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Encyclopedia > Bakersfield, California
Bakersfield, California
Downtown Bakersfield with City Hall and Police Headquarters at left and Hall of Records at right

Seal
Nickname: California's Country Music Capital
Location of Bakersfield, California
Location of Bakersfield, California
Coordinates: 35°24′21″N 119°01′07″W / 35.40583, -119.01861
Country United States
State California
County Kern
Founded 1869
Government
 - Mayor Harvey Hall
 - Senate Dean Florez (D)
Roy Ashburn (R)
 - Assembly Nicole Parra (D)
Jean Fuller (R)
 - U. S. Congress Jim Costa (D) (CA-20)
Kevin McCarthy (R) (CA-22)
Area
 - City 131 sq mi (296.3 km²)
 - Land 113.1 sq mi (292.9 km²)
 - Water 1.3 sq mi (3.4 km²)  1.14%
Elevation 404 ft (123 m)
Population (January 1, 2008)
 - City 328,692
 - Density 2,184.4/sq mi (843.4/km²)
 - Metro 780,711
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 93302
Area code(s) 661
FIPS code 06-03526
GNIS feature ID 1652668
Website: City of Bakersfield Official Website

Bakersfield is a large city at the southern end of the Central Valley of California, United States. It is one of the fastest-growing large-population cities in the USA, and is located roughly equidistant between Los Angeles and Fresno, 110 miles (180 km) to the south and north respectively. As of 2008, the population was estimated at 328,692[1] within the city limits, making it the 11th largest city in California and the 58th largest city in the United States according to U.S. Census estimates. The Bakersfield Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) has a population of 780,711, making it the 65th largest metropolitan area in the country. It is California's third largest inland city, after Fresno and Sacramento. The city's economy relies on agriculture, petroleum extraction and refining, and manufacturing. Bakersfield is also the 11th fastest growing city in the United States with a population of over 100,000, and the fastest growing city in the United States with a population of over 250,000. Bakersfield refers to one of several different places. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 1088 KB) Summary Photo taken by Bobak HaEri. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_Bakersfield,_California. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S state. ... The U.S. state of California is divided into 58 counties. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of the U.S. state of California. ... California State Senate chamber The California State Senate is the upper house of the California State Legislature. ... Dean Florez (born April 5, 1963 in Shafter, California) is a California State Senator. ... The California Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of California. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The California Republican Party is the California affiliate of the national Republican Party. ... The California State Assembly chamber California State Assembly Chamber in the State Capitol The California State Assembly is the lower house of the California State Legislature. ... Nicole Parra (born 1970) has been a California State Assemblywoman since 2002. ... Dr. Jean Fuller was elected to the California State Assembly in November of 2006. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Jim Costa (born April 13, 1952) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of California. ... California congressional districts since 2003. ... Kevin McCarthy For other people named Kevin McCarthy, see Kevin McCarthy. ... California congressional districts since 2003. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  PST or UTC-8 The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-8). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... North American area code 661 covers the majority of Californias Kern County, as well as part of Los Angeles County. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... This article is about Californias Central Valley. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Fresno redirects here. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... There are two official definitions of metropolitan area used today in the United States, metropolitan statistical areas, and combined statistical areas, the former restrictive, the latter more extensive. ... Sacramento redirects here. ...

Contents

History

The Yokuts Indians were the first people to settle in the San Joaquin Valley, roughly 8,000 years ago. In 1776, the Spanish missionary Father Francisco Garcés became the first European to explore the area. In 1851, gold was discovered in the Kern River in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains, and in 1865, oil was discovered in the valley. The Bakersfield area, a tule- reed-infested malarial swamp, was first known as Kern Island to the handful of pioneers who built log cabins there in 1860. The area was subject to flooding from the Kern River delta, which occupied what is now the downtown area. Yokutsan (also Yokuts) is a family of languages spoken in the interior of southern California in and around the San Joaquin valley. ... The Central Valley of California The San Joaquin Valley (English pronunciation in IPA: [sæn wɑˈkin]) refers to the area of the Central Valley of California that lies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in Stockton. ... Padre Francisco Tomás Garcés (April 12, 1738 - July 18, 1781), a Spanish Franciscan priest, was a missionary who explored much of the southwestern part of North America, including what is now Arizona and southern California. ... The Kern River north of Kernville The Kern River going through the Kern Canyon, just northeast of Bakersfield A Kern River hydroelectric power plant in the Kern River, at the entrance to part of Sequoia National Forest. ... This article is about the mountain range in the Western United States. ... Binomial name Schoenoplectus acutus (Muhl. ... Red blood cell infected with Malaria (Italian: bad air; formerly called ague or marsh fever in English) is an infectious disease which causes about 500 million infections and 2 million deaths annually, mainly in the tropics and sub-Saharan Africa. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ...


Founding

In 1863, former Iowa militia member and former California state senator Colonel Thomas Baker moved into the Kern Island area to champion the cause of land reclamation. He settled into a tule-reed thatched log cabin near present-day Truxtun Avenue and R Street. Baker, who had experience as a surveyor and was reputed to be one of the few government officials not corrupted by big business, was recommended to survey and lay out the town of Visalia in the late 1850s. He was also known for his hospitality.[citation needed] Land reclamation is either of two distinct practices. ... Visalia is a Central California city situated in the heart of California’s agricultural San Joaquin Valley, approximately 230 miles (370 km) southeast of San Francisco and 190 miles (310 km) north of Los Angeles. ...


Baker grew a field of alfalfa, near the modern Amtrak station, for travelers to feed their horses. Newspapers as far away as San Francisco advised travelers to visit Baker's field and use his field of alfalfa to feed their stock. For the Our Gang (Little Rascals) character, see Carl Switzer. ... Amtrak California is a brand name used by Caltrans Division of Rail on all state supported and Amtrak operated rail routes within the State of California. ... San Francisco redirects here. ...


As more families moved to the area, Baker subsidized development out of his own pocket. He constructed public sawmills, helped other pioneers drain their land, and surveyed the land. Baker was asked to plot out a new town after a flood of the Kern River rerouted the river channel to the north. At the founding ceremony in 1869, residents surprised Baker by naming the town Bakersfield, in his honor. For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ...


Population growth

Bakersfield's old Santa Fe Railroad depot
Bakersfield's old Santa Fe Railroad depot

The town continued to grow and reached a population of about 801 by 1880, and 2,626 by 1890.[2] In 1900, its population was approximately 4,836. The town continued to grow despite major floods in 1867 and 1893, and fires in 1889 and 1919. Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ...


In 1874, the Southern Pacific Railroad established itself in the area, but was unpopular because of its high fare rate.[citation needed] On May 27, 1898, the San Joaquin Valley Railroad (popularly known as "The People's Railroad"), now the Santa Fe Railroad, arrived in Bakersfield, greatly boosting the population. The Southern Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting marks SP) was an American railroad. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The San Joaquin Valley Railroad is one of several short line railroad companies and is part of the Sunset Divison of RailAmerica. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ...


In the 1930s, the Great Plains drought and dust storms (commonly called the Dust Bowl) precipitated a large influx of refugees from Arkansas and Oklahoma, who mostly found work in the agriculture and oil industries. The overwhelming number of refugees caused considerable social strife. After World War II, the city's population grew slowly and steadily over time. For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Farmer and two sons during a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936 The Dust Bowl, or the dirty thirties, was a period of horrible dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands from 1930 to 1936 (in some areas until 1940), caused by severe... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Migration from Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Southern California brought new residents, who were mostly employed by the oil industry. By 1980, Bakersfield's population was about 105,000. During the next 20 years, Bakersfield's population exploded and surpassed 250,000 by 2000. For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ...


1952 earthquake

On July 21, 1952 an earthquake struck at 4:52 a.m. Pacific Standard Time.[3] The earthquake, which was felt from San Francisco to the Mexican border, destroyed the nearby communities of Tehachapi and Arvin. The earthquake’s destructive force also bent cotton fields into U shapes, slid a shoulder of the Tehachapi Mountains across all four lanes of the Ridge Route, collapsed a water tower creating a flash flood, and destroyed the railroad tunnels in the mountain chain.[citation needed] Luckily, Bakersfield was spared, experiencing minor architectural damage without loss of life. The earthquake measured 7.3 on the Richter Scale. is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The border between Mexico and the United States spans four U.S. states, six Mexican states, and has over twenty commercial railroad crossings. ... Wind Turbines in the mountains Tehachapi (IPA: ) is a city incorporated in 1909 located in its namesake Tehachapi Mountains between Bakersfield and Mojave in Kern County, California. ... Arvin is a city located in Kern County, California. ... The Tehachapi Mountains (IPA: ) are a short transverse range in southern California in the United States, running SW-NE connecting the Coast Ranges on the west with the southern end of the Sierra Nevada mountains on the east. ... A map of the Ridge Route drawn in 1919 The Ridge Route, officially the Castaic-Tejon Route,[2] is a narrow two-lane highway in the northern Greater Los Angeles Area of the U.S. state of California. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...


The first aftershock came on July 29, and did minor architectural damage, but raised fears that the flow of the Friant-Kern Canal could be dangerously altered, potentially flooding the city and surrounding areas. Aftershocks are earthquakes in the same region of the mainshock (generally within a few rupture length) but of smaller magnitude and which occur with a pattern that follows Omoris law. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Aftershocks, for the next month, had become normal to Bakersfield residents, until at 3:42 p.m August 22 a 6.5 earthquake struck directly under the town's epicenter in the most densely populated area of the Southern San Joaquin Valley. The town did have some good fortune, however, as the quake struck late on a Friday afternoon when businesses were already closed down or beginning to close down. Four people died in the aftershock, and many of the town's historic structures were permanently lost. is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Central Valley of California The San Joaquin Valley (English pronunciation in IPA: [sæn wɑˈkin]) refers to the area of the Central Valley of California that lies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in Stockton. ...


