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Encyclopedia > Baldrick

Baldrick is a fictional character featured in the television series Blackadder. He serves as the servant, sidekick, and frequent punching bag of Edmund Blackadder, and is played by the actor Tony Robinson (However in the pilot episode he was played by Philip Fox). Just as Blackadder exists in many incarnations throughout the ages, so does Baldrick; wherever there is a Blackadder there is a Baldrick serving him. Initially Baldrick was the smart one and Blackadder the idiot, but as Blackadder's social status has fallen so has Baldrick's intelligence and personal hygiene, while Blackadder's rises with each series. Alice, a fictional character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. ... Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder the Third. ... Tony Robinson as Baldrick in Blackadder. ...

Contents

Character

Intelligent or not, Baldrick is always one for inventing "cunning plans", which are generally ridiculed by Blackadder, who nevertheless ends up using them. Though Baldrick is now famed for his "cunning plans", the actual catchphrase was not regularly used until the third series, with Blackadder saying it once in the first series and Baldrick claiming to have "a plan" in a "cunning" voice on one occasion in the second series. In the final episode of the last series, Blackadder Goes Forth, Baldrick announces he has a cunning plan that might just save them from "going over the top". His plan seems to revolve around Blackadder purposefully injuring himself on a large splinter on the trench ladder. The plan seems one of his saner ideas, but is dismissed by Blackadder, perhaps realising he cannot postpone going into battle (and certain death) indefinitely. Other traits shared by all Baldricks (except possibly the first one) are sheer disgustingness and an obsession with turnips. Goodbyeee. ... Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. ... Going over the top is a military phrase derived from the trench warfare of the First World War. ... Trinomial name Brassica rapa rapa L. For similar vegetables also called turnip, see Turnip (disambiguation). ...


Character development

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The Black Adder

Blackadder character
Baldrick, Son of Robin the Dung Gatherer
Nationality English
Occupation(s) Squire
First appearance The Foretelling
Last appearance The Black Seal
Episode count 6
Played by Tony Robinson

The mediaeval Baldrick was probably the only Baldrick of the four who could really be described as clever. Baldrick, an ex-dung shoveller (a respected position, which he had worked very hard to get - earlier jobs include milking pigs and mucking out lepers), first met Prince Edmund at the feast before the Battle of Bosworth Field. The two, along with Lord Percy, toasted their new friendship, unaware that from that point onwards, their descendants' lives would be eternally entwined. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Image File history File links Baldrick1. ... The English are an ethnic group and nation primarily associated with England and the English language. ... In feudal times a squire was a man-at-arms in the service of a knight, often as his apprentice. ... Tony Robinson as Baldrick in Blackadder. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the pig genus. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... Combatants King Richard III of England, Yorkist Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, Lancastrian Commanders Richard III of England† Nominally, Richmond in practice, the Earl of Oxford Strength 6,000 (king had 15,500 but Lord Thomas Stanley with 4,000 and his brother, Sir William Stanley with 2,500 betrayed... Lord Percy Percy (series 2) Lord Percy Percy was a fictional character, played by Tim McInnerny, in the popular British sitcom Blackadder, deriving his name from the factual Percy family. ...


Although cleverer than the Prince, Baldrick, knowing his place in the mediaeval pecking-order, holds him in awe. He often leads cheers in the Prince's honour (along with Lord Percy, who tries hard to join in), fills his head with illusions of grandeur, and often ends up doing his dirty work. This included carrying the decapitated body of Richard III and sleeping with the Spanish Infanta, Edmund's fiancée, so that Edmund didn't have to. The latter task resulted in several injuries, including a seriously blackened eye. When Baldrick is abandoned by Edmund in the final episode, a tear falls from his eye. Richard III (2 October 1452–22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... An engagement is an agreement by a couple to enter into marriage at some future time, usually accompanied by a formal or informal announcement to friends and family. ...


