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Encyclopedia > Badger
Badgers
American Badger
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Mustelidae
Subfamily: Melinae
Mellivorinae
Taxidiinae

Genera

 Arctonyx
 Melogale
 Meles
 Mellivora
 Taxidea Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Look up Badger in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Suborders  Mydeus  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea Badger is the common name for any animal of three subfamilies, which belong to the family Mustelidae: the same mammal family as the ferrets, the weasels, the otters, and several other types of carnivore. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... The hog badger (Arcionyx collaris) is a medium sized mammal. ... Melogale is the genus group Ferret-badgers. ... Binomial name Meles meles (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Badger (Meles meles) is a member of the Mustelidae family, and so is related to the stoats, otters, weasels, minks and other badgers. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ...

Badger is the common name for any animal of three subfamilies, which belong to the family Mustelidae: the same mammal family as the ferrets, the weasels, the otters, and several other types of carnivore. There are eight species of badger, in three subfamilies: Melinae (badgers of Europe and Asia – see links in species list below), Mellivorinae (the Ratel or honey badger), and Taxideinae (the American badger). The Asiatic stink badgers of the genus Mydaus were formerly included in the Melinae, but recent genetic evidence indicates that these are actually Old World relatives of the skunks (family Mephitidae). Typical badgers (Meles, Arctonyx, Taxidea and Mellivora species) are short-legged and heavy-set. The lower jaw is articulated to the upper by means of a transverse condyle firmly locked into a long cavity of the cranium, so that dislocation of the jaw is all but impossible. This enables the badger to maintain its hold with the utmost tenacity, but limits the jaw movement to hinging open and shut or sliding from side to side. In science, a common name is any name by which a species or other concept is known that is not the official scientific name. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... This article is about the mammal. ... For other uses, see Weasel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the carnivorous mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ratel (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... The Javan Stink Badger (Mydaus javanensis, also called the Teledu, Malay Stink Badger and Indonesian Stink Badger) is a member of the badger family endemic to Java. ... Polecat redirects here. ... The mandible (from Latin mandibÅ­la, jawbone) or inferior maxillary bone is, together with the maxilla, the largest and strongest bone of the face. ... The condyloid process is thicker than the coronoid, and consists of two portions: the condyle, and the constricted portion which supports it, the neck. ... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ... A joint is the location at which two bones make contact. ...

Contents

Etymology

The name badger is possibly derived from the French word blaireau being used in both senses. But more likely, the term comes from the French word bêcheur (digger), introduced during William the Conqueror's reign.[1] An older term for "badger" is brock (Old English brocc), a Celtic loanword (Gaelic broc, Welsh broch, from Proto-Celtic *brokko). The Proto-Germanic term was *þahsu- (German Dachs), probably from the PIE root *tek'- "to construct," so that the badger would have been named after its digging of setts (tunnels). In linguistics, derivation is the process of creating new lexemes from other lexemes, for example, by adding a derivational affix. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... A loanword (or loan word) is a word directly taken into one language from another with little or no translation. ... The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called, particularly in colloquial situations, the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) have historically been part of a dialect continuum stretching from the south of Ireland, the Isle of Man, to the north of Scotland. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... The root is the primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. ... The entrance to a sett The interior of a tunnel within a sett A sett is a network of tunnels making up a badgers homestead. ...


A male badger is a boar, a female a sow and a young badger is a cub. The collective name for a group of badgers is a clan, colony, or cete. For other uses, see Clan (disambiguation). ... This article is about a type of political territory. ...


