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Encyclopedia > Baekje
Baekje
Baekje diadem ornament.
Baekje diadem ornament.
Korean name
Hangul 백제
Hanja 百濟
Revised Romanization Baekje
McCune-Reischauer Paekche

Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. Baekje claimed to be a successor state to Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Goguryeo also claimed descendance from Buyeo, which it annexed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2336x3504, 964 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): History of Korea Crown of Baekje Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Jamo redirects here. ... Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... McCune-Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... Ë‘ This article is about the year 18. ... Events Childeric II proclaimed king of Austrasia. ... The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula in East Asia. ... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ...


Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong, at Wirye-sung around present-day Seoul. At its peak in the 4th century, Baekje controlled most of western Korean Peninsula, as far north as Pyongyang. It was defeated by an alliance of Silla and the Tang Dynasty in 660, becoming a part of Unified Silla. Onjo (?-28 CE, r. ... King Dongmyeong of Goguryeo (58 - 19 BCE, r. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula in East Asia. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ...

Contents

History

History of Korea

Prehistory
 Jeulmun period
 Mumun period
Gojoseon
 Jin
Proto-Three Kingdoms:
 Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye
 Samhan: Ma, Byeon, Jin
Three Kingdoms:
 Goguryeo
  Sui wars
 Baekje
 Silla, Gaya
North-South States:
 Unified Silla
 Balhae
Later Three Kingdoms:
 Taebong, Hubaekje
Goryeo
 Khitan wars
 Mongol invasions
Joseon
 Japanese invasions
 Manchu invasions
 French campaign
Korean Empire
Japanese rule
 Provisional Gov't
Division of Korea
North, South Korea
 Korean War Image File history File links Korea_unified_vertical. ... This article is about the history of Korea, up to the division of Korea in the 1940s. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... This article is about the prehistory of the Korean Peninsula, from circa 500,000 BCE through 300 BCE. See History of Korea, History of North Korea and History of South Korea for more contemporary accounts of the Korean past. ... The Jeulmun pottery period is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory that dates to approximately 8000-1500 B.C. (Bale 2001; Choe and Bale 2002; Crawford and Lee 2003; Lee 2001, 2006). ... The Mumun Pottery Period (Hanja: 無文土器時代, Hangeul: 무문토기시대 Mumun togi sidae) is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory that dates to approximately 1500-300 B.C. (Ahn 2000; Bale 2001; Crawford and Lee 2003). ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Jin was an early Iron Age state which occupied some portion of the southern Korean peninsula during the 2nd and 3rd centuries BCE, bordering the Korean kingdom Gojoseon to the north. ... Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea (원삼국시대, 原三國時代) refers to the period after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms. ... Chinese name Buyeo, Puyo, or Fuyu was an ancient kingdom located in todays North Korea and southern Manchuria, from around the 2nd century BC to 494. ... Okjeo was a small tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula from perhaps 2nd century BC to 5th century AD. Dong-okjeo (East Okjeo) occupied roughly the area of the Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea, and Buk-okjeo (North Okjeo) occupied the Duman River region. ... Dongye was a state which occupied portions of the northeastern Korean peninsula from roughly 150 BCE to around 400 CE. It bordered Goguryeo and Okjeo to the north, Jinhan to the south, and Chinas Lelang Commandery to the west. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Mahan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 3rd century CE in the southern Korean peninsula in the Chungcheong Province. ... Byeonhan, also known as Byeonjin (변진, 弁辰), was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the beginning of the Common Era to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, in the south and west of the Nakdong River valley. ... Jinhan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, to the east of the Nakdong River valley, Gyeongsang Province. ... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Combatants Goguryeo (Korea) Sui Dynasty (China) Commanders King Yeongyang Eulji Mundeok Gang I sik Go Geon Mu Sui Yangdi Yuwen Shu Yu Zhongwen Lai Huer Zhou Luohou Strength approximately 200,000 1,138,000 foot soldiers and total of more than 3,000,000 in invasion of 612 The... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ... North South States Period(남북국시대, 南北國時代) refers to the period from the 7th century to the 10th century when Unified Silla and Balhae coexited at the south and the north[1], [2]. Hitherto, this period had been called the period of Unified Silla. ... Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) (Bohai in Chinese) was an ancient multiethnic kingdom established after the fall of Goguryeo. ... The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... Taebong was a state established by Gung Ye(궁예, 弓裔) on the Korean peninsula in 901, during the Later Three Kingdoms period. ... Hubaekje, or Later Baekje, was one of the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea, along with Hugoguryeo and Silla. ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... The Goryeo-Khitan Wars were a series of 10th- and 11th-century conflicts between the kingdom of Goryeo and Khitan forces near what is now the border between China and North Korea. ... The Mongol invasions of Korea consisted of a series of campaigns by the Mongol Empire against Korea, then known as Koryo, from 1231 to 1259. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Combatants Korea under the Joseon Dynasty, China under the Ming Dynasty, Jianzhou Jurchens Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea King Seonjo Crown Prince Gwanghae Yi Sun-sin†, Gwon Yul, Yu Seong-ryong, Yi Eok-gi†, Won Gyun†, Kim Myeong-won, Yi Il, Sin Rip†, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Si-min... The First Manchu invasion of Korea occurred in 1627, when Hong Taiji led the Manchu army against Koreas Joseon dynasty. ... Combatants Joseon Dynasty Korea France Commanders Korea: King Gojong Daewon-gun France: Pierre-Gustave Roze Strength Korea: unknown France: 800 Casualties Korea: Unknown France: 40+ The French campaign against Korea of 1866 is also known as Byeonginyangyo (Western disturbance of the byeong-in year [1866]). It refers to the French... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag of the Japanese Empire Anthem Kimi ga Yoa Korea under Japanese Occupation Capital Keijo Language(s) Korean, Japanese Religion Shintoisma Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor of Japan  - 1910–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1925 Emperor Taisho  - 1925–1945 Emperor Showa Governor-General of Korea  - 1910–1916 Masatake Terauchi  - 1916–1919 Yoshimichi... The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea was a government in exile based in Shanghai, China and later in Chongqing, during the Japanese occupation of Korea. ... The Korean peninsula, first divided along the 38th parallel, later along the demarcation line The division of Korea into North Korea and South Korea stems from the 1945 Allied victory in World War II, ending Japans 35-year occupation of Korea. ... For the history of Korea before its division, see History of Korea. ... Combatants  United Nations:  Republic of Korea  Australia  Belgium  Canada  Colombia  Ethiopia  France Greece  Luxembourg  Netherlands  New Zealand  Philippines South Africa  Thailand  Turkey  United Kingdom  United States Medical staff:  Denmark  Italy  Norway  Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea  Peoples Republic of China  Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung...

