First mentioned 1236 Granted city rights 1589 Šiauliai ( (help· info), approximate English transcription: , is... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Aukštaitija County Panevėžys County Municipality Panevėžys city municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Panevėžys County Panevėžys city municipality Panevėžys district municipality Panevėžys rural elderate Population (rank) 115,604 in 2005 (5th) First mentioned 1503 Granted city... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Daugavpils (Belarusian Дзьвінск Dźvinsk, Russian Двинcк Dvinsk, Lithuanian Daugpilis, German Dünaburg, Polish Dźwinów, Dźwińsk or Dyneburg, Yiddish דענענבורג Denenburg), population 115,265 in 2000 census) is the second largest city in Latvia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Tartu County Mayor Laine Jänes Area 38. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Liepāja Liepāja (German: Libau, Lithuanian: Liepoja, Polish: Lipawa, Russian: Либава / Libava or Лиепая / Liyepaya, Yiddish: ליבאַװע / Libave) is a city in western Latvia on the Baltic sea. ... The term has no universal, standard or fixed definition. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Aukštaitija County Kaunas County Municipality Kaunas city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 11 Coordinates General information Capital of Kaunas County Kaunas city municipality Kaunas district municipality Population (rank) 361,274 in 2005 (2nd) First mentioned 1361 Granted city rights 1408 Kaunas ( (help· info), approximate English transcription... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Dzūkija County Vilnius County Municipality Vilnius city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 20 Coordinates General information Capital of Lithuania Vilnius County Vilnius city municipality Vilnius district municipality Population (rank) 540,318 in 2005 (1st) First mentioned 1323 Granted city rights 1387 Vilnius ( (help· info), Belarusian: , Russian... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Riga (Latvian: Rīga), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of the River Daugava, at . ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Harju County Mayor Jüri Ratas Area 159. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Lithuania minor County Klaipeda County Municipality Klaipeda city municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates 55°42′N 21°08′E General information Capital of Klaipėda County Klaipėda city municipality Population (rank) 188,767 in (3nd) First mentioned Granted city rights 1252 Klaipėda (approximate English... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Samogitia County Šiauliai County Municipality Šiauliai city municipality Elderate Number of elderates 2 Coordinates General information Capital of Šiauliai County Šiauliai city municipality Šiauliai district municipality Population (rank) 129,075 in 2005 (4th) First mentioned 1236 Granted city rights 1589 Šiauliai ( (help· info), approximate English transcription: , is... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Aukštaitija County Panevėžys County Municipality Panevėžys city municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Panevėžys County Panevėžys city municipality Panevėžys district municipality Panevėžys rural elderate Population (rank) 115,604 in 2005 (5th) First mentioned 1503 Granted city... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Tartu County Mayor Laine Jänes Area 38. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Alytus (approximate English transcription [ʌ.lıː.ˈtus], simplified Lithuanian transcription [alītus]; Polish: Olita) is the capital of Alytus County, Lithuania, with 70,000 inhabitants. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Location Ethnographic region Sudovia County Marijampolė County Municipality Marijampolė municipality Elderate Number of elderates 3 Coordinates General information Capital of Marijampolė County Marijampolė municipality Population (rank) 48,675 in 2001 (7th) First mentioned 1667 Granted city rights 1792 Marijampolė ( (help· info)) is an industrial town and the capital of the...

Other uses

In matters of ecology, biology, or geography, Baltic countries usually refers to all of the countries around the Baltic Sea: Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia's Kaliningrad Oblast, Poland, Germany and Denmark. Ernst Haeckel coined the term oekologie in 1866. ... Biology is the branch of science dealing with the study of life. ... Location of the Kaliningrad Oblast Map of the Kaliningrad Oblast Kaliningrad Oblast (Russian: ; German: or Nordostpreussen), informally called Yantarny kray (, meaning Amber region) is a federal subject of Russia (an oblast) on the Baltic coast, with no land connection to the rest of Russia; it is a non-contiguous exclave...


See also

The Baltic Germans (Baltendeutsche, Balten, and Deutschbalten respectively), were the ethnically German inhabitants of that area on the Eastern shore of the Baltic Sea which forms today the countries of Latvia. ... Baltic way (aka Baltic chain, Lithuanian: Baltijos kelias) is the event which occured on 23 August 1989. ... The Baltic Sea The Baltic region (sometimes briefly The Baltics) is an ambiguous term used to denominate an arbitrary region connected to the Baltic Sea (also called The Baltics). ... Baltic Russians are ethnic Russians who live in the previously Soviet-controlled Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. ... A glass skyscraper – an icon of Estonias economic boom Baltic Tiger is a term used to refer to any of the three Baltic states – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania – during their periods of economic boom, which started after the year 2000 and continues up to the present moment. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Overview map of the region. ... Northern Europe is marked in dark blue Northern Europe is a name of the northern part of the European continent. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... This term is generally used for the Soviet occupation of the Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) in the first phases of World War II. // History of the occupation Before the beginning of World War II Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed an ostensible non-aggression treaty known as... County Harju County Mayor Jüri Ratas Area 159. ... Official language German Capital Riga Regent Adolf Pilar von Pilchau Area ? km² Population ? Independance 12 April 1918 Admission 22 September 1918 (German State) National anthem ? The United Baltic Duchy (in German: Vereinigtes Baltisches Herzogtum) was a shortlived construct in 1918 made possible through Germanys occupation of Latvia and Estonia... The Baltic Sea The term Baltic Republics referred to the three Soviet Republics of Estonian SSR, Latvian SSR, and Lithuanian SSR. The sovereign nations of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, who had gained sovereignty in 1918, were occupied and annexed by the Soviet Union in 1940. ... Baltia was a legendary island in Roman mythology, said to be in northern Europe. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Baltic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (209 words)
Baltic provinces, former provinces of the Russian Empire
Baltic Ridge, hilly landscape at the southern coast of the Baltic Sea from Denmark through Germany and Poland to the Baltic countries
Baltic Russians ethnic Russians associated with the Baltic region
Baltic countries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1802 words)
Geographically, the Baltic Sea countries are countries that have access to the Baltic Sea: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, and Sweden.
The histories of today's Baltic countries took a first "common turn" in the 13th century when Christianity and feudalism were effectively introduced to the region by the invasion of the crusaders from the west (German Sword Brethren, Denmark) and the conversion of Lithuania's rulers from Paganism to Christianity.
In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Baltic provinces (Curonia, Livonia, Estonia and Ingria) and Lithuania in the 19th century, albeit with names and borders different from the present-day countries, were part of the Russian Empire.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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