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Encyclopedia > Bactrian camel
Bactrian Camel

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Camelidae
Genus: Camelus
Species: C. bactrianus
Binomial name
Camelus bactrianus
Linnaeus, 1758

Bactrian Camel range

The Bactrian Camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. The Bactrian camel has two humps on its back, in contrast to the Dromedary, also known as the Arabian Camel, which has one. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2240x1708, 1478 KB) Bactrian Camel Camelus bactrianus at the Cotswold Wildlife Park, Burford, Oxfordshire, England. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... . ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in... Families Suidae Hippopotamidae Tayassuidae Camelidae Tragulidae Moschidae Cervidae Giraffidae Antilocapridae Bovidae The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Species  Lama glama  Lama pacos  Lama guanicoe  Vicugna vicugna  Camelus dromedarius  Camelus bactrianus The four llamas and two camels are camelids: members of the biological family Camelidae, the only family in the suborder Tylopoda. ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Families Antilocapridae Bovidae Camelidae Cervidae Giraffidae Hippopotamidae Moschidae Suidae Tayassuidae Tragulidae Leptochoeridae † Chaeropotamidae † Dichobunidae † Cebochoeridae † Entelodontidae † Anoplotheriidae † Anthracotheriidae † Cainotheriidae † Agriochoeridae † Merycoidodontidae † Leptomerycidae † Protoceratidae † Xiphodontidae † Amphimerycidae † Helohyidae † Gelocidae † Merycodontidae † Dromomerycidae † Raoellidae † Choeropotamidae † Sanitheriidae † The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... A steppe in Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, a steppe (Russian: - , Ukrainian: - , Kazakh: - ), pronounced in English as , is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally considered as being dominated by tall grasses... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Camelus dromedarius Linnaeus, 1758 Dromedary range The Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius) (often referred to simply as the Dromedary) is a large even-toed ungulate native to northern Africa, Greater Middle East area and western India, also the land of east Africa, Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. ...


Nearly all of the estimated 1.4 million Bactrian Camels alive today are domesticated, but in October 2002 the estimated 950 remaining in the wild in northwest China and Mongolia were placed on the critically endangered species list.[1] Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Siberian Tiger is a subspecies of tiger that are critically endangered. ...

Contents

Physical characteristics and habitat

A Bactrian Camel in the Kyzyl Kum desert in Uzbekistan.
A Bactrian Camel in Frankfurt Zoo
A Bactrian Camel in Frankfurt Zoo

Bactrian Camels are over 2 meters (7 feet) tall at the hump and weigh in excess of 725 kg (1,600 lb). They are herbivores, eating grass, leaves, and grains, capable of drinking up to 120 litres (32 US gallons) of water at a time. In the wilds of Mongolia, this is usually in the form of ice or snow eaten in small but frequent amounts [2]. Their mouths are extremely tough, allowing them to eat thorny desert plants like asparagus. Image File history File links Bactrian_camel. ... Image File history File links Bactrian_camel. ... The Kyzyl Kum (Uzbek: red sand; also called Qyzylqum) is a desert in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 764 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2172 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 764 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2172 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ...


They are supremely adapted to protect themselves against the desert heat and sand, with wide, padded feet and thick leathery pads on the knees and chest, nostrils that can open and close, ears lined with protective hairs, and bushy eyebrows with two rows of long eyelashes. Thick fur and underwool keep the animal warm during cold desert nights and also insulate against daytime heat. A nostril is one of the two channels of the nose, from the point where they bifurcate to the external opening. ...


The Dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) is the only other surviving camel, native to the Sahara desert, but today is extinct in the wild. By comparison, the Bactrian Camel is a stockier, hardier animal able to survive the scorching desert heat of northern Iran to the frozen winters in Tibet [3]. The Dromedary is taller and faster, and with a rider it can maintain 8–9 mph for hours at a time. A loaded Bactrian Camel moves at about 2.5 mph [4]. Bactrian camels are also found in Hunder Sand Dunes in Nubra Valley, Ladakh. There are approx 2000 camels in Nubra. Binomial name Camelus dromedarius Linnaeus, 1758 Dromedary range The Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius) (often referred to simply as the Dromedary) is a large even-toed ungulate native to northern Africa, Greater Middle East area and western India, also the land of east Africa, Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. ... The Sahara is the worlds second largest desert (second to Antarctica), over 9,000,000 km² (3,500,000 mi²), located in northern Africa and is 2. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ...