Korea Portal
Monarchs of Korea
Baekje
  1. Onjo 18 BCE–29 CE
  2. Daru 29–77
  3. Giru 77–128
  4. Gaeru 128–166
  5. Chogo 166–214
  6. Gusu 214–234
  7. Saban 234
  8. Goi 234–286
  9. Chaekgye 286–298
  10. Bunseo 298–304
  11. Biryu 304–344
  12. Gye 344–346
  13. Geunchogo 346–375
  14. Geungusu 375–384
  15. Chimnyu 384–385
  16. Jinsa 385–392
  17. Asin 392–405
  18. Jeonji 405–420
  19. Guisin 420–427
  20. Biyu 427–455
  21. Gaero 455–475
  22. Munju 475–477
  23. Samgeun 477–479
  24. Dongseong 479–501
  25. Muryeong 501–523
  26. Seong 523–554
  27. Wideok 554–598
  28. Hye 598–599
  29. Beop 599–600
  30. Mu 600–641
  31. Uija 641–660

Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their ruling era. ... This is a timeline of Korean history. ... Korea has a long military history going back several thousand years, with an extensive series of wars that involved invasions, civil discord, counter-piracy actions against medieval Japan, the first use of armoured battleships in seabattles, and the devastation of rebellions against the Joseon era Japanese invasions, the forced peace... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their ruling era. ... Onjo (?-28 CE, r. ... Daru of Baekje (?-77, r. ... Giru of Baekje (?-128, r. ... Gaeru (reigned 128–166) was the fourth king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Chogo (reigned 166–214), also known as King Sogo or King Sokgo depending on the record, was the fifth monarch of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Gusu of Baekje (reigned 214–234) was the eldest son of King Chogo and the sixth king of the Baekje kingdom of ancient Korea. ... Saban of Baekje (reigned 234) was the seventh king of the Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Goi of Baekje (reigned 234–286) was the eighth king of the Korean Baekje kingdom, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Chaekgye of Baekje (?-298, r. ... Bunseo of Baekje (reigned 298–304) was the tenth king of the Korean Baekje kingdom, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Biryu of Baekje (reigned 304–344) was the eleventh king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Gye of Baekje (reigned 344–346) was the twelfth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Geunchogo of Baekje (reigned 346–375) was the thirteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Geungusu of Baekje (reigned 375–384) was the fourteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Chimnyu of Baekje (reigned 384–385) was the fifteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Jinsa of Baekje (reigned 385–392) was the sixteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Asin of Baekje (reigned 392–405) was the seventeenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Jeonji of Baekje (reigned 405–420) was the eighteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Guisin of Baekje (reigned 420–427) was the nineteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Biyu of Baekje (reigned 427–455) was the twentieth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Gaero of Baekje (455–475) was the twenty-first king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Munju (reigned 475–477) was the twenty-first king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Samgeun of Baekje (reigned 477–479) was the twenty-third king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Dongseong of Baekje (reigned 479–501) was the twenty-fourth king of the Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Muryeong (462–523; reigned 501–523) was the twenty-fifth king of Baekje during the period of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Seong (d. ... Wideok of Baekje (525–598) was the eldest son of King Seong and the 27th king of the Baekje kingdom of ancient Korea. ... Hye of Baekje (reigned 598–599) was the twenty-eighth king of the Baekje kingdom of ancient Korea. ... Beop of Baekje (reigned 599 to 600) was king of the Korean Baekje kingdom. ... Mu (reigned 600–641) was the thirtieth king of the Korean Baekje kingdom. ... King Uija (의자왕義慈王) (reigned 641–660) was the last king of Koreas Baekje kingdom. ...

Founding

According to the Samguk Sagi, Baekje was founded in 18 BCE by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Goguryeo to the southern region of the Korean peninsula, In present day Jeolla province. According to the Chinese record San Guo Zhi, during the Samhan period, one of the chiefdoms of the Mahan confederacy was called Baekje. We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ... Onjo (?-28 CE, r. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... The Sānguó Zhì (Chinese 三國志, or 三國誌), variously translated as Chronicle of the Three Kingdoms, Records of the Three States and Records of the Three Kingdoms was the official and authoritative historical text compiled by Chen Shou during the Chinese Jin Dynasty (265-420... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Mahan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 3rd century CE in the southern Korean peninsula in the Chungcheong Province. ...


The Samguk Sagi provides a detailed account of Baekje's founding. Jumong had left his son Yuri in Buyeo when he left that kingdom to establish the new kingdom of Goguryeo. Jumong became King Dongmyeongseong, and had two sons, Onjo and Biryu When Yuri later arrived in Goguryeo, Jumong promptly made him the crown prince. Realizing Yuri would become the next king, Onjo and Biryu decided to head south with their people, along with ten vassals. We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... King Dongmyeongseong of Goguryeo (58 - 19 BCE, r. ... For the 11th King of Baekje, see Biryu of Baekje. ...


Onjo settled in Wiryeseong (present-day Hanam), and called his country Sipje (meaning "Ten Vassals"), while Biryu settle in Michuhol (present-day Incheon), against the vassals' advice. The salty water and marshes in Michuhol made settlement difficult, while the people of Wiryeseong lived prosperously. Later Biryu went to his brother Onjo, asking for the throne of Sipje. When Onjo refused, Biryu declared war, but lost. In shame, Biryu committed suicide, and his people moved to Wiryeseong, where King Onjo welcomed them and renamed his country Baekje ("Hundred Vassals"). Wiryeseong was the name of two early capitals of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Ha Nam is also the name of a province in Vietnam. ... Inchon redirects here. ...


King Onjo moved the capital from the south to the north of the Han river, and then south again, probably all within present Seoul, under pressure from other Mahan states. King Gaeru is believed to have moved the capital to the Bukhan Mountain Fortress in 132, probably in present-day Gwangju, to the southeast of Seoul. Gaeru (reigned 128–166) was the fourth king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Bukhansan National Park, from near the peak of Mt Baekundae. ... Gwangju is a city in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea, southeast of Seoul. ...


Through the early centuries of the Common Era, sometimes called the Proto-Three Kingdoms Period, Baekje gradually gained control over the other Mahan tribes. BCE redirects here. ... Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea (원삼국시대, 原三國時代) refers to the period after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms. ...


Expansion

Three Kingdoms of Korea, at the end of the 5th century
Three Kingdoms of Korea, at the end of the 5th century

During the reign of King Goi (234286), Baekje became a full-fledged kingdom, as it continued consolidating the Mahan confederacy. In 249, according to the ancient Japanese text Nihonshoki, Baekje's expansion reached the Gaya confederacy to its east, around the Nakdong River valley. Baekje is first described in Chinese records as a kingdom in 345. The first diplomatic missions from Baekje reached Japan around 367 (According to the Nihon Shoki : 247). Download high resolution version (658x827, 14 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Three Kingdoms of Korea User:Chris 73/Gallery 003 Talk:Tsushima Islands/Archive 1 ... Download high resolution version (658x827, 14 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Three Kingdoms of Korea User:Chris 73/Gallery 003 Talk:Tsushima Islands/Archive 1 ... Goi of Baekje (reigned 234–286) was the eighth king of the Korean Baekje kingdom, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Events Wei Yan revolts against the kingdom of Shu Han Births Emperor Wu of Jin China (approximate date) Deaths Li Yan, general of the Shu Kingdom Wei Yan, Shu general, executed by Ma Dai Zhuge Liang of the Shu Kingdom in China, dies on the Wu Zhang Plains in a... This article is about the year 286. ... Nihonshoki (Japanese: 日本書紀), sometimes translated as Chronicles of Japan, is the second oldest book of classical Japanese history. ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ... The Nakdong River (Rakdong in North Korean) is the longest river in South Korea, and passes through major cities such as Daegu and Busan. ... // Events James was happy for once hehe what Births John Chrysostom, Christian bishop and preacher Deaths Pachomius, early monasticist (approximate date) Bishop Nicholas of Myra, Roman priest (or 352). ...


