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Encyclopedia > Bagrationi Dynasty
ბაგრატიონთა დინასტია
Bagrationi dynasty

Coat of arms
Official languages Georgian
Capitals Early Bagrationis: Artanuji, Kutaisi,
"Golden age" : Tbilisi
Breakaway branches: Tbilisi (Kingdom of Kartli); Gremi, Telavi (Kingdom of Kakheti); Kutaisi (Kingdom of Imereti)
Government Monarchy
Preceding states Principality of Kartli, Abkhazian Kingdom, Kakheti-Hereti, Emirate of Tbilisi
Succeeding state Imperial Russia

The Bagrationi royal dynasty (Georgian: ბაგრატიონთა სამეფო დინასტია or Bagrationta Samepo Dinastia) is a royal family whose ascendancy in Georgia lasted for more than a millennium, from the early 6th century until the early 19th century. Branches of the Bagrationi family formerly ruled many regional polities, including Georgia, Kakheti, Kartli, Imereti and Tao-Klarjeti. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined territory. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Ardanuç is a district of Artvin Province of Turkey. ... Kutaisi (Georgian: ; ancient names: Aea/Aia, Kutatisi, Kutaïssi ) is Georgias second largest city in the western province of Imereti. ... Tbilisi (Georgian თბილისი) is the capital city of the country of Georgia, lying on the banks of the Kura (Mtkvari) river, at . ... Kartli is the largest and most populated province of Eastern Georgia. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Georgia (country) ... The Kingdom of Imereti was established in 1455 by a member of the house of Bagration when the Kingdom of Georgia was dissolved into rival kingdoms. ... Places where monarchies maintain rule appear in blue. ... Ancient countries of Caucasus: Armenia, Iberia, Colchis and Albania Iberia was a name given by the ancient Greeks and Romans to the ancient Georgian kingdom of Kartli (4th century BC-5th century AD) corresponding roughly to the eastern and southern parts of the present day Georgia. ... The Abkhazian Kingdom or the Kingdom of the Abkhazians refers to an early medieval feudal state in the Caucasus which lasted from the 780s until being united, through dynastic succession, with the Kingdom of the Georgians (see Tao-Klarjeti) in 1008. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Georgia (country) ... Hereti was a historic province in eastern Georgia. ... The Emirs of Tbilisi ruled over the parts of today’s eastern Georgia from their base in the city of Tbilisi (Tiflis), from 736 to 1080 (nominally to 1122). ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Georgia (country) ... Kartli is the largest and most populated province of Eastern Georgia. ... Imereti is a historic province in Western Georgia, situated along the middle and upper reaches of the Rioni river. ... Tao-Klarjeti is the term conventionally used in modern history writing to describe the historic south-western Georgian principalities, now forming part of north-eastern Turkey and divided among the provinces of Erzurum, Artvin, Ardahan and Kars. ...