This Baldrick also has cunning plans that, contrary to most of the "cunning plans" of his descendants, mostly work, although they often initially seem ridiculous (and sometimes get messed up due to the actions of Lord Percy). For instance, when Edmund seeks to kill Dougal McAngus, Baldrick suggests that he gets an enormous great cannon, takes McAngus outside, makes him stick his head down the cannon and then blow it off. Edmund scoffs at this, and instead tries to kill McAngus using several different "cunning plans" of his own. After having failed miserably with all of these, he resorts to using Baldricks original plan, which works.


It was this Baldrick who suggested the title 'The Black Adder' for Prince Edmund (Edmund wanted to be called 'The Black Vegetable'), which his descendants later adopted as a surname.


The "clever" Baldrick character was ditched after the first series, becoming steadily more imbecilic with each incarnation.


Blackadder II

Blackadder character
Baldrick
Nationality English
Occupation(s) Servant
First appearance Bells
Last appearance Chains
Episode count 6
Played by Tony Robinson

The Elizabethan Baldrick is the servant and bondsman, rather than a friend, to Lord Blackadder, who mistreats him, and, Baldrick claims, at first tried to kill him. He has a bedroom in Blackadder's house, but has also been forced to sleep in the gutter and on the roof. He has a tendency to eat dung. Baldrick has been in Lord Edmund's service longer than either of them care to remember. Yet although his master treats him with the sort of contempt reserved for lepers, he remains intensely loyal. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Baldrick series 2 This work is copyrighted. ... The English are an ethnic group and nation primarily associated with England and the English language. ... It has been suggested that servant (domestic) be merged into this article or section. ... Bells is the first episode of the second season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Chains is an episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Tony Robinson as Baldrick in Blackadder. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... It has been suggested that Villein be merged into this article or section. ... Edmund, Lord Blackadder (1531-1566) was the main character in the second series of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ...


This Baldrick, whilst perhaps not as dim as his descendants, is far stupider than the original. A kindly soul, Baldrick's lack of formal education is compensated for by his basic streetwise cunning. While his 'cunning plans' do sometimes have a strange, twisted and often perverse logic and cunning to them (one suggestion was that Blackadder repay his debts by making money as a male prostitute, another is to disguise a 'mad, wild, killer bull' as a rooster and enter it in a cockfight), he does possess an entertaining level of stupidity. In one episode, Blackadder attempts to teach Baldrick how to add. Baldrick's conclusions, which include 'two beans plus two beans equals some beans', 'two beans plus two beans equals three beans... and that one' and 'two beans plus two beans makes a very small casserole', lead Blackadder to comment 'to you, Baldrick, the Renaissance was just something that happened to other people, wasn't it?' He did, however, figure out the equation in the middle of a later conversation. Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ...


It was also in this series that the first signs of Baldrick's love of turnips was shown, in the episode 'Beer', where he and Percy famously discover a turnip shaped like a 'thingy'. Baldrick later describes the incident as 'triffic'. He is particularly delighted by the discovery, because it contrasts with his own 'thingy' which is shaped like a turnip. In the same episode Baldrick reveals his recipe for Turnip Surprise - "the surprise is : there's nothing in it except the turnip". He is amazed when Blackadder points out that the Turnip Surprise is in fact simply a turnip.


Baldrick once went on an 'all mouse diet' by hanging a piece of cheese off of the end of his nose and lying with his mouth open, hoping that mice would scurry in. He later tried the same thing, with a mouse on the end of his nose to catch a cat, for variety.


Baldrick was also bridesmaid at Lord Blackadder's abortive wedding. "Queenie" kept him as a pet, calling him Lassie (Baldrick did not complain) and he stuck two pencils up his nose, so that he could attend a Royal fancy dress party as a pencil case. A bridesmaid is a girl or young woman who attends to the bride during or after a wedding or marriage ceremony. ... Queenie Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan Britain. ... Logo of the current Fancy Dress Party The Fancy Dress Party was a political party in England. ...


It can be argued that the sole triumph of this Baldrick was noticing that the mangroves and flowing lava probably meant that Captain Redbeard Rum hadn't, after all, berthed his ship in Southampton; however, a counter-argument exists that he can also be acclaimed for actually being able to tell the difference between a head and a foot, unlike future Baldricks, such as the Georgian version. Above and below water view at the edge of the mangal Mangroves are woody trees or shrubs that grow in mangrove habitats or mangal (Hogarth, 1999). ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Southampton is a city, unitary authority and major port situated on the south coast of England. ...


