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Encyclopedia > Bagram torture and prisoner abuse
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In 2005, a 2,000-page U.S. Army report was obtained by the New York Times concerning the homicides of two unarmed civilian Afghan prisoners by U.S. armed forces in 2002 at the Bagram Collection Point. The prisoners, Habibullah and Dilawar, were chained to the ceiling and beaten, which caused their deaths. Military coroners ruled that both the prisoners' deaths were homicide. Autopsies revealed severe trauma to both prisoners' legs, describing the trauma as comparable to being run over by a bus. Seven soldiers were charged. Image File history File links Stop_hand. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... This article needs to be updated. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Dilawar, arrived as a prisoner at the Bagram prison in Afghanistan on December 5, 2002, and was declared dead on December 10, 2002. ... A coroner is either the presiding officer of a special court, a medical officer or an officer of law responsible for investigating deaths, particularly those happening under unusual circumstances. ...

A sketch by Thomas V. Curtis, a former Reserve M.P. sergeant, showing how Dilawar was chained to the ceiling of his cell
A sketch by Thomas V. Curtis, a former Reserve M.P. sergeant, showing how Dilawar was chained to the ceiling of his cell

Contents

A sketch by Thomas V. Curtis, a former Reserve M.P. sergeant, showing how Dilawar was allegedly chained to the ceiling of his cell. ... A sketch by Thomas V. Curtis, a former Reserve M.P. sergeant, showing how Dilawar was allegedly chained to the ceiling of his cell. ...


Location

The torture and homicides took place at the military detention center known as the Bagram Collection Point (B.C.P.), which had been built by the Soviets as an aircraft machine shop during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (1980-1989). B.C.P. is a concrete-and-sheet-metal facility that was retrofitted with wire pens and wooden isolation cells. State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... A Soviet soldier on guard in Afghanistan in 1988. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The B.C.P. is part of the Bagram Air Base at the antique city of Bagram near Charikar in Parvan, Afghanistan. Bagram Air Base Bagram Air Base is located at the antique city of Bagram near Charikar in Parvan, Afghanistan. ... Parvan may refer to: Vasile Parvan Parvan Province This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


Habibullah

Mr. Habibullah died on December 4, 2002 at the hands of several U.S. soldiers. They hit the chained man with so-called "peroneal strikes," or severe blows to the side of the leg above the knee (incapacitates the leg by hitting the common peroneal nerve). According to the New York Times: December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Figure 1 : Lower extremity of right fibula. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

By Dec. 3, Mr. Habibullah's reputation for defiance seemed to make him an open target. [He had taken at least 9 peroneal strikes from two M.P.'s for being "noncompliant and combative."]
... When Sgt. James P. Boland saw Mr. Habibullah on Dec. 3, he was in one of the isolation cells, tethered to the ceiling by two sets of handcuffs and a chain around his waist. His body was slumped forward, held up by the chains. Sergeant Boland ... had entered the cell with [Specialists Anthony M. Morden and Brian E. Cammack]. ...
kneeing the prisoner sharply in the thigh, "maybe a couple" of times. Mr. Habibullah's limp body swayed back and forth in the chains.[1]

When medics arrived, they found Mr. Habibullah dead. It has been suggested that Gendarmerie be merged into this article or section. ...


Dilawar

Dilawar, who died on December 10, 2002, was a 22-year-old Afghan taxi driver and farmer who weighed 122 pounds and was described by his interpreters as neither violent nor aggressive. Dilawar, arrived as a prisoner at the Bagram prison in Afghanistan on December 5, 2002, and was declared dead on December 10, 2002. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Taxicab, short forms taxi or cab, is a type of public transport for single passenger or small group of passengers, typically for non-shared ride. ...


When beaten, he repeatedly cried "Allah!" The outcry appears to have amused U.S. military personnel, as the act of striking him in order to provoke a scream of "Allah!" eventually "became a kind of running joke," according to one of the MP's. "People kept showing up to give this detainee a common peroneal strike just to hear him scream out 'Allah,' " he said. "It went on over a 24-hour period, and I would think that it was over 100 strikes." For other uses, see Allah (disambiguation). ... Figure 1 : Lower extremity of right fibula. ...