Classification

This article is about the carnivorous mammals. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Melogale is the genus group Ferret-badgers. ... Melogale is the genus group Ferret-badgers. ... Binomial name Melogale moschata The Chinese Ferret Badger Distinctive mask-like face markings distinguish the Chinese ferret badger from other oriental mustelids. ... Binomial name Melogale everetti (Thomas, 1895) The Everetts Ferret Badger (Melogale everetti), also known as the Kinabalu Ferret Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... For other uses, see Ratel (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Chamitataxus avitus Owen, 2006 Chamitataxus was a prehistoric badger genus belonging to the group Fissipedia. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Mustelinae is a Subfamily of Family Mustelidae and includes wolverines, weasels, ferrets, martens, and similar carnivorous mammals of Order Carnivora. ... The Javan Stink Badger (Mydaus javanensis, also called the Teledu, Malay Stink Badger and Indonesian Stink Badger) is a member of the badger family endemic to Java. ... Binomial name Mydaus marchei (Huet, 1887) The Palawan stink badger is a small badger that lives on the Philippine Islands of Palawan and Busuanga. ...

Behavior

The behavior of badgers differs by family, but all shelter underground, living in burrows called setts. Some are solitary, moving from home to home, while others are known to form clans. Clan size is variable between 2 to 15. Badgers are fierce animals and will protect themselves and their young at all costs. Badgers are capable of fighting off much larger animals such as wolves, coyotes and bears. The entrance to a sett The interior of a tunnel within a sett A sett is a network of tunnels making up a badgers homestead. ... Wolves may refer to: Gray Wolf Other uses of Wolf: see Wolf (disambiguation) Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. Category: ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ...


Diet

American badger.
American badger.

North American Badgers (Taxidea taxus) are omnivores and prey predominantly on pocket gophers (Geomyidae), ground squirrels (Spermophilus), moles (Talpidae), marmots (Marmota), prairie dogs (Cynomys), woodrats (Neotoma), kangaroo rats (Dipodomys), deer mice (Peromyscus), and voles (Microtus). They also prey on ground-nesting birds (such as bank swallow or sand martin Riparia riparia and burrowing owl Athene cunicularia), lizards, amphibians, carrion, fish, skunks (Mephitis and Spilogale), insects, including bees and honeycomb, and some plant foods, such as corn (maize, Zea mais), peas, green beans, mushrooms and other fungi, and sunflower seeds (Helianthus). Unlike many carnivores that stalk their prey in open country, badgers catch most of their food by digging. They can tunnel after ground dwelling rodents with amazing speed. They have been known to cache food. Image File history File links Badger taxidea taxus. ... Image File history File links Badger taxidea taxus. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Omnivores are organisms that consume both plants and animals. ... Genera Cratogeomys Geomys Orthogeomys Pappogeomys Thomomys Zygogeomys The pocket gophers are burrowing rodents of the family Geomyidae. ... Genera see text The pocket gophers are burrowing rodents of the family Geomyidae. ... Genera Several, see text Squirrel is the common name for rodents of the family Sciuridae. ... Species about 38: see text. ... For other uses, see Mole. ... Genera Uropsilus Desmana Galemys Talpa Mogera Parascaptor Scaptochirus Scaptonyx Scapanulus Urotrichus Neurotrichus Scalopus Parascalops Scapanus Condylura For other meanings, see Mole (disambiguation). ... Species see text Marmots are members of the genus Marmota, in the rodent family Sciuridae (squirrels). ... Species see text Marmots are members of the genus Marmota, in the rodent family Sciuridae (squirrels). ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens Prairie dogs are small stout-bodied burrowing rodents with shallow cheek pouches native to both North and Central America. ... Species Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidens Prairie dogs are small stout-bodied burrowing rodents with shallow cheek pouches native to both North and Central America. ... Species see text A pack rat, also called a trade rat or wood rat, generally referrs to the North American Woodrat (Neotoma cinema), but other species of Neotoma also fall into the category. ... Species see text A pack rat, also called a trade rat or wood rat, can be any of several species in the genus Neotoma, but most commonly the North American Woodrat (Neotoma cinerea). ... Species 22, see text Kangaroo rats, genus Dipodomys, are small rodents native to North America. ... Kangaroo rats, genus Dipodomys, are small rodents native to North and Central America. ... species See text. ... species See text. ... A vole is a small rodent resembling a mouse but with a stouter body; a shorter, hairy tail; and smaller ears and eyes. ... Species See text The genus Microtus is a group of voles found in North America and northern Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Riparia riparia (Linnaeus, 1758) The Sand Martin (Riparia riparia) is a migratory passerine bird in the swallow family. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) Subspecies About 20 living, see text Synonyms Strix cunicularia Molina, 1782 Speotyto cunicularia Spheotyto cunicularia (lapsus) The Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) is a small, long-legged owl found throughout open landscapes of North and South America. ... This page is about Lizards, the order of reptile. ... For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Genera Mephitis Spilogale Conepatus The skunks or Mephitidae are a family of medium-sized mammals, typically black-and-white-furred, belonging to the order Carnivora. ... Mephitis could be: Mephitis (genus), one of the three genera of skunks. ... Species Spilogale gracilis Merriam, 1890 Spilogale putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) Spilogale pygmaea Thomas, 1898 The Eastern Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) of the family Mephitidae is smaller and more weasel-like than the striped skunk. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Symphypleona - globular springtails Subclass Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails) Subclass Dicondylia Monura - extinct Thysanura (common bristletails) Subclass Pterygota Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Blattodea (cockroaches) Mantodea (mantids) Isoptera (termites) Zoraptera Grylloblattodea Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets... Families Andrenidae Anthophoridae Apidae Colletidae Ctenoplectridae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae This article is about the insect. ... For other uses, see Honeycomb (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Corn (Zea mays L. ssp. ... Basidiocarps (mushrooms) of the fungus Leucocoprinus sp. ... The sunflower seed is the seed of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus). ... For other uses, see cache (disambiguation). ...