Geography and climate

Bakersfield is located at 35°21′24″N, 119°01′07″W,[4] and at 400-foot (120 m) elevation. It lies near the southern "horseshoe" end of the San Joaquin Valley, with the southern tip of the Sierra Nevadas just to the east. The city limits extend to the Sequoia National Forest, at the foot of the Greenhorn Mountain Range and at the entrance to the Kern Canyon. To the south, the Tehachapi Mountains feature the historic Tejon Ranch. To the west is the Temblor Range, which features the Carrizo Plain National Monument and the San Andreas Fault, approximately 35 miles (56 km) across the valley floor. The Central Valley of California The San Joaquin Valley (English pronunciation in IPA: [sæn wɑˈkin]) refers to the area of the Central Valley of California that lies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in Stockton. ... This article is about the mountain range in the Western United States. ... Sequoia National Park is a national park in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of Fresno, California. ... The Tehachapi Mountains (IPA: ) are a short transverse range in southern California in the United States, running SW-NE connecting the Coast Ranges on the west with the southern end of the Sierra Nevada mountains on the east. ... Tejon Ranch is the largest landowner in California. ... The Temblor Range lies at the southwestern end of the San Joaquin Valley in California in the United States. ... The Carrizo Plain is a large enclosed plain, approximately 50 miles (80 km) long and up to 15 miles (24 km) across, in eastern San Luis Obispo County, California, U.S. It contains the 180,000 acre (728 km²) Carrizo Plain National Monument, and is the largest single native grassland... View of the San Andreas Fault on the Carrizo Plain in central California, 35°07N, 119°39W The San Andreas Fault is a geological fault that runs a length of roughly 800 miles (1300 kilometres) through western and southern California in the United States. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 114.4 square miles (296 km²), of which 113.1 sq mi (293 km²) is land (98.86%) and 1.3 sq mi (3.4 km²) is water (1.14%). The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Bakersfield lies approximately 100 miles (160 km) north of Los Angeles (about a 1½-hour drive on I-5 and State Route 99) and about 300 miles (480 km) southeast of the state capital, Sacramento (about a 4½-hour drive on State Route 99).


Bakersfield's climate is a semi-arid dry steppe climate (Koppen climate classification BSh), defined by long, hot, dry summers and brief, cool, sometimes rainy winters. In fact, Bakersfield is one of the sunniest cities in the U.S. (just behind Yuma, Arizona and Palm Springs, California). Bakersfield enjoys long-lasting, mild autumns and early springs, giving the region a unique climate suitable for growing a wide variety of crops (ranging from citrus to carrots to almonds and pistachios). With an average rainfall of only 6.49 inches (165mm) per year, most precipitation falls during winter and spring. Since Bakersfield receives less than 10 inches (250mm) of rain per year, some consider Bakersfield to be a desert. Typically, no rain falls from May through September. Summers tend to be very hot in Bakersfield with daily temperatures usually exceeding 100 °F (38 °C) from mid June to as late as mid September, and occasionally exceeding 110 °F (43 °C). Winters often have mild daytime temperatures reaching into the low 60s°F (15 °C). Mornings and nights however, tend to be cold (especially in December and January), where lows can reach as low as 20 °F (−7 °C), often coming with dense Tule Fog and low visibility, causing many schools to have fog delays as long as three hours. Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... This article is about the ecological zone type. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Yuma is the county seat[1] of Yuma County, Arizona, United States. ... Palm Springs is a desert city in Riverside County, California approximately 110 miles (177 km) east of Los Angeles and 140 miles (225 km) northeast of San Diego. ...


The record maximum temperature was 115 °F (46 °C) on July 1, 1950, and the record minimum temperature was 19 °F (−7 °C) on December 23, 1998. The most rainfall in one month was 5.36 inches (136 mm) in February 1998. The maximum 24-hour rainfall was 2.29 inches (58 mm) on February 9, 1978. Although snow often falls in the Tehachapi mountains south of Bakersfield during the winter, snow is rare on the valley floor; however, 3 inches (76 mm) fell on January 25, 1999.[5] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


The American Lung Association ranked Bakersfield as the most ozone-polluted city in the nation in 2006.[6] It was also ranked as the second-most polluted city in terms of both short-term and year-round particle pollution.[7][8] The American Lung Association is a non-profit organization which fights lung disease in all its forms, with special emphasis on asthma, tobacco control and environmental health. It was founded in 1904 to fight tuberculosis as the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. ...



Weather averages for Bakersfield, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Average high °C (°F) 13 (55) 18 (64) 20 (68) 24 (75) 29 (84) 33 (91) 36 (97) 35 (95) 32 (90) 27 (81) 18 (64) 13 (55)
Average low °C (°F) 4 (39) 6 (43) 8 (46) 10 (50) 14 (57) 18 (64) 21 (70) 20 (68) 18 (64) 13 (55) 7 (45) 3 (37)
Precipitation mm (inches) 30 (1.2) 30.7 (1.2) 35.8 (1.4) 11.4 (0.4) 6.1 (0.2) 3 (0.1) 0 (0) 2 (0.1) 3.8 (0.1) 7.6 (0.3) 15 (0.6) 19.3 (0.8)
Source: weather.com[3] 2008-03-01

Demographics

As of the 2000 census,[9] there were 247,057 people, 83,441 households, and 60,995 families residing in Bakersfield. The population density was 2,184.4 people per square mile (843.4/km²). There were 88,262 housing units at an average density of 780.4/sq mi (301.3/km²). Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ...


The racial makeup of the city was 61.87% White, 9.16% Black or African American, 1.40% Native American, 4.33% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 18.68% from other races, and 4.43% from two or more races. 32.45% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ...


There were 83,441 households out of which 42.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 15.5% were female householders with no husband present, and 26.9% were non-families. 21.5% of households consisted of a single individual; 7.2% were additionally age 65 or older. 42.5% of households claimed children under age 18. The average household size was 2.92, and the average family size was 3.41. Matrimony redirects here. ...


By age, the population was spread out with 32.7% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 18.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were age 65 or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.


The median income for a household was $39,982, and the median income for a family was $45,556. The median income for males was $38,834, compared to $27,148 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,678. About 14.6% of families and 18.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.4% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over. Income, refers to consumption opportunity gained by an entity within a specified time frame, which is generally expressed in monetary terms. ... Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government and economy

The Kern County seat, established in 1866 in the mountain town of Havilah was moved to Bakersfield in 1874. Bakersfield has been incorporated twice in its history. It was first incorporated in 1874, but subsequently disbanded in 1876 with the purpose of deposing an unruly city marshal. The city was incorporated again in 1898. Currently, Bakersfield is governed by a city council and manager system, with a mayor acting as the presiding officer.


Bakersfield is home to the largest carrot-producing operations in the world, Grimmway Farms and Bolthouse Farms. In addition, one of the nation's largest and oldest farming co-ops, the California Cotton Cooperative Association (CalCot), was founded in Bakersfield in 1927. Cooperative farming is a system, in which farmers pool their resources for cooperation in certain areas, such as purchase of supplies (seeds, fertilizers, etc. ...


Other crops harvested in Bakersfield include table grapes, almonds, pistachios, citrus fruits, wheat, garlic, and potatoes.


In 1899, the Kern River Oil Field was uncovered at the Discovery Well by two brothers digging in a pit along the Kern River, about one-mile (1.6 km) east of Gordon's Ferry (where, in the 1850s, the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoaches had once crossed the Kern River). Advances in steam-injection of oil wells rejuvenated the oil field in the early 1960s. The oilfield, the third largest in California, is still active today and is one of the nation's highest yielding fields of all time. Other local oil fields include the enormous Midway-Sunset field, the largest in California and third-largest in the United States; the former Naval Petroleum Reserve at Elk Hills; the Kern Front field, and adjacent Mount Poso Oil Field; the nearly exhausted Buena Vista Field; and the Belridge field. Oil is still important to the local economy, although as other economic sectors have developed it has lost its overwhelming dominance. The Butterfield Stage, also known as Butterfield Overland Stage and Butterfield Overland Mail was a precursor to todays Information Superhighway in the United States, operating from 1857 to 1861. ...


There is a large automobile center in Bakersfield. One of the famous pioneers in the auto industry was John Barber, who began Barber Automotive Group. Barber Way, a street in Bakersfield, commemorates him.


Bakersfield's primary airport is Meadows Field Airport. A new terminal was completed in 2006. Meadows Field (IATA: BFL, ICAO: KBFL, FAA LID: BFL) is the primary airport of Bakersfield, California and is owned by Kern County, California. ...


Politics

Bakersfield differs from many California cities in that it is overwhelmingly conservative. According to the Bay Area Center for Research, Bakersfield is ranked as the 8th most conservative city in the United States, and the most conservative city in California [4].


In the United States presidential election in California, 2004, Kern County cast 66.5% of its votes for George W. Bush, and 32.5% for John Kerry. The 2004 United States presidential election in California refers to how California participated in the 2004 United States presidential election. ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of California. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


Factors for Bakersfield being largely conservative includes the petroleum production around the city, the city's Oklahoma and Dust Bowl heritage and the city's religious atmosphere. As a result, the city is a favorite stopping place for many Republican presidential candidates.


Communities and neighborhoods

A panoramic view of Bakersfield, taken from Stockdale Tower, the tallest building in the city, facing east/northeast. The office buildings in the foreground make up a mini financial district and regional offices for many oil companies that operate in the region; the major street to their right is California Avenue. Towards the upper right is downtown Bakersfield, marked by the black-with-white-roof Truxton Tower (the 2nd tallest building in the city). The area rising in the background-right is East Bakersfield. The mountain range is the background are the Greenhorn Mountains.
A panoramic view of Bakersfield, taken from Stockdale Tower, the tallest building in the city, facing east/northeast. The office buildings in the foreground make up a mini financial district and regional offices for many oil companies that operate in the region; the major street to their right is California Avenue. Towards the upper right is downtown Bakersfield, marked by the black-with-white-roof Truxton Tower (the 2nd tallest building in the city). The area rising in the background-right is East Bakersfield. The mountain range is the background are the Greenhorn Mountains.