Contents


Origins

Main article: Origin of the Bagratid dynasties

According to a family legend, taken down by the eleventh-century Georgian chronicler Sumbat Davitis-Dze,[1] and supplied much later by Prince Vakhushti Bagrationi (16961757) with chronological data, the ancestors of the dynasty traced their descent to the biblical king and prophet David and came from Palestine around 530 AD. Tradition has it that of seven refuge brothers of the Davidic line, three of them settled in Armenia and the other four arrived in Kartli (a major Georgian region also known as Iberia of Classical authors) where they intermarried with the local ruling houses and acquired some lands in hereditary possession. One of the four brothers, Guaram (died in 532), allegedly gave an origin to a line subsequently called Bagrationi after his son Bagrat.[2] A successor, Guaram, was installed as a presiding prince of Kartli under the Byzantine protectorate and bestowed, on this occasion, with the Byzantine court title of Kouropalates [3] in 575.[4] Thus, according to this version, began the dynasty of the Bagratids, who ruled until 1801. [5] The Bagratid Dynasties – Bagratuni in Armenia and Bagrationi in Georgia – were the longest-reigning royal families in the Caucasus (and in Europe), starting as princely houses and attaining to the royal status in both countries in the 9th century. ... Sumbat Davitis-Dze, or Sumbat, son of David, in modern English transliteration, was the 11th-century Georgian chronicler who described in his The Life and Tale of the Bagratids the history of the Bagrationi Dynasty of Georgia from the beginnings until 1030/31. ... Vakhushti Bagrationi (1696-1757) was a great Georgian historian and geographer, as well as one of the founders of the Moscow State University. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Gutenberg Bible owned by the United States Library of Congress The Bible (Hebrew: תנ״ך tanakh, Greek: η Βίβλος hē biblos) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Work of God, The Word, The Good Book or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βίβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the name used by Jews and Christians for their... The Kingdom of Israel Hebrew: מַלְכוּת יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard Hebrew Malḫut Yisraʼel, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ Yiśrāʼēl) was the Kingdom proclaimed by the Israelite nation around 1030-1020 BCE. // Biblical Account of Israels Origins According to the Biblical account, Israel is descended from Hebrew slaves who left the Land... A prophet is a person who has directly encountered God, of whose intentions he can then speak. ... David and Goliath by Caravaggio, c. ... Palestine (Hebrew: ארץ ישראל Eretz Israel, Arabic: فلسطين Filastīn or Falastīn, see also Land of Israel) is one of many historical names for the region between the Mediterranean Sea and the banks of the Jordan River, plus various adjoining lands to the east and south. ... Events September 22 - Pope Boniface II is elected to succeed Pope Felix IV December 15 - Justinian selects a second commission to excerpt and codify the writings of the jurists on Roman Law. ... Dionysius Exiguus invented Anno Domini years to date Easter. ... Davidic line, (also Davidic Kingdom or Davidic dynasty), known in Hebrew as Malchut Beit David (Monarchy [of the] House [of] David) refers to the tracing of royal lineage by kings and major leaders in Jewish history to the Biblical King David in Judaism. ... Kartli is the largest and most populated province of Eastern Georgia. ... Ancient countries of Caucasus: Armenia, Iberia, Colchis and Albania Iberia was a name given by the ancient Greeks and Romans to the ancient Georgian kingdom of Kartli (4th century BC-5th century AD) corresponding roughly to the eastern and southern parts of the present day Georgia. ... It has been suggested that Greco-Roman be merged into this article or section. ... Events First year in which Anno Domini calendar is actually used for numbering (in Dionysius Exiguuss treatise) January 11 - Nika riots in Constantinople; the cathedral is destroyed. ... Guaram I was a presiding prince and kourapalates of Iberia/Kartli for the Byzantine Emperor from 588 to c. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Byzantine Empire had a complex system of aristocracy and bureaucracy. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ...

Bagrationi Royal Dynasty Coat of Arms. Artwork by Thea Mamukelashvili[1]
Bagrationi Royal Dynasty Coat of Arms. Artwork by Thea Mamukelashvili[1]

This tradition had been given a general acceptance until the early 20th century. [6] While the Jewish origin, let alone the biblical descent of the Bagratids, has been largely discounted by modern scholarship, the issue of their origin still remains controversial. Several Soviet-era historians of Georgia developed a view summarized by N. Berdzenishvili and et al in their standard reference book on the history of Georgia: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x870, 82 KB) Summary (http://artproject. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x870, 82 KB) Summary (http://artproject. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... Nikoloz Berdzenishvili (1895-1965) was a Georgian historian who served as a Vice President of the Georgian Academy of Sciences from 1951 to 1957 and chaired the Department of History at Tbilisi State University from 1946 to 1956. ...

"The illustrious dynasty of the Bagrationi originated in the most ancient Georgian district – Speri (today İspir).[7] Through their farsighted, flexible policies, the Bagrationi achieved great influence from the sixth through eighth centuries. One of their branches moved out to Armenia, the other to Kartli, and both won for themselves the dominant position among the other rulers of Transcaucasia." [8]

