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Encyclopedia > Ball State University

Ball State University

Motto Education Redefined
Established 1918 (details)
Type Public
Endowment $117 million
President Jo Ann M. Gora
Faculty 955
Students 20,113
Undergraduates 18,528
Postgraduates 1,585
Location Muncie, IN, USA
Campus small city: 1,035 acres (4.189 km²)
Athletics 19
Division I / IA NCAA
Colors Cardinal and White            
Nickname Ball State Cardinals
Mascot Charlie Cardinal
Website www.bsu.edu

Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball State's campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are undergraduate students and over 1,500 are graduate students. Image File history File links BallStateUHoriz. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The History of Ball State University predates Ball State Universitys public-funding era by almost two decades. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Ball State Universitys athletic teams are called the Cardinals. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ...


Originally a normal school, Ball State has grown and expanded over the years and is recognized today for its programs in architecture, exercise science, education, anthropology, entrepreneurship, and communications. Ball State is identified by the Carnegie Classification as a high research university. A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education is a report classifying all accredited degree_granting colleges and United States. ...

Contents

History

Ball State University was not the first school to operate at its location. Previous educational institutions operated at the intersection of University and McKinley Avenues before 1918. However, they were neither public nor did they carry the "Ball" name. The History of Ball State University predates Ball State Universitys public-funding era by almost two decades. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


The pre-Ball years

The area of Muncie, Indiana that is now known as Ball State University had its start in 1899 as a private school called the Eastern Indiana Normal School to educate teachers. The entire school, including classrooms, library and the president's residence were housed in what is now known as the Ball State Administration building.


The one-building school had a peak enrollment of 256 and charged $10 for a year's tuition. It operated until the spring of 1901, when it was closed down by its president, F.A. Kumier, due to lack of funding. A year later, in the autumn of 1902, the school re-opened as Palmer University for the next three years after Francis Palmer, a retired Indiana banker gave the school a $100,000 endowment. A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Between 1905 and 1907, the school dropped the Palmer name and operated as the Indiana Normal College. It had two divisions, the Normal School for educating teachers and a College of Applied Sciences. The school had an average enrollment of about 200 students. Because of a diminishing enrollment and lack of funds, school president Francis Ingler closed Indiana Normal College at the end of the 1906–07 school year.


Between 1907 and 1912 the campus sat vacant. In 1912, a group of local investors led by Michael Kelly reopened the school as the Indiana Normal Institute. To pay for updated materials and refurbishing the once-abandoned Administration Building, the school operated under a mortgage from the Muncie Trust Company. Although the school had its largest student body with a peak enrollment of 806, officials could not keep up with mortgage payments, and the school was forced to shut down once again in June 1917 after the Muncie Trust Company initiated foreclosure proceedings. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Foreclosure is the equitable proceeding in which a bank or other secured creditor sells or repossesses a parcel of real property (immovable property) due to the owners failure to comply with an agreement between the lender and borrower called a mortgage or deed of trust. Commonly, the violation of...


Ball Brothers intervene

The Ball Brothers from left to right: George A. Ball, Lucious L. Ball, Frank C. Ball, Edmund B. Ball, and William C. Ball
The Ball Brothers from left to right: George A. Ball, Lucious L. Ball, Frank C. Ball, Edmund B. Ball, and William C. Ball

On July 25, 1917, local industrialists the Ball Brothers, founders of the Ball Corporation, bought the Indiana Normal Institute out of foreclosure. For $35,100, the Balls bought the Administration Building and surrounding land bordered by University Avenue, McKinley Avenue, Riverside Avenue and Tillotson Avenue, except for the northwest quadrant which was kept as a wildlife preserve (Christy Woods). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x619, 132 KB) Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x619, 132 KB) Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Balls Brothers is a family-owned company in the United Kingdom that operates as a wine merchant with an associated chain of 18 wine bars and restaurants in London. ... Ball Corporation, earlier Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Co. ...


In early 1918, during the Indiana General Assembly's "short session," state legislators accepted the gift of the school and the land by the Ball Brothers. The state granted operating control of the Muncie Campus and school building to the administrators of the Indiana State Normal School in Terre Haute. Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Terre Haute (IPA: ) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the states western border with Illinois. ...


The close relationship between the Balls and the school led to an unofficial moniker for the college as many students, faculty and local politicians casually referred to the school as "Ball State" as a shorthand alternative to its longer, official name. During the 1922 short session of the Indiana legislature, the state renamed the school as the Ball Teachers College. This was in recognition to the Ball family's continuing beneficence to the institution. During this act, the state also reorganized its relationship with Terre Haute, and established a separate local board of trustees for the Muncie campus.