King Geunchogo (346375) expanded its territory to the north through war against Goguryeo, while annexing the remaining Mahan societies in the south. During Geunchogo's reign, the territories of Baekje included most of the western Korean Peninsula (except the two Pyeongan provinces), and in 371, Baekje defeated Goguryeo at Pyongyang. Baekje continued substantial trade with Goguryeo, and actively adopted Chinese culture and technology. Buddhism became the official state religion in 384. Geunchogo of Baekje (reigned 346–375) was the thirteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Events Athanasius is restored as Patriarch of Alexandria. ... Events The Huns invade Europe. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula in East Asia. ... Pyŏngan (Pyŏngan-do) was one of the Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Events Martin of Tours becomes Bishop of Tours _ year approximate Baekje forces storm the Goguryeo capital in Pyongyang Births Valentinian II - titular Roman emperor - year approximate Deaths August 1 - St Eusebius of Vercelli St Hilarion - year approximate Lucifer of Cagliari - bishop King Gogugwon of Goguryeo Categories: 371 ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Forum of Theodosius I built in Constantinople. ...


Baekje also became a sea power and continued mutual goodwill relationships with the Japanese rulers of the Yamato period, transmitting continental cultural influences to Japan. Chinese writing system, Buddhism, advanced pottery, ceremonial burial, and other aspects of culture were introduced by aristocrats, artisans, scholars, and monks throughout their relationship.[1] The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... Various styles of Chinese calligraphy. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ...


During this period, the Han River basin remained the heartland of the country. The Han River located in South Korea, is the confluence of the South Han River, which originates in Mount Daedeok-san, and the North Han, which originates in Mount Geumgang-san. ...


Ungjin period

Baekje's capital was located at Ungjin (present-day Gongju) from 475 to 538. Ungjin is a former city on the Korean Peninsula. ... Gongju (Gongju-si) is a city in South Chungcheong province, South Korea. ...


In the 5th century, Baekje retreated under the southward military threat of Goguryeo, and in 475, the Seoul region fell to Goguryeo. Baekje moved its capital southward to Ungjin. The Nihon Shoki says that Ungjin was given by the Emperor of Japan to the King Munju of Baekje and supposes that this area was under Japanese control. Isolated in mountainous terrain, the new capital was secure against the north but also disconnected from the outside world. It was closer to Silla than Wiryeseong had been, however, and a military alliance was forged between Silla and Baekje against Goguryeo. Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... See also 475 (number) Events Orestes forces western Roman emperor Julius Nepos to flee and declares his son Romulus Augustus to be emperor. ... King Munju (?-477, r. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ...


Most maps of the Three Kingdoms period show Baekje occupying the Chungcheong and Jeolla provinces, the core of the country in the Ungjin and Sabi periods. Chungcheong (Chungcheong-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ...


Sabi period

Baekje's capital was located at Sabi (present-day Buyeo County) from 538 to 660. Sabi was the capital of the Korean kingdom of Baekje from AD 538 until Baekjes fall to Silla in 660. ... Buyeo County (Buyeo_gun) is a county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ...


In 538, King Seong moved the capital to Sabi (in modern-day Buyeo County), and rebuilt his kingdom into a strong state. From this time, the official name of the country was Nambuyeo ("South Buyeo"), a reference to Buyeo to which Baekje traced its origins. The Sabi Period witnessed the flowering of Baekje culture, alongside the growth of Buddhism. March 12 - Witiges, king of the Ostrogoths ends his siege of Rome and retreats to Ravenna, leaving the city in the hands of the victorious Byzantine general, Belisarius. ... Seong (d. ... Sabi was the capital of the Korean kingdom of Baekje from AD 538 until Baekjes fall to Silla in 660. ... Buyeo County (Buyeo_gun) is a county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ...


Seong sought to strengthen Baekje's relationship with China. The location of Sabi, on the navigable Geum River, made contact with China much easier, and both trade and diplomacy flourished during the 6th and 7th centuries. It also marked less friendly relations with Silla. The Geum River is a river in South Korea. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ...


In the 7th century, with the growing influence of Silla in the southern and central Korean peninsula, Baekje began its decline. The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


Fall and restoration movement

In 660, the coalition troops of Silla and Tang of China attacked Baekje. The capital Sabi eventually fell, resulting in the annexation of Baekje by Silla. King Uija and his son were sent into exile in China while some of the royals probably fled to Japan. For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... King Uija (의자왕義慈王) (reigned 641–660) was the last king of Koreas Baekje kingdom. ...


Baekje forces attempted a brief restoration movement, but faced Silla-Tang joint forces of 130,000 men. General Boksin proclaimed Prince Buyeo Pung as the new king of Baekje, called King Peung. Baekje requested Japanese aid, and Prince Naka no Ōe, later to become Emperor Tenji, dispatched an army contingent led by Abe no Hirafu to Korea. Before the ships from Japan arrived, his forces harassed a contingent of Tang forces in Ungjin County. Boksin (?_663) was a military leader of the Korean kingdom of Baekje. ... Buyeo Pung was one of the sons of King Uija of Baekje. ... Emperor Tenji (From Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Tomb of Emperor Tenji, Kyoto Emperor Tenji (天智天皇 Tenji Tennō) (626-672), also known as Prince Naka no ÅŒe (中大兄皇子, Naka no ÅŒe no ÅŒji) and Emperor Tenchi, was the 38th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Abe no Hirafu (阿部比羅夫) was a governor of Koshi. ...


In 663, Baekje revival forces and a Japanese naval fleet convened in southern Baekje to confront the Silla forces in the Battle of Baekgang. The Tang dynasty also sent 7000 soldiers and 170 ships. After five naval confrontations that took place in August 663 at Baekgang, considered the lower reaches of Tongjin river, the Silla-Tang forces emerged victorious. // Events Byzantine emperor Constans II invades south Italy (Part of) the city wall of Benevento is reconstructed The movement to restore Baekje is defeated by Silla and Tang Battle of Hakusukinoe An annonymous monk reaches the summit of mount Fuji Environmental change A brief outbreak of plague hits Britain Births... Combatants Silla and Tang Dynasty China Baekje and Japan Commanders Unknown Boksin, Buyeo Pung, Abe no Hirafu Strength 130,000 warriors; at least 170 ships 29,000 warriors; at least 170 ships Casualties Unknown 400 ships; Unknown number of warriors lost The Battle of Baekgang, also known as Battle of...


Social and political structure

The establishment of a centralized state in Baekje is usually traced to the reign of King Goi, who may have first established patrilineal succession. Like most monarchies, a great deal of power was held by the aristocracy. King Seong, for example, strengthened royal power, but after he was slain in a disastrous campaign against Silla, the nobles took much of that power away from his son. Goi of Baekje (reigned 234–286) was the eighth king of the Korean Baekje kingdom, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... Seong (d. ...


Hae clan and Jin clan were the representative royal houses who had considerable power from the early period of Baekje, and they produced many queens over several generations. The Hae clan was probably the royal house before the Buyeo clan replaced them, and both clans appear descended from the lineage of Buyeo and Goguryeo. The eight clans, Sa, Yeon, Hyeop, Hae, Jin, Guk, Mok, and Baek, were powerful nobles in the Sabi era, and these clans were recorded in Chinese records such as Tongjeon. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Sabi was the capital of the Korean kingdom of Baekje from AD 538 until Baekjes fall to Silla in 660. ...


Central government officials were divided into sixteen ranks, the six members of the top rank forming a type of cabinet, with the top official being elected every three years. In the Sol rank, the first (Jwapyeong) through the sixth (Naesol) officials were political, administrative, and military commanders. In the Deok rank, the seventh (Jangdeok) through the eleventh (Daedeok) officials may have headed each field. Mundok, Mudok, Jwagun, Jinmu and Geuku from the twelfth to the sixteenth, may have been military administrators. Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ...