Blackadder: The Cavalier Years

Baldrick is servant to Sir Edmund Blackadder. Like his Elizabethan ancestor he moonlights as an executioner, although in his case it is part of a cunning plan to save the life of Charles I of England by replacing his head with a pumpkin. He is the son of a pig farmer and a bearded lady. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Jennifer Miller, bearded woman The bearded woman has been a phenomenon of legend, curiosity, ridicule, and more recently, political statement and fashion statement. ...


Blackadder the Third

Blackadder character
Lord S. Baldrick
Nationality British
Occupation(s) Dogsbody, then Lord
First appearance Dish and Dishonesty
Last appearance Blackadder's Christmas Carol
Episode count 7
Played by Tony Robinson

The Baldrick of Regency Britain works as an underscrogsman (apprentice dogsbody) to Mr. E. Blackadder esq., butler to Prince George. He lives in a pipe in the upstairs water closet of the Palace. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Baldrick_Blackdder This work is copyrighted. ... A Lord (Laird in some Scottish contexts) is a male who has power and authority. ... Dish and Dishonesty is an episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... Tony Robinson as Baldrick in Blackadder. ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Edmund Blackadder esq. ... Prince George Prince George (1762-1816) was a fictional caricature of the historical figure HRH The Prince George, Prince of Wales, played by Hugh Laurie in the third series of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ...


The third Baldrick is much more noticeably stupid and disgusting than those previous to him. Like his Elizabethan ancestor, he is known to eat dung occasionally. He is also more childlike; when asked if he has any distinguishing features, referring to his nose he asserts, "I've got this huge growth in the middle of my face." There is not the slightest sign of 'cunning' in any of his plans, which include: Elizabethan redirects here. ...

  • escaping the guillotine by waiting until your head has been cut off, then 'springing into action' and running 'around and around the farmyard, and out the farmyard gate', in the style of a chicken, and
  • replacing the burnt first copy of Samuel Johnson's dictionary by taking the string, which has been salvaged, and putting in some new pages. Blackadder clarifies that Baldrick is suggesting that he re-write the entire dictionary in a single night. Blackadder attempts this anyway, before getting stuck at "aardvark".

Blackadder also claims that Baldrick has never changed his trousers, and implores him never to do so, for they are, Blackadder claims, akin to Pandora's Box. The Maiden, an older Scottish design. ... The traditional barnyard with its animals is a thing of the past. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... A Dictionary of the English Language, one of the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language, was prepared by Samuel Johnson and published on April 15, 1755. ... Binomial name Orycteropus afer (Pallas, 1766) Aardvark range map The Aardvark (Orycteropus afer; sometimes called antbear)[1] is a medium-sized mammal native to Africa. ... Pandoras Box is the box entrusted to the mythological figures Epimetheus and his wife Pandora. ...


Although he is now on a closer social standing to Blackadder than before, he still receives the same level of abuse as his Elizabethan ancestor. Edmund punches him; kicks him; breaks a milk-jug over his head; smashes a huge turnip on his head; roasts him for a few minutes on a spit; grabs him by the shirt collar; threatens to cut him up into strips and tell the prince that he walked over a very sharp cattle grid in an extremely heavy hat; and promises five minutes of hellish tortures involving a small pencil equalling anything possible from Beelzebub. Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ...


However, despite his noticeable disabilities, this Baldrick has more success than any of the others. In an election rigged by Blackadder, he is elected MP for Dunny-on-the-Wold, a rotten borough, although he was intended to be a puppet for Blackadder to manipulate. He is later made a Lord by Prince George, and is, therefore, eligible to sit in the House of Lords (although whether or not he ever does so is another matter, and as he is never again referred to by his title after episode 1, it seems plausible that Blackadder persuaded the Prince to attaint Baldrick of his peerage). He also succeeds where no Baldrick has succeeded before or since, in calling Blackadder a 'lazy, big nosed, rubber-faced bastard'. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The term rotten borough refers to a parliamentary borough or constituency in the Kingdom of England (pre-1707), the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1801), the Kingdom of Ireland (1536-1801) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (from 1801 until their final abolition in 1867) which due... A Lord (Laird in some Scottish contexts) is a male who has power and authority. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Baldrick spends the £400,000 he received as a Lord on an enormous turnip ("well, I had to haggle.") Blackadder later destroys it by sticking it on Baldrick's head.