The honey badger consumes honey, porcupines and even venomous snakes (such as the puff adder). They will climb trees to gain access to honey from bees' nests. Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... Genera Family Erethizontidae   Coendou   Sphiggurus   Erethizon   Echinoprocta Family Hystricidae   Atherurus   Hystrix   Thecurus   Trichys The porcupine is a rodent known for its coat of sharp spines, or quills that defend it from predators. ... Families Acrochordidae Aniliidae Anomalepididae Anomochilidae Atractaspididae Boidae Bolyeriidae Colubridae Cylindrophiidae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Leptotyphlopidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Typhlopidae Uropeltidae Viperidae Xenopeltidae Snakes are cold blooded legless reptiles closely related to lizards, which share the order Squamata. ... Binomial name Bitis arietans (Merrem, 1820) Synonyms Cobra lachesis - Laurenti, 1768 Cobra clotho - Laurenti, 1768 [Coluber] Lachesis - Gmelin, 1788 [Coluber] Clotho - Gmelin, 1788 C[oluber]. Bitin - Bonnaterre, 1790 Col[uber]. Intumescens - Donndorff, 1798 Vipera severa - Latreille In Sonnini & Latreille, 1801 [Vipera (Echidna)] arietans - Merrem, 1820 Vipera inflata - Burchell, 1822 Echidna...

Badger foraging at night.
Badger foraging at night.

The diet of the Eurasian badger consists largely of earthworms, insects, and grubs. They also eat small mammals, amphibians, reptiles and birds as well as cereals, roots and fruit.[2] Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... For the LPG album, see The Earthworm (album). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Grub or GRUB can mean: a slang term for food a beetle larva that resembles a worm a distributed commercial search engine: see Grub (search engine) a number of places in Switzerland, Austria and Germany, such as: Grub, canton of Appenzell Outer Rhodes, Switzerland Grub, Germany for the GNU project... For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ... Reptilia redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Grain redirects here. ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ...

Eurasian badger.
Eurasian badger.