The Kern River going through the Kern Canyon, just northeast of Bakersfield A Kern River hydroelectric power plant in the Kern River, at the entrance to part of Sequoia National Forest. ...

Downtown

Downtown Bakersfield is bounded by 24th Street to the North, F Street to the West, California Avenue to the South, and Union Avenue to the East. The two main streets of downtown Bakersfield are Truxtun Avenue and Chester Avenue. Unlike most downtown areas in major cities, downtown Bakersfield does not have a towering skyline, although it has a few tall buildings such as the Bank of America Building (10 stories), the Holiday Inn Select Hotel (9 stories), and the Padre Hotel (9 stories). Notable attractions in downtown Bakersfield include the Rabobank Arena, the McMurtrey Aquatic Center, the Padre Hotel, the Bakersfield Museum of Art, the historic Fox Theater, and a nightlife district centered around 19th Street and Wall Street Alley. Rabobank Arena Rabobank Arena is a 10,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Bakersfield, California, USA. Located downtown at the corner of Truxtun Avenue and N Street, it was built in 1998, and was formerly known as Bakersfield Centennial Garden, that was named by a local resident, Brian Landis. ... The McMurtrey Aquatic Center is a state-of-the-art swimming, diving, and recreational facility for the City of Bakersfield, California, USA. It is located near Centennial Garden, newly renamed Rabobank Arena, in downtown Bakersfield. ...


East Bakersfield

East Bakersfield is generally bounded by Bernard Street to the North, Union Avenue to the West, Brundage Lane to the South, and Fairfax to the East. The two main streets of East Bakersfield are Mount Vernon Avenue and Niles Street. Most of East Bakersfield is not in Bakersfield city limits and is unincorporated. East Bakersfield is one of the two first major sections of the city to develop, along with downtown. In contrary to the general population of Bakersfield, it is noted for its large population of minorities including Latino(a)s-Americans and African-Americans. Notable attractions include the The Kern County Museum which was founded in 1941 and serves more than 94,000 people each year. The museum is consistently recognized for providing some of the most outstanding educational programs in the state of California, such as Native American Life, and Frontier Life. Along with downtown Bakersfield, it is also one of the few parts of the city where you can find locally run restaurants opposed to major chains in other parts.


Buck Owens Boulevard

Formerly named Pierce Rd, it was renamed Buck Owens Boulevard in 1998 after country music legend Buck Owens. This area is located next to Highway 99, between Rosedale Highway/24th Street in Bakersfield, and Airport Drive in Oildale. It is the heart of the Bakersfield's Country Music scene. The main attractions are the Bakersfield sign (formerly located at intersection of California and Union Ave.) and the Buck Owens Crystal Palace night club, museum, and restaurant. It is also located near Bakersfield Beach Park and the locally famous truck stop restaurant Zingo's Cafe. Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ...


Westchester

The Westchester district is just west of Downtown Bakersfield. It is bounded by Highway 99 to the West, 24th street to the south, Chester Ave. to the east, and the Kern River, across from Oildale, to the north. Westchester is a mostly residential neighborhood. The neighborhood is known for large shady trees and historic homes built between the 1900s and 1950s. Main points of interest include the Kern County Museum, Sam Lynn Ballpark, and the Garces circle. Sam Lynn Ballpark is a stadium in Bakersfield, California. ...


Stockdale

Stockdale
Stockdale

The Stockdale district is bounded roughly by Ming Avenue to the south, California Avenue to the East, the Kern River to the north, and Coffee Road to the West. Stockdale is a mix of middle-to-upper class residential, retail and offices and is home to Stockdale Country Club. Neighborhoods here include Amberton, Westwood, Stockdale Estates, Old Stockdale (which some realtors have renamed "Olde Stockdale"), Los Portales, Quailwood, Park Stockdale and Westpark. This area has four major commercial streets -- California Avenue, Truxtun Avenue, and Stockdale Highway. Notable points of interest include Truxtun Lake, the Kern River Parkway, and the Stockdale Tower. California Avenue is home to many office buildings, a mini financial district and regional offices for many oil companies. The Stockdale Tower, standing at 12 stories and 175 feet (53 m) tall, was built in the early 1980s and is the tallest building in Kern County.


Southwest Bakersfield

Gosford
Gosford

Southwest Bakersfield is Bakersfield's most populated and most diverse part of town in terms of residents and neighborhoods. This area was the primary location for growth in Bakersfield from the 1960s through the 1990s, when development finally began in the northwest and resumed in the northeast. Southwest Bakersfield is still growing rapidly today, and has seen three high schools built in the area since 1990, with another one, Independence High School, scheduled to open in August 2008. Additionally, this area contains many master-planned middle class neighborhoods such as The Seasons, Laurelglen, Campus Park, Amberton, The Oaks, and Stone Creek, as well as the upper class gated communities of Haggin Oaks, Seven Oaks, and the prestigious Winter Ridge Estates. California State University, Bakersfield is also located in the Southwest. California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), also called CSU Bakersfield and/or Cal State Bakersfield, is a public university located in Bakersfield, California, and was founded in 1965. ...


Kern City

Kern City
Kern City

Kern City is located in Southwest Bakersfield across from West High School. The development was built in the 1960s by Del Webb at the same time he was building Sun City and is an enclave of mostly senior citizen residents. Del Webb (1899 - 1974) was an American real estate developer and sports-team owner who is significant for founding and developing the retirement community of Sun City, Arizona. ... Sun City is the name (or part of the name) of several locations, many of which were developed by Del Webb, now part of Pulte Homes. ...


Northwest Bakersfield

Rosedale
Rosedale

Northwest Bakersfield is located between the Bakersfield suburbs of Rosedale, Fruitvale, and Oildale. It has seen rapid growth over the last 15 years.It is home to rural Greenacres and newly master-planned neighborhoods such as Riverlakes Ranch, Madison Grove and Brimhall. Northwest Bakersfield has one major shopping center, the Northwest Promenade. This area is known for traffic congestion with few east-west and north-south arterials connecting to the rest of the Bakersfield Metropolitan Area. 7th Standard Road (now known as Merle Haggard Drive) and Olive Drive connects northwest Bakersfield to Oildale, while only Rosedale Highway connects Rosedale to downtown Bakersfield in the east-west direction. Only two roads (Coffee Rd. and Calloway Drive) connect Northwest Bakersfield to Southwest Bakersfield in a north-south direction. Rosedale is a census-designated place located in Kern County, California. ... Oildale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kern County, California, United States. ...


Rio Bravo

Rio Bravo
Rio Bravo

The Rio Bravo area is located east of northeast Bakersfield, in the foothills. It is largely rural and unpopulated, but is currently seeing rapid growth and development with Bakersfield's City in the Hills project. Points of interest include Hart Memorial Park (named after [[Johnny Hart][10]]), Lake Ming, the Rio Bravo Country Club, and the California Animal Living Museum (CALM Zoo), and is the former home of Mesa Marin Raceway before its demolition. Mesa Marin Raceway was a high banked half mile racetrack in Bakersfield, California that was demolished following the 2005 racing season to make way for housing developments in the foothills of northeast Bakersfield. ...


Northeast Bakersfield

Northeast Bakersfield is bounded by University Avenue to the south, Union Avenue to the west, the Panorama bluffs to the north, and Fairfax Rd. to the east. Northeast Bakersfield has both large Latino and Caucasian populations. Northeast Bakersfield, along with Westchester and Rio Bravo, is home to some of the wealthiest residents in Bakersfield (particularly The Bakersfield Country Club and homes lining the Panorama Bluffs). Yet, there is also a balanced mixture of middle and upper-lower class neighborhoods as well. It has one major shopping center, the East Hills Mall. Bakersfield's community college, Bakersfield College, is also located in Northeast Bakersfield. Unlike most of Bakersfield which sits on the flat valley floor, Northeast Bakersfield is situated along rolling hills that are about 300 feet (91 m) higher in elevation than the rest of the city. The Panorama Bluffs provide the best view in the city, providing views of the Kern River oilfields, Oildale and downtown Bakersfield. Although there aren't many, a few local restaurants can be found in Northeast Bakersfield as well. For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... BC Administration Building and main entrance Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, USA. Its main campus is located on a 153 acre plot in northeast Bakersfield, and it also operates two satellite campuses: the Weill Institute in downtown Bakersfield, and at the Delano Center...


Old Town Kern

Old Town Kern is located primarily around Baker Street, near the former town of Sumner. It has a large homeless population, and is currently under redevelopment. This district is home to many Basque cuisine restaurants. Basque cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients of the cuisine of the Basque people in Spain. ...


Education

CSUB's Walter Stiern Library
CSUB's Walter Stiern Library
Bakersfield College
Bakersfield College

Two of the earliest schools founded in Kern County were Mrs. Thomas Baker's school, opened in 1863 at the Baker home (near present-day 19th and N Streets); and a Catholic parochial school opened by Reverend Father Daniel Dade in 1865 in Havilah (then the county seat). In 1880, Norris School was established. The land for this school was donated by William Norris, a local farmer. Thirteen to twenty students were taught in its one classroom during the 1880s. Bakersfield City School District (BCSD), is the state's largest elementary school district. The first high school in Bakersfield, Kern County Union High School, opened in 1893. It was renamed Bakersfield High School after World War II. Image File history File links Walter_Stiern_Library,_CSUB.jpg The Walter Stiern Library, CSUB, September 2003. ... Image File history File links Walter_Stiern_Library,_CSUB.jpg The Walter Stiern Library, CSUB, September 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2085x1545, 512 KB) Photo taken by Bobak HaEri, on January 4, 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2085x1545, 512 KB) Photo taken by Bobak HaEri, on January 4, 2007. ... A view from the science building looking out on Griffith Field Bakersfield High School (BHS) is a high school located in Bakersfield, California, USA. First founded in 1893 as Kern County High School, changed to Kern County Union High School in 1915, and finally to Bakersfield High School in 1945. ...