In 1924, Ball Teachers College's trustees hired Benjamin Burris as the first president of the state-funded college. The Ball brothers continued giving to the university and partially funded the construction of the Science Hall (now called the Burkhardt Building) in 1924, and an addition to Ball Gymnasium in 1925. By the 1925–26 school year, Ball State enrollment reached 991 students: 697 women and 294 men. Based on the school's close relationship with the Ball Corporation, a long-running nickname for the school was "Fruit Jar Tech."[1]


Ball State Teachers College

During the regular legislative session of 1929, the Indiana General Assembly formally separated the Terre Haute and Muncie campuses of the state teachers college system, but placed the governing of the Ball State campus under the Indiana State Teachers College Board of Trustees, based in Terre Haute.[2] During this action, the school was renamed Ball State Teachers College. The following year enrollment increased to 1,118 with 747 female and 371 male students.

Aerial view of Muncie with the university in the lower left quadrant.
Aerial view of Muncie with the university in the lower left quadrant.

In 1935, the school added the Arts Building for art, music and dance instruction (now used by the Ball State Art Museum and the Department of Geology). Enrollment that year reached 1,151 with 723 women and 428 men. Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2807 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2807 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


As an expression of the many gifts the Ball family gave the university since 1917, sculptor Daniel Chester French was commissioned by the Muncie Chamber of Commerce to cast a bronze fountain figure to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Ball brothers' gift to the state. His creation, the statue Beneficence, still stands today between the Administration Building and Lucina Hall where Talley Avenue ends at University Avenue. Daniel Chester French Signature, Daniel Chester French (April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor. ... Chambers of commerce are business advocacy groups which are usually not associated with government. ... Beneficence Beneficence serves as the motto and logo for Ball State University, located in Muncie, Indiana. ...


In 1961, Ball State became fully independent of Indiana State University via the creation of the Ball State College Board of Trustees, so that Ball State was no longer governed remotely by the Indiana State College Board of Trustees.[2] Also in 1961, the name of Ball State was changed to Ball State College.


Ball State University

In 1965, in recognition of its enrollment growth (10,066 students) and for transforming into more than a school to educate public school teachers, the Indiana General Assembly renamed the school Ball State University.


Ball State has seen a trend of near-constant growth since its creation. Current enrollment is the highest in the school's history, prompting construction of a new residence hall slated to be completed in 2007-2008. Bachelor's degrees are available in eight different areas which contain over one hundred and fifty individual programs – a sharp increase from the five degree programs initially offered by the University. Ball State's academic future is considered by many to be bright as the University continues a course of upgrading programs and adding new ones where applicable.


Campus life

Pruis Hall

Ball State's campus life revolves around two main quadrangles. The original historic quadrangle is at the south end of campus where the Student Center and Village are located. The new quadrangle is located to the north and consists of a variety of modern buildings that include Bracken Library and Pruis Hall, which is the cultural venue for recitals, ensembles, and films. Image File history File links Pruishall. ... Image File history File links Pruishall. ...


Despite the two quadrangles, the most heavily-utilized buildings on campus are situated along McKinley Avenue (which runs north-south) and Riverside Avenue (which runs east-west). The intersection of the two streets is nicknamed the "scramble light" after its pedestrian scramble feature. The pedestrian phase stops all traffic allowing pedestrians to cross in all directions, thus causing everyone to "scramble." It is rumored that this intersection is the busiest pedestrian intersection in the state of Indiana. A Barnes Dance in New York City near the New York Public Library. ...


A 2005 survey conducted by Intel Corporation rates Ball State as the number one wireless campus in the nation. Ball State's academic and administrative buildings, residence hall common areas, and green spaces have wireless access fed by 625 Wi-Fi access points.[3] Intel redirects here. ...


Shafer Tower

Despite being dedicated fairly recently in 2002, Shafer Tower has become an unofficial landmark of Ball State University. It is a free-standing bell tower, or campanile, that is equipped with a carillon. It is located in the median of McKinley Avenue on the north quadrangle of campus. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Shafer Tower is a 150-foot tall carillon tower located in the middle of the campus of Ball State University. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ... A campanile (pronounced []) is, especially in Italy, a free-standing bell tower (Italian campana, bell), often adjacent to a church or cathedral. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... In probability theory and statistics, a median is a type of average that is described as the number dividing the higher half of a sample, a population, or a probability distribution, from the lower half. ...