Many modern scholars, however, argue the above version, referring to a more complex analysis of primary Armenian and Georgian sources. A genealogical scheme per Cyril Toumanoff is, by far, the most accepted in Western scholarly literature. It affirms that the Georgian Bagratids branched out of the Armenian Bagratid dynasty in the person of Adarnase, whose father Vasak (son of Ashot III the Blind, presiding prince of Armenia from 732 to 748) passed to Kartli following an abortive uprising against Arab rule in 772. Adarnase’s son, Ashot I, attained to the principate of Kartli in 813 and thus founded the last royal house of Georgia. Accordingly, the legend of Davidic origin of the Georgian Bagratids was a further development of the earlier claim entertained by the Armenian dynasty and their apologist Moses of Khorene.[9] Once the Georgian branch, who had quickly acculturated in the new environment, [10] assumed royal power, the myth of their biblical origin helped to assert their legitimacy and emerged as a main ideological pillar of the millennium-long Bagrationi rule in Georgia.[11] Sper or Speri was an ancient Georgian principality. ... Ä°spir is a district of Erzurum Province of Turkey. ... Prince Cyril Toumanoff (1913 – 1997) was a Russian-born historian and genealogist of Armeno-Georgian descent specialized in the history of Armenia and Georgia. ... The term Western world or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... ... Ashot III the Blind of the Bagratuni dynasty was a presiding prince of Armenia for the Caliph from 732 to 748. ... Events October 10 - Battle of Tours: Near Poitiers, France, leader of the Franks Charles Martel and his men, defeat a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe. ... Events January - An earthquake strikes the Middle East from northern Egypt to northwestern Mesopotamia, destroying many remnants of Byzantine culture. ... Events Pope Adrian I succeeds Pope Stephen IV. Adrian I turns to Charlemagne for support against king Desiderius of the Lombards. ... Ashot I Kuropalates (end of the 8th cent. ... Events June 22 - Byzantine Emperor Michael I is defeated in a war against the Bulgarians. ... Moses of Chorene was an Armenian scholar, who lived in the fifth century. ...


Although certain, generation by generation, history of the Bagrationi dynasty begins only in the late 8th century, C. Toumanoff has demonstrated that the first Georgian branch of the Bagratids may be traced back as far as the second century A.D., when we hear them ruling over the princedom of Odzrkhe in what is now southern Georgia. [12] The Odzrkhe line, known in the medieval annals as the Bivritianis, lasted until the 5th century AD and they cannot be considered as the direct ancestors of the later Bagratids who eventually restored Georgian royal authority.[13] Odzrkhe or Odzrakhe was a historic fortified town and the surrounding area in what is now Samtskhe-Javakheti region, southern Georgia. ...

A fresco from Gelati Monastery depicting David the Builder holding his will and a model of the monastery
Enlarge
A fresco from Gelati Monastery depicting David the Builder holding his will and a model of the monastery

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (306x714, 61 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (306x714, 61 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Gelati Monastery The Monastery of the Virgin - Gelati near Kutaisi (Imereti region of Western Georgia) was founded by the King of Georgia David the Builder (1089-1125) in 1106. ...

History

Early Bagrationi dynasty

The raise of the Bagratid family was made possible by the extinction of the Guaramids and the near-extinction of the Chosroids,[14] the two earlier Georgian dynasties, with whom the Bagratids extensively intermarried, and also by the Abbasid preoccupation with their own civil wars and the conflict with the Byzantine Empire. Although the harsh Arab rule did not afforded them a foothold in the ancient capital of Tbilisi and eastern Kartli, the Bagratids successfully maintained their initial domain in Klarjeti and Samtskhe and, under the Byzantine protectorate, extending their possessions southward into the northwestern Armenian marches to form a large polity conventionally known in modern history writing as Tao-Klarjeti after its two major provinces. In 813, the new dynasty acquired, with Ashot I, the hereditary title of presiding prince (erismtavari) of Kartli, to which the emperor attached the title of kourapalates.[15]. Abbasid provinces during the caliphate of Harun al-Rashid Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyid caliphs. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are a large and heterogeneous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... Tbilisi (Georgian თბილისი) is the capital city of the country of Georgia, lying on the banks of the Kura (Mtkvari) river, at . ... In Georgian history, Tao-Klarjeti is the term conventionally used to describe the area in what is now the northeastern Turkey (particularly its Artvin province), which includes the historic Georgian provinces of Tao, Klarjeti, Shavsheti (Šavšat), Kola (Kogh), Artaani (Artahan), Erusheti and also several lesser Georgian-Armenian marchlands. ... Samtskhe-Javakheti is a region in southern Georgia, with Akhaltsikhe as its capital. ... Tao-Klarjeti is the term conventionally used in modern history writing to describe the historic south-western Georgian principalities, now forming part of north-eastern Turkey and divided among the provinces of Erzurum, Artvin, Ardahan and Kars. ... Events June 22 - Byzantine Emperor Michael I is defeated in a war against the Bulgarians. ... Ashot I Kuropalates (end of the 8th cent. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ...