History

It is thought that the Bactrian Camel was domesticated (independently from the Dromedary) sometime before 2500 BC[5], probably in northern Iran, Northeast Afghanistan[5] and Northern Pakistan or southwestern Turkestan[citation needed]. The Dromedary is believed to have been domesticated between 4000 BCE and 2000 BCE[6] in Arabia. The wild population of Bactrian Camels was first described by Nikolai Przhevalsky in the late 19th century. (Redirected from 25th century BCE) (26th century BC - 25th century BC - 24th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC -- Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period 2494 BC -- End of Fourth Dynasty, start of Fifth Dynasty in Egypt. ... Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (5th millennium BC – 4th millennium BC – 3rd millennium BC - other millennia) Events City of Ur in Mesopotamia (40th century BC). ... (3rd millennium BC – 2nd millennium BC – 1st millennium BC – other millennia) Events Second dynasty of Babylon First Bantu migrations from west Africa The Cushites drive the original inhabitants from Ethiopia, and establish trade relations with Egypt. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... Nikolai Mikhaylovich Przhevalsky, also spelled Przewalski and Prjevalsky (Russian: ) (April 12, 1839—November 1, 1888 (Gregorian calendar)), was a Russian geographer and explorer in central and eastern Asia. ...


Subspecies

There is some evidence that the Bactrian Camel can be divided up into different subspecies. In particular, it has been discovered that a population of wild Bactrian Camel lives within a part of the Gashun Gobi region of the Gobi Desert. This population is distinct from domesticated herds both in genetic makeup and in behavior. However, the significance of those differences has not yet been demonstrated. The Gobi Desert lies in the territory of the Peoples Republic of China and the Country of Mongolia. ...


There are possibly as many as three regions in the genetic makeup that are distinctly different from domesticated camels and there is up to a 3% difference in the base genetic code. However, with so few wild camels, it is unclear what the natural genetic diversity within a population would have been.


Canadian Researcher William Sommers found that these wild camels had the ability to drink saltwater slush, although it is not yet certain the camel can extract useful water from it. Domesticated camels do not attempt to drink salt water, though the reason is unknown.


Gallery

References

  1. ^ Hare (2002). Camelus bactrianus. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this species is critically endangered
  2. ^ Planet Earth Deserts. Retrieved on April 29, 2007.
  3. ^ Creature Features - Pet Facts: Camels. Retrieved on December 5, 2005.
  4. ^ Camel. Retrieved on December 5, 2005.
  5. ^ a b "camel." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2007. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 11 Feb. 2007 <[1]>.
  6. ^ Al-Swailem et al. 2007. Classification of Saudi Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius) subtypes based on RAPD technique.Journal of Food, Agriculture & Environment Vol.5 (1) : 143-148. Online pdf

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikispecies has information related to:
  • EDGE of Exisitence (Camelus bactrianus) - Saving the World's most Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) species
  • National Geographic - Wild Bactrian Camels Critically Endangered
  • Wild Camel Protection Foundation
  • BBC - Discovery of camels in the Gashun Gobi region

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bactrian Camels (813 words)
Bactrian camels are native to the cold climates of Central Asia, so they are well adapted for life in Alaska.
In contrast, Bactrian camels have two humps and are native to the cold, mountain and high desert climates of Central Asia.
The wild Bactrian camel is endangered due to human impact on their environment, hybridization with domestic camels, sport hunting, predation by desert wolves and destruction of camels due to their competition with livestock herds for limited food resources.
Camel - MSN Encarta (585 words)
Camel, large cud-chewing mammal with one or two humps on the back, found in the arid regions of Africa, Asia, and Australia.
Domesticated Arabian camels are found throughout North Africa and South and Southwest Asia, with the largest populations in Somalia, Sudan, and India.
Wild Bactrian camels live only in the Gobi Desert of southwestern Mongolia and in the Takla Makan desert and the Lop Nur area of northwestern China.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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