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Encyclopedia > Balthus
Nude with arms raised, oil on canvas, 1951 by Balthus
Nude with arms raised, oil on canvas, 1951 by Balthus

Balthazar Klossowski de Rola (February 29, 1908 in ParisFebruary 18, 2001) was an esteemed Polish/French modern artist whose work was ultimately anti-modern. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... February 29th, or bissextile day, is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two...

Contents

Life and work

Style and themes

Balthus' style is primarily classical and academic. Though his technique and compositions were inspired by pre-renaissance painters, there are also eerie intimations reminiscent of contemporary surrealists like de Chirico. Painting the figure at a time when figurative art was largely ignored, he is widely recognised as an important 20th century artist. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Surrealism is an artistic movement and an aesthetic philosophy that aims for the liberation of the mind by emphasizing the critical and imaginative powers of the subconscious. ... Giorgio de Chirico in 1936 photographed by Carl Van Vechten. ...


Many of his paintings show young girls in an erotic context. Balthus insisted that his work was not pornographic, but that it just recognized the discomforting facts of children's sexuality.


Early life

In his formative years his art was sponsored by Rainer Maria Rilke, Maurice Denis, Pierre Bonnard and Henri Matisse. His father, Erich Klossowski, a noted art historian (he wrote a monograph on Daumier), and his mother Elisabeth Dorothea Spiro (known as Baladine Klossowska) were part of the cultural elite in Paris. Balthus' older brother, Pierre Klossowski, was a philosopher and writer influenced by theology and the works of Marquis de Sade. Among the visitors and friends of the Klossowskis were famous writers such as André Gide and Jean Cocteau, who found some inspiration for his novel Les Enfants Terribles (1929) on his visits to the family. Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... Maurice Denis (November 25, 1870 – November 1943) was a French painter and writer and a member of the Symbolist and Les Nabis movements. ... The Dining Room in the Country Pierre Bonnard (October 3, 1867 – January 23, 1947) was a French painter and printmaker. ... The Dessert: Harmony In Red (1908), one of Matisses most famous paintings. ... Erich Klossowski (1875 - 1949) was a French/German art historian and a painter, now primarily known as the father of the philosopher Pierre Klossowski and the artist Balthus. ... Honoré Daumier (portrait by Nadar). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Pierre Klossowski (1905 – August 12, 2001) was a French writer, translator and artist. ... At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Theology at: The School of Theology Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... André Gide in 1893 Gide redirects here, for other people named Gide, see Gide (disambiguation) André Paul Guillaume Gide (November 22, 1869 – February 19, 1951) was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1947. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Les Enfants Terribles is a 1929 novel by Jean Cocteau. ...


In 1921 Mitsou, a book which included forty drawings by Balthus, was published. It depicted the story of a young boy and his cat, with a preface by Balthus' mentor Rilke. The theme of the story foreshadowed his life-long fascination with cats, which resurfaced with his self-portrait as The King of Cats (1935). In 1926 Balthus visited Florence, copying frescos by Piero della Francesca, which inspired another early ambitious work by the young painter: the tempera wall paintings of the Protestant church of the Swiss village of Beatenberg (1927). From 1930 to 1932 he lived in Morocco, was drafted into the Moroccan infantry in Kenitra and Fes, worked as a secretary, and sketched his painting La Caserne (1933). Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Fresco by Dionisius representing Saint Nicholas. ... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... A 1367 tempera on wood by Niccolò Semitecolo. ... Beatenberg a municipality in the Interlaken district of the Canton of Bern in Switzerland. ... Kenitra is a city of Morocco, formerly known as Port Lyautey. ... FES is a three-letter acronym that may refer to: Family Expenditure Survey, a national survey in UK Functional electrical stimulation, a neurological treatment technique Flat Earth Society, an organization that advocates the belief that the Earth is flat Flywheel energy storage Fellowship of Evangelical Students Foundation for Ecological Security...


A young artist in Paris

Moving in 1933 into his first Paris studio at the Rue de Furstemberg and later another at the Cour de Rohan, Balthus showed no interest in modernist styles such as Cubism. His paintings often depicted pubescent young girls in erotic and voyeuristic poses. One of the most notorious works from his first exhibition in Paris was The Guitar Lesson (1934), which caused controversy due to its depiction of a sexually explicit depiction of a pre-pubescent girl being sexually molested by her teacher. Other important works from the same exhibition included La Rue (1933), La Toilette de Cathy (1933) and Alice dans le miroir (1933). This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Child sexual abuse is an umbrella term describing criminal and civil offenses in which an adult engages in sexual activity with a minor or exploits a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification. ...