According to the Samguk Yusa, during the Sabi period, the chief minister (Jaesang) of Baekje was chosen by a unique system. The names of several candidates were placed under a rock (Cheonjeongdae) near Hoamsa temple. After a few days, the rock was moved and the candidate whose name had a certain mark was chosen as the new chief minister. Whether this was a form of selection-by-lot or a covert selection by the elite is not clear. Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period. ...


Language and culture

Baekje was established by immigrants from Goguryeo who spoke what could be a Buyeo language, a hypothetical group linking the languages of Gojoseon, Buyeo, Goguryeo, Baekje. The indigenous Samhan people, having migrated in an earlier wave from the same region, probably spoke a variation or dialect of the same language. The Buyeo (Puyŏ) languages are a hypothetical language family that would relate the languages of Buyeo, Goguryeo, Baekje and the Japonic languages, and possibly place them together as a family under the hypothetical Altaic family. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ...


Baekje artists adopted many Chinese influences and synthesized them into a unique artistic tradition. Buddhist themes are extremely strong in Baekje artwork. The beatific Baekje smile found on many Buddhist sculptures expresses the warmth typical of Baekje art. In addition, Taoist and other Chinese influences are widespread. Chinese artisans were sent to the kingdom by the Liang Dynasty in 541, and this may have given rise to an increased Chinese influence in the Sabi period. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... Liang Dynasty (梁朝 (Pinyin: Liáng cháo)) (502-557), also known as Southern Liang Dynasty (南梁), was the third of Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Chen Dynasty. ...


The tomb of King Muryeong (501–523), although modelled on Chinese brick tombs and yielding some imported Chinese objects, also contained many funerary objects of the Baekje tradition, such as the gold diadem ornaments, gold belts, and gold earrings. Mortuary practices also followed the unique tradition of Baekje. This tomb is seen as a representative tomb of the Ungjin period. The Tomb of King Muryeong, also known as Songsan-ri Tomb No. ... The crown of Baekje refers to several artifacts excavated that are believed to be the royal headgear of the kings, queens, and nobility of the Baekje Kingdom. ... Both the king and queen are wearing gold girdles. ... Ungjin is a former city on the Korean Peninsula. ...


Delicate lotus designs of the roof-tiles, intricate brick patterns, curves of the pottery style, and flowing and elegant epitaph writing characterize Baekje culture. The Buddhist sculptures and refined pagodas reflect religion-inspired creativity. A splendid gilt-bronze incense burner (백제금동대향로) excavated from an ancient Buddhist temple site at Neungsan-ri, Buyeo County, exemplifies Baekje art. A pagoda at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia This article is about the building style. ... The Gilt-bronze Incense Burner of Baekje is the 287th National Treasure of Korea and it was designated on May 30, 1996. ... Buyeo County (Buyeo_gun) is a county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ...


Little is known of Baekje music, but local musicians were sent with tribute missions to China in the 7th century, indicating that a distinctive musical tradition had developed by that time.


Foreign relations

Relations with China

In 372, King Geunchogo paid tribute to the Jin Dynasty of China, located in the basin of the Yangtze River. After the fall of Jin and the establishment of Song Dynasty in 420, Baekje sent envoys seeking cultural goods and technologies. Geunchogo of Baekje (reigned 346–375) was the thirteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... For other uses, see Tribute (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Yangtze River or Chang Jiang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), or Drichu in Tibetan (Tibetan: འབ; Wylie: bri chu) is the longest river in Asia and the third longest in the world, after the Nile in Africa, and the Amazon in South America. ... The Song Dynasty (宋朝, previous spelling Sung) (420-479) was first of the four Southern Dynasties in China, followed by the Qi Dynasty. ...


Baekje sent an envoy to Northern Wei of Northern Dynasties for the first time in 472, and King Gaero asked for military aid to attack Goguryeo. Kings Muryeong and Seong sent envoys to Liang several times and received titles of nobility. The Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏 386-534) is most noted for the unification of northern China in 440, it was also heavily involved in funding the arts and many antiques and art works from this period have survived. ... Gaero of Baekje (455–475) was the twenty-first king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Muryeong (462–523; reigned 501–523) was the twenty-fifth king of Baekje during the period of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Seong (d. ... Liang Dynasty (梁朝 (Pinyin: Liáng cháo)) (502-557), also known as Southern Liang Dynasty (南梁), was the third of Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Chen Dynasty. ...


Tomb of King Muryeong is built with bricks according with Liang's tomb style.


Baekje's presence on the continent

Although controversial, some Chinese and Korean records indicate that Baekje territory included parts of present-day China, across the Yellow Sea.[2][3][4][5] ...


According to the Book of Song, “Goguryeo came to conquer and occupy Liaodong, and Baekje came to occupy Liaoxi (遼西) (in modern Tangshan, Hebei); the place that came to be governed by Baekje was called the Jinping District, Jinping Province.”[6] The records of Book of Jin on Murong Huang states that the alliance of Goguryeo, Baekje, and a Xianbei tribe took military action.[7] The Samguk Sagi records that these battles occurred during the reign of King Micheon of Goguryeo (309-331). The Book of Song (Chinese: 宋書/宋书; Wade-Giles: Sungshu), is a the historical writing for the Chinese Song of Southern Dynasties covering the history from 420 to 479, and is one of the traditional Twenty-Four Histories. ... The Liaodong Peninsula (sim. ... Tangshan (Chinese: 唐山市; Pinyin: Tángshān shì) is a prefecture-level city in Hebei province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Book of Jin (Chinese:晋书) is one of the official Chinese historical works. ... Murong Huang (慕容皝) (297-348), courtesy name Yuanzhen (元真), formally Prince Wenming of (Former) Yan ((前)燕文明王) was a ruler of the Chinese/Xianbei state Former Yan and the commonly recognized founder of the state. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Xianbei belt buckles, 3-4th century CE. The Xianbei (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsien-pei) were a significant nomadic people residing in Manchuria and eastern Mongolia, or Xianbei Shan. ... We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ... King Micheon of Goguryeo (r. ...


According to the Book of Liang, “during the time of Jin Dynasty (265-420), Goguryeo conquered Liaodong, and Baekje also occupied Liaoxi and Jinping, and established the Baekje provinces.”[8] The Book of Liang (Ch: 梁書, Liangshu), was compiled under Yao Silian 姚思廉 in 635. ... The Jin Dynasty (晉 pinyin: jìn, 265-420), one of the Six Dynasties, followed the Three Kingdoms and preceded the Southern and Northern Dynasties in China. ...


The Zizhi Tongjian, compiled by Sima Guang (1019-1086) of the Song Dynasty (960-1279), states that in 346, Baekje invaded Buyeo, located at Lushan, and as a result the people of the country were scattered westward toward Yan. [9] That year was the first year of the King Geunchogo’s reign (346-375) in Baekje. Zizhi Tongjian (traditional Chinese character: 資治通鑑; simplified Chinese character: 资治通鉴; pinyin Zīzhì Tōngjìan, Wade-Giles Tzu-chih tung-chien) is known to be a important Chinese history text of annual chronology. ... Sima Guang (Chinese:司马光; Wade-Giles:Szuma Kuang, 1019-1086) was a Chinese historian, scholar and statesman of the Song Dynasty. ... Northern Song in 1111 AD Capital Bianjing (汴京) (960–1127) Linan (臨安) (1127–1276) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 960–976 Emperor Taizu  - 1126–1127 Emperor Qinzong  - 1127–1162 Emperor Gaozong  - 1278–1279 Emperor Bing History  - Zhao Kuangyin taking over the throne of the Later Zhou... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lushan is famous for its villas. ... Yan State knife money Yan (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) was a state during the Western Zhou, Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods in China. ... Geunchogo of Baekje (reigned 346–375) was the thirteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ...