Baldrick isn't given any sort of first name until this third series, when he speculates that it might be "Sodoff", since in childhood when he said to the other guttersnipes, "Hello, my name's Baldrick," they would reply, "Yes, we know. Sod off, Baldrick!" A diplomatic Blackadder opts to record him as "S. Baldrick". The initial appears to have been adopted by his descendants.


This particular specimen of Baldrick can also be noted for his definition of dog: "Not a cat" and sea: "Big, blue wobbly thing that mermaids live in". His command with words is also demonstrated in his "magnificent octopus" (magnum opus), a semi-autobiographical work that goes as so: Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ...

"Once upon a time there was a lovely little sausage called Baldrick. And it lived happily ever after."

His heroes are the highwayman 'The Shadow', and The Scarlet Pimpernel (or "Scarlet Pimple" as Baldrick believes his name to be). The former was executed as a result of Blackadder's informing, and the latter was poisoned by him. Plate with German Wurst (liver-, blood- and hamsausage) A sausage consists of ground meat, animal fat, herbs and spices, and sometimes other ingredients, usually packed in a casing (historically the intestines of the animal, though now generally synthetic), and sometimes preserved in some way, often by curing or smoking. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Amy Hardwood is a fictional character in the British sitcom Blackadder. ... The Scarlet Pimpernel is a classic play and adventure novel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy, set during the French Revolution. ...


This Baldrick grew up in a "haunted hovel", in which a vile, disgusting apparition would slowly make its way into his parents' bed at night. Curiously, this phantom vanished the very day Baldrick left home. We are to assume that Baldrick killed his own mother. His cunning plan was to chop his mother's head off to solve the problem of her low ceiling.


Blackadder's Christmas Carol

Mr Baldrick is assistant in Ebenezer Blackadder's moustache shop. While still stupid, it seems that having to work for the exceedingly naïve Mr Blackadder has forced him to develop some of the savvy of his earlier ancestors. He remains the only person to be fooled by Tiny Tom Scratchit's alleged lameness, however. He is also possibly the only person to spell "Christmas" without getting any of the letters right (he initially renders the word as "Kwelfnuve", but strikes it through, correcting it to "Kweznuz"). Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... Ebenezer Blackadder is one of the many Blackadder ancestors from the BBC sitcom of the name. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that marks the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Blackadder Goes Forth

Blackadder character
Image:Private Baldrick.jpg
Private S. Baldrick
Nationality British
Occupation(s) Private
First appearance Plan A: Captain Cook
Last appearance Goodbyeee
Episode count 6
Played by Tony Robinson

Private Baldrick is a soldier in a First World War trench, serving under Captain Blackadder and Lieutenant George. His hero is Lord Flashheart. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Image File history File links Private_Baldrick. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Goodbyeee. ... Tony Robinson as Baldrick in Blackadder. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna... Captain Edmund Blackadder (1871—1917 assumed, MIA) was the main character in the fourth and final series of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Lieutenant George Lieutenant The Honourable George Colthurst St. ... Lord Flashheart is the name of two characters (the first presumably an ancestor of the second) who appeared in two episodes of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ...


Equally as disgusting as the third Baldrick, Private Baldrick is, without a doubt, the stupidest of the Baldrick dynasty to date. His 'cunning plans' verge on those of an insane person. Examples include carving his name on a bullet, in relation to the old saying 'a bullet with your name on it', his explanation being that if he owns the bullet, it won't ever kill him as he won't ever shoot himself ('shame' comments Captain Blackadder), and the chances of there being two bullets with 'Baldrick' on them are 'very small indeed'. // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder typically stemming from a form of mental illness. ...