Despite the revitalization of the monarchy, Georgian lands remained divided among rival authorities, with Tbilisi remaining in the Arab hands. The sons and grandsons of Ashot I established three separate branches – the lines of Kartli, Tao, and Klarjeti – frequently struggling with each other and with the neighboring rulers. The Kartli line prevailed; in 888, with Adarnase I, it restored the indigenous Georgian royal authority dormant from 580. [16] His descendant Bagrat III was able to gather his inheritance in both Tao-Klarjeti and Abkhazian Kingdom, due largely to the diplomacy and conquests of his energetic foster-father David III of Tao. This unified monarchy maintained its precarious independence from the Byzantine and Seljuk empires throughout the 11th century, and flourished under David IV the Builder (10891125), who repelled the Seljuk attacks and essentially completed the unification of Georgia with the reconquest of Tbilisi in 1122. With the decline of the Byzantine power and the dissolution of the Great Seljuk Empire, Georgia became one of the most preeminent nations of the Christian East, her pan-Caucasian empire[17] stretching, at its largest extent, from North Caucasus to northern Iran, and eastwards into Asia Minor. In spite of repeated occasions of dynastic strife, the kingdom continued to prosper during the reigns of Demetrios I (1125 - 1156), GeorgeIII (1156 - 1184), and especially, his daughter Tamar (1184 - 1213). With the death of George III the main male line went extinct and the dynasty was continued by the marriage of Queen Tamar with the Alan prince David Soslan of the alleged Bagratid descent.[18] The Emirs of Tbilisi ruled over the parts of today’s eastern Georgia from their base in the city of Tbilisi (Tiflis), from 736 to 1080 (nominally to 1122). ... Events January 13: With the death of Charles the Fat, the Frankish kingdom is split again, and this time permanently. ... Events Around this time, the historian Jordanes writes several books. ... Bagrat III (ca. ... The Abkhazian Kingdom or the Kingdom of the Abkhazians refers to an early medieval feudal state in the Caucasus which lasted from the 780s until being united, through dynastic succession, with the Kingdom of the Georgians (see Tao-Klarjeti) in 1008. ... The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the 11th to... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... A fresco from Gelati Monastery depicting David the Builder holding his will and a model of the monastery David IV also known as David the Builder (Georgian: დავით აღმაშენებელი, Davit Ag(h)mashenebeli) (1073 – January 24, 1125), from the House of Bagrationi, was King of Georgia from (1089 to 1125). ... Events Northumbria divided by the Normans into the counties of Northumberland, County Durham, Yorkshire, Westmorland and Lancashire August 11, powerful Britain Coronation of Rama Varma Kulasekhara in Kerala Synod of Melfi under Pope Urban II imposes slavery on the wives of priests Palmyra destroyed by earthquake Byzantine conquest of Crete... Events May 23 - Lothair of Saxony becomes Holy Roman Emperor on the death of Henry V. War ends between Toulouse and Provence. ... Events Resolution of Investiture Controversy in the Concordat of Worms Pierre Abélard writes Sic et Non Births Ben Lancaster, Gradutate, Dynamite dancer. ... It has been suggested that Eastern Church be merged into this article or section. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The North Caucasus, also called Ciscaucasus, Forecaucasus, or Front Caucasus (Russian: ), is the northern part of the Caucasus region. ... Motto: Persian: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« (English: Independence, freedom, (the) Islamic Republic) Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Capital Tehran Largest city Tehran Official language(s) Persian Government Supreme Leader President Islamic republic Ali Khamenei Mahmoud Ahmadinejad Revolution Declared Overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Demetre I (დემეტრე I) (ca. ... Events May 23 - Lothair of Saxony becomes Holy Roman Emperor on the death of Henry V. War ends between Toulouse and Provence. ... Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi... Giorgi III Giorgi III (გიორგი III) (d. ... // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ... Tamar as depicted on a mural from Vardzia monastery Tamar (1160-1213), from the House of Bagrationi, was Queen of the Kingdom of Georgia from 1184 to 1213. ... Events September 12 - Albigensian Crusade: Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester defeats Peter II of Aragon, the king of Aragon at the Battle of Muret. ... The Alans, Alani, Alauni or Halani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of mixed backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and shared, in a broad sense, a common culture. ... David Soslan (Georgian: დავით სოსლანი) (d. ...


