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Encyclopedia > Ballistite

Ballistite is a smokeless propellant explosive made from two high explosives nitrocellulose mixed with nitroglycerin. Smokeless powder is the name given to any number of gunpowder-like propellants used in firearms which produce negligible smoke when fired, unlike the older black powder which it replaced. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... Nitrocellulose (Cellulose nitrate, guncotton) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose (e. ... Nitroglycerin, also known as nitroglycerine, trinitroglycerin, and glyceryl trinitrate, is a chemical compound, a heavy, colorless, poisonous, oily, explosive liquid obtained by nitrating glycerol. ...


In 1886, a French chemist, Paul Vieille invented the first smokeless powder, called Poudre B (Poudre Blanche = white powder). It was made out of two forms of nitrocellulose (collodion and guncotton) softened with ethanol and ether and kneaded together. Three times more powerful than black powder (Poudre N, Poudre Noir), and not generating vast quantities of smoke, Poudre B was a great improvement on it. 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Look up chemist on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Paul Marie Eugène Vieille (2 September 1854-14 January 1934) was a French chemist and the inventor of smokeless gunpowder in 1886. ... Smokeless powder is the name given to any number of gunpowder-like propellants used in firearms which produce negligible smoke when fired, unlike the older black powder which it replaced. ... Poudre B (Poudre Blanche in French = white powder) or Vieille powder, was the first smokeless gunpowder. ... Collodion is a solution of nitrocellulose in ether or acetone, sometimes with the addition of alcohols. ... Nitrocellulose (Cellulose nitrate, guncotton) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose (e. ... Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a flammable, colorless chemical compound, one of the alcohols that is most often found in alcoholic beverages. ... Ether is the general name for a class of chemical compounds which contain an ether group — an oxygen atom connected to two (substituted) alkyl groups. ... Black powder - here a 100 grams container - can be freely bought in Switzerland. ...


Prior to its introduction, a squad of soldiers firing volleys would be completely unable to see their targets after a few shots, whilst their own location would be obvious because of the huge cloud of white smoke hanging over them. The reason that smokeless powders are smokeless is that the combustion products were mainly gaseous, compared to around 60% solid products for black powder (potassium carbonate, potassium sulfate etc). Poudre B was therefore immediately adopted by the French military but tended to become unstable over time as the volatile solvents evaporated and led to many accidents, for example two battleships, the Jena and the Liberte blew up in Toulon harbour in 1907 and 1911 respectively. A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... Smoke from a wildfire Smoke is a suspension in air (aerosol) of small particles resulting from incomplete combustion of a fuel. ... Smokeless powder is the name given to any number of gunpowder-like propellants used in firearms which produce negligible smoke when fired, unlike the older black powder which it replaced. ... Combustion or burning is an exothermic reaction between a substance (the fuel) and a gas (the oxidizer), usually O2, to release heat. ... Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms a strongly alkaline solution. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... HMS Victory in 1884 In naval warfare, battleships were the most heavily armed and armored warships afloat. ... Location within France Coat of Arms of Toulon Toulon (Tolon in Provençal) is a city in southern France and a large military harbor on the Mediterranean coast, with a major French naval base. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1911 was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...