The site at California Avenue and F Street is the location of the first campus of Bakersfield College, which was established in 1913 and relocated in 1956 to its current location overlooking the Panorama Bluffs in northeast Bakersfield. Bakersfield College has an enrollment of 16,000 students. To serve a growing baby-boomer population after World War II, the Kern High School District has steadily expanded to nineteen campuses and more than 35,000 students, making it the largest high school district in the state. In 1965, a university in the California State University system was founded in Bakersfield. California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) has approximately 7,800 students. It was an NCAA Division II sports powerhouse in the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) with some sports, including wrestling (PAC-10), competing in Division I. CSUB has become a Division I athletic school and is trying to begin the process of joining the Big West Conference . In 1982, Santa Barbara Business College was founded. BC Administration Building and main entrance Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, USA. Its main campus is located on a 153 acre plot in northeast Bakersfield, and it also operates two satellite campuses: the Weill Institute in downtown Bakersfield, and at the Delano Center... For the video game, see Baby Boomer (video game). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The California State University (CSU) is one of three public higher education systems in the state of California, the other two being the University of California system and the California Community College System. ... California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), also called CSU Bakersfield and/or Cal State Bakersfield, is a public university located in Bakersfield, California, and was founded in 1965. ... The California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) is an intercollegiate athletic conference in the Division II of the NCAA. It was founded in December of 1938 and began competition in 1939. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... , Santa Barbara Business College, founded in 1888, is one of the oldest colleges in California and in the country[1]. Created in 1888, SSBC was originally crated as both a business college and a normal institute, for training teachers. ...


According to a March 2006 study by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government of Harvard University, the Bakersfield metropolitan area is one of the lowest college-educated communities in the nation. Calculated using 2000 US Census figures, the study shows that only 13.5% of adults in the Bakersfield area have a bachelor's degree or higher. This contrasts sharply with the state and the national figures of 26% and 24%, respectively. Harvard redirects here. ...


Housing and development

Bakersfield city limits continue to expand due to a "hopscotch" pattern of housing development. Westward annexation, which could eventually subsume the area between the base of the Sierra Nevada range and the Temblor Range, has led some planners to consider incorporating a new city to govern the area of rapid growth to the west of the city.[citation needed]


The city of Shafter, a small farming town north of Bakersfield, has filed a suit to limit the northern expansion of Bakersfield's limits. Shafter has also annexed large pieces of farmland to its east and south to ensure that Bakersfield does not envelop its southern area.[citation needed] Shafter is a city in Kern County, California, United States. ...


The large bluff and plateau which lie east of Bakersfield—toward the Rio Bravo and Kern Canyon area—have been under development for the last sixty years. Because the steep, north-facing edge of the bluff provides a view of the foothills, mountains, oil fields, and Kern River, the city government has attempted to balance development and preservation in this area. In addition, city leaders recognize the possibility that extensive development may lead to erosion and landslides.[citation needed] It's estimated by local officials that Bakersfield and its outlying suburbs will reach populations over one million people by 2020.[citation needed]


Transportation

Highways

Bakersfield is currently serviced by three freeways. State Route 99 bisects Bakersfield from north to south, while State Route 58 exists as a freeway east of SR 99, servicing the southeast part of the city and extending over the Tehachapi mountains to Tehachapi, Mojave, and Barstow. State Route 178 consists of a short segment of freeway that runs from a point near downtown to the northeastern part of the city, although there is currently no direct freeway connection between SR 99 and SR 178. State Route 99 (SR 99), commonly known as Highway 99, is a north-south state highway in the U.S. state of California, stretching almost the entire length of the Central Valley. ... JUNCTION POSTMILE US-101 SLO 0. ... JUNCTION POSTMILE CA-99 KER 0. ...


Bakersfield is the second-largest city in the U.S (behind Fresno[11]) that is not directly linked to an Interstate highway. Fresno redirects here. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ...


Though interest in extending Interstate 40 to Bakersfield has increased in recent years, lack of funding has prevented the proposed extension of I-40 to a neighboring city, San Luis Obispo. Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... San Luis Obispo, San Luis, or SLO (Spanish for ) is a city in California. ...


Currently, plans for freeway alignments to the metropolitan Bakersfield area include three east-west connections on the northern, central, and southern parts of town. These connections would link Highways 58 and 178, the future downtown Centennial Corridor, and the future Kern River Westside Parkway to one another or to State Route 99. In addition, a north-south extension west of Rosedale would connect the southern, central, and northern alignments.[12] State Route 99 (SR 99), commonly known as Highway 99, is a north-south state highway in the U.S. state of California, stretching almost the entire length of the Central Valley. ... Rosedale is a census-designated place located in Kern County, California. ...


Another plan proposes a link between the northern east-west alignment along 7th Standard Road and Interstate 5. This new connection would be designated Highway 58. Congressional funding has been secured for this 25–35 year project; construction is scheduled to begin by 2010.[13] INTERSTATE JUNCTIONS JUNCTION EXIT # Mexican Federal Highway 1/ Mexican Border CA 0 I-805 CA 1 I-15 CA 13 I-8 CA 20 I-805 CA 31 I-405 CA 94 I-605 CA 124 I-710 CA 130 I-10 CA 134 CA 135 I-405 CA 158...


Another proposal would upgrade and re-designate State Route 99 as an Interstate highway to be named Interstate 9.[14] State Route 99 (SR 99), commonly known as Highway 99, is a north-south state highway in the U.S. state of California, stretching almost the entire length of the Central Valley. ... The Interstate Highway System is still being expanded. ...


Culture

Many of Bakersfield's oldest and most historic restaurants are Basque,[15] including Woolgrowers, Maitia's, Noriega's, Pyrenees, Sandrini's, Benji's, Narducci's, and Italian Restaurant Luigi's. Basque cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients of the cuisine of the Basque people in Spain. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ...


The Kern County Museum, located on Chester Avenue just north of downtown Bakersfield, boasts an extensive collection of regional artifacts. Permanent exhibits include: "Black Gold: The Oil Experience", a hands-on modern approach at showing how oil is mined; and "The Lori Brock Children's Discovery Museum", a hands-on children's museum and a display on the influential "Bakersfield Sound" style of country music.


Events

Every Spring, Bakersfield hosts one of California's Scottish Games and Clan Gathering.[16] In the late summer, the local St. George's Greek Orthodox Church hosts an annual Greek Festival.


In March, Auto Club Famoso Raceway holds the annual March Meet nostalgia drag racing event. The event dates back to the U.S. Fuel and Gas Finals held in March 1959.


Twice a year, the CSUB Indigenous Native American Club hosts a Native Gathering on the California State University Bakersfield campus at Runner Park [5] .


In the fall, Bakersfield hosts the annual Kern County Fair, which showcases much of the area's agriculture as well as putting on entertaining concerts and hosting a small carnival.


Each year Bakersfield hosts a political conference known as the Bakersfield Business Conference. Since 1985 this conference has grown in attendance and as of 2007 the attendance numbered over 9,000. The Conference has had several notable political speakers to include Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, George Bush, Margaret Thatcher, Neil Armstrong, Norman Schwarzkopf, Colin Powell, Mike Wallace, Dan Rather, Tom Brokaw, Rush Limbaugh and Paul Harvey.[17]


Music

Country

In the 1950s and -60s, local musicians such as Bill Woods, Tommy Collins, Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and Wynn Stewart developed a streamlined country music style called the Bakersfield sound, which emphasized pedal steel guitar, the Fender Telecaster electric guitar and intense vocals. Bakersfield country was considered a spinoff of the honky-tonk style of country music that emerged from Texas, appropriate since many musicians there hailed from either Texas or surrounding states. Today, Bakersfield is third only to Nashville, Tennessee and Texas in country music fame, and Bakersfield continues to produce famous country music artists.[citation needed] the late Buck Owens' Crystal Palace is still one of the most respected concert venues, regularly showing off new recording artists as well as established country music stars. Buddy Alan (Buck's eldest son) performs with The Buckaroos (Doyle Curtsinger, Jim Shaw, Terry Christoffersen and David Wulfekuehler) regularly. Country music artist Gary Allan bases his music on the Bakersfield sound. Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Bill Woods is the co-host of Tens Morning News. ... Thomas Collins a. ... Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Winford Lindsey Stewart (born June 7, 1934 in Morrisville, Missouri, died July 17, 1985 in Hendersonville, Tennessee) was an American country music performer. ... The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California, at bars such as The Blackboard. ... Pedal steel guitar with two 10-string necks The pedal steel guitar is a type of Electric guitar that uses a metal slide to stop the strings, rather than fingers on strings as with a conventional guitar. ... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ... A vintage belt buckle from Gilleys, a large honky tonk featured in the movie Urban Cowboy. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Nashville redirects here. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Gary Allan (born Gary Allan Herzberg on December 5, 1967[1]) is an American country music singer. ...


Rock & Roll, Punk Rock, Heavy Metal and More

In 1978, The Rolling Stones released the song "Far Away Eyes" on the album Some Girls. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards collaborated extensively on writing the song and it was recorded in late 1977. The Rolling Stones, longtime country music fans, incorporated many aspects of Bakersfield sound country music into this song. Bakersfield is mentioned in the first line of the song. Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Far Away Eyes is the sixth track from rock and roll band the Rolling Stones 1978 album Some Girls. ... For other uses, see Some Girls (disambiguation). ... The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California, at bars such as The Blackboard. ...