Guitar Lesson, oil on canvas by Balthus
Guitar Lesson, oil on canvas by Balthus

In 1937 he married Antoinette de Watteville, who was from an old and influential aristocratic family from Bern. He had met her as early as in 1924, and she was the model for the aforementioned La Toilette and for a series of portraits. Balthus had two children from this marriage, Thaddeus and Stanislas (Stash) Klossowski, who recently published books on their father, including the letters by their parents. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Location within Switzerland The city of Bern, English traditionally Berne (Bernese German Bärn , German Bern , French Berne , Italian Berna , Romansh Berna ), is the Bundesstadt (administrative capital) of Switzerland, and is the fourth most populous Swiss city (after Zürich, Geneva and Basel). ...


Early on his work was admired by writers and fellow painters, especially by André Breton and Pablo Picasso. His circle of friends in Paris included the novelists Pierre Jean Jouve, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Joseph Breitbach, Pierre Leyris, Henri Michaux, Michel Leiris and René Char, the photographer Man Ray, the playwright and actor Antonin Artaud, and the painters André Derain, Joan Miró and Alberto Giacometti (one of the most faithful of his friends). In 1948, another friend, Albert Camus, asked him to design the sets and costumes for his play L'Etat de Siège (The State of Siege, directed by Jean-Louis Barrault). Balthus also designed the sets and costumes for Artaud's adaptation for Percy Bysshe Shelley's The Cenci (1935), Ugo Betti's Delitto all'isola delle capre (Crime on Goat-Island, 1953) and Barrault's adaptation of Julius Caesar (1959-1960). André Breton André Breton (French IPA: ) (February 19, 1896 – September 28, 1966) was a French writer, poet, and surrealist theorist, and is best known as the main founder of surrealism. ... Pablo Ruiz Picasso (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. ... Pierre Jean Jouve (1887 - 1976) was a French writer, novelist and poet. ... Antoine de Saint-Exupéry[1] (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... Henri Michaux (May 24, 1899 - October 18, 1984) was a highly individualistic Belgian poet, writer and painter who wrote in the French language. ... Michel Leiris (1901-1990) was a French surrealist writer and ethnographer. ... René Char (1907 - 1988) René Char (June 14, 1907 - February 19, 1988) was a 20th century poet. ... Man Ray, photographed at Gaite-Montparnasse exhibition in Paris by Carl Van Vechten on June 16, 1934 Man Ray (August 27, 1890–November 18, 1976) was an American artist who spent most of his career in Paris, France. ... Antonin Artaud Antoine Marie Joseph Artaud, better known as Antonin Artaud (born September 4, 1896, in Marseille; died March 4, 1948 in Paris) was a French playwright, poet, actor and director. ... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906). ... Joan Miró photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, June, 1935 Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a Catalan painter, sculptor, and ceramist born in Catalonia, Spain. ... Alberto Giacometti (October 10, 1901 – January 11, 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draftsman and printmaker. ... Albert Camus (pronounced )( ) (November 7, 1913 – January 4, 1960) was an Algerian-French author and philosopher. ... Jean-Louis Barrault (September 9, 1910 - January 22, 1994) was a French actor, director and mime artist. ... -1... The Cenci was a verse drama by Percy Bysshe Shelley written in the summer of 1819, and inspired by a real Italian family, the Cencis (in particular, Beatrice Cenci). ... Ugo Betti (Camerino, February 4, 1892 – Rome, June 9, 1953) was an Italian judge, better known as an author, who is considered by many the greatest Italian playwright next to Pirandello. ... The Tragedy of Julius Cæsar, more commonly known simply as Julius Caesar, is a tragedy by William Shakespeare probably written in 1599. ...