Badgers and humans

Many badgers in Europe were gassed during the 1960s and 1970s to control rabies. Until the 1980s, gassing was also practiced in the UK to control the spread of bovine TB. Scandinavian custom is to put eggshells in one's boots when walking through badger territory, as badgers are believed to bite down until they can hear a crunch. Hunting badgers is common in many countries, either as a perceived pest, or for sport. Ostensibly badgers are protected in the UK by the Protection of Badgers Act 1992. (Otherwise an exemption allowing fox hunters to loosely block setts to prevent chased foxes escaping into them was brought to an end with the passage of the Hunting Act 2004). Meddling in badger population is prevented as badgers are listed in the Berne Convention (Appendix III), but they are not otherwise the subject of any international treaty or legislation. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s is the current decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Larval form of some beetle is damaging specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in entomogical collection. ... A fox hunt Fox hunting is a form of hunting for foxes using a pack of scent hounds. ... The Hunting Act 2004 is an Act in the United Kingdom passed in 2004. ... The Bern Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats 1979, also known as the Bern Convention (or Berne Convention), came into force on June 1, 1982. ...

See Eurasian badger for more details about badgers and bovine tuberculosis.

Badger-baiting is a blood sport outlawed in the United Kingdom by the Cruelty to Animals Act 1835 as well as the Protection of Badgers Act 1992. Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: no relavent information If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... For other uses, see Blood sport (disambiguation). ... The Cruelty to Animals Act 1835 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (citation 5 & 6 Will. ...


The Dachshund dog breed has a history with badgers; "dachs" is the German word for badger, and dachshunds were originally bred to be badger hounds.[1] The dachshund is a short-legged, elongated dog breed of the hound family. ...


Badgers are popular in English language fiction. Many badger characters are featured in author Brian Jacques' Redwall series, most often falling under the title of Badger Lord or Badger Mother. One such badger contains 'Brock' in his name. Other stories featuring badgers include The Boy Who Talked to Badgers (1975 movie), The Tale of Mr. Tod, The Wind in the Willows, The Once and Future King, The Animals of Farthing Wood, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Book of Merlyn, and The Chronicles of Narnia. In the Harry Potter series, one of the four "houses" of Hogwarts, Hufflepuff, is symbolised by a badger. The character Frances in Russell Hoban's series of children's books is a badger. They also appear prominently in two volumes of Erin Hunter's Warriors: The New Prophecy series. A badger god is also featured as a major character and spirit guide for the lead character in The Immortals series by Tamora Pierce. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... (James) Brian Jacques (born June 15, 1939) is an English author, best known for his Redwall series of novels, as well as the Tribes of Redwall and Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. ... Redwall was the first book in the series by Brian Jacques. ... A Badger Lord is the ruler of Salamandastron in the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. ... Badger Mother is a fictional office in the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. ... The Tale of Mr. ... For other uses, see The Wind in the Willows (disambiguation). ... The Once and Future King is an Arthurian fantasy novel written by T.H. White. ... This article is about the book. ... Fantastic Mr Fox book cover by Quentin Blake book cover by Tony Ross. ... The Book of Merlyn is an Arthurian fantasy book written by T. H. White. ... Narnia redirects here. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Russell Hoban in 2005 Russell Conwell Hoban (born February 4, 1925) is an American writer of fantasy, science fiction, mainstream fiction, magic realism, poetry, and childrens books. ... Warriors is a possibly cult status book series by Kate Cary and Cherith Baldry of the UK, under the pen name Erin Hunter. ... Warriors is a series of childrens novels written under the pen name Erin Hunter, detailing the lives of four clans of wild forest cats. ... German cover of Wild Magic. ... Tamora Pierce (born December 13, 1954) is a fantasy author who writes books for young adults. ...


The most prominent poem on the badger is from the Romantic period's John Clare. "Badger" describes a badger hunt, complete with badger-baiting, and treats the badger as a noble creature who dies at the end. John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, in his time commonly known as the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet, the son of a farm labourer, born at Helpston near Peterborough. ...