Downfall

The invasions by the Khwarezmians in 1225 and the Mongols in 1236 terminated Georgia’s "golden age". The struggle against the Mongol rule created the state of diarchy, with an ambitious lateral branch of the Bagrationi dynasty holding sway over Imereti, western Georgia. There was a brief period of reunion and revival under George V the Brilliant (12991302, 13141346), but the eight onslaughts of the Turco-Mongol conqueror Timur between 1386 and 1403 dealt great blow to the Georgian kingdom. Its unity was finally shattered and, by 1490/91, the once powerful monarchy finally fragmentized into three independent kingdoms – Kartli (central to eastern Georgia), Kakheti (eastern Georgia), and Imereti (western Georgia) – each led by the rival branches of the Bagrationi dynasty, and into five semi-independent principalities – Odishi (Mingrelia), Guria, Abkhazia, Svaneti, and Samtskhe – run by their own feudal clans. The Georgian rulers maintained their perilous autonomy during the three subsequent centuries of the Ottoman and Persian domination, sometimes acting nothing but mere puppets in the hands of their powerful suzerains. The Khwarezmid Empire (also known as the Khwarezmian Empire) was a Muslim Iranian state in the 11th century in Khwarezmia that lasted until the Mongol invasion in 1220. ... Events Births Thomas Aquinas, Christian philosopher and theologian (d. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... // Events May 6 - Roger of Wendover, Benedictine monk and chronicler of St Albanss Abbey dies. ... The medieval kingdom of Georgia first clashed with the advancing Mongol armies in 1220. ... Diarchy (or dyarchy) is a society or an organization with two rulers on an equal standing. ... The Kingdom of Imereti was established in 1455 by a member of the house of Bagration when the Kingdom of Georgia was dissolved into rival kingdoms. ... Giorgi V the Brilliant George V, the “Brilliant” (Georgian: გიორგი V ბრწყინვალე, Giorgi V Brtskinvale; also translated as the Illustrious, or Magnificent) (born 1286 or 1289 – died 1346) was King of Georgia from 1299 to 1302 and again from 1314 until his death. ... Events Osman I declares the independence of the Ottoman Principality The County of Holland is annexed by the County of Hainaut April 1, 1299 Kings Towne on the River Hull granted city status by Royal Charter of King Edward I of England. ... Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... The Turco-Mongols were the aristocratic, nomadic horsemen who served as rulers and conquerors in the Turco-Persian society. ... Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan Timur (Chagatai Turkish: تیمور, iron) (also known as Temur, Taimur, Timur Lenk, Timur-i Leng, Temur-e Lang, Tamerlane, Tamburlaine, and Aqsaq Timur which translates to Timur the Lame, as he was lame after sustaining an injury to the leg as a child) (1336–February... Events Battle of Sempach: Swiss safeguard independence from Habsburg rule End of reign of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ... Events July 21 - Battle of Shrewsbury. ... Events Tirant Lo Blanc by Joanot Martorell, Martí Joan De Galba is published. ... // Events December 6 - King Charles VIII marries Anne de Bretagne, thus incorporating Brittany into the kingdom of France. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Georgia (country) ... Mingrelia (Samegrelo in Georgian) is a historic province in the western part of the republic of Georgia, formerly also known as Odishi. ... Guria is a region in Georgia (Caucasus), in the western part of the country, bordered by the eastern end of the Black Sea. ... The Principality of Abkhazia emerged as a separate feudal entity in the 15th-16th centuries, amid the civil wars in the Kingdom of Georgia that concluded with the dissolution of the unified Georgian monarchy. ... Svaneti (სვანეთი. Also known as Svanetia or Svania in Russian and Western languages) is a historic province in Georgia, in the northwestern part of the country. ... Samtskhe-Javakheti is a region in southern Georgia, with Akhaltsikhe as its capital. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau. ...


The line of Imereti, incessantly embroiled in civil wars, continued with many breaks in succession, and the kingdom was only relatively spared from the encroachments from its Ottoman overlords, while Kartli and Kakheti were subjected to numerous invasions by the Persians, whose efforts to annihilate the stubborn vassal kingdoms went in vain, and the two eastern Georgian monarchies, though occasionally losing their independence in the course of their history, survived to be reunified, in 1762, under King Heraclius II, who united in his person both the Kakhetian and Kartlian lines, the latter represented by its junior branch of Mukhrani since 1658. 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Erekle II of Kartli and Kakheti Erekle II (also Irakli) (1720-1798), Georgian king of the Bagrationi dynasty, ruled Kingdom of Kakheti in 1744-1762 and Kartl-Kakheti in 1762-1798. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by...