Champrovent to Chassy

In 1940, with the invasion of France by German forces, Balthus fled with his wife to Savoy to a farm in Champrovent near Aix-les-Bains, where he began his work on two major paintings: Landscape near Champrovent (1942-1945) and The Living Room (1942). In 1942 he escaped Nazi France to Switzerland, first to Bern and in 1945 to Geneva, where he made friends with the publisher Albert Skira and the writer and member of the French Resistance André Malraux. Balthus returned to France in 1946 and a year later he made a trip with André Masson to Southern France, meeting figures such as Picasso and Jacques Lacan, who eventually became a collector of Balthus' work. In 1950 he designed the stage, together with Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, for a production of the Mozart opera Così fan tutte in Aix-en-Provence. Three years later he moved into the Chateau de Chassy in the Morvan, living with his niece Frédérique Tison and finishing his large-scale masterpieces La Chambre (The Room 1952, possibly influenced by Pierre Klossowski's novels) and La Passage de Commerce Saint-André (1954). Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... Aix-les-Bains is a spa town of eastern France, near the Lac du Bourget, and 9 m. ... Location within Switzerland The city of Bern, English traditionally Berne (Bernese German Bärn , German Bern , French Berne , Italian Berna , Romansh Berna ), is the Bundesstadt (administrative capital) of Switzerland, and is the fourth most populous Swiss city (after Zürich, Geneva and Basel). ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... In 1933, publisher Albert Skira contacted Andre Breton about a new journal, which he planned to be the most luxurious art and literary review the Surrealists had seen, featuring a slick format with many color illustrations. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... André Malraux, French author, adventurer, and statesman André Malraux (November 3, 1901 - November 23, 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman preeminent in the world of French politics and culture during his lifetime. ... Pedestal Table in the Studio, (1922) André-Aimé-René Masson (January 4, 1896 – October 28, 1987) was a French artist. ... This region consists of the southern part of France. ... Jacques Lacan Jacques-Marie-Émile Lacan (April 13, 1901 – September 9, 1981) was a French psychoanalyst, psychiatrist, and doctor. ... The poster Normandie (1935) is Cassandres most famous design Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (January 24, 1901 – June 19, 1968) was an influential Ukrainian-French painter, commercial poster artist, and typeface designer. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Così fan tutte, ossia La scuola degli amanti, K. 588, is an opera buffa by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ... Aix (prounounced eks), or, to distinguish it from other cities built over hot springs, Aix-en-Provence is a city in southern France, some 30 km north of Marseille. ... The Morvan is a mountainous massif lying just to the west of the Côte dOr escarpment in Burgundy, France. ... Pierre Klossowski (1905 – August 12, 2001) was a French writer, translator and artist. ...


Later life and work

As international fame grew with exhibitions in the gallery of Pierre Matisse (1938) and the Museum of Modern Art (1956) in New York City, he cultivated the image of himself as an enigma. In 1964 he moved to Rome, where he presided (appointed by the French Minister of Culture André Malraux) over the Villa de Medici as director of the French Academy in Rome, and made friends with the filmmaker Federico Fellini and the painter Renato Guttuso. View across garden, in new MoMA building by Yoshio Taniguchi. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Minister of Culture and Communications is, in the Government of France, the cabinet member in charge of national museums and monuments; promoting and protecting the arts (visual, plastic, theatrical, musical, dance, architectural, literary, televisual and cinematographic) in France and abroad; and managing the national archives and regional maisons de... André Malraux, French author, adventurer, and statesman André Malraux (November 3, 1901 - November 23, 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman preeminent in the world of French politics and culture during his lifetime. ... Villa Medici in Rome. ... The French Academy in Rome (French: Académie de France à Rome) is an Academy located in the Villa Medici, within the Villa Borghese, in Rome, Italy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Renato Guttuso. ...


In 1977 he moved to Rossinière, Switzerland. That he had a second, Japanese wife Setsuko Ideta whom he married in 1967 and was thirty-five years his junior, simply added to the air of mystery around him (he met her in Japan, during a diplomatic mission also initiated by Malraux). A son, Fumio, was born in 1968 but died only two years later. Rossinière is a municipality in the Pays-dEnhaut of the Canton of Vaud in Switzerland. ... André Malraux, French author, adventurer, and statesman André Malraux (November 3, 1901 - November 23, 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman preeminent in the world of French politics and culture during his lifetime. ...


The photographers and friends Henri Cartier-Bresson and Martine Franck (Cartier-Bresson's wife), both portrayed the painter and his wife and their daughter Harumi (born 1973) in his Grand Chalet in Rossinière in 1999. Portrait of Henri Cartier-Bresson taken by George Platt Lynes. ... Martine Franck (b. ... Chalet A chalet (pronounced ), also called Swiss chalet, is a type of building in the Alpine region made of wood. ...


Balthus was the only living artist who had his artwork in the Louvre's collection (it came from Picasso's private collection when it was donated to that museum). This article is about the museum. ... Pablo Ruiz Picasso (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. ...