I was driving home early Sunday morning through Bakersfield
Listening to gospel music on the colored radio station

In the early nineties, a group of friends from the middle-class suburbs of Bakersfield formed the band Korn. They quickly became innovators in the nu metal genre by employing low-tuned 7-string guitars, along with extremely low bass lines influenced by funk and hip-hop music. This sound later characterized the nu metal subgenre. This article is about the band. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Alternative metal. ... A guitar (classical, acoustic or electric) with seven strings instead of six. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Breakdance, an early form of hip hop dance, often involves battles, showing off skills without any physical contact with the adversaries. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ...


Gospel

In 1974 Southern Gospel artist The Lighthouse Boys was formed and helped pave the way for future generations of Christian Musicians to come out of Bakersfield. One of those bands was Christian Rap artist Royal Ruckus who went on to sign with Flicker Records and tour nationally with GRITS and other top CCM artists in the nation. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Christian rap (originally gospel rap, but also known as holy hip hop, or Christian hip-hop) is a form of rap music that uses Christian-themed lyrics to express the songwriters faith. ... Flicker Records is a Christian record label based in Franklin, Tennessee. ... This article is about the corn-based Southern U.S. food. ... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ...


Pete Prevost joined Sparrow Records rock band Sanctus Real in 2006 as their second guitarist. Sparrow Records is a popular Christian Music record label; a Division of EMI Music. ... Sanctus Real is a Christian rock band, originally from Toledo, Ohio. ...


Sports and recreation

Bakersfield is home to a large population of off-highway vehicle (OHV) enthusiasts. As of May 2001, over 18,000 OHVs were registered in Kern County.[18] On May 26, 2005, the City of Bakersfield and the State of California Parks department obtained an assignable option, using a grant from the OHV Trust funds, to purchase a prospective 11,000 acre (45 km²) site for an OHV park.[19] Ruth Coleman, Director of California State Parks, remarked, "This project responds to the needs of the Bakersfield community for increased recreation opportunities and will provide a cornerstone for the Central Valley Strategy." Several programs, including National 4-H and California Off-Road PALS, exist to train youth in proper OHV recreation.[20] This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bakersfield also hosts various amateur sporting events, including shooting, cycling, boat drag, rugby, water skiing, soccer, youth baseball, tennis, horseshoes, and volleyball competitions. Other recreational opportunities include whitewater rafting, rock climbing, mountain biking, and skiing in the southern Sierras. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sierra. ...


Venues

The city’s major civic center, the Rabobank Arena(was cenntennial garden) in downtown Bakersfield, is home to the Bakersfield Jam; a NBA Developmental League team, and the Bakersfield Condors; an ECHL AA-level hockey team,who are now affiliated with the Anaheim Ducks. In addition, the arena hosts basketball teams of CSU Bakersfield, the California State High School Wrestling Championships, sporting, and entertainment conventions. The Bakersfield Blitz; a former af2 team, also played at Rabobank Arena. Rabobank Arena Rabobank Arena is a 10,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Bakersfield, California, USA. Located downtown at the corner of Truxtun Avenue and N Street, it was built in 1998, and was formerly known as Bakersfield Centennial Garden, that was named by a local resident, Brian Landis. ... It has been suggested that Long Beach Jam be merged into this article or section. ... The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ... The Bakersfield Condors are a minor league ice hockey team based in Bakersfield, California. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), also called CSU Bakersfield and/or Cal State Bakersfield, is a public university located in Bakersfield, California, and was founded in 1965. ... The Bakersfield Blitz are a professional arena football team. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ...


Other arenas include the McMurtrey Aquatic Center, which includes an Olympic-sized swimming pool that hosts high-school events, a recreational pool with two waterslides, a smaller "child safe" pool, lockers, showers, and much more. The Ice Sports center hosts youth hockey. The Kern County Soccer Park is the largest soccer facility in California. The McMurtrey Aquatic Center is a state-of-the-art swimming, diving, and recreational facility for the City of Bakersfield, California, USA. It is located near Centennial Garden, newly renamed Rabobank Arena, in downtown Bakersfield. ...


Bakersfield has been a stop for the Ben Hogan Tour and Nike Tour. It also hosts PGA Tour qualifying events and NCAA Division II regionals and tournaments. Courses include the private Seven Oaks Country Club, the Bakersfield Country Club, the Rio Bravo Country Club and the public River Lakes Golf Club. The Nationwide Tour is the developmental tour for the PGA Tour, and features professional golfers who have either failed to score well enough at that levels Qualifying School (the main tours qualifying tournament, popularly referred to as Q-School) or who have done so but then failed to... The Nationwide Tour is the developmental tour for the PGA TOUR, and features professional golfers who have either failed to score well enough at that levels Qualifying School (the main tours qualifying tournament, popularly referred to as Q-School) or who have done so but then failed to... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Fox Theater is a restored movie theater. It hosts movies, concerts and entertainers. The Fox Theater is located at 2001 H Street in Downtown Bakersfield, California. ...


Bakersfield currently has three movie theatres: Edwards Cinemas Bakersfield Stadium 14 and United Artist East Hills Mall 10 (both apart of Regal Entertainment Group), and Reading Cinemas Valley Plaza 16. Regal Entertainment Group (NYSE: RGC) is North Americas largest movie theatre chain, operating 6,273 screens in 584 locations in 40 U.S. states. ... Reading Entertainment is a movie theater company which is part of Reading International, Inc. ...


The Dome, a small building formerly known as Strongbow Stadium, hosts a number of different events including concerts, boxing, kickboxing, and professional wrestling.


Football

Football is the most popular sport in Bakersfield. The Bakersfield High School team has won more total games, sections, and state titles than any other California school and the Bakersfield College team has won four national championships. In addition, several notable NFL athletes, including Frank Gifford, Brent McClanahan, David Carr, Cory Hall, Jeremy Staat, James Wofford, Rodney Wright, Rashaan Shehee, Jeff Siemon, Brock Marion, Stephen Neal and Joey Porter first played football at one of the seventeen Bakersfield-area high schools. The Bakersfield High School Driller football team attracts huge crowds at every game. In film, the football movie The Best of Times was based loosely on an old rivalry between Bakersfield High and Taft High. Former CSUB wrestler Stephen Neal currently plays Right Guard for the New England Patriots. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A view from the science building looking out on Griffith Field Bakersfield High School (BHS) is a high school located in Bakersfield, California, USA. First founded in 1893 as Kern County High School, changed to Kern County Union High School in 1915, and finally to Bakersfield High School in 1945. ... BC Administration Building and main entrance Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, USA. Its main campus is located on a 153 acre plot in northeast Bakersfield, and it also operates two satellite campuses: the Weill Institute in downtown Bakersfield, and at the Delano Center... NFL redirects here. ... Francis Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... Brent McClanahan (born September 21, 1951 in Bakersfield, California) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Minnesota Vikings. ... For the former AIDS sufferer, see David Carr (history of AIDS). ... Jeremy Staat (born October 10, 1976 in Bakersfield, California) is a former American Football defensive end who played four seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the St. ... James Cunningham Wofford (born November 3, 1944) is an American equestrian, who has competed in many international competitions in the sport of eventing. ... Jeffrey Glenn Siemon (born June 2nd, 1950 in Rochester, Minnesota) is a former professional American football player. ... Brock Elliot Marion (born June 11, 1970 in Bakersfield, California) is a former American football free safety in the NFL who played twelve seasons for the Dallas Cowboys, the Miami Dolphins, and the Detroit Lions from 1993 to 2004. ... Stephen Neal is a starting right guard in the National Football League who re-signed with the New England Patriots after testing the free-agency market following the 2005 season. ... Joey Eugene Porter (born March 22, 1977 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American football linebacker for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. ... A view from the science building looking out on Griffith Field Bakersfield High School (BHS) is a high school located in Bakersfield, California, USA. First founded in 1893 as Kern County High School, changed to Kern County Union High School in 1915, and finally to Bakersfield High School in 1945. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present...


Motor sports

Bakersfield is the birthplaces of NASCAR drivers Kevin Harvick and Casey Mears. Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... For the racing team owned by Kevin Harvick and his wife Delana, see Kevin Harvick Incorporated. ... Casey James Mears (born March 12, 1978 in Bakersfield, California) is the driver of the #25 National Guard/GMAC Chevrolet in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports. ...


The Bakersfield Speedway is a ⅓-mile (500 m) banked clay oval track in Oildale. It hosts weekly Saturday-night racing, most notably the World of Outlaws. The Bakersfield Speedway is currently attempting to become a more nationally significant track by hosting races that feature out-of-state drivers. Oildale is a census-designated place located in Kern County, California. ... World of Outlaws sprint car World of Outlaws late model The World of Outlaws (often abbreviated WoO) is an American sanctioning body. ...