Badger hair is used to make quality shaving brushes and has even been used in some instances as doll hair. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The badger is the state animal of Wisconsin. Likenesses of badgers appear through the Wisconsin State Capitol, and a badger appears on the head of the statue of Wisconsin atop the building. This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the state Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. ...


The official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is Buckingham U. Badger, AKA Bucky Badger. University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Bucky Badger Bucky Badger in person during a football game at Camp Randall Bucky Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ...


Urban legends

  • British forces were said to have released man-eating badgers in the vicinity of Basra, Iraq following the 2003 coalition invasion.[3] This allegation has been denied by the British, and local scientists agree that the animals, Ratels, also known as Honey Badgers, are native to the area.[4]

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ratel. ... For other uses, see Ratel (disambiguation). ... Look up native in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

References

  1. ^ BBC Natural World, 2008, Badgers: Secrets of the Sett
  2. ^ Diet of the Eurasian badger
  3. ^ "British blamed for Basra badgers", BBC News, 2007-07-12. Retrieved on 2007-07-12. 
  4. ^ Carney, Mike. "Brits 'deny' releasing 'giant man-eating' badgers that target Iraqis", USA Today, 2007-07-12. Retrieved on 2007-07-12. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikispecies has information related to:
melinae
Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... This article is about the carnivorous mammals. ... Species Aonyx capensis Aonyx congicus Aonyx is a genus of otters, containing two species, the African Clawless Otter and the Congo Clawless Otter. ... Binomial name Aonyx capensis (Schinz, 1821) The African Clawless Otter, Aonyx capensis, also known as the Cape Clawless Otter or Groot otter, is the second largest freshwater species of otter. ... Binomial name Amblonyx cinereus (Illiger, 1815) Oriental Small-clawed Otters, (aka Asian Small-Clawed Otters) are the smallest otters in the world. ... Binomial name Enhydra lutris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) is a large otter native to the North Pacific, from northern Japan and Kamchatka west across the Aleutian Islands south to California. ... Binomial name Enhydra lutris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) is a large otter native to the North Pacific, from northern Japan and Kamchatka west across the Aleutian Islands south to California. ... Genera Amblonyx Aonyx Enhydra Lontra Lutra Lutrogale Pteronura Otters are aquatic or marine carnivorous mammals, members of the large and diverse family Mustelidae, which also includes weasels, polecats, badgers and others. ... Binomial name Lontra canadensis (Schreber, 1777) The Northern River Otter, Lontra canadensis, is a North American member of the Mustelidae or weasel family. ... Binomial name Lontra provocax The Southern river otter (Lontra provocax) is a species of otter that lives in Chile and Argentina. ... Binomial name Lontra longicaudis (Olfers, 1818) The Neotropical River Otter (or just Neotropical Otter), Lontra longicaudis, is an otter species found in Central and South America. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) Marine Otters (Lontra felina) are rare and poorly-understood marine mammals of the weasel family (Family Mustelidae). ... Binomial name Lutra lutra (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Otter, Lutra lutra, is a European member of the Mustelidae or weasel family, and is typical of freshwater otters. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map (note: range also includes British Isles) The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, also known as the Eurasian river otter, common otter, Old World otter and European otter, is a European and Asian member of the Lutrinae or otter subfamily, and is typical of freshwater otters. ... Binomial name Lutra sumatrana The hairy-nosed otter (Lutra sumatrana) is an otter thought extinct in 1998 but more were found. ... Speckle-throated otter (hydrictis maculicollis) otherwise known as the spot-necked otter hunts in rivers and lakes and has to have clear water for visual purposes. ... Speckle-throated otter (hydrictis maculicollis) otherwise known as the spot-necked otter hunts in rivers and lakes and has to have clear water for visual purposes. ... Species † Lutrogale cretensis - Cretan