Alfred Nobel patented a ballistite in 1887 whilst he was living in Paris. It was composed of 10% camphor and equal parts nitroglycerin and collodion. The camphor reacted with any acidic products of the chemical breakdown of the two explosives, but did tend to evaporate over time leaving a potentially unstable mixture. His patent specified that the nitrocellulose should be "of the well-known soluble kind". He offered to sell the rights to the new explosive to the French government, but they declined, largely because they had just adopted Poudre B. He subsequently licensed the rights to the Italian government, and opened a factory at Avigliana, Turin in 1889. Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel   listen[?] (October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden – December 10, 1896, San Remo, Italy) was a Swedish chemist, engineer and the inventor of dynamite. ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Camphor, also known as 1,7,7-trimethyl-bicyclo(2,2,1)heptan-2-one, d-camphor, d-(+)-camphor, (+)-2-bornanone, d-2-bornanone, 1,7,7-trimethylnorcamphor, 2-camphanone, 2-camphonone, bornan-2-one, or caladryl has the chemical formula C10H16O. Camphor is a white transparent waxy crystalline solid... Nitroglycerin, also known as nitroglycerine, trinitroglycerin, and glyceryl trinitrate, is a chemical compound, a heavy, colorless, poisonous, oily, explosive liquid obtained by nitrating glycerol. ... Collodion is a solution of nitrocellulose in ether or acetone, sometimes with the addition of alcohols. ... Avigliana is a town of approximately 10,000 inhabitants located about 25 km from Turin in the Susa valley in Piedmont in northern Italy. ... Location within Italy Region Piedmont Province Turin Area   – Total   – Water 130 km² (50 mi²) ##.# km² (#.# mi²) #.##% Population   – Total (2002)   – Density 857,433 6,596/km² Time zone CET: UTC+1 Latitude Longitude   45° 04′ N, 7° 40′ E1. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The Italian Army swiftly converted their M1870 and M1870/87 rifles with their black powder cartridges to a new model, the M1890 Vetterli which used a cartridge loaded with ballistite. As Italy was a competing Great Power to France, this was not received well by the French press and public. The newspapers accused Nobel of industrial espionage by spying on Vieille and "high treason against France". Following a police investigation he was refused permission to conduct any more research or to manufacture explosives there. He therefore moved to San Remo in Italy in 1891 where he spent the last five years of his life. A rifle is a firearm that uses a spiral groove cut into the barrel to spin a projectile (usually a bullet), thus improving accuracy and range of the projectile. ... Black powder - here a 100 grams container - can be freely bought in Switzerland. ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Press is a general term having a number of related meanings stemming from the original definition of pressing as the physical action of applying force: Things relating to Metalworking: Machine press, a machine that shapes material by the application of pressure; Flypress, a machine that cuts material by pressing with... The name San Remo can refer to several different things: San Remo, Italy – a large town in Italy San Remo, Victoria – a town in Victoria, Australia The San Remo – an apartment building in New York City This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Meanwhile, a government committee in Great Britain, called the "Explosives Committee" and chaired by Sir Frederick Abel monitored foreign developments in explosives. Abel and Sir James Dewar, who was also on the committee, jointly patented a modified form of ballistite in 1889. This consisted of 58% nitroglycerin by weight, 37% guncotton and 5% vaseline. Using acetone as a solvent, it was extruded as spaghetti-like rods initially called "cord powder" or "the Committee's modification of ballistite", but this was swiftly abbreviated to cordite. Sir Frederick Augustus Abel, Bart. ... James Dewar (1842-1923) Sir James Dewar (September 20, 1842 - March 27, 1923) was a Scottish chemist and physicist. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Petroleum jelly or petrolatum is a byproduct of the refining of petroleum, made from the residue of petroleum distillation left in the still after all the oil has been vaporized. ... For an alternate use of acetone, see Acetone (music). ... A solvent is a liquid that dissolves a solid, liquid, or gaseous solute, resulting in a solution. ... Spaghetti is a long, thin form of pasta, round in cross-section. ... Cordite is a smokeless propellent explosive made by combining two high explosives: nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin. ...


Nobel sued Abel and Dewer over patent infringement, eventually in the House of Lords in 1895 but lost, because of the words "of the well-known soluble kind" in his patent was taken to mean the soluble collodion and specifically exclude the water-insoluble guncotton. Cordite, ballistite and Poudre B continued to be used in various different armed forces for many years, but cordite gradually became predominant. Ballistite is still manufactured as a solid fuel rocket propellant, although the less volatile but chemically similar diphenylamine is used instead of camphor. This article is about the British House of Lords. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... Nitrocellulose (Cellulose nitrate, guncotton) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose (e. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ballistite (228 words)
Ballistite is a double-base powder used as a rocket propellant.
Ballistite burns progressively, but at a rate dependent upon the composition and physical characteristics of the powder grain, the temperature of the powder grain before ignition, and the pressure during reaction.
Basically, solid propellant charges, such as Ballistite, may be grouped under one of two types- restricted-burning and unrestricted burning.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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