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Encyclopedia > Baleen
Baleen hair is attached to the baleen plate
Baleen hair is attached to the baleen plate

Baleen (also called whalebone) is a substance made of keratin and is therefore stiff but somewhat elastic. Whalebone is a modification of the epidermis. A bony mineral, hydroxyapatite, is also present in baleen in small amounts, along with traces of manganese, copper, boron, iron, and calcium. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Microscopy of keratin filaments inside cells. ... Look up Elastic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin. ... Minerals are natural compounds formed through geological processes. ... Hydroxylapatite is a naturally occurring form of calcium apatite with the formula Ca5(PO4)3(OH), but is usually written Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 to denote that the crystal unit cell comprises two molecules. ... General Name, Symbol, Number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Atomic mass 54. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic brown Atomic mass 63. ... General Name, Symbol, Number boron, B, 5 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 13, 2, p Appearance black/brown Atomic mass 10. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Atomic mass 55. ... General Name, Symbol, Number calcium, Ca, 20 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 4, s Appearance silvery white Atomic mass 40. ...


Baleen makes up baleen plates, which are arranged in two parallel rows that look like combs of thick hair; they are attached to the upper jaws of baleen whales. Whales use these combs for filter feeding. Whales are the only vertebrate group to use this method of feeding in great abundance (Flamingos and crabeater seals use similar methods, but do not have baleen), and it has allowed them to grow to immense sizes. The Blue Whale, the largest animal ever to live, is a baleen whale. Parallel is a term in geometry and in everyday life that refers to a property in Euclidean space of two or more lines or planes, or a combination of these. ... A comb A comb for people with hair loss. ... Young Girl Fixing her Hair, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson Hair is a filamentous outgrowth from the skin, found mainly in mammals. ... Human jaw front view Human jaw left view Human jaw top view The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ... Families Balaenidae Balaenopteridae Eschrichtiidae Neobalaenidae Scientifically known as the Mysticeti, the baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form a suborder of the order cetacea. ... Filter feeders (also known as suspension feeders) are animals that feed by straining suspended matter and food particles from water, typically by passing the water over a specialized structure, such as the baleen of baleen whales. ... For the seminal American doo-wop group, best known for I Only Have Eyes for You (1959), see The Flamingos. ... Binomial name Balaenoptera musculus (Linneus, 1758) Blue Whale range The Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales. ...


Depending on the species of whale, a baleen plate can be 0.5 to 3.5 metres (2 to 12 feet) long, and weigh up to 200 pounds (90 kg). Its hairy fringes are called baleen hair or whalebone-hair. Baleen plates are broader at the gumline (base). The plates have been compared to sieves or Venetian blinds. metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre (in the U.S., chiefly meter) is a measure of length, approximately equal to 3. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... KG, Kg or kg may indicate: A Kampfgeschwader, a bomber squadron of the former German Luftwaffe Basketball Player Kevin Garnett An abbreviation for kilogram (always kg) Knight of the Garter, a British decoration Kommanditgesellschaft, German version of a limited partnership Kongo language (ISO 639 alpha-2) An abbreviation for konig... Sieve may mean: a colander, used in cooking goaltender, as taunted among crowds at American college ice hockey games In mathmatics, sieve theory, technique for counting or filtering sets of numbers sieve of Eratosthenes general number field sieve sieve (category theory), a way of writing down how objects in a...


The word "Baleen" derives from Early Modern English word meaning "whale". It derives from the Latin balaena and is related to the Greek phallaina, both of which also mean "whale". Early Modern English refers to the stage of the English language used from about the end of the Middle English period (the later half of the 1400s) to 1650. ... Whales are the largest species of exclusively aquatic mammals, members of the order Cetacea, which also includes dolphins and porpoises. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...

Contents


Evolution of baleen

The oldest true fossils of baleen are only 15 million years old, but baleen rarely fossilizes, and scientists believe it originated considerably earlier than that. This is indicated by skull modifications which are associated with baleen (such as a buttress of bone found beneath the eyes in the upper jaw, and loose lower jaw bones at the chin), being found in fossils from considerably earlier. Currently, baleen is believed to have evolved around thirty million years ago, possibly from a creature with a hard, gummy upper jaw, similar to that found on Dall's porpoise today, which are , at a microscopic level, almost identical to baleen. Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. ...


Curiously, many early baleen whales also had teeth, but these were likely used only peripherally, or perhaps not at all (again, similar to Dall's porpoise, which catches squid and fish by gripping them against its hard upper jaw).


Baleen in filter feeding

A whale's baleen plates play the most important role in its filter feeding process. In order to feed, a baleen whale opens its mouth widely and scoops in large volumes of water, which inevitably contains large quantities of the plankton it feeds on. It then shuts its mouth and presses its tongue against its hard upper jaw, forcing the water to pass through the baleen, where the plankton are sieved out. The water is then released, and the prey is swallowed. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Uses of baleen

Baleen plate was formerly used in buggy whips and parasol ribs, and to stiffen parts of women's stays and dresses, like corsets. Baleen was commonly used to crease paper; its flexibility keeps it from damaging the paper. Its function now has been replaced by plastic. It was also formerly believed that baleen plate could be obtained from whale fins. The term dress may refer to either clothing or attire in general a specific type of garment, discussed in the article on skirt and dress This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... It has been suggested that Waist cincher be merged into this article or section. ... Piece of paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the compression of fibers. ... Plastic covers a range of synthetic or semisynthetic polymerization products. ... A fin is a surface used to produce thrust or to steer while traveling in water, air, or other fluid media. ...


See also

Families Balaenidae Balaenopteridae Eschrichtiidae Neobalaenidae Scientifically known as the Mysticeti, the baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form a suborder of the order cetacea. ...

Further reading

  • St. Aubin, D.J, R.H. Stinson and J.R. Geraci 1984. "Aspects of the structure and function of baleen, and some effects of exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons". Canadian Journal of Zoology 62: 193-198

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baleen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (550 words)
This is indicated by skull modifications which are associated with baleen (such as a buttress of bone found beneath the eyes in the upper jaw, and loose lower jaw bones at the chin), being found in fossils from considerably earlier.
Currently, baleen is believed to have evolved around thirty million years ago, possibly from a creature with a hard, gummy upper jaw, similar to that found on Dall's porpoise today, which are, at a microscopic level, almost identical to baleen.
Baleen plate was formerly used in buggy whips and parasol ribs, and to stiffen parts of women's stays and dresses, like corsets.
Baleen whale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (572 words)
The distinguishing feature between this suborder and the toothed whales is that baleen whales have baleen plates instead of teeth in the upper jaw, which enables them to filter food from water.
Baleen whales are generally larger than toothed whales, and the females are larger of the two sexes.
In contrast to toothed whales, baleen whales are unlikely to echo-locate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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