A small staircase in the tower leads to a control room of the carillon, which has 48 custom-made bells. From here a musician can play the instrument on special occasions or for concerts. But usually, the bells are programmed by computer to automatically chime every 15 minutes between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.


Due to a construction defect in the type of cement used to build the tower, most of Shafer Tower literally had to be built twice.[4] The architect of record was Edmund Hafer Associates of Evansville, Indiana.[5] Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ...


Bracken Library

Possibly the top destination for Ball State students is Bracken Library.[6] This facility has the floor area of nearly seven American football fields and houses five floors of university offices, classrooms, computer labs, private study suites, video viewing suites, and thousands of books, videos, and audio devices available to students. Bracken Library hosts the Ball State University Digital Media Repository, an open access resource containing over 67,000 digital objects in 29 collections. It is estimated that more than 3,000 students visit Bracken Library each day.[7] Built in 1975, Bracken's most recent remodel finished in 1997. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Bracken Library recently installed a café and lounge on the first floor.[8] The Bookmark Café's opening was initially delayed due to shipping irregularities with material suppliers, but opened in January 2007.

Ball State's Shafer Tower, completed in 2001
Ball State's Shafer Tower, completed in 2001

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1210 KB) Bell tower at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1210 KB) Bell tower at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. ...

L.A. Pittenger Student Center

Constructed in the mid-1950s, the Student Center houses the University's hotel, meeting rooms, a food court, and various forms of recreation for students including a bowling alley. It is also home to parking services and the very own BSU Barber.


In September 2006, the university rejected a proposal to build a new student center. Instead, the existing student center will be fully renovated and expanded.[9]


Student housing

The University currently operates eight residence complexes that house nearly 7,000 students and a ninth $43.5 million residence hall, tentatively named North Residence Hall, is scheduled to begin construction in 2007.[10] Ball State's freshman residence hall program is listed as one of the best in the nation by the Unofficial, Unbiased Insider's Guide to the Most Interesting Colleges.


By far the largest housing complex is LaFollette, which houses over 1,900 students. This co-ed facility, completed in 1967, has four L-shaped, eight-story units, and a ten story tower in the center that houses mainly older and international students. Johnson Complex, on the north end of campus, is a modern complex consisting of one eight-story building and two four-story buildings. The complex is the only one on campus to feature Z-shaped rooms and houses all Honors College students. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition, Ball State has one all women's dormitory that houses approximately 600 students. The Woodworth Complex is comprised of four halls that also house sorority suites.[11] In the fall of 2007, a two-story dining facility and atrium attached to the complex re-opened after two years of renovations. [12]


Of the current residence halls in operation, only one, Elliott Hall, has been in operation for nearly the entire history of the University. Constructed from 1937 to 1939, Elliott was formerly an all-male dormitory and, during World War II, housed cadets and recruits from joint programs operated with the Army and Air Force. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Beginning in December 2007, DeHority Hall will be closed for extensive renovations.[13] Sometime after 2010, residence halls that would be too expensive to remodel and update, including the LaFollette complex will be demolished.[14] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Two apartment complexes operated by the University provide affordable homes for single students and students with families. Apartments are available in one- and two-bedroom styles, and townhouses are available in two- and three-bedroom styles. The apartments are located close to campus, shopping, restaurants, entertainment, and schools.


University Residence Halls

  • DeHority Complex
  • Elliott Hall
  • Johnson Complex
    • Johnson A (Botsford and Swinford Halls)
    • Johnson B (Schmidt and Wilson Halls)
  • LaFollette Complex
  • North Residence Hall (construction imminent; to be completed by 2010)
  • Noyer Complex
  • Park Hall
  • Studebaker Complex
    • Studebaker West
    • Studebaker East
  • Woodworth Complex (All Women's Complex)
  • Wagoner Complex (Houses Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities Students)

The Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities The Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities (also The Indiana Academy or simply IASMH) is a two-year residential public high school located on the campus of Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, although it operates as a separate entity. ...