The Times reported that:

On the day of his death, Dilawar had been chained by the wrists to the top of his cell for much of the previous four days.
"A guard tried to force the young man to his knees. But his legs, which had been pummeled by guards for several days, could no longer bend. An interrogator told Mr. Dilawar that he could see a doctor after they finished with him. When he was finally sent back to his cell, though, the guards were instructed only to chain the prisoner back to the ceiling.
"Leave him up," one of the guards quoted Specialist Claus as saying. Several hours passed before an emergency room doctor finally saw Mr. Dilawar. By then he was dead, his body beginning to stiffen.
It would be many months before Army investigators learned a final horrific detail: Most of the interrogators had believed Mr. Dilawar was an innocent man who simply drove his taxi past the American base at the wrong time.[2]

Investigation

In October 2004, the Army's Criminal Investigation Command concluded that there was probable cause to charge 27 officers and enlisted personnel with criminal offenses in the Dilawar case ranging from dereliction of duty to maiming and involuntary manslaughter. Fifteen of the same soldiers were also cited for probable criminal responsibility in the Habibullah case. Seven soldiers have been charged so far. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In United States criminal law, probable cause refers to the standard by which a police officer may make an arrest, conduct a personal or property search or obtain a warrant. ... Robert Buzz Patterson is a US Marine officer and author. ... MAIMING; mutilation, a physical injury which involves the loss of, or incapacity to use, a bodily member. ... Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ...


Ongoing investigations and prosecutions

 This article or section needs to be updated.
Parts of this article or section have been identified as no longer being up to date.

Please update the article to reflect recent events, and remove this template when finished. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

According to an article published in the October 15, 2004 New York Times 28 soldiers were under investigation. [3] Some of the soldiers were reservists in the 377th Military Police Company. The 377th was under the command of Captain Christopher M. Beiring. The rest were in the 519th Military Intelligence Battalion. They were under the command of Captain Carolyn A. Wood. October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Christopher M. Beiring is a Captain in the United States Army Reserves. ... The 519th Military Intelligence Battalion is a unit of the United States Army. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


As of November 15, 2005 charges had been laid against 15 soldiers. [4] November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Soldier unit charges
Sgt. James P. Boland 377th MP
  • charged with maltreatment, dereliction of duty and assault
  • most charges dropped
  • letter of reprimand
Spc. Brian Cammack 377th MP
  • pleaded guilty to assault and two counts of making a false official statement
  • received three months incarceration
  • demoted to private
  • bad-conduct discharge.
Pfc. Willie V. Brand 377th MP
  • convicted of assault, maiming, maltreatment and making a false official statement.
  • demoted to private.
Sgt. Anthony Morden 377th MP
  • pled guilty to one count of assault and two counts of dereliction of duty.
  • received 75 days in prison
  • demoted to private
  • bad-conduct discharge.
Sgt. Christopher W. Greatorex 377th MP
  • acquitted of assault, maltreatment and making a false official statement
Sgt. Darin M. Broady 377th MP
  • acquitted of assault, maltreatment and making a false official statement
Capt. Christopher M. Beiring 377th MP
  • charged with dereliction of duty and making a false official statement
  • all charges dropped on 6 January 2006
Staff Sgt. Brian L. Doyle 377th MP
  • acquitted of dereliction of duty and maltreatment
Sgt. Duane M. Grubb 377th MP
  • acquitted of assault, maltreatment and making a false official statement
Sgt. Alan J. Driver 377th MP
  • aquitted of assault and maltreatment [5]
Spc. Nathan Adam Jones 377th MP
  • charged with assault, maltreatment and making a false official statement.
  • charges have all been dropped
Spc. Glendale C. Walls 519th MI
  • pled guilty to dereliction of duty and assault.
  • received two months in prison
  • demoted to private
  • bad-conduct discharge.
Sgt. Selena M. Salcedo 519th MI
  • pled guilty to dereliction of duty and assault.
  • demoted to specialist or corporal,
  • fined $1000
  • letter of reprimand.
Sgt. Joshua Claus 519th MI
  • pled guilty to maltreatment and assault
  • five months in prison.
Pfc. Damien M. Corsetti 519th MI
  • charged with dereliction of duty, maltreatment, assault, wrongful use of hashish, and performing an indecent act with another person

Christopher M. Beiring is a Captain in the United States Army Reserves. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sergeant Duane M. Grubb was a member of the 377th Military Police Company during the time it was stationed in Bagram. ... Glendale C. Walls was a soldier in the United States Army. ... Selena M. Salcedo was an United States soldier, who pled guilty to abuse that contributed to the deaths in custody of two Afghani prisoners, Habibullah and Dilawar, on December 4, 2002 and December 10, 2002. ... Damien M. Corsetti was a soldier in the United States Army. ...