In the first episode, Captain Cook, he claims to be the first Baldrick in the entire family tree to have a brilliant plan, giving a speech saying, 'Permission to write home immediately sir! This is the first good plan a Baldrick's ever had. For centuries we've tried, and they've always turned out total pig swill! My mum will be pleased as punch." This was after Blackadder said his plan to get out of the trenches through cookery was indeed a brilliant plan, but with the slight flaw that Baldrick was 'the worst cook in the entire world'. Captain Cook was the first episode in the fourth series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (Blackadder Goes Forth). ...


Private Baldrick's hobbies include cookery, his specialities include: Cooking is the act of preparing food for consumption. ...

  • Rat au Van (a rat that's been run over by a van),
  • Filet mignon in Sauce Bearnaise (dog turds covered in glue),
  • Plum duff (a mole hill decorated in rabbit droppings),
  • Cream custard (cat's vomit), and
  • Coffee (hot mud), with milk (spit), sugar (dandruff) and rather dubious 'chocolate sprinkles'.
  • Apple crumble which contains fish
  • More rat; Sauté, which involves:
    • taking the freshly shaved rat and marinading it in a puddle until it is drowned
    • stretching it out under a hot lightbulb
    • getting within dashing distance of a latrine
    • wolfing it down!
  • Rat fricassé, which is the same as above, but a slightly bigger rat.

This Baldrick is also a poet. His greatest poem is, without a doubt, 'The German Guns'. The words are: Filet Mignon (French) is a steak cut of beef taken from the tenderloin, or Psoas major of the cow. ... Bearnaise sauce (French: Sauce Béarnaise) is a sauce of butter and egg yolks flavored with tarragon and shallots, with chervil, cooked in wine and vinegar to make a glaze. ... Custard is a range of preparations based on milk and eggs, thickened with heat. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom

Baldrick was particularly surprised when Captain Blackadder guessed the final line.


During his time in the trenches, Baldrick also wrote a second poem; the words are as follows:

Hear the words I sing,
War's a horrid thing,
So I sing sing sing...
...ding-a-ling-a-ling.

Blackadder commented that "it started badly, it tailed off a little in the middle and the less said about the end the better-but apart from that it was excellent."


Baldrick also does a fantastic Charlie Chaplin impression (although some believe it to be a slug balancing act, and General Melchett mistook it for a feeble impression of Buster Keaton). “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ... Red Slug, Arion rufus - red color form Slugs are gastropod mollusks without shells or with very small internal shells, in contrast to snails, which have a prominent coiled shell. ... Joseph Frank Keaton, Jr. ...


The opening sequence to each episode of series 4 features a ceremonial parade in which the company led by Captain Blackadder marches past General Melchett on a reviewing stand. Baldrick appears as part of the regimental band, splendid in scarlet and blue full dress, but playing that most unmartial of instruments: a triangle.


Despite his stupidity, Private Baldrick (however inadvertently) delivers the most profound speech of the lot. In preparation for 'the final push', tension is high, and Baldrick demands, "Why can't we just stop sir? Why can't we just say 'no more killing, let's all go home'? Why would it be stupid just to pack it in, sir? Why?" Neither Captain Blackadder nor Lieutenant George are able to come up with a good answer. In the fourth series of Blackadder, the character of Baldrick does take on something of a deeper meaning, as an innocent victim of the terrible slaughter of the first world war. George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ...


Private Baldrick never got to tell the audience his final 'cunning plan' to escape the trenches, as he is sent over the top before he can reveal it to Captain Blackadder, Lieutenant George and Captain Darling (although it might have involved a rusty nail he noticed on a trench ladder). It is believed that Private S. Baldrick was killed going 'over the top' in 1917. Captain Edmund Blackadder (1871—1917 assumed, MIA) was the main character in the fourth and final series of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... Captain Kevin Darling Captain Kevin Darling was a fictional character played by Tim McInnerny in series four of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