The nearly contemporary record of the Book of Qi, as well as the later Zizhi Tongjian, state that a Northern Wei (386-534) army, comprised of 100,000 cavalry, attacked Baekje but were defeated in 488. This account is confirmed by the Samguk-sagi records on the tenth year of King Dongseong’s reign (488).[10] Since such an army could not have travelled from northern China to the southwestern corner of the Korean peninsula without passing through the hostile and powerful Goguryeo (in the reign of King Jangsu of Goguryeo (413-491)), without being recorded in contemporary chronicles, the “Baekje” in those records must refer to Baekje presence on the other side of Goguryeo, in Liaoxi. The Book of Qi or Book of Southern Qi (Chinese: ; pinyin: Qí ShÅ«/Nánqí ShÅ«) is a history of the Chinese dynasty Southern Qi covering the period from 479 to 502, and is one of the Twenty-Four Histories of Chinese history. ... The Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏 386-534) is most noted for the unification of northern China in 440, it was also heavily involved in funding the arts and many antiques and art works from this period have survived. ... Dongseong of Baekje (reigned 479–501) was the twenty-fourth king of the Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... King Jangsu of Goguryeo (Personal names: Koryŏn 巨連 Jùlián, Kŏryŏn 高璉 Gāolián, 394~491), a king of Goguryeo (Chinese, Gaogouli) who ruled from 413 to 491. ...


The Book of Qi also records that in 495 Baekje's King Dongseong requested honorary titles for the generals who repulsed the Wei attack. The titles given by the Southern Qi court carried the names of their domains that sounded like some Liaoxi areas, such as Guangling, Qinghe, Chengyang, etc.[11] The Southern Qi Dynasty 齊朝 (479-502) was the second of the Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Liang Dynasty. ...


The Territory Section of Mǎnzhōu Yuánliú Kǎo (满洲源流考, "Considerations on the Origin of Manchu") also summarizes Baekje's territories, obviously including a portion of Liaoxi:[12] The Manchu people (Manchu: Manju; Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Mongolian: Манж) are a Tungusic people who originated in Manchuria (todays Northeastern China). ...

The boundary of Baekje begins from the present-day Guangning and Jinyi provinces in the northwest and then crosses the sea in an easterly direction to arrive at the Joseon’s Hwanghae, Chungcheong, Jeolla, etc. provinces. Running east to west, Baekje’s territory is narrow; running north to south, it is long. Thus it occurs that if one looks at Baekje’s territory from the Liucheng and Beiping area, Silla is located in the southeast of Baekje, but if one looks from the Gyeongsang and Ungjin area of Baekje, Silla is located in the northeast. Baekje also borders Mohe in the north. Its royal capital has two castles at two different places in the east and west. Both castles are called “Goma.” The Book of Song says that the place governed by Baekje was called the Jinping district of the Jinping province. Tong-gao says that the the Jinping province was located between Liucheng and Beiping of the Tang period. [13]

Hence one of Baekje’s capitals was located in “Liaoxi,” and the other inside the "Joseon" provinces. It was during the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang that Baekje relocated its capital to southern Korea. Joseon or Chosun (Korean: ì¡°ì„ ; Hanja: 朝鮮; Revised: Joseon; McCune-Reischauer: Chosŏn; Chinese: CháoxiÇŽn; Japanese: Chōsen) is a name for Korea, as used in the following cases: As part of the name of several ancient kingdoms (including Gojoseon, Gija Joseon, and Wiman Joseon); During most of the Joseon... Hwanghae (Hwanghae-do) was one of the Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty, and one of the thirteen provinces of Korea during the Japanese Colonial Period. ... Chungcheong (Chungcheong-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Beijing (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: Běijīng; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking), is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Gyeongsang (Gyeongsang-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Ungjin is a former city on the Korean Peninsula. ... The Mohe (靺鞨, Korean: Malgal, 말갈), were a Tungusic tribe in ancient Manchuria. ... Emperor Wu of Liang (梁武帝) (464-549), personal name Xiao Yan (蕭衍), courtesy name Shuda (叔達), nickname Lianer (ç·´å…’), was the founding emperor of the Chinese dynasty Liang Dynasty. ...


Both the Old and the New History of Tang say that the old Baekje territories were divided up and taken by Silla and Balhae. [14] If Baekje was limited to the southwestern corner of the Korean peninsula, then it would have been impossible for the Balhae to occupy any of the old Baekje territories. For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) (Bohai in Chinese) was an ancient multiethnic kingdom established after the fall of Goguryeo. ...


The Silla scholar and alleged Sinocentrist Choi Chi-won (857-?) wrote that “Goguryeo and Baekje at the height of their strength maintained strong armies numbering one million persons, and invaded Wu and Yue in the south and You, Yan, Qi, and Lu in the north of the mainland China, making grave nuisances to the Middle Kingdom”.[15] Choe Chiwon (857-?) was a noted Korean Confucian official, philosopher, and poet of the late Unified Silla period (668-935). ...


According to these records, Baekje must have held the Liao-xi province for more than a hundred years.


Relations with Japan

Military assistances

To confront with the military pressure of Goguryeo and Silla, Baekje (called Kudara in Japanese, means also "100 vassals") established close relations with Japan. According to the Korean chronicle Samguk Sagi, Baekje and Silla sent their princes as hostages to the Japanese court. In exchange, Japan provided military support.[16] Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ...


The Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms and Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms cite some Baekje royal family's descendants and some nobles as dignitaries in the Japanese court, maintaining continental influence and ensuring the continuation of the Yamato alliance, as in the time of Emperor Yomei when the Buddhist temple of Horyuji was constructed. It is also known that Muryeong of Baekje, the twenty-fifth king, was born in Japan. We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ... Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period. ... ... Categories: Japan-related stubs | Buddhist temples | World Heritage Sites in Japan ... Muryeong (462–523; reigned 501–523) was the twenty-fifth king of Baekje during the period of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ...


Northern horse riders conquested Japan and established Yamato government. A theory popular in Korea is that Baekje invaded Japan, that the northern horse riders were from Baekje and kept the close relationship with the families in mother land including military supports. On the other hand, the Japanese claim descent from horse riders who came in Japan through the Korean peninsula, but who were not Koreans; the ancient Japanese chronicles also present Korean peninsula inhabitants as unknown foreigners.


The Chinese Book of Song of the Liu Song Dynasty, written by the Chinese Historian Shen Yue (441-513), presents the Sovereign of Japan as the suzerain of Baekje, Silla and the Gaya Confederacy. The Book of Song (Chinese: 宋書/宋书; Wade-Giles: Sungshu), is a the historical writing for the Chinese Song of Southern Dynasties covering the history from 420 to 479, and is one of the traditional Twenty-Four Histories. ... The Song Dynasty (宋朝, previous spelling Sung) (420-479) was first of the four Southern Dynasties in China, followed by the Qi Dynasty. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ...