Involved but uncharged

Some interrogators involved in this incident were sent to Iraq and were assigned to the now infamous Abu Ghraib prison. Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse images The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ...


Investigators cited probable cause to charge Specialist Damien Corsetti -- whose nickname was apparently "The Monster" -- with assault, maltreatment of a prisoner and indecent acts at Bagram; he has not been charged. At Abu Ghraib, he forced an Iraqi woman to strip during questioning, for which he was fined and demoted.


Other official reactions

Afghan President Hamid Karzai said on May 2005 that "he was shocked by a U.S. Army report on abuse of detainees in Afghanistan, saying his government wanted custody of all Afghan prisoners and control over U.S. military operations." Hamid Karzai (Pushtu: حامد کرزي, Persian: حامد کرزی) (born December 24, 1957) is the current and first democratically elected President of Afghanistan (since December 7, 2004). ...


UN special representative in Afghanistan Jean Arnault "called for firm guarantees that such abuses would not be committed again, and renewed requests for access to prisons and detention facilities by the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission."[6] This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ...


A widespread pattern of abuse

An editorial of the New York Times noted a parallel with the later abuse and torture of prisoners in Iraq: The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

(W)hat happened at Abu Ghraib was no aberration, but part of a widespread pattern. It showed the tragic impact of the initial decision by Mr. Bush and his top advisers that they were not going to follow the Geneva Conventions, or indeed American law, for prisoners taken in antiterrorist operations.
The investigative file on Bagram, obtained by The Times, showed that the mistreatment of prisoners was routine: shackling them to the ceilings of their cells, depriving them of sleep, kicking and hitting them, sexually humiliating them and threatening them with guard dogs -- the very same behavior later repeated in Iraq.[7]

In November 2001, SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape) program's chief psychologist, Col. Morgan Banks, was sent to Afghanistan, where he spent four months at Bagram. In early 2003, Banks issued guidance for the "behavioral science consultants" who helped to devise Guantánamo's interrogation strategy although he has emphatically denied that he had advocated the use of SERE counter-resistance techniques to break down detainees. Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse images The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former governor of Texas. ... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949 The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland, that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape) is a U.S. military training program developed at the end of the Korean War to provide service members with training in the Code of Conduct, survival skills, evading capture, and dealing with being taken prisoner. ... Bagram Air Base Bagram Air Base is located at the antique city of Bagram near Charikar in Parvan, Afghanistan. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ...


Denial of widespread pattern of abuse by U.S. Government

Main article: Periodic Report of the United States of America to the United Nations Committee Against Torture The Periodic Report of the United States of America to the United Nations Committee Against Torture is periodically submitted by the United States government, through the State Department, to the United Nations Committee Against Torture. ...


The United States government, through the State Department makes periodic reports to the United Nations Committee Against Torture. In October 2005, the report focused on pretrial detention of suspects in the War on Terrorism, including those held in Guantanamo Bay and Afghanistan. This particular Periodic Report is significant as the first official response of the U.S. government to allegations that there is widespread abuse of prisoners in Guantanamo Bay and Afghanistan The report denies the allegations. The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (officially the Global War on Terrorism or GWOT[1]) is a campaign by the United States, NATO, and other allies with the stated goal of ending international terrorism by stopping those groups identified as terrorist groups, and ending state sponsorship of terrorism. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ...


McCain Amendment

Main article: McCain Detainee Amendment The McCain Detainee Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Senate Department of Defense Authorization bill, commonly referred to as the Amendment on (1) the Army Field Manual and (2) Cruel, Inhumane, Degrading Treatment, amendment #1977 and also known as the McCain Amendment 1977. ...


