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Encyclopedia > Bahram Chobin

Bahram Chobin (in Persian بهرام چوبین) was a famous Eran spahbod (military commander) during Khosrau II's rule in Sassanid Iran. Descended from the Mihran family, his first great victory came in Herat in 589, which is reported in a number of sources. He successfully defeated a large Gokturk army. Reportedly, the Turkish forces outnumbered his troops five to one. Relying on the discipline and superior training of his Persian Cataphract cavalry, Bahram trapped and defeated the Turks, killing the Gokturk Yabqu. After a minor defeat against Eastern Roman empire and Khosrau II's Humiliation which followed the defeat, he along with the main Persian army (spah) rebelled against Khosrau II and marched toward Ctesiphon. Khosrau II, unable to fight such an army, fled to Roman territory and Bahram sat on the throne as King Bahram VI for about a year (590 - 591). Persian (known variously as: فارسی Fārsi or پارسی Pārsi, local name in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, Tajik, a Central Asian dialect, or Dari, another local name in Tajikistan and Afghanistan) is a language spoken in Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Spahbod (Persian:سپهبد is consisted of two words: Spah سپه (army) bod بد (master) ) was a rank used in the Parthian empire and more widely in Sassanid dynasty of Persia (Iran). ... Khosrau II (sometimes called Parvez, the ever Victorious), King of Persia, son of Hormizd IV of Persia (579–590), grandson of Khosrau I of Persia (531–579). ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... Seven Clans or more accurately Seven Parthian clans (Persian, Haft Khandan) were seven different Parthian clans who constituted the Dahae Confederation. ... Herāt (Persian هرات) is a city in western Afghanistan, in the valley of the Hari Rud river in the province also known as Herat, and was traditionally known for wine. ... Events October 17 - The Adige River overflows its banks, flooding the church of St. ... The Göktürks or Kök-Türks known as Tujue (突厥 tu2 jue2) in medieval Chinese sources, established the first known Turkic state around 552, after the Huns, under the leadership of Bumin/Tuman Khan/Khaghan (d. ... Persian may refer to more than one article: the Western name for Iranian (see Iran/Persia naming controversy) Persian, an Iranian language the Persians, an ethnic group a Persian, a breed of cat Persian, a Pokémon character Etymology English Persian < Old English, < Latin *Persianus, < Latin Persia, < ancient Greek Persis... Depiction of Sassanid cataphracts in the computer game Rome Total War: Barbarian Invasion. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... Ctesiphon, 1932 Ctesiphon (Parthian: Tyspwn as well as Tisfun) is one of the great cities of ancient Mesopotamia and the capital of the Parthian Empire and its successor, the Sassanid Empire, for more than 800 years located in the ancient Iranian province of Khvarvaran. ... Events September 3 - St. ... Events Ethelbert of Kent elected Bretwalda after Ceawlin of Wessex, the former Bretwalda, is deposed. ...


However many western provinces of the empire specially Armenia revolted against Bahram VI's rule in favour of Khosrau II. Bahram VI, incapable of suppressing the revolts, upon hearing the arrival of Khosrau II with an army of 70,000 who were supplied by the Byzantine Emperor Maurice and Armenians, fled to Transoxiana, to Turkic tribes. He was murdered later on by the Turkic khan in order to avoid confrontation with Khosrau II. The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... A solidus of Maurices reign Flavius Mauricius Tiberius Augustus or Maurice I (539 - November, 602) was the emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 582 to 602. ... Map showing modern Transoxiana. ... This is the disambiguation page for the terms Turk, Turkey, Turkic, and Turkish. ...


There is much fable attributed to Bahram VI, as is the norm in for many heros in Persian literature. After collapse of Sassanid empire and Islamic conquest of Iran, Samanid dynasty, one of the first independent Iranian dynasties, considered themselves from Bahram Chobin's lineage. Persian literature is literature written in Persian. ... The Sassanid Empire or Sassanian Empire (Persian: Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia (Iran) during the era of the third Persian Empire from 226 until 651. ... The Islamic conquest of Iran (637-651 CE) destroyed the Sassanid Empire and led to the eventual decline of the Zoroastrian religion in Iran. ... The Samanid dynasty (819-999) was a Persian dynasty in Central Asia, named after its founder Saman Khuda. ...

Preceded by:
Hormizd IV
Sassanid Rulers
590591
Succeeded by:
Khosrau II

Hormizd IV, son of Khosrau I of Persia (531–579), reigned as King of Persia from 579 to 590. ... Events September 3 - St. ... Events Ethelbert of Kent elected Bretwalda after Ceawlin of Wessex, the former Bretwalda, is deposed. ... Khosrau II (sometimes called Parvez, the ever Victorious), King of Persia, son of Hormizd IV of Persia (579–590), grandson of Khosrau I of Persia (531–579). ...

External links

  • Cited by Richard Frye

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frye.History of Ancient Iran (6053 words)
Bahram's demotion and revolt, attributed to the jealousy of Hormizd in the sources, surely had deeper roots in the unhappiness of the nobility with their ruler, for Bahram was supported by the nobility on all sides.
Gathering former partisans of Bahram Chobin around him, Bistam was able to maintain independence and even expand his authority, striking coins and ruling the northeastern part of Iran.
The revolts of Bahram Chobin and Bistam reveal weaknesses in the system of Chosroes I, since the nobility was basically unwilling to support the throne, although they were still conservative enough to demand a Sasanian prince as ruler rather than a usurper to the throne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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