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Encyclopedia > Bahram V of Persia
Silver coin of Bahram V with fire temple on its verso (British Museum , London)
Silver coin of Bahram V with fire temple on its verso (British Museum , London)

Bahram V, King of Persia (421438), also called "Bahram Gur", son of Yazdegerd I of Persia (399–421), after whose sudden death (or assassination) he gained the crown against the opposition of the grandees by the help of al-Mundhir, the Arabic dynast of al-Hirah. Bahram V's mother was Soshandukht, the daughter of the Jewish Exilarch. Image File history File links Coin06. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... Events February 8 - Constantius III becomes Co_Emperor of the Western Roman Empire June 7 - Roman Emperor Theodosius II marries Aelia Eudocia, formerly known as Athenais. ... Events February 15 - The Codex Theodosianus, a collection of edicts of Roman law, is published. ... Yazdegerd I (made by God Izdigerdes), king of Persia, son of Shapur III, 399-420, called the sinner by the Persians. ... Al-Mundhir (Arabic: المنذر ), (c. ... Al Hirah was an ancient city located south of al-Kufah in south-central Iraq. ...


He promised to rule otherwise than his father, who had been very energetic and at the same time tolerant in religion. So Bahram V began a systematic persecution of the Christians, which led to a war with the Roman Empire. But he had little success, and soon concluded a treaty by which both empires promised toleration to the worshippers of the two rival religions, Christianity and Zoroastrianism. This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Zoroastrianism (Persian: زرتشتی, Zartoshti) was once the imperial religion of Sassanid (Sassanian) Iran, and played an important role in the Achaemenid as well as Parthian empires in Persia or more properly Iran. ...


In 427 Bahram V crushed an invasion in the east by the nomadic Hephthalites, extending his influence into Central Asia, where his portrait survived for centuries on the coinage of Bukhara (in modern Uzbekistan). The Hephthalites, also known as White Huns, were a nomadic people who lived across northern China, Central Asia, and northern India in the fourth through sixth centuries. ... Bukhara (Bokhara in XIX century English, Buxoro or Бухоро in Uzbek (the Cyrillic alphabet was officially phased out for Uzbek after independence); بُخارا /Bukhârâ/ in Persian, Buhe/Puhe Tang Chinese, Бухара in Russian; also Boxara in Tatar) is the fifth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and capital of the Bukhara region (Bukhoro Wiloyati). ...


Bahram V deposed the vassal King of the Persian part of Armenia and made it a province. He is a great favourite in Persian tradition, which relates many stories of his valour and beauty, of his victories over the Romans, Turks, Indians and Africans, and of his adventures in hunting and in love; he is called Bahram Gur, "Onager," on account of his love for hunting, and in particular, hunting onagers. A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. ...


In reality Bahram V seems to have been rather a weak monarch, after the heart of the grandees and the priests. He is said to have built many great fire temples, with large gardens and villages (Tabari).


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication in the public domain.
Preceded by:
Yazdegerd I
Sassanid Ruler
421438
Succeeded by:
Yazdegerd II

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bahram V of Persia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (338 words)
Bahram V, King of Persia (421–438), also called "Bahram Gur", son of Yazdegerd I of Persia (399–421), after whose sudden death (or assassination) he gained the crown against the opposition of the grandees by the help of al-Mundhir, the Arabic dynast of al-Hirah.
In 427 Bahram V crushed an invasion in the east by the nomadic Hephthalites, extending his influence into Central Asia, where his portrait survived for centuries on the coinage of Bukhara (in modern Uzbekistan).
Bahram V deposed the vassal King of the Persian part of Armenia and made it a province.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Bahram V of Persia (289 words)
Bahram V, king of Persia (420-439), also called "Bahram Gur",son of Yazdegerd I, after whose sudden death (or assassination) he gained the crown against the opposition of the grandees by the help of al-Mondhir, the Arabic dynast of Hira.
Bahram's mother was Soshandukht, the daughter of the Jewish Exilarch.
Bahram deposed the vassal king of the Persian part of Armenia and made it a province.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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