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Encyclopedia > Balliol College, Oxford
Colleges and Halls of the University of Oxford
Balliol College
                                 
College name Balliol College
Named after John de Balliol
Established 1263
Sister college St John's College, Cambridge
Master Andrew Graham
JCR President Helen Lochead
Undergraduates 403
MCR President Chelsea Payne
Graduates 228


Location of Balliol College within central OxfordCoordinates: 51°45′17″N 1°15′28″W / 51.7547, -1.2578
Homepage
Boatclub

Balliol College (pronounced [beɪlɪəl]), founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (523x669, 10 KB) Summary Crest of Balliol College, Oxford Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... John de Balliol (d. ... Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Andrew Graham (born June 20, 1942 in Perranporth, Cornwall) is an academic and Master of Balliol College, Oxford. ... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (360 × 370 pixel, file size: 156 KB, MIME type: image/png) Small map of central Oxford This map may be incomplete, and may contain errors. ... Image File history File links Blue_pog. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total...


Balliol is Oxford's most popular college measured in terms of the number of students who want to enter. In 2005, Balliol had the largest number of applications of any Oxford college from both undergraduate students and from graduate students (for at least the third year running) according to the college website [1]. Balliol also traditionally attracts more international students than the other undergraduate colleges. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Traditionally, the undergraduates are amongst the most politically active in the university, and the college's alumni include several former prime ministers. H. H. Asquith (a Balliol undergraduate and British Prime Minister) once described Balliol men as possessing "the tranquil consciousness of an effortless superiority". During Benjamin Jowett's Mastership in the 19th century, the College rose from its relative obscurity to occupy the first rank of colleges, and indeed continues to play a prominent role. In 2006, 45.1% of finalists got First Class Honours degrees, a higher proportion than any other Oxford college has ever achieved, and was placed second in the Norrington Table. A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... Benjamin Jowett (April 15, 1817 – October 1, 1893) was an English scholar and theologian, Master of Balliol College, Oxford. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Norrington Table is an annual ranking that lists the colleges of the University of Oxford in order of the performance of their undergraduate students on that years final examinations. ...

Contents

History

The College was founded in about 1263 (leading many to argue that it is, indeed, the University's oldest college) by John de Balliol under the guidance of the Bishop of Durham. After his death in 1269, his widow, Dervorguilla of Galloway, made arrangements to ensure the permanence of the college. She provided capital, and in 1282, formulated the college statutes, documents that survive to this day. Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... John de Balliol (d. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Events Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1269 ... Dervorguilla of Galloway a. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ...


Student life

The college provides its students with a broad range of facilities, including accommodation, the great hall (refectory), a library, two bars, and separate common rooms for the fellows, the graduates and undergraduates. There are also garden quadrangles and a nearby sportsground and boat-house. The sportsground is mainly used for cricket, tennis, hockey and soccer. The majority of undergraduates are housed within the main college or in the modern annexes around the sportsground. Croquet may be played in the Master's Field, or garden quadrangles in the summer. The graduates are housed mainly within Holywell Manor which has its own bar, gardens, canteen, common room, laundry and computing facilities. Balliol is proud to have a long standing Music Society which organises four free Sunday evening concerts in the College Hall each term. Balliol is the only Oxford college to have its own bridge club. Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Arthur Ashe Stadium at Flushing Meadows, New York Tennis is a game played between two players (singles) or between two teams of two players (doubles). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Winslow Homer: Croquet, 1864 Croquet is a recreational game and, latterly, a competitive sport that involves hitting wooden or plastic balls with a mallet through hoops embedded into the grass playing arena. ...