Prime Ministers and rock stars alike attended the funeral of Balthus. Bono, lead-singer of U2, sang for the hundreds of mourners at the funeral, including the President of France, the Prince Sadruddhin Aga Khan, supermodel Elle McPherson and the photographer Cartier-Bresson. A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Paul David Hewson (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA pronunciation: ), is the lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. ... Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan, KBE, (January 17, 1933 – May 12, 2003) was the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1965 to 1977. ... Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen. ... Elle Macpherson (born March 29, 1964, Sydney, Australia) is an Australian supermodel and actress. ...


Ancestral Debates

Balthus' father, Erich was born to a noble Polish family (szlachta) of the Rola coat-of-arms, that lived in Prussia. This was evidently the reason for his son Balthus, to add, later, "de Rola" to his family name Klossowski, which was in tradition of szlachta (if he lived in Poland, the arrangement of his last name would have been Rola-Kłossowski or Kłossowski h. Rola.) The artist was very conscious of his Polish ancestry and the Rola arms was embroidered onto many of his kimono, in the style of Japanese kamon. StanisÅ‚aw Antoni Szczuka, a Polish nobleman Szlachta ( ) was the noble class in Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the two countries that later jointly formed the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Rola - is a Polish Coat of Arms. ... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2... Klossowski is a surname, and may refer to: Balthazar Klossowski de Rola, the French painter Balthus Erich Klossowski Pierre Klossowski This page or section lists people with the surname Klossowski. ... Rola - is a Polish Coat of Arms. ... Kamon (家紋) or mon (紋) are Japanese crests. ...

'Nude Before a Mirror', oil on canvas painting by Balthus, Metropolitan Museum of Art

According to most biographies, Balthus denied having any ethnic Jewish heritage, claiming that biographers had confused his mother's true ancestry. In "Balthus: A Biography" by Nicholas Fox Weber, Weber, who is Jewish, attempts to find common ground whilst interviewing Balthus by bringing up a biographical note that stated Balthus' mother was Jewish. Balthus replied "No, sir, that is incorrect." and went on to explain: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


"One of my father's best friends was a painter called Eugen Spiro, who was the son of a cantor. My mother was also called Spiro, but came apparently from a Protestant family in the south of France. One of the Midi Spiros - one of the ancestors - went to Russia. They were likely of Greek origin. We called Eugen Spiro "Uncle" because of the close relationship, but he was not my real uncle. The Protestant Spiros are still in the south of France." Eugene Spiro, born Eugen Spiro (April 18, 1874, Breslau, Silesia - September 26, 1972, NYC) was a German and American painter. ... Look up cantor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Balthus continued by saying he did not think it was tasteful to forcefully correct these errors, given his many Jewish friends. Nicholas Fox Weber concludes in his biography that Balthus was lying about this "biographical error," though the exact reasoning behind why was never explained. Weber states that the name "Spiro" is only a Greek given name, though this is incorrect, as the personal name serves equivalently as a surname.[1] Balthus consistently repeated that if he, in fact, was Jewish, he would have no problem with it. In support of Weber's view, Balthus did make dubious claims about his ancestry before, once claiming he was descended from Lord Byron on his father's side. Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ...


According to Weber, Balthus would frequently add to the story of his mother's ancestry, saying that she was also related to the Romanov, Narischkin, and lesser known Raginet families among others, though, conceedingly, Balthus never claimed his mother's side was from a straight un-mixed lineage, and despite the sensationalism with which Weber says he told these stories and the method in which Weber presents Balthus' claims, Balthus never saw himself as contradictory. The true extent of what Balthus was saying for artistic worth and what he was saying in earnest is unknown as he did not stick seriously to all his claims. Weber never interviewed Balthus' brother, Pierre, in order to confirm or deny Balthus' mother's ancestry, though he did present a quote by Baladine's lover, the poet Rainer Maria Rilke in which Rilke states that the Spiros were descended form one of the richest Sephardic-Spanish families. In a seemingly conclusionary note, Weber writes "The artist neglected, however, to tell me that, in the most miserable of ironies, Fumio (Balthus' son) suffered from Tay-Sachs disease." The House of Romanov (Рома́нов, pronounced ) was the second and last imperial dynasty of Russia, which ruled the country for five generations from 1613 to 1761. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... Tay-Sachs disease is a fatal genetic disorder, inherited in an autosommal recessive pattern, in which harmful quantities of a fatty substance called ganglioside GM2 accumulate in the nerve cells in the brain. ...