After the destruction of the Mesa Marin Raceway, a new track, currently known as Kern County's New Home to NASCAR,[21] was approved for construction by the Kern County Board of Supervisors in December, 2006. The track will be built west of Bakersfield at the Interstate-5/Highway 43 (Enos Lane) interchange near the Kern River, on what is now an almond orchard. Current designs indicate a ½-mile (800 m), high-banked tri-oval, similar to its predecessor, which will allow speeds over 140 mph (230 km/h). It will be outfitted with luxury suites, modern facilities, a drag strip, SAFER barriers, Nextel Cup-quality surfacing, and lighting. The stadium will have a capacity of over 5,000. Marion Collins and his family will oversee the facility while the DeStefanis, who own the land, will put up most of the capital. The track is set to open for the 2008 racing season and will host local racing events, a popular high school racing series, and the NASCAR Grand National Division, AutoZone West Series events. The name of the track is being withheld in hopes of finding a corporate sponsor. The track was christened Kern River Speedway due to the lack of a sponser in 2008. Construction has halted due to the falling out of California's real estate market that the track financiers were depending on to sell land to fund the construction of the track. Mesa Marin Raceway was a high banked half mile racetrack in Bakersfield, California that was demolished following the 2005 racing season to make way for housing developments in the foothills of northeast Bakersfield. ... The Steel and Foam Energy Reduction (SAFER) barrier, sometimes called a soft wall, is a new technology found primarily on oval automobile race tracks and intended to make racing accidents safer. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... The NASCAR Grand National Division, AutoZone West Series (formerly the NASCAR Winston West Series) is a regional stock car racing division of NASCAR. The West Series was first formed in 1954 as a proving ground for drivers from the West who could not travel to race in the more traditional...


In addition, Bakersfield hosts the March Meet, a drag racing event, at the Famoso Drag Strip. The initial March Meet was started by the car club The Bakersfield Smokers, in 1959, and included the legendary Swamp Rat machine driven by "Big Daddy" Don Garlits. Garlits came from Florida to prove himself to the west coasters who invented drag racing. This event, which originally gave legitimacy to the NHRA, founded by Wally Parks in 1951, is now a nostalgic drag racing event held every March and operated by the track. In the fall of each year, Auto Club Famoso Raceway hosts the California Hot Rod Reunion, a gathering of street rodders, drag racers and auto enthusiasts. Top Fuel dragster Drag racing is a sport in which cars race down a track with a set distance as fast as possible. ... Cover of Hot Rod magazine, featuring Don Garlits front engine dragster, Wynns Jammer Donald Glenn Garlits (born January 14, 1932, Tampa, Florida) is considered the father of drag racing. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ...


Rick Mears - 4 time Indianapolis 500 winner Rick Ravon Mears (born December 3, 1951 in Wichita, Kansas) is an American race car driver. ...


Sports

Note: Bakersfield had an Arena Football team in the af2 league in the 2000's, but has folded operations. Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ...

Club League Venue Established Championships
Bakersfield Blaze CaL, Baseball Sam Lynn Ballpark 1995 0
Bakersfield Condors ECHL, Ice hockey Rabobank Arena 1995 0
Bakersfield Jam D-League, Basketball Rabobank Arena 2003 1
Bakersfield Brigade PDL, Soccer Bakersfield Christian High School 2005 0

The Bakersfield Blaze are a minor league baseball team in Bakersfield, California, USA. They are a high-A class team in the California League, and are a farm team of the Texas Rangers. ... The California League is a minor league baseball league which operates throughout the state of California. ... Sam Lynn Ballpark is a stadium in Bakersfield, California. ... The Bakersfield Condors are a minor league ice hockey team based in Bakersfield, California. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... Rabobank Arena Rabobank Arena is a 10,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Bakersfield, California, USA. Located downtown at the corner of Truxtun Avenue and N Street, it was built in 1998, and was formerly known as Bakersfield Centennial Garden, that was named by a local resident, Brian Landis. ... It has been suggested that Long Beach Jam be merged into this article or section. ... The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ... Rabobank Arena Rabobank Arena is a 10,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Bakersfield, California, USA. Located downtown at the corner of Truxtun Avenue and N Street, it was built in 1998, and was formerly known as Bakersfield Centennial Garden, that was named by a local resident, Brian Landis. ... The Bakersfield Brigade is a USL Premier Development League soccer team that is based in Bakersfield, California. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada. ... Bakersfield Christian High School (abbr. ...

Notable residents and former residents

Law and politics

  • Mary K. Shell -- first woman mayor of Bakersfield, 1981-1985, member of the Kern County Board of Supervisors (1985-1997); Republican activist

This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... US Brigadier General Edward Fitzgerald Ned Beale (February 4, 1822 - April 22, 1893) is best known for his carrying out former Secretary of War Jefferson Davis Camel Corps experiment in the Coachella Valley of California. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... GOP redirects here. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the swing saxophonist and occasional singer, see Earle Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 20th Attorney General of California, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the Judicial Branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ...

Science and medicine

Dr Hans E Einstein (born 1923) is the foremost authority on the lung disease Valley Fever. ... Coccidioidomycosis (also known as Valley fever, California valley fever, and (incorrectly) coccidiomycosis) is a fungal disease caused by Coccidioides immitis or . ...

Arts and entertainment

Adema is five-member rock band from Bakersfield, California. ... Ralph Emerson Bailey (July 14, 1878 - April 8, 1948) was a U.S. Representative from Missouri. ... Noah Beery (January 17, 1882 - April 1, 1946) was an American actor. ... Big Poppa E is the stage name of slam poetry performer Eirik Ott. ... Robert Adame Beltran (born November 19, 1953) is an American actor best known for his role as Commander Chakotay on Star Trek: Voyager. ... Justin Berry (born July 24, 1986) is an American who, beginning at age 13, operated pornographic websites featuring himself and other teen males. ... A typical webcam Webcams are small cameras, (usually, though not always, video cameras) whose images can be accessed using the World Wide Web, instant messaging, or a PC video conferencing application. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ... Frank Bidart (b. ... James Chapman (born 1955) is an American novelist and publisher. ... Brandon Edwin Cruz (born May 28, 1962 in Bakersfield, California) was a child actor and is a musician. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The term child actor is generally applied to a child acting in motion pictures or television, but also to an adult who began his or her acting career as a child; to avoid confusion the latter is also called a former child actor. ... Image used by permission from http://www. ... Golds Gym International, Inc. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... ... Jeff Dandurand (Born February 13, 1974), more commonly known as Jeff Duran, is a Los Angeles based comedian, radio personality, television personality and actor. ... a Radio Personality is the modern incarnation of the disk jockey, or DJ. In the 1990s, successful radio stations began to focus less on the musical expertise of their hosts and more on the individual hosts personalities. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Dave Ellis can refer to two people: Dave Ellis, a guitarist and former leader of the band Astra Dave Ellis, a computer game designer and author This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Kelli Brianne Garner (born April 11, 1984) is an American actress. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... Gerald Haslam (b. ... Gabriel Iglesias (born on July 15, 1976 in Chula Vista, California) is a Mexican-American comedian who is best known for his loud Hawaiian shirts, funny voices, and clean animated style of comedy. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about Jonathan Davis, the lead singer of Korn. ... Reginald Fieldy Arvizu (born November 2, 1969 in Bakersfield, California) is the bass player for the band Korn. ... James Christian Munky/The Gorilla Shaffer (born June 6, 1970 in Rosedale, California) is the nu metal band Korns guitarist, generally filling rhythm and lead guitar duties since his bandmate Brian Head Welch left the group. ... David Randall Silveria (born September 21, 1972 in San Leandro, California) is the drummer for the nu-metal band Korn from 1993-2006, but then Silveria announced he would be taking a break from the band due to an old wrist injury. ... Brian Phillip Welch (born June 19, 1970 in Bakersfield, California) better known by his nickname Head, is the former guitarist and a founding member of Korn, a multi-platinum, Grammy award winning nu metal band and a major influence in the rise of the nu metal movement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Dalene Kurtis (born November 12, 1977 in Apple Valley, California) is an American model. ... Michael Lockwood is an American guitarist and producer, a native of Los Angeles, probably most well-known for producing and performing with Lisa Marie Presley and Aimee Mann. ... Jaz McKay (born August 1958) is a radio host, writer, and comedian. ... Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... Prussian Blue is a white nationalist folk teen duo formed in early 2003 by Lynx Vaughan Gaede and Lamb Lennon Gaede (pronounced gay-dee or in IPA, ), fraternal twin girls born June 30, 1992 (age 14) and brought up in the United States. ... Lawrence Tibbett Lawrence Mervil Tibbett (November 16, 1896 - July 15, 1960) is acknowledged as one of the greatest American singers of opera. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ...