Balliol also takes pride in its college tortoise, Rosa, named after the notable German Marxist Rosa Luxemburg. Each June, pet tortoises from various Oxford colleges are brought to Corpus Christi College, Oxford where they participate in a very slow race; Balliol's own Rosa has competed and won many times. Taking care of the resident tortoise is one of the many tasks assigned to Balliol students each year. Sadly, Rosa has been missing for over two years now raising the unanswered question of whether she exists any longer. However, recently the College has acquired a new tortoise, which can be seen wandering in the Fellows' Garden. Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Rosa Luxemburg Rosa Luxemburg (March 5, 1870 or 1871 – January 15, 1919, in Polish Róża Luksemburg) was a Jewish Polish-born Marxist political theorist, socialist philosopher, and revolutionary. ... College name Corpus Christi College Named after Corpus Christi, Body of Christ Established 1517 Sister College Corpus Christi College President Sir Tim Lankester JCR President Binyamin Even Undergraduates 239 Graduates 126 Homepage Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Balliol students are noted for their left-wing tendencies; the college ethos has been described as "conservatively left-wing". The JCR has had requests for the Sun and News of the World newspapers several times, but each time a majority of students voted against the idea.


Balliol's JCR is noted for being particularly active, providing many services for its members. These range from laundry facilities, one of the few enitrely student run bars in Oxford (the Manager, Lord/Lady Lindsay, is elected each year by students in the JCR) to a cafeteria (known as Pantry) which serves itemised cooked breakfast until 11.30am each day, Lunch 6 days a week, afternoon tea and cakes, and dinner 5 nights a week. Members of the JCR are encouraged to get involved with the running of these facilities.


Traditions and customs

The front of the college in Broad Street.
The front of the college in Broad Street.

Along with many of the ancient colleges, Balliol has evolved its own traditions and customs over the centuries, many of which occupy a regular calendar slot. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2588x1911, 1675 KB) A photograph of the facade of Balliol College, Oxford. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2588x1911, 1675 KB) A photograph of the facade of Balliol College, Oxford. ... Historical view of Broad Street looking east towards (left to right) the Clarendon Building, and the Sheldonian Theatre and the Old Ashmolean Building. ...

  • Another important feast in the College calendar is the Snell Dinner (normally held on the Friday of the 3rd week in March). This dinner is held in memory of John Snell, whose benefaction established exhibitions for students from the University of Glasgow to study at Balliol (the first exhibitioners were matriculated in 1699) one of whom was Adam Smith. The feast is attended by fellows of Balliol College, the current Snell Exhibitioners, and representatives from Glasgow University and St John's College, Cambridge.
  • By far the most eccentric is The Nepotists carol-singing event organised by the College's Arnold and Brackenbury society. This event happens on the last Friday of Michaelmas term each year. On this occasion Balliol students congregate in the college hall to enjoy mulled wine and the singing of hymns. The evening ends with a rendition of "The Gordouli" on Broad Street, outside the gates of Trinity College. The Gordouli is an eccentric song written by Balliol students in the 1890s, inspired by (and inspiring) the rivalry between the students of Trinity and Balliol.

Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Saint Catherine of Alexandria, known as Saint Catherine of the Wheel, is an apocryphal figure claimed to have been a noted scholar in the early 4th Century who, at the age of only 18, is said to have visited the Emperor Maximinus II and to have convinced him of the... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ... John Snell (1629 - August 6, 1679), founder of the Snell exhibitions at Oxford, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, the son of a blacksmith. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Michaelmas (pronounced ), or the Feast of Ss. ... College name The College of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity and Sir Thomas Pope (Knight) Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1555 Sister College Churchill College President Sir Ivor Roberts KCMG MA JCR President Richard Appleton Undergraduates 298 MCR President Andrew Ng Graduates 105 Homepage Boatclub See also Trinity...

The College buildings

Front Quadrangle

The college has been on its present site since its inception by Balliol's Scholars as their residence. A lease dating to 1263 to them is the traditional 'foundation' date. The oldest parts of the College are the north and west ranges of the front quadrangle, dated to 1431, respectively the medieval Hall, west side, now the 'new library' and the 'old library' first floor north side. The ground floor is the 'Old' (ie Senior) Common Room. This means that Balliol's second library predates printed books. There is a possibility that the original Master's Chamber, south west side, adorned with a fine oriel window is earlier than these; it is now the Master's Dining Room. The Chapel is the third (perhaps fourth) on the site Butterfield 1857. Alfred Waterhouse designed the main Broad Street frontage of the college, with gateway and tower, known as the Brackenbury Buildings, in 1867-68 Staircases ('Stc') I-VII, the first Stc next to the Chapel is the Organ Scholars lodgings. These replaced earlier structures. The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... Historical view of Broad Street looking east towards (left to right) the Clarendon Building, and the Sheldonian Theatre and the Old Ashmolean Building. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Garden Quadrangle