The McCain Detainee Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Senate Department of Defense Authorization bill, commonly referred to as the Amendment on (1) the Army Field Manual and (2) Cruel, Inhumane, Degrading Treatment, amendment #1977 and also known as the McCain Amendment 1977. The amendment would prohibit inhumane treatment of prisoners. The Amendment was introduced by Senator John McCain, a candidate for the 2000 presidential Republican primary, who is viewed as a likely candidate for 2008. On October 5, 2005, the United States Senate voted 90-9 to support the amendment.[8] Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. ... This article discusses the primary elections to nominate candidates for the 2000 U.S. presidential election. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Critics of the bill note with much evidence of a back-room deal between McCain and the White House that the exemption for the CIA makes the entire bill mere public relations. It is CIA activities that are at the forefront of the issue and thus the very purpose of having such a bill in the first place. To exempt the very source of the problem is to give licence to the main source of the problem. Former victims of CIA torture see little that is sincere in McCain's stance on this matter.


See also

Carolyn Wood Captain Carolyn Wood, United States Army, is a military intelligence officer who served in both Afghanistan and Iraq. ... Dilawar, arrived as a prisoner at the Bagram prison in Afghanistan on December 5, 2002, and was declared dead on December 10, 2002. ... Satar Jabar standing on a box with wires connected to his body Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse images Beginning in 2003, numerous accounts of abuse and torture of prisoners held in the Abu Ghraib Prison in Iraq (also known as Baghdad Correctional Facility) occurred. ... Criticisms of the War on Terrorism addresses the issues, morals, ethics, efficiency, and other questions surrounding the War on Terrorism. Arguments are also made against the phrase itself, calling it a misnomer. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... Combatants al-Qaeda, Taliban Northern Alliance, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, New Zealand, Italy, Germany Commanders Mohammed Omar Osama bin Laden Tommy Franks Mohammed Fahim Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on... Torture, the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain upon an individual to extract information, a confession or as a punishment, is prohibited by international law and illegal in most countries. ... Human Rights Record of the United States can be perceived to mean: Human Rights Record of the United States, a report issued annually by the Peoples Republic of China since 1998 evaluating the United States, according to the USAs own standards (as which used in the USAs... The Salt Pit is the codename of an isolated clandestine CIA interrogation centre in Afghanistan. ... ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

References

  1.   Tim Golden, In U.S. Report, Brutal Details of 2 Afghan Inmates' Deaths, mirrored from the New York Times, May 20, 2005. (About war crimes in Bagram.)
  2.   Tim Golden, Army Faltered in Investigating Detainee Abuse, New York Times, May 22, 2005. (More about war crimes in Bagram.)
  3.   28 soldiers tied to 2 Afghan deaths, reprint New York Times, October 15, 2004
  4.   A look at the soldiers accused in Afghanistan abuse investigation, Akron Beacon Journal, December 5, 2005
  5.   UN Condemns Torture of Afghans, CRI Online, May 22, 2005
  6.   Editorial: Patterns of Abuse, New York Times, May 23, 2005
  7.   McCain Amendment roll call

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Akron Beacon Journal is a morning newspaper located in Akron, Ohio. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • America: Incommunicado detention / Fear of ill-treatment, Adil al-Jazeeri, Amnesty International, July 16, 2003 - "Detainees undergoing interrogation by agents of the CIA in the Bagram Air Base have allegedly been subjected to "stress and duress" techniques, including prolonged standing or kneeling, hooding, blindfolding with spray-painted goggles, being kept in painful or awkward positions, sleep deprivation, and 24-hour lighting. Two detainees died at Bagram Air Base in December 2002 in circumstances suggesting that they may have been beaten. The military investigation into the deaths was still ongoing in late June, according to the Pentagon"
  • From Bagram to Abu Ghraib, Mother Jones, March 1, 2005
  • U.S. 'Thumbs Its Nose' at Rights, Amnesty Says by Alan Cowell, New York Times, May 26, 2005
  • Years After 2 Afghans Died, Abuse Case Falters, New York Times, February 13, 2006

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bagram Summary (666 words)
In the 1950s the area, with the Islamic name of Bagram, was selected as a main base for the Afghan air force.
Its airport was widely used by the Red Army during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan (1979–1988).
Today, Bagram hosts the strategic Bagram Air Base from which most US air activity in Afghanistan takes place.
Bagram Air Base - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (860 words)
Bagram Air Base (ICAO: OAIX) is an airport located at the antique city of Bagram, southeast of Charikar in Parvan, Afghanistan.
Bagram Airbase played a key role during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan from 1980 to 1989, serving as a base of operations for troops and supplies.
Bagram was also the initial staging point for the invading Soviet forces at the beginning of the conflict, with a number of airborne divisions being deployed there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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