Sports

Larry Richard Barnes Jr. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Nikki Blue was a WNBA basketball player from 2006-2006. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The Washington Mystics are a Womens National Basketball Association team based in Washington, DC. They started play in 1998, the second year of the WNBA and are one of the WNBAs first expansion franchises. ... Stanford redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966–1969) Eastern Division (1966–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC East (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Aqua, Coral, Navy, White Mascot T. D. Personnel Owner H. Wayne Huizenga (50%) and Stephen M. Ross (50%) General Manager... Browns redirects here. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... The Only Season The San Francisco Demons were a short-lived springtime American football team based in San Francisco, California. ... For the aircraft, see XFL Airabonita The XFL was a professional American football league that played for one season in 2001. ... John Wesley Callison (born March 12, 1939 in Qualls, Oklahoma) is a former American Major League Baseball rightfielder. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... For the former AIDS sufferer, see David Carr (history of AIDS). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Chris Childs (born November 20, 1967 in Bakersfield, California) is an American professional basketball player. ... NBA redirects here. ... Phillip Anthony Dumatrait (born July 12, 1981 in Bakersfield, California) is an American Major League Baseball player in the Cincinnati Reds organization. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Francis Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... In American football and Canadian football, the termsafety can refer to: two positions in the most-common defensive backfield setup, the strong safety and the free safety, or a type of score, worth one or two points. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... For the racing team owned by Kevin Harvick and his wife Delana, see Kevin Harvick Incorporated. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Colby Preston Lewis (born August 2, 1979, in Bakersfield, California) is a pitcher currently playing for the Oakland Athletics. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Brock Elliot Marion (born June 11, 1970 in Bakersfield, California) is a former American football free safety in the NFL who played twelve seasons for the Dallas Cowboys, the Miami Dolphins, and the Detroit Lions from 1993 to 2004. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... William Herbert Buckshot May (December 13, 1899 - March 15, 1984) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who appeared in one game for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1924. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Casey James Mears (born March 12, 1978 in Bakersfield, California) is the driver of the #25 National Guard/GMAC Chevrolet in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports. ... Rick Ravon Mears (born December 3, 1951 in Wichita, Kansas) is an American race car driver. ... Indy 500 redirects here. ... Roger Mears (born March 24, 1947, Wichita, Kansas), is a former off-road driver who also drove in the USAC and CART Championship Car series. ... Rider at Mile 328 of the Baja 1000 Four-wheel vehicle known as a Truggy Baja 1000 is an off-road race that takes place on Mexicos Baja California Peninsula in the fall. ... Stephen Neal is a starting right guard in the National Football League who re-signed with the New England Patriots after testing the free-agency market following the 2005 season. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Hank Pfister (born October 9, 1953 in Bakersfield, California) is a former tennis player from the United States, who won two singles titles (1981, Maui and 1982, Newport) during his professional career. ... Joey Eugene Porter (born March 22, 1977 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American football linebacker for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. ... A Linebacker (LB) is a position in American and Canadian football that was invented by football coach Fielding Yost of the University of Michigan and first played by Germany Schulz. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Steelers redirects here. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966–1969) Eastern Division (1966–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC East (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Aqua, Coral, Navy, White Mascot T. D. Personnel Owner H. Wayne Huizenga (50%) and Stephen M. Ross (50%) General Manager... Jerry Quarry Irish Jerry Quarry (May 15, 1945 - January 3, 1999) was called by some the best heavyweight boxer to never win a world title. ... For the mixed martial arts division of the same name, see Heavyweight (MMA). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Rocky Rasley (born April 27, 1947 in Bakersfield, California) is a former an NFL guard from 1969-1970, 1972-1976. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Martin Rader (born December 26, 1948 in Claremore, Oklahoma) is a former catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... Dario Resta (1884-1923) was an Italian race car driver born in Milan Italy. ... The Indianapolis 500 is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ... L.J. Shelton (born March 21, 1976) is a current offensive tackle for the Miami Dolphins. ... A diagram of the linemen, with defensive linemen (in 4-3 formation) in red and offensive linemen in green. ... Browns redirects here. ... Lonnie Jewel Shelton (born October 19, 1955 in Bakersfield, California) is a former NBA player who played from 1976-1985. ... Jeffrey Glenn Siemon (born June 2nd, 1950 in Rochester, Minnesota) is a former professional American football player. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... Jeremy Staat (born October 10, 1976 in Bakersfield, California) is a former American Football defensive end who played four seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the St. ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Bill Cowher Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933-present) Eastern Division (1933-1943; 1945-1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference (1953-1969) Century Division (1967-1969) American Football... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Robert Swift (born December 3, 1985, in Bakersfield, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Seattle SuperSonics of the NBA. He stands 7 feet 1 inches tall and plays the center position. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... Todd Walker (right) is welcomed into the LSU Hall of Fame by Skip Bertman Todd Arthur Walker (born May 25, 1973 in Bakersfield, California) is an infielder who recently played for the Oakland Athletics. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Jacob Thomas Woods (born on September 3, 1981 in Fresno, California) is a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who plays for the Seattle Mariners of the American League. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... A view from the science building looking out on Griffith Field Bakersfield High School (BHS) is a high school located in Bakersfield, California, USA. First founded in 1893 as Kern County High School, changed to Kern County Union High School in 1915, and finally to Bakersfield High School in 1945. ... In American football and Canadian football, defensive backs are the players on the defensive team who take positions somewhat back from the line of scrimmage; they are distinguished from the defensive line players, who take positions directly behind the line of scrimmage. ...

References to Bakersfield

Literature

This article is about the novel. ... For other members of the family, see Steinbeck (disambiguation). ... The Onion Field is a 1973 nonfiction book by Joseph Wambaugh, a sergeant for the Los Angeles Police Department, regarding the kidnapping of two plainclothes LAPD officers by a pair of criminals during a traffic stop, and the subsequent murder of LAPD Officer Ian James Campbell. ... Joseph Aloysius Wambaugh, Jr. ... This article is about the novel On the Road. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... James Chapman (born 1955) is an American novelist and publisher. ... Where the Heart Is is a 1995 novel by Billie Letts. ... Dear Mr. ... Danielle Steel (b. ... Esperanza Rising is a 2000 novel by Pam Muñoz Ryan. ... Pam Muñoz Ryan (born 25 December 1951) is an American latino author. ... For other uses of the term, see Misery (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Desperation is a Horror novel by Stephen King. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Richard Bachmans author photo. ... Rose Madder is a 1995 novel by Stephen King. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Bukowski redirects here. ... World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (abbreviated WWZ) is a novel by Max Brooks which chronicles a theoretical zombie apocalypse, specifically the titular Zombie World War, as a series of after-the-fact oral history interviews with prominent survivors. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Music

  • "Streets Of Bakersfield" - A song by Buck Owens made in and about Bakersfield.
  • "Mexicali Blues" - A song by Grateful Dead mentions Bakersfield in the song.
  • "Leaving Jesusland" & "Instant Crassic" - Two songs by NOFX mention Bakersfield, with lyrics referring to the city's mostly conservative political stance ("Leaving Jesusland") and a very short humorous song about the town in the band's eyes ("Instant Crassic")
  • "I Wish I Could See Bakersfield" - A song by Craig Morgan (singer)
  • "Unfair" - A song by Pavement mentions Bakersfield trash at end of song.
  • "I've Been Everywhere" - A song by Johnny Cash mentions Bakersfield.

Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... This article is about the band. ... NOFX is an American punk rock band formed in Los Angeles, California (now based in San Francisco), in 1983. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pavement may refer to: Pavement (material): An American English term referring to the durable surfacing of roads and walkways. ...

Film and television

Many films and television shows are filmed in and around Bakersfield. This list represents a selection of those which feature specific references to the city.

  • Catscratch - A cartoon on Nickelodeon; the cats race in a race called "The Bakersfield 500"
  • Bakersfield P.D. - A sitcom about Bakersfield police officers.
  • The Running Man - Opens with the Bakersfield Food Riots in which the main character, Ben Richards (played by Arnold Schwarzenegger the current Governor of California) is framed as "The Butcher of Bakersfield."
  • Fearless - Starring Jeff Bridges opens with the aftermath of a plane crash in a cornfield outside Bakersfield and also features the now-defunct Golden Empire Ambulance service.
  • In two episodes of the TV series Clueless, "Bakersfield Blues" and "Back From Bakersfield", the main character and her father moved to Bakersfield.
  • The Simpsons episode "Take My Wife, Sleaze" features Hell’s Satans, a fictional biker gang from Bakersfield.
  • In Every Which Way But Loose, Clint Eastwood's character sneaks his precocious pet orangutang Clyde into the fictional Bakersfield Zoo to relieve carnal tensions. Several scenes were shot in Bakersfield, some including views of the famous Bakersfield sign that formerly spanned Union Avenue just south of California Avenue.
  • In The Cell, the equipment used by the serial killer has a plate stamped "Made in Bakersfield."
  • In Day 2 of 24, George Mason plans to escape the blast radius of an atomic bomb set to go off in Los Angeles by going to Bakersfield.
  • In the film Cast Away, starring Tom Hanks, the day is saved thanks to an outhouse that reads "Bakersfield" across the side.
  • Pumkin, a contestant from Vh1's Flavor of Love and its spin off Flavor of Love Girls: Charm School, is from Bakersfield. She is best known for spitting on contestant New York.
  • In the film View from the Top, Gwyneth Paltrow's character mentions the routes of the flights for the airline she is applying to and at her job interview she claims that they stop once a week to Bakersfield.
  • In the film Misery, Kathy Bates's character Annie Wilkes mentions growing up in Bakersfield.
  • In the film Sunset Boulevard, Gloria Swanson's character Norma Desmond mentions she has oil in Bakersfield.
  • In the film Airplane II: The Sequel, Controller Jacobs (Stephen Stucker) makes reference to places where he traveled to, and says "Then we went to Bakersfield, then we went to Fresno, but no one goes to Fresno anymore."
  • The 1986 Robin Williams/Kurt Russell film The Best of Times re-matches the heroes' hometown high school football team from the nearby small town of Taft against the far superior Bakersfield High football team, 20 years after they lost the original game. The Bakersfield team (and the city in general) is depicted as the ironic "big city" antagonist in this film.
  • In the August 17, 2007 episode of Last Comic Standing, comedian Doug Benson made a religious reference to Bakersfield as being "hell" in his head-to-head comedic performance.
  • In the Friends episode "The One with Chandler's Dad", Chandler and Monica go to Las Vegas to tell Chandler's father about their marriage. Bakersfield is mentioned in a joke.
  • In the 1978 Rolling Stones song "Far Away Eyes", Mick Jagger narrates a humorous country & western story that begins "I was driving home early Sunday morning through Bakersfield, listening to gospel music on the colored radio station..."
  • "Bakersfield California" was the subject of one of the puzzles on an episode of Wheel of Fortune
  • In episode 304 of South Of Nowhere, "Spencer's New Girlfriend", Carmen (Brooke Vallone) talks about Bakersfield being the worst place she has lived in.
  • In the film "Short Circuit", Norman Crosby asks Ben Jabituya: "Where are you from, anyway?". Ben Jabituya replys, "Bakersfield, originally."
  • In the 1970 film "Five Easy Pieces", Jack Nicholson is seen walking through downtown Bakersfield. Other scenes were filmed near the oilfields of Taft, and near the community of Wasco. This despite the fact that the film is set in Oklahoma.
  • In the 1974 Columbo episode "Swan Song", fictional country singer Tommy Brown, played by Johnny Cash plays a concert in Bakersfield before staging a fatal plane crash killing his wife.
  • The movie "There Will Be Blood" makes reference to Bakersfield. The story was based on the early days of the Oil industry in the area.
  • In the 2006 film Alpha Dog Bakersfield is mentioned toward the end of the film.
  • In the classic Christmas episode of the iconic Cartoon Network series Johnny Bravo, guest starring popular American entertainer Donny Osmond, Johnny wants to mail a letter to Santa Claus and the energetic postal worker mentions that the post office's range of operations spans "from Bakersfield to Borneo."