University Village

Although this is considered off-campus, University Village plays an integral part of campus life for students who both live on- and off-campus. Known informally as simply The Village, the district is home to a set of shops and restaurants located immediately east of campus. Although most of the buildings have been rebuilt over the years, the Village has existed in its present location since the early 1920s. Current Village locales include Village Green Records, TJ's Burgers, The MT Cup, Motini's, Mo's Tavern, The White Rabbit, Art Mart, The Locker Room, The Bird, Wizard's Keep, Scotty's Brewhouse, Subway, The Pita Pit, Jimmy John's Gourmet Subs, Greek's Pizza, The Chug, and The Den. In December 2006, Dill Street hosted a mechanical bull for "Wee-Man", who was in Muncie filming the CBS reality show "Armed and Famous", to ride. Trish Stratus was expected as well, but never arrived. [15] SUBWAY® is the name of a franchise that mainly sells sandwiches and salads. ... Pita Pit restaurants are typically located near colleges and universities, such as this location across the street from the University of North Texas in Denton, TX. The Pita Pit is a quick service restaurant franchise serving pita sandwiches. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Jack Osbourne (left) and Jason Wee Man Acuna (right) during filming Armed & Famous is a reality television series that premiered January 10, 2007, on CBS. The series follows five celebrities as they train to become reserve police officers for the Muncie, Indiana, police department, followed by graduation. ...


Most evenings, Mark Carter, more commonly known as "the hot dog man", comes out to sell his "nearly world famous" hot dogs to patrons of the numerous bars in the village area adjacent to the BSU campus. Carter was named number fifty-one on Sports Illustrated's "The 100 Things You Gotta Do Before You Graduate" list, published in 2003.[16] Humorously enough, Carter's first name is erroneously listed as James in the accompanying article. For a time, Carter operated a storefront location on Martin Street in the BSU village, but returned to his original method of selling from a cart at the intersection of Dill Street and University Avenue several years ago. Carter's most popular item is the chili cheese dog, although he also offers bratwurst as well as Italian and polish sausages.


Academics

Strengths

Administration Building
Administration Building

Though previously a bastion in the field of teaching, the university has been recognized in many fields, including Architecture, Telecommunications & Journalism, Business, and Nursing. Highlights: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (453 × 604 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Administration Building, Ball State University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (453 × 604 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Administration Building, Ball State University. ...

  • The university's entepreneurship program has been ranked in the top five of all colleges for its undergraduate entrepreneurship program for the last three years in a row, according to the US News & World Report magazine.
  • According to the 2006 edition of the same magazine, Ball State has one of the best undergraduate business programs in the nation.
  • In 2004 "This Business of Broadcasting" named Ball State as one of the nation's top broadcasting programs in the country.
  • The 2005 edition of Almanac of Architecture and Design named Ball State one of the top ten colleges in landscape architecture.
  • The BSU School of Music is widely known for its quality at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; the school's Music Technology program houses one of the most elite facilities in the United States. In addition, the music education division has long been recognized as one of the best music teacher training programs in the Midwest.
  • Ball State is the administrator to Burris Laboratory School. The school, which opened in 1929, is one of few schools in the nation to be created and maintained by a university for the purpose of giving teachers hands-on experience in the classroom directly.
  • The University is also the administrator for the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities. The Academy is one of the oldest schools for gifted/talented high school juniors and seniors in the nation and provides University faculty an additional resource in research and hands-on experience.
  • The Ball State Department of Chemistry held the record for largest undergraduate summer research program in 2004 and 2005.
  • In 2006, Planetizen.com ranked Ball State's Urban Planning & Development program the seventeenth best in the country. It was also ranked in the following areas: number seven in historic preservation, number seven in land-use planning, number six in technology, number five in zoning administration, and number three in the midwest.
  • In 2004, Ball State's master's program in Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education (SAAHE) ranked 14th among 186 programs in a national study presented to the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA).

U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Burris Laboratory School is a K-12 establishment located on the west side of Muncie, Indiana. ... The Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities The Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities (also The Indiana Academy or simply IASMH) is a two-year residential public high school located on the campus of Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, although it operates as a separate entity. ...

Colleges and schools

Ball State University is academically organized into seven degree-granting colleges:

  • College of Applied Sciences and Technology
    • containing the School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
    • containing the Departments of: Family and Consumer Sciences • Industry and Technology • Military Science • Nursing • Wellness and Gerontology
  • College of Architecture and Planning, offering the only public-university accredited degrees in architecture, and urban planning within Indiana
    • containing the Departments of: Architecture • Landscape Architecture • Urban Planning
  • Miller College of Business
    • containing the Departments of: Accounting • Economics • Finance and Insurance • Information Systems and Operations Management • Marketing and Management
  • College of Communication, Information, and Media
    • containing the Departments of: Communication Studies • Journalism • Telecommunications, and the Center for Information and Communication Sciences
  • College of Fine Arts
    • containing the School of Music
    • containing the Departments of: Art • Theatre and Dance
    • containing the Ball State University Museum of Art
  • College of Sciences and Humanities
    • containing the Departments of: Anthropology and Archaeology • Biology • Chemistry • Computer Science • Criminal Justice and Criminology • English • Geography • Geology • History • Mathematical Sciences • Modern Languages and Classics • Natural Resources and Environmental Management • Philosophy and Religious Studies • Physics and Astronomy • Physiology and Health Science • Political Science • Psychological Science • Social Work • Sociology • Speech Pathology and Audiology
  • Teachers College
    • containing the Departments of: Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services • Educational Leadership • Educational Psychology • Educational Studies • Elementary Education • Special Education

Ball State University also has two non-degree-granting colleges: The Miller College of Business is the business college of Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. ...

  • Honors College for the coordination of more rigorous classes for the gifted student
  • University College for the coordination of advising and other services

Accreditation

Ball State University as a whole has been accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools continuously since 1925.[17] ABET has continuously accredited Ball State University's following bachelors degree since the date listed: Manufacturing Engineering Technology 1994. The Higher Learning Commission is part of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. ... The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) is one of six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Accredition Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) is a non-profit organization that serves the public by making accreditations of the universities and scientific institutions which live up to certain qualities defined by the organization. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Athletics

Ball State competes in the following NCAA sports[18]
Men's sports Women's sports
Sport Division Sport Division
Basketball I MAC Basketball I MAC
Golf I MAC Golf I MAC
Swimming I MAC Swimming I MAC
Tennis I MAC Tennis I MAC
Volleyball I MIVAC Volleyball I MAC
Baseball I MAC Softball I MAC
Football I MAC Soccer I MAC
Field hockey I MAC
Gymnastics I MAC
Indoor Track & Field I MAC
Outdoor Track & Field I MAC
Cross country I MAC
See also: Ball State Cardinals

Ball State competes in the NCAA Division I / IA and is part of the Mid-American Conference (MAC) in all Olympic sports except for men's volleyball, where it competes in the Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Conference (MIVAC). The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... MIVA Conference logo. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... This article is about the sport. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, and kinesthetic awareness, such as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Ball State Universitys athletic teams are called the Cardinals. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... MIVA Conference logo. ...


Ball State athletics also has Cheerleading, a non-NCAA sport. Youth Cheerleaders during a football halftime show. ...


Charlie Cardinal is Ball State's anthropomorphized cardinal mascot. He is sometimes called simply "Charlie." Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...


The Code Red Dance team performs at many BSU sporting events. They are known for their high-energy, entertaining performances.




Notable alumni

Many Ball State graduates have gained regional, national and international attention, including U.S. ambassador to Lebanon, Jeffrey D. Feltman. Ball State graduates have particularly left their mark in the fields of American professional sports and popular entertainment. Perhaps the most recognizable alumnus of Ball State is American television host, David Letterman, of The Late Show with David Letterman on CBS. He is joined by fellow television performers, Joyce DeWitt, who played Janet Wood in the 1970s sitcom Three's Company, and Anthony Montgomery, who played Travis Mayweather on Star Trek: Enterprise on UPN. Following is a list of notable alumni of Ball State University: // Justin Beriault, NFL football player (safety), Dallas Cowboys Blaine Bishop, NFL former player Tennessee Titans Brad Maynard, NFL football player (punter), Chicago Bears Bernie Parmalee, NFL former player Miami Dolphins and current tight ends coach at the University of... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... Jeffrey Feltman is the United States Ambassador to Lebanon (as of December 19, 2005). ... NBC news anchor Tom Brokaw A news presenter is, broadly speaking, a person that presents a news show on television or radio. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an award-winning American comedian, late night talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, and IRL IndyCar Series car owner. ... Late Show with David Letterman is an hour-long weeknight comedy and talk show broadcast by CBS from the Ed Sullivan Theater on Broadway in New York City. ... Joyce Anne DeWitt (born April 23, 1949) is an American actress perhaps most famous for her role as Janet Wood on the television situation comedy Threes Company. ... Janet Wood Janet Wood was a fictional character on the television sitcom Threes Company. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For the Entourage episode, see Threes Company (Entourage). ... Anthony T. Montgomery (born June 2, 1971 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American film and television actor. ... Travis Mayweather is a fictional character played by Anthony Montgomery in the television series Star Trek: Enterprise, serving as a navigator and helm officer on board the Earth starship Enterprise (NX-01). ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ...