South-side is the front part of the Master's Lodgings on Broad Street from the Waterhouse improvements of the 1860s of the front quad. The neighbour to this is the Fisher Building of 1759 (Stc X) The undistinguished looking Stc XI, south west side, is in fact the oldest structure in this quadrangle, 1720, originally intended as accommodation for scholars from Bristol, hence its name. Continuing the west-side Stc XII-XIV dates from 1826, by George Basevi, and marks the beginnings of the college's academic renaissance being required for the increasing number of Commoners applying for places. Stc XV by Warren of 1912 filled in the last gap of the quadrangle; the ground floor and basement is the principal Junior Common Room. This unfortunately obscures the lines of the Salvin designed Stc XVI-XIX with Tower of 1853. As does the 1968 building by Beard Stc XX, replacing a Victorian structure. This completely hides a formal gateway similar to that at the Broad Street main entrance, this can be viewed outside from Little Magdalen Street, through the gap marked XIX one finds the small function room 'Massey Room'. At north side, of Stc XX is the 'Back Gate' which is part of the 1906 Warren building, west and north side, Stc XXI. At 1 St Giles Street is its neighbour which is part of the college and houses the Oxford Internet Institute. Beard's Stc XXII, replacing Victorian rooms, these were provided from the Vivian Bulkeley-Johnson benefaction. Beard's Stc XX and XXII are connected by the Snell Bridge accommodation at third floor level, which was provided from Glasgow University's Snell Benefaction. The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) is a multi-disciplinary institute based at the University of Oxford in England, and housed in Balliol College, Oxford. ...


The 'new' Hall (replacing that in the front quadrangle) is built on land given by Benjamin Jowett, a Victorian Master of the College. Also by Alfred Waterhouse of 1877, it contains a Willis organ for concerts, again instituted by Jowett. The ground floor contains the college bar and shop ie 'The Buttery' (west side) and the Senior Common Room lunch room (east side). The 1966 new Senior Common Room range (Stc XXIII)(northern and eastern sides) was a benefaction of the Bernard Sunley Foundation and contains some smaller rooms and the principal SCR lounge, replacing Victorian facilities. Below this is a Lecture Room {'LR XXIII'}. The east side of the quad is a neighbouring wall with Trinity College, at the southern end is the Master's Garden, in front of the Chapel, and the Fellow's Garden in front of the 'Old' (Senior) Common Room. The Tower forming the corner between the 'Old Hall' and 'Old Library' is also by Salvin, of 1853 and balances that at Stc XVI-XIX.


The 20th century saw several further additions to the college's buildings. Many undergraduates and some graduates live in buildings on Jowett Walk, five minutes' walking distance from the main buildings, surrounding the Master's Field, the sports facilities of the College. The majority of graduates are housed in the Holywell Manor complex, on Manor Road a little further south of this. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


The quad at Balliol is the scene of the well-known limerick about the philosophy of Bishop Berkeley:

There was a young man who said, God


Must think it exceedingly odd


If he finds that this tree


Continues to be


When there's no one about in the Quad;

and also of the ingenious response by the (Balliol-educated) Catholic theologian and Bible translator Ronald Knox:

Dear Sir, your astonishment's odd:


I am always about in the Quad.


And that's why the tree


Will continue to be,


Since observed by, Yours faithfully, GOD.

Notable former students

Main article: List of Balliol College people

In common with many Oxford colleges, Balliol has produced a wide range of graduates in the fields of economics, history, law, physiology, medicine, management, humanities, mathematics, science, technology, media, philosophy, poetry, politics, and religion. They have also contributed significantly to public life. Balliol people were, for example, prominent in establishing the International Baccalaureate, the National Trust, the Workers Educational Association, the Welfare State and Amnesty International. The following is a list of notable people educated at Balliol College, Oxford. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... medicines, see Medication. ... It has been suggested that Management system be merged into this article or section. ... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, a making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... The Workers Educational Association (WEA) is a British voluntary organisation, active in the field of adult education. ... William Henry Beveridge (March 5, 1879-1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is a pressure group that promotes human rights. ...