Otter † Lutrogale palaeoleptonyx Lutrogale perspicillata - Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale is a genus of otter, with only one extant species - the smooth-coated otter. ... Binomial name Lutrogale perspicillata (Geoffroy, 1826) The Smooth-coated Otter (Lutrogale perspicillata) is a species of otter, the only extant representative of the genus Lutrogale. ... Binomial name Pteronura brasiliensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Giant Otter, Pteronura brasiliensis, (also known as the river wolf) is the longest of the worlds otters, as well as one of the largest mustelids[2]. It is native to South America but is endangered and is also very rare in captivity. ... Binomial name Pteronura brasiliensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Giant Otter, Pteronura brasiliensis, (also known as the river wolf) is the longest of the worlds otters, as well as one of the largest mustelids[2]. It is native to South America but is endangered and is also very rare in captivity. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... Binomial name Melogale everetti (Thomas, 1895) The Everetts Ferret Badger (Melogale everetti), also known as the Kinabalu Ferret Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Melogale moschata The Chinese Ferret Badger Distinctive mask-like face markings distinguish the Chinese ferret badger from other oriental mustelids. ... Mydaus is a genus of Old World carnivore comprising of two species of stink badger. ... Binomial name Mydaus marchei (Huet, 1887) The Palawan stink badger is a small badger that lives on the Philippine Islands of Palawan and Busuanga. ... The Javan Stink Badger (Mydaus javanensis, also called the Teledu, Malay Stink Badger and Indonesian Stink Badger) is a member of the badger family endemic to Java. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Mustelinae is a Subfamily of Family Mustelidae and includes wolverines, weasels, ferrets, martens, and similar carnivorous mammals of Order Carnivora. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 A Tayra at the Summit Botanical Gardens and Zoo, Panamá The Tayra (Eira barbara), also known as the Tolomuco or Perico ligero in Central America, is an omnivorous animal from the weasel family Mustelidae. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 A Tayra at the Summit Botanical Gardens and Zoo, Panamá The Tayra (Eira barbara), also known as the Tolomuco or Perico ligero in Central America, is an omnivorous animal from the weasel family Mustelidae. ... The hurón or grison (Spanish: ferret) refers to either of two related ferret-like mammals from Central and South America: Galictis vittatus. ... Binomial name Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) The Lesser Grison (Spanish: Hurón Menor; Portuguese: Furão), Galictis cuja, is an animal belonging to the ferret family Mustelidae from South America. ... Binomial name Galictis vittata (Schreber, 1776) The Greater Grison, Galictis vittata, is an animal belonging to the ferret family Mustelidae from Central and South America, from southern Mexico to Brazil and Bolivia, living in savannas and rainforests, usually seen near rivers and streams. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Ictonyx striatus Kaup, 1835 The Striped Polecat (Ictonyx striatus, also called the African Polecat, Zoril, Zorille or Zorilla) is a member of the weasel family which somewhat resembles a skunk. ... Binomial name Ictonyx striatus Kaup, 1835 The Striped Polecat (Ictonyx striatus, also called the African Polecat, Zoril, Zorille or Zorilla) is a member of the weasel family which somewhat resembles a skunk. ... Binomial name Lyncodon patagonicus (Blainville, 1842) The Patagonian weasel is a small mustelid that is the only member of the genus Lyncodon. ... Binomial name Lyncodon patagonicus (Blainville, 1842) The Patagonian weasel is a small mustelid that is the only member of the genus Lyncodon. ... Species Martes americana Martes flavigula Martes foina Martes gwatkinsii Martes martes Martes melampus Martes pennanti Martes zibellina For the Wiltshire village see Marten, Wiltshire. ... Binomial name Martes americana (Turton, 1806) The American Marten (Martes americana) is a North American marten sometimes also called the Pine Marten, even though it is a separate species from the European Pine Marten. ... Binomial name Martes flavigula Boddaert, 1785 Subspecies M. f. ... Binomial name Martes foina (Erxleben, 1777) The Beech Marten (Martes foina) is the most common species of marten in Central Europe. ... Nilgiri marten Martes gwatkinsii Horsfield, 1851 Distribution The Nilgiri marten is endemic to Western Ghats. ... Binomial name