Many alumni have gone on to successful business careers like Kent C. Nelson, Retired President and CEO, United Parcel Service and John Schnatter, Founder and Chairman of Papa John's Pizza restaurants. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Kent Oz Nelson. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... John H. Schnatter (born 1962) is the founder, chairman and former CEO of Papa Johns International, Inc. ... Papa Johns Pizza (NASDAQ: PZZA) is the third largest carryout and delivery pizza restaurant in the United States behind Pizza Hut and Dominos Pizza; it is based in Louisville, Kentucky. ...


In the field of comics, artist Jim Davis, the cartoonist creator of Garfield also is a graduate of Ball State. Sam Smith, sports writer for the Chicago Tribune, is a graduate of Ball State. Doug Jones, former Charlie Cardinal, is an actor of over 25 films (Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Hellboy, Pan's Labrynth, Men in Black II, Batman Returns), television series, and commercials (including the McDonald's "Mac Tonight" campaign) and music videos. Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... James Robert Jim Davis (born July 28, 1945), is an American cartoonist who created the popular comic strip Garfield. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... Sam Smith (right) with Antawn Jamison. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Douglas Jones (born May 24, 1960) is an American actor. ... Hellboy (also known as Super Sapiens in Malaysia) is an American supernatural thriller, directed by Mexican director Guillermo del Toro. ... Pans Labyrinth (Spanish: El laberinto del fauno, literally The Labyrinth of the Faun) is a Spanish, Academy Award-winning,[2] fantasy[1][3] film written and directed by Mexican film-maker Guillermo del Toro. ... Men in Black II is a 2002 science fiction comedy action film starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. ... Batman Returns is a 1992 superhero thriller film based on the Batman character created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Mac Tonight was a mascot introduced by McDonalds restaraunts in 1983. ...


Sportswriter Jason Whitlock currently writes for The Kansas City Star and Fox Sports with previous stints at ESPN and AOL Sports. Sportswriting is a form of journalism who writes and reports on sports topics and events. ... Jason Lee Whitlock (b. ... The Kansas City Star is a McClatchy newspaper based in Kansas City, Missouri, in the United States. ... For Fox Sports in Australia see Fox Sports (Australia). ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Several professional athletes participated in Ball State sports before turning pro. They include NFL players such as Justin Beriault of the Dallas Cowboys; Reggie Hodges, a punter drafted in 2005 by the St. Louis Rams and currently with the Indianapolis Colts; Blaine Bishop, formerly of the Tennessee Titans; Brad Maynard, a punter with the Chicago Bears; Bernie Parmalee, formerly of the Miami Dolphins and current tight ends coach at the University of Notre Dame; and, Dante Ridgeway, a wide receiver for the New Orleans Saints. NBA stars Theron Smith of the Charlotte Bobcats and Bonzi Wells of the Houston Rockets competed on the NCAA level at Ball State as did Major League Baseball players, including Larry Bigbie of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Bryan Bullington, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, and Thomas Howard ("Tank"), formerly of the San Diego Padres, Cincinnati Reds, and several other major league teams. NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Justin Beriault (born Arthur Justin Beriault on August 23, 1981) is a free safety for the NFL team the Dallas Cowboys. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Silver, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1966) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present... Reggie Hodges is a National Football League Punter for the Philadelphia Eagles. ... City St. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Other nicknames The Horseshoes Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970... Blaine Bishop (born July 24, 1970 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is a former professional American football safety. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brad Maynard is a punter for the NFLs Chicago Bears. ... [[Image:|frame|right|Todd Sauerbrun punts the ball for the Carolina Panthers. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach liljimjim Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Dante Ridgeway (born April 18, 1984 in Decatur, Illinois) is an American football wide receiver in the National Football League who was drafted by the St. ... The wide receiver (WR) position in American and Canadian football is the pass-catching specialist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Theron Augustus Smith (born October 3, 1980 in Winter Haven, Florida) is a professional basketball player in the NBA. After a college career at Ball State University, he was undrafted, and began his career with the Memphis Grizzlies. ... The Charlotte Bobcats are a professional basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Gawen DeAngelo Bonzi Wells, also known as the Bonz, (born September 20, 1976 in Muncie, Indiana) is a 65 shooting guard in the National Basketball Association for the Indiana Pacers. ... The Houston Rockets are an American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Larry Robert Bigbie (b. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Bryan Bullington (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations National League (1887–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 11, 20, 21, 33, 40, 42 Name Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present) Pittsburgh Innocents (1890) Pittsburg Alleghenies (1882–1889) (Also referred to as Infants in 1890) Other nicknames The Bucs, The Buccos... Thomas Howard was the name of several prominent English noblemen who lived between the 15th century and the 17th century. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine...