The Chinese Book of Sui of the Sui Dynasty says that Japan provided military support to Baekje and Silla.[17] The Sui Dynasty (隋朝 Hanyu Pinyin: suí cháo, 581-618) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... The Sui Dynasty of China amongst the Asian, African, and European spheres of the world, 600 AD. The Sui Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; 581-618 AD[1]) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ...


Japanese historians interpret certain passages of the Gwanggaeto Stele as stating that Baekje was a subject of Yamato Japan and that Yamato Japan established a military outpost on the Korean peninsula. However, the Japanese interpretation of the stele of Emperor Gwanggaeto of Goguryeo is regarded as highly controversial as it is a widely known fact that the information on the stele was altered and vandalized by the Japanese in the 20th century to give a sense of legitimacy to the imperial occupation of Korea. No Korean or Chinese records mention a Japanese military command post on the Korean peninsula, nor do any records corroborate Japanese claims that Baekje was a tributary of Yamato Japan. On the contrary, however, there are records that suggest that Yamato was instead a tributary or vassal state of Baekje and that the Yamato Japanese were subordinate to the Baekje king.


The Japanese Nihon Shoki claims that the Yamato Japanese armies crossed the sea and subdued Silla and Baekje. However, the Nihon Shoki is widely regarded to be an unreliable source of information as it mixes heavy amounts of supposition and legend with facts. No Korean or Chinese records ever mention the conquest of southern Korea by Yamato Japan.


Any Japanese claims that Yamato Japan made Silla and/or Baekje subjects is unproven by any historical accounts other than the ancient and highly controversial Nihon Shoki. Japan's views are unshared by any historians outside of the nation while Korean historians have a stronger evidence to refute Japanese claims. It should be noted that Japan has a record of historical distortion. It is also highly illogical as Silla and Baekje were powerful, centralized kingdoms when Yamato Japan was a fledgling state. The "Nihon Shoki" gives the invasion date of Silla and Baekje as the late 4th century. However, by this time, Japan was not even a fully formed kingdom. It was rather a confederation of chiefdoms. To suggest a nation still formed by a group of tribes (Japan) crossed the sea led by a great empress named Jingu and defeated both Silla and Baekje, which at the time had great military power, is historically inaccurate and irrational. The intense hate for Silla people by the Yamato Japanese could be one possible reason for the creation of a fantasy tale that tells of a successful invasion into Silla.


Some believe the Gwanggaeto Stele, erected in 414 by King Jangsu of Goguryeo, speaks of a Japanese invasion in the Korean peninsula and that large Japanese armies were participating actively there during the late 4th and early 5th centuries. Some believe that characters were modified and the Japanese presence added by a Japanese soldier who rediscovered the stele for justifying the Japanese invasion for Korea. Today's Chinese and Japanese scholars discredit the intentionally damaged stele theory based on the study of the stele itself[18][19] and the pre–Sakō and pre-lime-marred rubbings..[20] The Japanese military activities represent half of the stele. The stele of King Gwanggaeto of Goguryeo was erected in 414 by King Jangsu as a memorial to his deceased father. ... King Jangsu (Korean: 장수왕; McCune-Reischauer: Changsu wang; Chinese characters: 長壽王; Pinyin: Chángshòu wáng; Personal names: 巨連 Jùlián, 高璉 Gāolián), a king of Koguryŏ/Gaogouli ruling from 412 to 490. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ...


According to the Samguk Sagi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms), written in 1145, King Asin sent his son Jeonji as a hostage in 397.[21], and King Silseong of Silla sent his son as a hostage in 402 too. We dont have an article called Samguk sagi Start this article Search for Samguk sagi in. ... Asin of Baekje (reigned 392–405) was the seventeenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Jeonji of Baekje (reigned 405–420) was the eighteenth king of the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... For other uses, see Hostage (disambiguation). ...


Cultural exchanges

Ajiki(아직기) of King Gengusu period of Baekje, Danyang-i(단양이) and Go-anmu(고안무)of King Muryeong period of Baekje migrated to Japan to spread Confucianism. A Confucian temple in Wuwei, Peoples Republic of China. ...


The most famous noblemen and scholars that emigrated to Japan from Baekje had a Chinese ancestry, and they came from the Chinese Lelang Commandery, in the northwest of the Korean peninsula, then through Baekje. Lelang (樂浪郡 le4 lang4 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies which was kept in the Korean Peninsula over 400 years until Goguryeo conquers it in 313 A.D. History In 108 B.C. Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty conquered the area under Youqu (右渠), a...


Among these nobles were :

  • Prince Yuzuki no Kimi descendant of the Chinese Qin Dynasty, ancestor of the Hata clan, the Uzumasa clan, the Chosokabe clan, etc.
  • Prince Koman-O another descendant of the Chinese Qin Dynasty, ancestor of a lateral branch of the Hata clan, the Koremune clan, etc.
  • Prince Achi no Omi descendant of the Chinese Han Dynasty, ancestor of the Sakanoue clan, the Akizuki clan, the Harada clan of Kyushu, and the Tamura clan, etc.

Probably the best known immigrant scholar of that period in Japan was Wang In (Wani in Japanese). Wang In was mastering confucianism and Chinese language. His descendants in Japan claimed that he was a Chinese from Lelang Commandery (BC 86 ~ AD 313) who had moved to Japan through Baekje. Yeongam of Jeolla province in Korea claims that Wangin was born in their place. It is possible that Wang In was born in the Korean peninsula with a Chinese background. To Wang In is attributed the construction of a storehouse used for preserving the presents sent from Korea to the Japanese court. Qin Dynasty in 210 BC Capital Xianyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy History  - Unification of China 221 BC  - Death of Qin Shi Huangdi 210 BC  - Surrender to Liu Bang 206 BC The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded by the... The Hata clan (秦氏) was an immigrant group active in Japan during the Yamato period, according to the epic history Nihonshoki. ... The Chosokabe clan The Chosokabe clan were respected as deputy administrators of the Tosa in the 12th Century. ... Qin Dynasty in 210 BC Capital Xianyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy History  - Unification of China 221 BC  - Death of Qin Shi Huangdi 210 BC  - Surrender to Liu Bang 206 BC The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded by the... The Hata clan (秦氏) was an immigrant group active in Japan during the Yamato period, according to the epic history Nihonshoki. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... Wani as imagined in 19th century Japanese drawing Wani (Wani, Wani Kishi )) is a semi-legendary scholar who is said to have been dedicated to Japan by Baekje of southwestern Korea during the reign of Emperor ÅŒjin. ... Lelang (樂浪郡 le4 lang4 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies which was kept in the Korean Peninsula over 400 years until Goguryeo conquers it in 313 A.D. History In 108 B.C. Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty conquered the area under Youqu (右渠), a... Yeongam County (Yeongam-gun) is a county in South Jeolla Province, South Korea. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ...


One of the most famous sculptors in the late 6th and early 7th century was Tori Busshi, and whose grandfather Shiba Tatto was a Chinese man who immigrated to Japan in 522. The Shaka image of Asukadera, 606 CE Tori Busshi was a Japanese sculptor. ...