Weber holds this up as evidence that Balthus was lying about not having Jewish ancestry, given Tay-Sachs is a heavily Ashkenazic-Jewish disease. This, of course, conflicts with Rilke's report of the Spiros being Sephardic, which Weber later says was a "Rilke embellishment" and also brings up the relevance of the preponderance of Japanese infantile Tay-Sachs, since Balthus' wife was Japanese. Ashkenazi (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי, Standard Hebrew Aškanazi, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAškănāzî) Jews or Ashkenazic Jews, also called Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי&#1501...


Influence and legacy

The work of Balthus shows numerous influences, including the writings of Emily Brontë, the writings and photography of Lewis Carroll, and the paintings of Masaccio, Piero della Francesca, Simone Martini, Poussin, Jean Etienne Liotard, Joseph Reinhardt, Géricault, Ingres, Goya, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, Courbet, Edgar Degas, Félix Vallotton and Paul Cézanne. His favourite composer was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Emily Jane Brontë (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) – believed to be a self-portrait Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... The Holy Trinity (1425-1428) - Fresco, Santa Maria Novella, Florence Masaccio (born Tommaso Cassai or in some Tommaso di Ser Giovanni di Mone) (December 21, 1401, San Giovanni Valdarno, Italy – autumn 1428, Rome), was an important painter of frescoes during the early Italian Renaissance, whose works are the first monument... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... Petrachs Virgil (title page) (c. ... Les Bergers d’Arcadie, set in Ancient Greece. ... Self-portrait, 1773 Jean-Étienne Liotard (born 1702 at Geneva; died 1789 in Paris) was a French painter. ... Monument at Gericaults tomb. ... Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (pronounced (Ang, rhymes with bang, with a hint of the r, but the final es is not pronounced) (August 29, 1780 - January 14, 1867) was a French Neoclassical painter. ... Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (March 30, 1746 – April 16, 1828) was a Spanish painter and printmaker. ... Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (portrait by Nadar) Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (July 26, 1796 – February 22, 1875) was a French landscape painter. ... Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet (10 June 1819 – 31 December 1877) was a French painter who led the Realist movement in 19th-century French painting. ... Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917), born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (IPA ), was a French artist famous for his work in painting, sculpture, printmaking and drawing. ... Félix Vallotton was a Franco-Swiss painter, engraver, illustrator and writer (Lausanne 1865-Paris 1925). ... Paul Cézanne (IPA: , January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ...


His work has strongly influenced several contemporary artists; among them Jan Saudek, Will Barnet, Duane Michals, John Currin, Eli Levin, and Emile Chambon. Jan Saudek (b. ... Will Barnet (born 1911) is an American painter, printmaker, teacher and critic. ... Album cover of Clouds Over Eden by Richard Barone. ... John Currin is a U.S. painter. ...


His widow, Countess Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, heads the Balthus Foundation established in 1998.[2]


Influences on film-makers and writers and musicians

He has also influenced the filmmaker Jacques Rivette of the French New Wave. His film Hurlevent (1985) was inspired by Balthus' drawings made at the beginning of the 1930s. As he says in an interview with Valerie Hazette: "Seeing as he's a bit of an eccentric and all that, I am very fond of Balthus (...) I was struck by the fact that Balthus enormously simplified the costumes and stripped away the imagery trappings (...)". Jacques Rivette (born March 1, 1928) is a French film director. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ...

Balthus' "Girl at a Window" between Jean-Pierre Léaud and Claude Jade in "Domicile conjugal"

A reproduction of Balthus' Girl at a Window (a painting from 1957) prominently appeared in François Truffaut's film Domicile Conjugal (Bed & Board, 1970). The two principal characters, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud) and his wife Christine (Claude Jade), are arguing. Christine takes down from the wall a small drawing of approximately 25 X 25 cm and give it to her husband: Christine: -"Here, take the small Balthus". Antoine: "Ah, the small Balthus. I offered it to you, it's yours, keep it." Image File history File links Screenshot_Claude_Jade_Jean-Pierre_Léaud_Balthus_Domicile_conjugal. ... Image File history File links Screenshot_Claude_Jade_Jean-Pierre_Léaud_Balthus_Domicile_conjugal. ... Jean-Pierre Léaud (born May 5, 1944) is a French actor. ... Claude Jade Claude Jade (born Claude Marcelle Jorré on 8 October 1948 - 1 December 2006) was a celebrated French actress, best known by starring in François Truffauts films Baisers volés, Domicile conjugal and Lamour en fuite. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... Bed & Board is lodging with food. ... Jean-Pierre Léaud (born May 5, 1944) is a French actor. ... Claude Jade Claude Jade (born Claude Marcelle Jorré on 8 October 1948 - 1 December 2006) was a celebrated French actress, best known by starring in François Truffauts films Baisers volés, Domicile conjugal and Lamour en fuite. ...