Martes martes (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about the European Pine Marten. ... Binomial name (Erxleben, 1777) The fisher is a North American marten, a medium sized mustelid. ... Binomial name Martes zibellina Linnaeus, 1758 The Sable (Martes zibellina) is a small mammal, closely akin to the martens, living in southern Russia near the Ural Mountains through Siberia and Mongolia to Hokkaidō in Japan. ... For other uses, see Weasel (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Desmarest, 1818 The Tropical Weasel or Amazon Weasel (Mustela africana) is a South American weasel, which has been recorded in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. ... Binomial name Mustela altaica Pallas, 1811 The Mountain Weasel, also known as the Pale Weasel, is a species of weasel that lives in mountainous parts of Asia from Kazakhstan, Tibet and the Himalayas through to Mongolia, northeastern China, southern Siberia and Korea. ... Ermine redirects here. ... Binomial name (Lesson, 1827) The Steppe Polecat (Mustela eversmannii) is a small carnivore and is one of several species of weasel that belong to the genus Mustela. ... Species Mustela felipei Colombian Weasel (Comadreja Colombiana) is a mammal originary of south america, specially Colombia , but some specimens have been found in northern Ecuador. ... Binomial name Mustela frenata Lichtenstein, 1831 The Long-tailed Weasel (Mustela frenata) is the most widely distributed mustelid in the New World. ... Binomial name Hodgson, 1835 The Yellow-bellied Weasel (Mustela kathiah) is a species of mammal in the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mustela lutreola (Linnaeus, 1761) The European Mink, Mustela lutreola, is a European member of the Mustelidae family found in some regions of Spain, France, Romania, Sweden, Poland and the greater part of Russia, though not found east of the Ural Mountains. ... The Indonesian Mountain Weasel (Mustela lutreolina) is only found on the islands of Java and Sumatra at elevations over 1,000 metres. ... Binomial name (Audubon & Bachman, 1851) The Black-footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes) is a small carnivorous North American mammal closely related to the Steppe Polecat of Russia, and a member of the diverse family Mustelidae which also includes weasels, mink, polecats, martens, otters, and badgers. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1766 The Least Weasel, is the smallest member of the genus Mustela, and indeed in the entire order carnivora. ... Binomial name Mustela putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about one species of mammal referred to as Polecat. For other uses, see Polecat (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Mustela sibirica Pallas, 1773 The Siberian Mountain Weasel, also known as the Siberian Weasel, Kolinsky or Himalayan Weasel, is a rust coloured relative of the weasel. ... Trinomial name Mustela strigidorsa xxxx (AuthorLastname, XXXX) The Back-striped weasel (Lat. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The American Mink is a trademark of the American Legend Cooperative The American Mink, Neovison vison, is a North American member of the Mustelidae family found in Alaska, Canada and most of the United States. ... Binomial name Vormela peregusna (Güldenstädt, 1770) The marbled polecat () is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. ... Binomial name Vormela peregusna (Güldenstädt, 1770) The marbled polecat () is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. ...

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Badger - MSN Encarta (387 words)
Badger, mammal characterized by short, strong legs; elongated feet that are more or less plantigrade (heels touch the ground); and straight, strong toes adapted to burrowing.
Badgers are heavily furred, distinctly marked, and very strong.
The American badger is native to the western regions of North America, as far east as Ohio, south to central Mexico, and north to southern Canada.
Badger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1189 words)
\'\'\'Badger\'\'\' is the common name for any animal of three subfamilies, which belong to the family Mustelidae: the same mammal family as the ferrets, the weasels, the otters, and several other types of carnivore.
Badgers may not be killed, nor their setts interfered with, except on licence from the government, with an exception permitting the killing of badgers in the attempt to eradicate bovine tuberculosis.
Badger baiting dog breeds are used to locate the badger in the tunnel, after which the diggers attempt to dig down to the badger.
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