Points of interest

Beneficence Beneficence serves as the motto and logo for Ball State University, located in Muncie, Indiana. ... Scheumann Stadium (officially, the John B. and June M. Scheumann Stadium), also known as Ball State Stadium, is a stadium in Muncie, Indiana. ... The Wheeler Orchid Collection and Species Bank is located within Christy Woods, an 18 acre (73,000 m²) property located on the southwest corner of the Ball State University campus in Muncie, Indiana, USA. The collection contains over 1,200 plants, from over 85 genera, represented by over 500 different... John E. Worthen Arena is a basketball arena in Muncie, Indiana. ...

Trivia

  • Two streets located in close proximity to campus, named Ball and Dicks, have their street signs stolen at least once a year. Just off Campus, High Street has often come up missing as well.
  • The tallest structure on campus is Shafer Tower. The tallest building, however, is the Teachers' College, which stands at 138 feet (42 m). Teachers' College is also the tallest building in Muncie.
  • The elevators in three of Ball State's taller residence halls – Lafollette, Johnson, and Studebaker East – are unusual in that they were extremely early co-ed dormitories. As such, their elevators serve only two floors: The first floor lobby, and the sixth floor lobby, which duplicates the first floor almost exactly. This served to separate the male and female portions of the dormitory, as the stairs would pass by lobby doors.
  • Serving as a pedestrian expressway for north-south campus travel, the Cow Path extends along part of the western border of the campus from the Johnson residence halls to Riverside Avenue between the Fine Arts and Cooper Science buildings. At one time it also linked the intersection of Neely and McKinley Avenues, cutting a trail across a grassy field on which the Bell Building now stands.
  • The light by the Teacher's College is known as the 'scramble light' due to both directions being stopped so students can 'scramble' across the road in traditional ways, along with cutting right through the middle.
  • In the television series, The Simpsons, the fictional character Superintendent Chalmers as well as Snake (who played Lacrosse) are supposed to have attended Ball State.
  • Richard Dreyfuss' character in the feature film Close Encounters of the Third Kind can be seen wearing a famous "Ball U" t-shirt. Many of the events in the movie were "supposed" to take place around the Delaware County Area (Ball State).
  • PBS visited Ball State University in 2006 to interview students for a documentary entitled Generation Next. A webcam kiosk asked students for their opinions on topics ranging from the Iraq War to religion.[19] The documentary is set to air January 2007.
  • In 2006 the CBS reality show Armed and Famous was filmed in Muncie and featured shots of the Ball State campus and students in the series. Erik Estrada, La Toya Jackson, Jack Osbourne, Trish Stratus, and Wee Man were all featured in the series that put the city of Muncie on a national stage. The series began airing in January 2007 but was canceled shortly afterward.
  • On July 30, 2007 Ball State University announced that the university's new communication and media building will be named after David Letterman, with a formal ceremony on September 7, 2007.[20]
  • In September 2007, David Letterman gave Ball State University glowing praise on The Oprah Winfrey Show. [1]

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Superintendent Gary Chalmers, voiced by Hank Azaria, is a fictional character in the animated TV series The Simpsons, the superintendent of Springfields school district. ... This article is about the film; for the a definition of the UFO related phenomenon, see Close encounter. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical webcam A web camera (or webcam) is a real-time camera (usually, though not always, a video camera) whose images can be accessed using the World Wide Web, instant messaging, or a PC video calling application. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Jack Osbourne (left) and Jason Wee Man Acuna (right) during filming Armed & Famous is a reality television series that premiered January 10, 2007, on CBS. The series follows five celebrities as they train to become reserve police officers for the Muncie, Indiana, police department, followed by graduation. ... Erik Estrada at DragonCon 07 in Atlanta, GA Erik Estrada (born March 16, 1949 in East Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States) is an American actor of Puerto Rican descent, known for his co-starring lead role in the 1977–1983 US television series CHiPs. ... For other uses, see La Toya (disambiguation). ... Jack Joseph Osbourne (born November 8, 1985 in London, England) is the son of music legend Ozzy Osbourne and music manager Sharon Osbourne, which also makes him the grandson of Don Arden. ... Patricia Anne Stratigias[6][10] (born December 18, 1975, IPA: ), better known by her stage name Trish Stratus, is a Canadian former fitness model, retired professional wrestler and television personality. ... Jason Acuna a. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an award-winning American comedian, late night talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, and IRL IndyCar Series car owner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Oprah Winfrey Show (also known as Oprah) is an American nationally syndicated talk show, hosted and produced by Oprah Winfrey and is the highest-rated talk show in American television history. ...