Balliol has produced four Nobel Laureates: Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood (Chemistry), Sir John Hicks (Economics), Baruch S. Blumberg (Medicine), and Anthony J. Leggett (Physics). Seven more have been Fellows of the College: George Beadle (Medicine), Norman Ramsey (Physics), Robert Solow (Economics), John Van Vleck (Physics), Gunnar Myrdal (Economics), Linus Pauling (both Peace and Chemistry) and William D. Phillips (Physics) Finally, one must not forget renowned evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Adam Smith attended this college between 1740 and 1746 as a Snell Exhibitioner. Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood was an English physical chemist. ... For other persons named John Hicks, see John Hicks (disambiguation). ... Baruch Samuel Blumberg (born 1925) is a American scientist and recipient of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Medicine for discoveries concerning new mechanisms for the origin and dissemination of infectious diseases. ... Anthony James Leggett (born March 26, 1938), is Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. ... Beadle won a Nobel Prize in 1958 George Wells Beadle (October 22, 1903 - June 9, 1989) was an American scientist in the field of genetics. ... Norman Foster Ramsey, Jr. ... Robert Merton Solow (born August 23, 1924) is an American economist particularly known for his work on the theory of economic growth. ... John Hasbrouck van Vleck (March 13, 1899 – October 27, 1980) was an American physicist. ... Gunnar Myrdal (December 6, 1898 – May 17, 1987) was a Swedish economist and politician. ... Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American quantum chemist and biochemist. ... Categories: Stub | 1948 births | Nobel Prize in Physics winners ... Clinton Richard Dawkins (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist, and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. ...


Academe: Oliver Smithies was awarded the Lasker Prize (America's 'Nobel Prize') in 2001. Sir Peter Morris, a Fellow, became President of the Royal College of Surgeons and George Alberti President of the Royal College of Physicians. Sir Anthony Kenny was a long serving President of the British Academy. Oliver Smithies was awarded a Lasker Award in 2001. ... Peter Morris can refer to several people. ... The Royal College of Surgeons of England is an independent professional body committed to promoting and advancing the highest standards of surgical care for patients. ... Sir (Kurt) George (Matthew Mayer) Alberti (born 27 September 1937) is the British Governments National Clinical Director for Emergency Access. ... College building by Denys Lasdun The Royal College of Physicians of London is the oldest medical institution in England was founded in 1518 and is one of the most active of all medical professional organisations. ...


In Politics it has also produced three British Prime Ministers H. H. Asquith, Harold Macmillan , and Edward Heath. At the mid point of the twentieth century members of the College held senior leadership positions in the three major political parties, those previously mentioned were supplemented by Jo Grimmond (Liberal Leader), Denis Healey and Roy Jenkins both of whom had been Chancellor and both expected to serve as PM, the last named also led the Social Democratic Party and became President of the European Commission. Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ...


In the religious sphere:- Archbishops of Canterbury (Tait, Stanley, Morton, Lang, Temple, and Abbott), two cardinals (Heard and Manning), the Guardian of the Bahá'í Faith (Shoghi Effendi) and a Saint (Alexander Briant) The last photograph of Shoghi Effendi, taken a few months before he died. ...


Monarchs - three kings (Olav V and Harald V of Norway) Yang Di-Pertuan Besar (Malaysia) and Richard von Weizsacker, President of Germany. Olav V Olav V (July 2, 1903 - January 17, 1991) reigned as King of Norway from 1957 to 1991. ... King Harald V His Majesty King Harald V (born February 21, 1937) became King of Norway in 1991. ...


Military: The College has produced five Victoria Cross holders, amongst many decorated warriors including two awarded the Iron Cross (First Class).