Catscratch is an American animated television series created by Doug TenNapel (the creator of the neverhood games company,Earthworm Jim and the upcoming Cartoon Network original series Phibian Mike) airing on Nickelodeon in 2005 and on Nicktoons Network in late 2007 [1]. It was also shown on Nickelodeon UK on... Bakersfield P.D. was a short-lived American television comedy series that aired on Fox in 1993-94. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... The Running Man is a film loosely based on the Stephen King novel of the same name, released in 1987, and was directed by Paul Michael Glaser, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as Ben Richards. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Fearless is a 1993 movie directed by Peter Weir and written by Rafael Yglesias from his novel, which stars Jeff Bridges, Isabella Rossellini, Tom Hulce, Rosie Perez, Benicio del Toro, and John Turturro. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Clueless was a television series based on the 1995 teen movie Clueless. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Take My Wife, Sleaze is the eighth episode of the eleventh season of The Simpsons. ... Every Which Way But Loose is a 1978 U.S. motion picture, released by Warner Brothers, produced by Robert Daley and directed by James Fargo. ... For other uses, see Clint Eastwood (disambiguation). ... For the chess opening, see Sokolsky Opening. ... The Cell is a 2000 suspense film written by Mark Protosevich and directed by Tarsem Singh. ... 24 is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American action drama television series. ... George Mason was a fictional character in the Fox television series 24. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jeffrey Tom Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. ... The first season of Flavor of Love started airing on New Years Night, 2006, and aired for ten episodes. ... Flavor of Love is an American reality television dating game show starring Flavor Flav of the rap group Public Enemy. ... Tiffany Pollard (born January 6, 1982)[2] is an American actress and reality television contestant, best known for VH1s Flavor of Love and I Love New York. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972)[1] is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe- and two-time Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actress. ... US mass market DVD cover Misery is a 1990 United States horror/thriller film from Columbia Pictures and Castle Rock Entertainment, based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King. ... Kathleen Doyle Bates (born June 28, 1948) is an Academy Award-winning American theatrical, film, and television actress, and a stage and television director. ... It has been suggested that Norma Desmond be merged into this article or section. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sunset Boulevard (1950 film). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fresno, a Spanish word for ash tree (from Latin fraxinus) is a common placename in Spanish speaking areas. ... Fresno, a Spanish word for ash tree (from Latin fraxinus) is a common placename in Spanish speaking areas. ... This article is about the American actor and comedian; for other people named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... The Best of Times was released in the United States in 1986. ... Taft is a city in Kern County, California, United States. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 2007 in television involves some significant events. ... Last Comic Standing is an American reality television talent show that premiered in 2003. ... Doug Benson is an American comedian who has appeared on Comedy Central Presents, The Marijuana-logues, Best Week Ever and most recently as a semi-finalist on Last Comic Standing. ... This article is about the television show. ... Monica wants Chandlers dad to be at their wedding knowing Chandler would regret it for the rest of his life if his father wasnt there. ... Chandler Muriel Bing[1] (born April 8, 1968) is a fictional character on the popular US television sitcom Friends (1994–2004), played by Matthew Perry. ... Monica E. Geller (born April 22, 1969) is a fictional character on the popular US television sitcom Friends (1994-2004), played by Courteney Cox Arquette. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... See also: 1970s in music. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... This article is about the current, syndicated nighttime edition of the U.S. game show, which began in 1983. ... South of Nowhere is an American television series created by Thomas W. Lynch. ... For alternate meanings see Short circuit (disambiguation) A short circuit (sometimes known as simply a short) is a fault whereby electricity moves through a circuit in an unintended path, usually due to a connection forming where none was expected. ... Five Easy Pieces is a 1970 film written by Carole Eastman (as Adrien Joyce) and Bob Rafelson, and directed by Rafelson. ... Columbo is an American crime fiction TV series, starring Peter Falk as Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide detective with the Los Angeles Police Department. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... For the term relating to dog behavior, see Alpha (biology). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Johnny Bravo is an American animated television series created by Van Partible. ... Donald Clark Donny Osmond (born December 9, 1957) is an American entertainer. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... Φ Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located at the centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. ...

Video games

The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark, and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... Headhunter is a video game developed by Amuze for the Sega Dreamcast and PlayStation 2 video game consoles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Musicals

  • In the Off-Broadway show Altar Boyz, Juan learns that his parents are in Bakersfield.

Altar Boyz is an Off-Broadway musical comedy about a fictitious Christian boy band from Ohio. ...

Sister cities

Bakersfield has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI):[23] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Bucheon City Hall. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Template:Wakayama infobox Wakayama (和歌山市; -shi) is the capital city of Wakayama Prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... A town of Ningbo, Zhejiang province, P.R.China Categories: | ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Latitude 20. ...

References

  1. ^ California Department of Finance 2008 Population Estimate
  2. ^ Historical Population Data for California (XLS). City of Sunnyvale, California. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  3. ^ Southern California Earthquake Data Center - Kern County Earthquake (1952)
  4. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ Golden Gate Weather Services
  6. ^ People at Risk In 25 Most Ozone-Polluted Cities American Lung Association. Accessed January 7, 2007.
  7. ^ People at Risk In 25 U.S. Cities Most Polluted by Short-Term Particle Pollution American Lung Association. Accessed January 7, 2007.
  8. ^ People at Risk In 25 U.S. Cities Most Polluted by Year-Round Particle Pollution American Lung Association. Accessed January 7, 2007.
  9. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ Reference Needed
  11. ^ Interstate 5 @ Interstate-Guide.com
  12. ^ California Highways (www.cahighways.org): Routes 57 through 64
  13. ^ [1][2]
  14. ^ Interstate 9 @ Interstate-Guide.com
  15. ^ Bakersfield Basque Symposium (English). John M. Ysursa (2006-05-31). Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  16. ^ Kern County Scottish Society
  17. ^ http://www.bpcbakbusconf.com/new/index.php?Page=Conference
  18. ^ KOHVA - Kern Off-Highway Vehicle Association
  19. ^ http://parks.ca.gov/pages/712/files/052605.pdf
  20. ^ Friends of Kern Open Space
  21. ^ Kern County's New Home to Nascar
  22. ^ Daughter! I Forbid Your Recurring Dream!
  23. ^ Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI)

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Government

  • City of Bakersfield Official Website
  • Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • Kern County Voter Registration
  • Used Motor Cycle Recycling Centers
  • Kern County Health Department
  • Kern County Veterans Service Department

Online media

  • Bakersfield Real Estate Market News
  • Real Estate Market Opinion
  • New To Bakersfield- relocation site
  • Bakersfield News
  • Bakersfield News and Opinion
  • Bakotopia social networking site & entertainment magazine
  • MAS: Bi-lingual Latino social networking site & magazine
  • Bakersfield News
  • Bakersfield News & information
  • The Bakersfield Independent, News, Features, Reviews and Entertainment

History

  • Bakersfield's Lost Treasures Interactive Map
  • Local History section on NewToBakersfield.com
  • Kern County Museum

Associations

  • Bakersfield Bridal Association
  • Bakersfield Downtown Business and Property Owner's Association

See also

A view from the science building looking out on Griffith Field Bakersfield High School (BHS) is a high school located in Bakersfield, California, USA. First founded in 1893 as Kern County High School, changed to Kern County Union High School in 1915, and finally to Bakersfield High School in 1945. ... BC Administration Building and main entrance Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, USA. Its main campus is located on a 153 acre plot in northeast Bakersfield, and it also operates two satellite campuses: the Weill Institute in downtown Bakersfield, and at the Delano Center... California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), also called CSU Bakersfield and/or Cal State Bakersfield, is a public university located in Bakersfield, California, and was founded in 1965. ... Meadows Field (IATA: BFL, ICAO: KBFL, FAA LID: BFL) is the primary airport of Bakersfield, California and is owned by Kern County, California. ...

Map links

  • Bakersfield, California is at coordinates 35°22′24″N 119°01′07″W / 35.3732921, -119.0187125 (Bakersfield, California)Coordinates: 35°22′24″N 119°01′07″W / 35.3732921, -119.0187125 (Bakersfield, California)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bakersfield, California (715 words)
Bakersfield, incorporated in 1898, is located in the County of Kern and is the county seat.
Bakersfield residents are very active in sports, taking advantage of 2 lakes, 5 private and 6 public golf courses, 6 private and 13 public tennis facilities, 5 private country clubs, 2 skating rinks, 3 bowling facilities, 3 auto race tracks, over 50 neighborhood community parks, 300 churches, and 28 libraries.
Bakersfield has a rich heritage that goes back 8,000 years to the Yokut Indians who were the first people to settle in the San Joaquin Valley.
Bakersfield, California at AllExperts (8343 words)
Bakersfield is dominated in the east by a large bluff and plateau that used to be the delta to the Kern River.
Bakersfield is generally a politically conservative city,even amongst minorities, with a large population that can trace its family roots to the western exodus of agrarian families from the Great Plains during the Dust Bowl of the 1930's.
Bakersfield is home to California State University, Bakersfield, founded in 1965, a Division II sports powerhouse, especially in basketball, and Bakersfield College, a Junior College football powerhouse with a 19,000 seat on-campus stadium, and one of the nation's oldest junior colleges founded in 1913.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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