It is claimed that the capital of Chinese Lelang Commandery (108 BC-313) was near today's P'yŏngyang. Lelang was the greatest of the Four Commanderies of Han created in 108 BC in the areas captured after the conquest of Wiman Joseon state (194 BC-108 BC) by Emperor Wu of the Chinese Han Dynasty, which corresponds to the current North Korea. South to Lelang was the Daifang Commandery situated in the Haeju's region. A flux of Chinese immigration into the Korean peninsula continued without cessation, implanting there Chinese culture and technology. Lelang (樂浪郡 le4 lang4 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies which was kept in the Korean Peninsula over 400 years until Goguryeo conquers it in 313 A.D. History In 108 B.C. Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty conquered the area under Youqu (右渠), a... Pyongyang is the capital city of North Korea, located on the Taedong River, at (39. ... The Four Commanderies of Han (漢四郡, 한사군) are Lelang, Lintun, Xuantu and Zhenfan commanderies in the western Korean peninsula or Liaodong set up by Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty in early 2nd century BC after his conquest of Wiman Joseon. ... Wiman Joseon (194 BC - 108 BC) was the continuation of Go-Joseon, founded by Wiman. ... Emperor Wu can refer to: Emperor Wu of Han China Emperor Wu of Jin China This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... Daifang (帶方郡 dai4 fang1 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies in the Korean peninsula. ... Haeju (Hanja: 海州) is a city in North Korea located in South Hwanghae Province near Haeju Bay. ...


Were spread to Japan through Baekje : confucianism, Chinese writing system, loanwords from China, buddhism (and zen) from india, etc. Scholars, architects, sculptors, potters and other immigrants contributed much to the development of Japanese culture, religion, and technology. Prince Achi no Omi from the Chinese Han Dynasty came with Chinese women skilled in weaving. Prince Yuzuki no Kimi from the Chinese Qin Dynasty is the ancestor of the Hata clan whose office was for a long time to spread the cultivation of the silkworm. Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji   ) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (平仮名), katakana (片仮名), and the Arabic numerals. ... Sino-Japanese or Kango () in Japanese, refers to that portion of the Japanese vocabulary that originated in the Chinese language or has been created from elements borrowed from Chinese. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... The Hata clan (秦氏) was an immigrant group active in Japan during the Yamato period, according to the epic history Nihonshoki. ...


The fall of Baekje and the retreat to Japan

Some members of the Baekje nobility and royalty emigrated to Japan even before the kingdom was overthrown. After Baekje's fall in 663, Japan sent the general Abe no Hirafu with 20,000 troops and 1,000 ships to revive Baekje with Buyeo Pung (known in Japanese as Hōshō), a son of Uija of Baekje who had been an emissary to Japan. Around August of 661, 10,000 soldiers and 170 ships, led by Abe no Hirafu, arrived. Additional Japanese reinforcement, including 27,000 soldiers led by Kamitsukeno no Kimi Wakako and 10,000 soldiers led by Iohara no Kimi also arrived at Baekje in 662. This attempt, however, failed at the battle of Baekgang, and the prince was slain. Only half of the troops were able to return to Japan. According to the Nihon Shoki, 400 Japanese ships were lost in the battles. The Japanese army retreated to Japan with many Baekje refugees. Buyeo Pung's younger brother Sun-gwang (Zenkō in Japanese) (善光 or 禅広) served for Japan and was given the family name Kudara no Konikishi (百濟王) by the Emperor of Japan. Abe no Hirafu (阿部比羅夫) was a governor of Koshi. ... Buyeo Pung was one of the sons of King Uija of Baekje. ... King Uija (의자왕義慈王) (reigned 641–660) was the last king of Koreas Baekje kingdom. ... Combatants Silla and Tang Dynasty China Baekje and Japan Commanders Unknown Boksin, Buyeo Pung, Abe no Hirafu Strength 130,000 warriors; at least 170 ships 29,000 warriors; at least 170 ships Casualties Unknown 400 ships; Unknown number of warriors lost The Battle of Baekgang, also known as Battle of... The Kudara no Kinokishi (Japanese: ) was a Japanese clan whose founder was Zenkō ( or ), a son of the last kind of Baekje, King Uija. ... For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ...


First the former royal family members were treated as "foreign guests" (蕃客) and were not incorporated into the political system of Japan for some time. The mother of Emperor Kammu (737-806) was Takano no Niigasa; a concubine of Prince Shirakabe grandson of Emperor Tenji; and she was a descendant of King Muryeong of Baekje. Emperor Kammu treated the Kudara no Konikishi clan as his "relatives by marriage". Emperor Kanmu Emperor Kanmu ) (737–806) was the 50th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Takano no Niigasa (高野新笠) (?–790) was a concubine of Emperor Konin and the mother of Emperor Kammu. ... Emperor Tenji (From Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Tomb of Emperor Tenji, Kyoto Emperor Tenji (天智天皇 Tenji Tennō) (626-672), also known as Prince Naka no ÅŒe (中大兄皇子, Naka no ÅŒe no ÅŒji) and Emperor Tenchi, was the 38th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... King Muryeong (462-523 r. ... Emperor Kanmu Emperor Kanmu ) (737–806) was the 50th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... The Kudara no Konikishi (Japanese: ) was a Japanese clan whose founder Zenkō ( or ) was a son of the last king of Baekje, King Uija. ...


The Kings of Baekje are the ancestors of the Kudara no Konikishi clan seen above (they are also called Kudara clan, as Baekje was called Kudara in Japanese), the Ouchi clan, the Sue clan, etc. The Kudara no Konikishi (Japanese: ) was a Japanese clan whose founder Zenkō ( or ) was a son of the last king of Baekje, King Uija. ... The Ōuchi family ) was one of the most powerful and important families during the reign of the Ashikaga shogunate in the 12th to 14th centuries. ...


Legacy

Baekje was briefly revived in the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea period, as Unified Silla collapsed. In 892, General Gyeon Hwon established Hubaekje (“Later Baekje”), based in Wansan (present-day Jeonju). Hubaekje was overthrown in 936 by King Taejo of Goryeo. The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Gyeon Hwon (867?-936, reigned 900-935) was the king and founder of Hubaekje, one of the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Hubaekje, or Later Baekje, was one of the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea, along with Hugoguryeo and Silla. ... Jeonju (Jeonju-si) is a city in and the capital of North Jeolla Province, South Korea. ... Taejo of Goryeo (877-943, r. ...


In contemporary South Korea, Baekje relics are often symbolic of the local cultures of the southwest, especially in Chungnam and Jeolla. The gilt-bronze incense burner, for example, is a key symbol of Buyeo County, and the Baekje-era Buddhist rock sculpture of Seosan Maaesamjonbulsang is an important symbol of Seosan City. South Chungcheong is a province in the west of South Korea. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... The Gilt-bronze Incense Burner of Baekje is the 287th National Treasure of Korea and it was designated on May 30, 1996. ... Buyeo County (Buyeo_gun) is a county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ... Seosan is a city in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ...