'Characters' the most prolific hashish dealer in Britain's history (Howard Marks). Balliol lawyers have also been prominent. Lord Bingham, who read History and has been the College's Visitor for many years, is the Senior Law Lord of the United Kingdom, while Sir Brian Hutton and Lord Rodger have held equivalent positions in Northern Ireland and Scotland at one point all three simultaneously. Dennis Howard Marks (born August 13, 1945 in Kenfig Hill, near Bridgend, Wales) achieved notoriety as an international cannabis smuggler through high-profile court cases, connections with groups such as MI6, the IRA, and the Mafia, and his eventual conviction at the hands of the American Drug Enforcement Agency. ... Thomas Henry Bingham, Baron Bingham of Cornhill, KG PC (born October 13, 1933), is one of the most senior judges in the United Kingdom. ... Lord Hutton James Brian Edward Hutton, Baron Hutton, PC (born 29 June 1932), is a former British Law Lord. ... Alan Ferguson Rodger, Lord Rodger of Earlsferry, (b. ... Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the country. ...


Literary figures include Robert Southey, Matthew Arnold, Gerald Manley Hopkins, Arthur Hugh Clough, Hilaire Belloc, Graham Greene, Anthony Powell and Aldous Huxley, Robertson Davies and Nevil Shute. Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... The Best ideal is the true/ And other truth is none. ... Arthur Hugh Clough (January 1, 1819 – November 13, 1861) was an English poet, and the brother of Anne Jemima Clough. ... Henry Graham Greene, OM, CH (October 2, 1904 – April 3, 1991) was a great English playwright, novelist, short story writer, travel writer and critic whose works explore the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell, CH (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a British novelist best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ...


Balliol members have had a predominance as holders of the office of Chancellor of the University from the 20th Century to the present; George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon, Harold Macmillan, Roy Jenkins and Chris Patten, the last two were opposed in their election by Edward Heath and Lord Bingham of Cornhill respectively. Chancellors of the University of Oxford include: 1224 Robert Grosseteste (Master of the School of Oxford since 1208) 1231 Ralph Cole (surname queried) 1231 Richard Batchden 1233 Ralph Cole 1238 Simon de Bovill 1239 John de Rygater 1240 Richard of Chichester 1240 Ralph de Heyham 1244 Simon de Bovill 1246... Thomas Henry Bingham, Baron Bingham of Cornhill, PC (born October 13, 1933), is one of the most senior judges in the United Kingdom. ...


Academics and visiting academics

As with all Colleges, Balliol has a more or less permanent set of teaching staff, known as Fellows. These include both Tutorial Fellows and Professorial Fellows, many of them with international reputations (e.g. Joseph Raz, David Vines). These are supplemented by academics on short term contracts. In addition, there are distinguished visiting international academics who come to Oxford for periods of up to a year. This is effected through the George Eastman Visiting Professorial Fellowship. The official list of current senior members of the College can be found here. There is an incomplete list of Balliol College academics past and present. Joseph Raz (born 1939) is an influential legal, moral and political philosopher. ... // David Vines is a British-born British-based Australian academic economist. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... This is a list of academics, teachers and visitors who are or who have been on the faculty of Balliol College, Oxford. ...


Fictional Balliol

Main article: Balliol College in fiction

Balliol has featured in fiction since the 19th century, possibly due to its long-held reputation as a college of the intellectual elite. Whilst the institution has been regarded as typifying a whole range of both negative and positive attributes, on several occasions it has been instated by authors as the ultimate target for various educationally ambitious school boys (and, more recently, school girls). Having placed the fictional character at the college the author may then proceed to endorse its academic excellence, or to take a swipe at its intellectual pretensions. This is a selection of instances where Balliol College, Oxford appears in fiction. ...


Institutes and centres

  • Balliol, especially the Master, Andrew Graham, played a major role in 2000 and 2001 in setting up the Oxford Internet Institute. This was the world's first multidisciplinary research and policy centre in a university devoted to examining the impact on society of the Internet. It is a department of Oxford University, but is located in Balliol, and its Director is a Professorial Fellow of Balliol.

Andrew Graham (born June 20, 1942 in Perranporth, Cornwall) is an academic and Master of Balliol College, Oxford. ... The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) is a multi-disciplinary institute based at the University of Oxford in England, and housed in Balliol College, Oxford. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

External links

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Balliol College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1579 words)
Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
Balliol is the only Oxford college to have its own bridge club; bridge is an integral part of Balliol and the club recently provided all four team in the cuppers semi-finals, a notable achievement.
The patron saint of the College is Saint Catherine of Alexandria.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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