Russian Domination

Erekle II of Georgia (or Heraclius II) was arguably the last prominent figure from the bagrationi dynasty. He resided in Kakheti (Eastern part of Georgia) and was also known as "The Little Kakhetian". His biggest disappointment was the loss against Persia, which led him to the signature of Treaty of Georgievsk, which is still a matter of argument in Georgia today. The treaty allowed Russia to place its troops in Georgia to protect Georgia from invaders. Subsequently Russia annexed Georgia in 1801. His descendants emerged in Imereti, in the western part of Georgia, but Imereti was occupied by Russian forces several years later. Erekle II (aka Irakli) (1720-1798), Georgian king of the Bagrationi dynasty, ruled Kingdom of Kakheti in 1744-1762 and Kartl-Kakheti in 1762-1798. ... Categories: Caucasus geography stubs | Georgia (country) ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... The Treaty of Georgievsk established the protectorate of the Russian Empire on the Kingdom of Kartl-Kakheti (in the eastern Georgia) and an alliance between the two countries in 1783. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Imereti is a historic province in Western Georgia, situated along the middle and upper reaches of the Rioni river. ...


Bagrationis Today

The Bagrationi family left Georgia after the Red Army took over Tbilisi in 1921. Although the descendants of the last kings still live in Georgia, in 1942 Irakli Bagrationi-Mukhraneli, of the junior branch of the family, proclamed himself Head of the Royal House and founded “Georgian Traditionalist Union” throughout Europe. His second wife was the daughter of Italian Count Maria Antoaneta, who deceased in 1944. After that he remarried to the daughter of Spanish bourbon prince Infanta Maria-Mercedes. Nowadays, the Bagrationi-Mukhraneli family descendants live in Rome. Probably the purest[citation needed] descendant of the family is Giorgi “Jorge” Bagrationi (born in 1941 in Rome, currently living in Spain). The short forms Red Army and RKKA refer to the Workers and Peasants Red Army, (in Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия - Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya), the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918. ... Tbilisi (Georgian თბილისი) is the capital city of the country of Georgia, lying on the banks of the Kura (Mtkvari) river, at . ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC (mythical), early 1st millennium BC (archaeological) Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC (mythical), early 1st millennium BC (archaeological) Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ...


See also

// Erismtavars of Kartli (575-605, 786-809) Guaram I Kurapalate became the Erismtavars (Grand Duke) of Kartli (Georgian: Kartlis Erismtavari) in 575. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Sumbat Davitis-Dze, The Life and Tale of the Bagratids (ცხოვრებაჲ და უწყებაჲ ბაგრატონიანთა ჩუენ ქართველთა მეფეთასა), see Suny (1994), p. 349; Rapp (2003), p. 337
  2. ^ The earliest Georgian forms of the dynastic name are Bagratoniani, Bagratuniani and Bagratovani, changed subsequently into Bagrationi. These names as well as the Armenian Bagratuni and the modern designation Bagratid mean "the children of Bagrat" or "the house of/established by Bagrat".
  3. ^ From the time of Justinian I, the dignity of Kouropalates (Greek: κουροπαλάτης, i.e., chancellor) was one of the highest in the Byzantine Empire, reserved usually for members of the Imperial family. Its frequent conferment upon various Georgian and Armenian dynasts emphasizes their importance in the politics of those times. Suny (1994), p. 348
  4. ^ Vakhushti Bagrationi, History of the Kingdom of Georgia (აღწერა სამეფოსა საქართველოსი); a Russian translation available at ArmenianHouse.org. URL accessed on May 22. 2006.
  5. ^ Georgia-. In 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica (11th). (1910-1911).
  6. ^ Suny (1994), 349
  7. ^ Centered on the modern-day district of İspir, northeastern Turkey, this province is sometimes thought to have been the cradle of the Georgian people (Suny [1994], p. 11). It lay in what is frequently referred to as the Armeno-Georgian marchlands where the two communities coexisted and intermingled for several centuries, but the Georgian Speri and the Armenian Sper may not always be absolutely identical (cf. Tao and Tayk, Rapp [2003], p. 14.).
  8. ^ Berdzenishvili et al, Istoriia Gruzii, p. 129, cited in: Suny (1994), p. 349
  9. ^ Toumanoff, C. Iberia on the Eve of Bagratid Rule, p. 22, cited in: Suny (1994), p. 349
  10. ^ Rapp (2003), p. 169
  11. ^ Rapp (2003), p. 234
  12. ^ Toumanoff, C. Studies in Christian Caucasian History, p. 316, cited in: Rapp (2003), p. 145
  13. ^ Rapp (2003), pp. 218, 249
  14. ^ Suny (1994), p. 29
  15. ^ Toumanoff (1963), p. 203
  16. ^ Toumanoff (1963), p. 203
  17. ^ "Georgia.." Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service. URL accessed on 2006-05-25.
  18. ^ According to Prince Vakhushti, David Soslan’s ancestry traced back to the Georgian refuge prince David, a grandchild of George I of Georgia (1014 - 1027) and his Alan wife Alde.