Notes

  1. ^ "Korean Buddhism Basis of Japanese Buddhism," Seoul Times, June 18, 2006; "Buddhist Art of Korea & Japan," Asia Society Museum; "Kanji," JapanGuide.com; "Pottery," MSN Encarta; "History of Japan," JapanVisitor.com.
  2. ^ http://gias.snu.ac.kr/wthong/publication/paekche/eng/hi3-7.pdf Hong, Wontak, Paekche of Korea and the Origin of Yamato Japan, Myongwhasa (1994)
  3. ^ 송, 종성 (2002). 가야 백제 그리고 일본 (Gaya baekje geurigo ilbon; Gaya, Baekje and Japan). 서울: 서림재. ISBN 89-85290-12-6. 
  4. ^ 姜銓薰, 백제 대륙진출설의 제문제 (The Problem of Controlling Continent by Baekje), 韓國古代史論叢, 4, 392-450 (1992)
  5. ^ 이명규, 百濟의 中國大陸에서의 商業的 軍事的 活動 背景과 性格 (The Background and Features of Economical and Military Activities by Baekje in the Current Chinese Land), Master Thesis, Department of History, Seoul National University (1981)
  6. ^ 宋書 列傳 夷蠻 東夷 百濟國 高麗略有遼東 百濟略有遼西 百濟所治 謂之晋平郡晋平縣
  7. ^ 三國史記 高句麗本紀 美川王 十四年 侵樂浪郡 十五年...南侵帶方郡 二十年 我及殷氏宇文氏 使共攻慕容廆 二十一年...遣兵寇遼東 晋書卷一百九 載記第九 慕容皝 句麗百濟及宇文殷部之人 皆兵勢所徙
  8. ^ 梁書 列傳 東夷 百濟 晋世句麗旣略有遼東 百濟亦據有遼西 晋平二郡地矣 自置百濟郡
  9. ^ 資治通鑑 晋紀 穆帝 永和二年 春正月...初 夫餘居于鹿山 爲百濟所侵 部落衰散 西徙近燕 而不設備 燕王皝 遣世子儁 帥慕容軍 慕容恪 慕容根三將軍 萬七千騎 襲夫餘 (二: 326)
  10. ^ 資治通鑑 齊紀 武帝永明六年十二月 魏遣兵擊百濟 爲百濟所敗...晉世句麗略有遼東百濟亦據有遼西晉平二郡也 (二: 1159)
    南齊書 列傳 東夷 百濟國 魏虜又發騎數十萬攻百濟入其界 牟大遣將...率衆襲擊虜軍 大破之 建武二年 牟大遣使上表曰...臣遣...等領軍逆討 三國史記 百濟本紀 東城王 十年 魏遣兵來伐 爲我所敗
  11. ^ 南齊書 百濟國 . . .牟大又表曰 臣所遣行…廣陽太守…廣陵太守 淸河太守 … 詔可…除太守 … 城陽太守 … 詔可 竝賜軍號
  12. ^ 欽定滿洲源流考 卷九 疆域二 百濟諸城 … 謹案 … 百濟之境 西北自今廣甯錦義 南踰海 蓋 東極 朝鮮之黃海忠淸全羅等道 東西狹而南北長 自柳城北平計 之則 新羅在其東南 自慶尙熊津 計之則 新羅在其東北 其北亦與 勿吉爲隣也 王都有東西兩城 號 固麻城 亦曰居拔城 以滿洲語考 之 固麻爲格們之轉音 居拔蓋滿 洲語之卓巴言 二處也 二城皆王 都 故皆以固麻名之 宋書言百濟 所治謂之 晉平郡晉平縣 通考云 在唐柳城北平之間則國都在遼西 而朝鮮全州境內又有俱拔故城殆 梁天監時[502-19] 遷居南韓之 城 歟唐顯慶中[656-60]分爲 五都督府曰 … 東明爲百濟之祖 自槀離渡河以之名地當與槀離國 相近考 遼史 槀離爲鳳州韓州 皆在今開原境則東明都督府之設 亦應與開原相邇矣 … 唐書又言 後爲新羅渤海靺鞨所分百濟遂絶
    金史 地理上 廣寧府本遼顯州 … 廣寧有遼世宗顯陵
    遼史 地理志二 東京道 顯州 … 奉顯陵…置醫巫閭山絶頂築堂曰望海…穆宗葬世宗於顯陵西山…有十三山
    欽定滿洲源流考 卷十四 山川一
    元一統志 十三山在廣寧府南一 百十里 … 在今錦縣東七十五里 卷十五 山川二 … 明統志 大凌河源出大甯自義州西六十里入境南流經廣寧左右屯衛入海
    欽定滿洲源流考 卷十一 疆域四 遼東北地界 遼史 顯州 … 本漢無盧縣卽醫巫閭 … 自錦州八十里至… 元一統志 乾州故城在廣甯府西南七里
  13. ^ 欽定 滿洲源流考 卷三 部族 百濟 … 通典 [卷一百八十五 邊方典一]… 晋時句麗旣略有遼東 百濟亦略有遼西晋平 唐柳城北平之閒 … 元史 … 唐柳城北平之間實今錦州
  14. ^ 舊唐書 列傳 東夷 百濟 … 其地自此爲新羅及渤海靺鞨所分百濟之種遂絶
    新唐書 列傳 東夷 百濟 … 而其地已新羅及 渤海靺鞨所分 百濟遂絶
  15. ^ 三國史記 下 卷第四十六 列傳 第六 崔致遠 ...高麗百濟全盛之時 强兵百萬 南侵吳越 北撓幽燕齊魯 爲中國巨蠹
  16. ^ (1993) in Delmer M. Brown (ed.): The Cambridge History of Japan. Cambridge University Press, 140-141. 
  17. ^ Chinese History Record Book of Sui : 隋書 東夷伝 第81巻列伝46 : 新羅、百濟皆以倭為大國,多珍物,並敬仰之,恆通使往來 [1][2]
  18. ^ Takeda, Yukio. "Studies on the King Gwanggaeto Inscription and Their Basis". Memoirs of the Research Department of the Toyo Bunko. 47(1989):57-87.
  19. ^ Xu, Jianxin. 好太王碑拓本の研究 (An Investigation of Rubbings from the Stele of Haotai Wang). Tokyodo Shuppan, 2006. ISBN 9784490205695.
  20. ^ Oh, Byung-sang, "FOUNTAIN: Echoes of drumming hoofbeats", JoongAng Ilbo, October 04, 2002.
  21. ^ Samguk Sagi (in Korean). “六年 夏五月 王與倭國結好 以太子腆支爲質” 

The Sui Dynasty (隋朝 Hanyu Pinyin: suí cháo, 581-618) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... The Joong Ang Ilbo is one of the Big Three Newspapers in Korea, the so-called Cho-Joong-Dong (after the first words of the Chosun Ilbo and Dong-a Ilbo. ...

See also

Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their fall. ... This is a list of Wikipedia articles on Korea-related people, places, things, and concepts. ... This article is about the history of Korea, up to the division of Korea in the 1940s. ... List of Baekje-related researchers Korea researchers Hong, Won-tack : Professor Emoritus of Seoul National University East Asian History Lee, Keun-woo : Professor of Bukyeong University Korean History Series of Internet Citizen News ... The crown of Baekje refers to several artifacts excavated that are believed to be the royal headgear of the kings, queens, and nobility of the Baekje Kingdom. ... There are and were a very large number of monarchies in the world. ...

External links

  • Baekje History Museum maintained by South Chungcheong Province of South Korea
  • Buyeo National Museum
  • Gongju National Museum
  • Baekje Research Institute eatablished in Chungnam National University
  • East Asian History by Wontack Hong, Professor Emeritus, Seoul National University

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baekje information - Search.com (1949 words)
Baekje (18 BCE (legendary) – 660 CE) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.
Baekje was established by immigrants from Goguryeo who spoke a Buyeo language, a hypothetical group linking the languages of Gojoseon, Buyeo, Goguryeo, Baekje, and early Japanese.
Baekje was briefly revived in the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea period, as Unified Silla collapsed.
Reference Encyclopedia - Baekje (3233 words)
Baekje (October 18 BCE – August 660 CE) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula.
Baekje was briefly revived in the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea period, as Unified Silla collapsed.
It was during the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang that Baekje relocated its capital to southern Korea.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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