Gallery

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (453 × 604 pixel, file size: 55 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Beneficence, Ball State University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

See also

The History of Ball State University predates Ball State Universitys public-funding era by almost two decades. ... See Indiana state entry. ... Following is a list of notable alumni of Ball State University: // Justin Beriault, NFL football player (safety), Dallas Cowboys Blaine Bishop, NFL former player Tennessee Titans Brad Maynard, NFL football player (punter), Chicago Bears Bernie Parmalee, NFL former player Miami Dolphins and current tight ends coach at the University of... The following is a list of notable Ball State University teaching faculty and staff: Mir Masoom Ali, statistics David L. Arnold, geography Ramon Avila, marketing Mohammad Behforuz, chemistry Stephen Bell, Telecommunications professor (former host of Good Morning America) Dick Bellaver, information and communication sciences (formerly with AT&T Bell Labs...

Notes

  1. ^ Perspective (Ball State University alumni magazine), January 2005. Retrieved September 9, 2007.
  2. ^ a b Indiana State University History and Traditions. Indiana State University.
  3. ^ Ball State University Moves To Head Of The Class In Intel’s Ranking Of The Top 50 “Most Unwired” U.S. Campuses. Intel Corporation. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  4. ^ Shafer Tower remains on schedule. The Ball State Daily News. Retrieved on 2007-06-23.
  5. ^ Shafer Tower Progress Report. College of Architecture and Planning. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  6. ^ Ball State University Libraries. Ball State University. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  7. ^ Bracken Library. Ball State University. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  8. ^ Bracken Library to feature cafe. Ball State University. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  9. ^ Pittenger Update on Agenda. The Ball State Daily News Online (September 15, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  10. ^ http://www.thestarpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070819/NEWS01/708190341/1002
  11. ^ Woodworth Complex. Ball State University. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  12. ^ http://media.www.bsudailynews.com/media/storage/paper849/news/2007/08/16/News/Woodworth.Commons.Reopens-2930993.shtml
  13. ^ Ball State to spend $24 million to renovate residence halls. Ball State University. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  14. ^ State Budget Committee Agenda, Indiana State Budget Committee Meeting, May 19, 2005. (Accessed October 2, 2006)
  15. ^ Wee Man visits Village bars with CBS film crew in tow Friday. Retrieved on 2007-09-29.
  16. ^ The 100 Things You Gotta Do Before You Graduate. Sports Illustrated. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  17. ^ Ball State University. The Higher Learning Commission. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  18. ^ Ball State University Profile. NCAA. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  19. ^ Young Adults Driving Culture War. PBS Online. Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  20. ^ "Ball State to add Letterman name", Indianapolis Star. Retrieved on 2007-08-25. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Ball, Edmund F., From fruit jars to satellites: The story of Ball Brothers Company, Incorporated, Newcomen Society, 1960
  • Ball State University, The Elisabeth Ball Collection of paintings, drawings, and watercolors: Ball State University Art Gallery, January 15-February 26, 1984, Indiana University Press, 1984, ISBN 0-915511-00-2
  • Birmingham, Frederic A., Ball Corporation, the first century, Curtis Publishing, 1980, ISBN 0-89387-039-0
  • Bullock, Kurt E., Ball State University: A sense of place, Ball State University Alumni Association, 1993, ISBN 0-937994-25-1
  • Edmonds, Anthony O., & Geelhoed, E. Bruce, Ball State University: An Interpretive History, Indiana University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-253-34017-9
  • Hooover, Dwight W., Middletown revisited, Ball State University Press, 1990, ISBN 0-937994-18-9

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ball State University Academics, History, Financial Aid, and Other (1043 words)
Ball State University was founded in 1899 as a private normal school, which became part of the state college system in 1918.
Ball State University defines its mission as one of “the discovery of knowledge, the integration of learning experiences, and their application through civic and professional leadership.
Ball State was founded in 1899 as a normal school, which was eventually purchased by the Ball brothers, successful and entrepreneurial businessmen in the local Muncie community.
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