In the third book of the Hannibal Lecter Series (Hannibal), it is implied that the fictional serial killer Hannibal Lecter is a distant cousin of Balthus. Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... Hannibal, a novel by Thomas Harris, is the source material for the film Hannibal, directed by Ridley Scott. ...


Harold Budd's album The White Arcades features a track titled "Balthus Bemused by Color". Harold Budd (born May 24, 1936) is an American ambient/avant-garde composer. ... The White Arcades (1988) is an album performed by Harold Budd. ...


Films on Balthus

  • Damian Pettigrew, Balthus Through the Looking-Glass (72', Super 16, PLANETE/CNC/PROCIREP, 1996). Major documentary on and with Balthus filmed at work in his studio and in conversation at his Rossinière chalet. Shot over a 12-month period in Switzerland, Italy, France and England, the film captures the painter's unique vision and extraordinary lifestyle. Won UNESCO Grand Prize, Lausanne International Art Festival Best Photography Prize including Official Selection 8th International VUE SUR LES DOCS Marseille.

Damian Pettigrew (born in Quebec) is a Canadian filmmaker and multimedia artist, best known for his cinematic portraits of Balthus and Federico Fellini. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ IUCN biographical note on Countess Setsuko Klossowska de Rola, 2003 accessed at [2] April 4, 2007

References and bibliography

  • Stanislas Klossowski de Rola, Balthus (Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1996)
  • Claude Roy, Balthus. (1996)
  • Nicholas Fox Weber, Balthus, A Biography, (Alfred A. Knopf, 1999) ISBN 0-679-40737-5
  • Gero Von Boehm, The Painter's House. With photographs by Kishin Shinoyama (2000)
  • Jean Clair and Virginie Monnier, Balthus: Catalogue Raisonne of the Complete Works. (Editions Gallimard, 2000)
  • Alain Vircondelet, Mémoires de Balthus (Editions du Rocher, 2001)
  • Jean Clair, Balthus (Thames and Hudson, 2001)
  • Balthus. Correspondence amoureuse avec Antoinette de Watteville 1928-1937 (Buchet Chastel, 2001)
  • Gilles Neret, Balthus. The King of Cats. (Taschen, 2003)
  • Raphaël Aubert, Le Paradoxe Balthus (Editions de la Différence, 2005)

Gnomes 30th Anniversary Edition from Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ... Colophon of the publisher Alfred A. Knopf. ... Éditions Gallimard is the second most important French publisher, and probably the most respected. ... Thames & Hudson (also Thames and Hudson and sometimes T&H for brevity) are a publisher, especially of art and illustrated books, founded in 1949 by Walter and Eva Neurath. ...

External links

  • La Fondation Balthus
  • Ten Dreams Galleries
  • http://oseculoprodigioso.blogspot.com/2005/09/balthus-arte-figurativa.html The Prodigious Century
  • Obituaries
  • Valerie Hazette. Hurlevent: Jacques Rivette's Adaptation of Wuthering Heights, Senses of Cinema, October 2003)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Balthus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1299 words)
Balthus' older brother, Pierre Klossowski, was a philosopher and writer influenced by theology and the works of Marquis de Sade.
Balthus returned to France in 1946 and a year later he made a trip with André Masson to Southern France, meeting figures such as Picasso and Jacques Lacan, who eventually became a collector of Balthus' work.
Balthus was the only living artist who had his artwork in the Louvre's collection (it came from Picasso's private collection when it was donated to that museum).
Balthus presents Balthus by Jed Perl (3352 words)
Balthus was born in Paris, and his painting, from beginning to end, is quintessentially French in the way that realist, romantic, and classical tendencies are commingled so that each somehow modifies the others.
Balthus is eighty-five—a fact that he is no doubt well aware of, in spite of his having been born on February 29, leap day, and therefore having only a few years ago invited friends to a twentieth-birthday celebration.
Balthus has sometimes been criticized and even occasionally ridiculed for calling himself Count Balthazar Klossowski de Rola; opinions differ as to whether his father’s Polish family was actually entitled to the title, but in any event it does seem a bit absurd for an artist of his stature to care one way or the other.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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