Bagrat is a male name popular in Armenia and medieval Georgia. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... Various governments have a Chancellor who serves as some form of junior or senior minister. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Vakhushti Bagrationi (1696-1757) was a great Georgian historian and geographer, as well as one of the founders of the Moscow State University. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... The Georgians (ქართველი ერი (Kartveli Eri) or ქართველები (Kartvelebi) in the Georgian language) are a nation or an ethnic group, originating in the Caucasus. ... Sper was an old district of Armenia c. ... Tao-Klarjeti is the term conventionally used in modern history writing to describe the historic south-western Georgian principalities, now forming part of north-eastern Turkey and divided among the provinces of Erzurum, Artvin, Ardahan and Kars. ... Tayk In Armenian history writing, the term Tayk is often used as a pars pro toto for the historic northwest Armenian lands which are now located in north-eastern Turkey. ... 1913 advertisement for the 11th edition, with the slogan When in doubt — look it up in the Encyclopædia Britannica The Encyclopædia Britannica (properly spelled with æ, the ae-ligature) was first published in 1768–1771 as The Britannica was an important early English-language general encyclopedia and is still... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Giorgi I (Georgian: გიორგი I) (998 or 1002 – August 16, 1027), of the House of Bagrationi, was the king of Georgia from 1014 until his death in 1027. ... Events February 14 - Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 - Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock... Events March 26 - Pope John XIX crowns Conrad II Holy Roman Emperor. ...

References

  • "Sebeos' History"
  • John Mamikonean's History of Taron"
  • "Aristakes Lastivertc'i's History "
  • Chronicle of Sumbat Davitis dze
  • "Moktsevai Kartlisai"
  • "Tskhovreba Kartvelta Mepeta"
  • "Matiane Kartlisa"

History

  • A. Khakhanov. "Histoire de la Georgie", Paris, 1900 (in French)
  • A. Manvelichvili. "Histoire de la Georgie", Paris, 1951 (in French)
  • A. Manvelishvili. "Russia and Georgia. 1801-1951", Vol. I, Paris, 1951 (in Georgian)
  • K. Salia. "History of the Georgian Nation", Paris, 1983
  • Kartlis Tskhovreba, vol. I-IV, Tbilisi, 1955-1973 (in Georgian)
  • P. Ingorokva. Giorgi Merchule (a monograph), Tbilisi, 1954 (in Georgian)
  • E. Takaishvili. "Georgian chronology and the beginning of the Bagratid rule in Georgia".- Georgica, London, v.I, 1935
  • Sumbat Davitis dze. "Chronicle of the Bagration's of Tao-Klarjeti", with the investigation of Ekvtime Takaishvili, Tbilisi, 1949 (in Georgian)
  • "Das Leben Kartlis", ubers. und herausgegeben von Gertrud Patch, Leipzig, 1985 (in German)
  • V. Guchua, N. Shoshiashvili. "Bagration's".- Encyclopedia "Sakartvelo", vol.I, Tbilisi, 1997, pp. 318-319 (in Georgian)

Ekvtime Takaishvili ( January 3, 1863- February 21, 1953) was a great Georgian historian, archaeologist and public benefactor, Dr.Sci. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bagrationi
  • Genealogical account of Bagratids per Bichikashvili-Ninidze-Peikrishvili
  • Genealogical account of Bagratids per Prince Toumanoff

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The Bagrationi dynasty /bɑgɹɑtjɪaniː/ (Georgian: ბაგრატიონი, bagrationi, ბაგრატიონთა დინასტია, bagrationt'a dinastia) was a ruling family whose ascendancy in Georgia lasted from the early Middle Ages until the early 19th century.
The history of the dynasty is inextricably bound with that of Georgia.
With the death of George III the main male line went extinct and the dynasty was continued by the marriage of Queen Tamar with the Alan prince David Soslan of the alleged Bagratid descent.
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