Blackadder: Back & Forth

Baldrick is septic tank cleaner to the 21st century Lord Blackadder in Blackadder: Back and Forth. His first appearance is serving Blackadder's millennium dinner, which he does wearing nothing but an amusing apron, on a whim. His cooking is similar to Private Baldrick's; he prepared dinner by coughing over an avocado. His underpants may date from the 18th century, or in any case smell as though they do, and turn out to be the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs. Rather surprisingly he builds a working time machine, making him "the greatest genius who ever lived." Or it would do, if he knew how it worked. Following his master's rewriting of history, he becomes Prime Minister of the United Kingdom - and possibly dictator, as the television commentator observes that elections have been abolished (although how much power he has with Edmund as king is questionable). Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... A septic tank also known as a septic system is a small scale sewage treatment system common in areas with no connection to main sewerage pipes. ... The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... A millennium (pl. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Dodo, shown here in illustration, is an often-cited[1] example of modern extinction. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... Dictator is the of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... An election is a decision making process where people choose people to hold official offices. ...


Also, Legionary Baldricus is a soldier under Centurion Blacaddicus in the Roman Britain section of Blackadder: Back & Forth. Part of the forces defending Hadrian's Wall. He is apparently bilingual (although it's possible he's a local conscript and doesn't really understand Latin). He wears his helmet back to front, and was presumably killed by the attacking "Scots" The Roman army is the set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman republic and later Roman empire as part of the Roman military. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term bilingualism (from bi meaning two and lingua meaning language) can refer to rather different phenomena. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Gaels are an ethno-linguistic group which spread from Ireland to Scotland and the Isle of Man. ...


Other Baldricks

  • Bert Baldrick, dogsbody to Thomas Gainsborough's butler, is mentioned by the third Baldrick as his cousin, who says that Bert says that all portraits look the same because they're painted to a romantic ideal rather than the idiosyncratic facial features of the person in question. Bert Baldrick, Blackadder observes, must have a far larger vocabulary than Sodoff Baldrick.
  • Baldrick, slave to Grand Admiral Blackadder of the Dark Segment in the future section of Blackadder's Christmas Carol. He doesn't actually get to do much except stand around in a posing pouch. In an alternate future in which he is the Grand Admiral, he manages to destroy his own forces. He explains to the queen, "Good news... for the enemy. They completely destroyed our entire army. I got a bit confused and dropped a bomb on our lot.'
  • A rumoured fifth series of Blackadder said to have a character named Bald Rick, apparently the drummer in Edmund's 1960s-era band.
  • The Comic Relief publication of the complete Blackadder scripts (Blackadder - The Whole Damn Dynasty - 1485-1917) contains "Baldrick's Family Tree", which mainly comprises all the children of a Baldrick being called Baldrick. Occasionally there are some exceptions. Some of the other entries in Baldrick's Family Tree include the common cold, dung beetles, ticks, Earls Court (change for Ealing), Ruislip, Pot plant, Paul Gascoigne, Ronald Reagan and his children Ronnie and Thingie. A neolithic ancestor by the name of Bad Reek is mentioned as being present at the construction of Stonehenge. A Baldrick was also, apparently, the sixth wife of Henry VIII, who was "old, half-mad and suffering from syphilis at the time, and was happy to get anything he could".
  • Baldrick, uncle of Sodoff Baldrick, who is never seen but whom Baldrick says was an actor who played Macbeth's second codpiece ("Macbeth wore him in the fight scenes"..."Ah. So he was a stunt codpiece"). When asked if his uncle had 'a large part' he replied that it depended on which actor played Macbeth.
  • Private S. Baldrick's father, who is never seen but whom Baldrick says was a nun (when the judge asked him his profession, he said "Nun" (none)). His mother is frequently mentioned, and Blackadder says that she is a resident of London Zoo and Baldrick is her only human child. His grandfather died from being run over by a traction engine.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baldrick at AllExperts (2158 words)
The Elizabethan Baldrick is the servant and bondsman, rather than a friend, to Lord Blackadder, who mistreats him, and, Baldrick claims, at first tried to kill him.
Baldrick once went on an 'all mouse diet' by hanging a piece of cheese off of the end of his nose and lying with his mouth open, hoping that mice would scurry in.
Baldrick isn't given any sort of first name until the third series, when he speculates that it might be "Sod off", since his childhood friends would say "Sod off, Baldrick!" A diplomatic Blackadder opts to record him as "S. Baldrick".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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