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Encyclopedia > Baby Busters

Baby Busters is a name for a demographic group born in the United States, and sometimes Canada, from 1958 through 1968. They are called this due to a decline in the birth rate; specifically, the U.S. birth rate fell for eleven consecutive years after 1957, the longest such decline in American history. The name is intended to contrast with the term "Baby Boomer"; indeed, the central purpose of its usage appears to be to deny Boomer affiliation on behalf of those born from 1958 through 1964, thus rejecting the mass media's widespread practice of observing 1960 or even 1964 as the baby boom's cutoff date. Approximately 43 million people were born in the United States during the years of the actual "bust;" adding immigrants and subtracting deaths of those born during this period, it is believed that about 41 million persons born during these years were alive in the United States as of the end of 2003. Demographics is a shorthand term for population characteristics. Demographics include age, income, mobility (in terms of travel time to work or number of vehicles available), educational attainment, home ownership, employment status, and even location. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A baby boomer is someone who was born during the period of increased birth rates when economic prosperity arose in many countries following World War II. In the United States, the term is commonly used to refer to the generation which demographic popularizers have identified with birth years from the... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... A baby boom is any period of greatly increased birth rate within temporal and usually geographical bounds. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first identification of baby busters in this context appears to have been made by anthropologist Marvin Harris (1927-2001) in his 1981 book America Now (later re-released under the title Why Nothing Works: The Anthropology of Daily Life). In 1987, the word twentysomething was coined, an apparent back-formation of Thirtysomething, the title of a then-popular Baby Boomer-themed television series. Douglas Coupland's groundbreaking 1991 novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture was dedicated to "the generation born in the late 1950s and 1960s," and in the following year's Presidential election the "under-35 generation" was frequently cited as the core supporters of third-party candidate Ross Perot. In his 2001 book, The Isolation Generation, Dean Anderson identifies a generation labeled the Pre-Lunar Space-Agers as having been born between the launch of Sputnik (October 4, 1957) and the Apollo 11 moon landing (July 20, 1969), thus making 1958 through 1968 the group's full birth years. Marvin Harris Marvin Harris (August 18, 1927 – October 25, 2001) was an American anthropologist and highly influential in the development of cultural materialism. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... America Now is a former politics and business TV program on CNBC with Lawrence Kudlow and James Cramer. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... thirtysomething (1987 – 1991) was a ground-breaking and award-winning American evening television drama, of the type popularly labeled a soap opera when broadcast during the daytime. ... Douglas Coupland (born December 30, 1961) is a Canadian author and cultural commentator, raised in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, published in 1991, is the first novel by Douglas Coupland. ... // Events and No. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930), is a billionaire American businessman from Texas best known as a candidate for President of the United States (in 1992 and 1996). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Sputnik 1 The Sputnik program was a series of unmanned space missions launched by the Soviet Union in the late 1950s to demonstrate the viability of artificial satellites. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apollo 11 was an American space mission, part of the Apollo program and the first manned mission to land on the Moon. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ...


The psychographic position of the Baby Busters and how they relate to neighboring generations has been the subject of considerable debate. Some insist that they constitute an entirely separate group, between the Baby Boomers and Generation X, while others reckon them as an older subset of Generation X. The combination of the aforementioned dedication of Douglas Coupland's novel followed by the media obsession with "twentysomethings" that persisted well into the 1990s has only served to heighten the confusion. A baby boom is defined as a period of increased birth rates relative to surrounding generations. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Douglas Coupland (born December 30, 1961) is a Canadian author and cultural commentator, raised in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ...


Another frequently-encountered description of Baby Busters consists of the span of birth years 1965 through 1976 in the US. These years lie in between the end of Baby Boom (1964, beginning in 1946) and the beginning of the Echo Baby Boom (1977, ending in 1994 and sometimes known as "Generation Y," even though birth rates began a seven-year dip in 1991, this being the second longest such streak in modern history after the eleven-year decline of 1958-68 already alluded to), the conceptual children of the Baby Boomers. As plotted against a normal distribution curve, the Baby Boom had its apex in 1957 (4.3 million births), and was followed by a decline in births but was still a relatively large number of births (remaining at 4 million or above through 1964). The US Census Bureau defines the dearth in births from 1965 through 1976 in terms of demographic birth cohorts as the Baby Bust, although many in the advertising industry prefer to observe 1978 as the last such year (with Generation Y commencing with those born in 1979). 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... Demographics is a shorthand term for population characteristics. Demographics include age, income, mobility (in terms of travel time to work or number of vehicles available), educational attainment, home ownership, employment status, and even location. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ...


Baby Buster celebrities

American Generations
Term Period
Awakening Generation 1701-1723
First Great Awakening 1730-1740
Liberty Generation
Republican Generation
Compromise Generation
1724-1741
1742-1766
1767-1791
Second Great Awakening 1790-1840
Transcendental Generation
Gilded Generation
Progressive Generation
1792-1821
1822-1842
1843-1859
Missionary Awakening 1886-1908
Missionary Generation
Lost Generation
Interbellum Generation
G.I. Generation
Greatest Generation
1860-1882
1883-1900
1900-1910
1900-1924
1911-1924
American High 1929-1956
Silent Generation
Baby Boomers
Beat Generation
Generation Jones
1925-1945
1946-1964
1948-1962
1954-1965
Consciousness Revolution 1964-1984
Baby Busters
Generation X
MTV Generation
1958-1968
1965-1981
1975-1985
Culture Wars 1984-2005
Boomerang Generation
Generation Y
iGeneration
New Silent Generation
1981-1986
1982-2003
1986-2000
2004-
Crisis of 2020 2020-

Celebrities born 1958 through 1968 include: William Strauss and Neil Howe in their books Generations (ISBN 0688119123) and The Fourth Turning divide Anglo-American history into saecula, or seasonal cycles of history, and divide the saecula into generations by birth year, and classify generations and historical periods into four types each. ... The Awakening Generation is the name given by Strauss and Howe in their book Generations to those Americans born from 1701 to 1723. ... The First Great Awakening was a religious movement among American colonial Protestants in the 1730s and 1740s. ... The Liberty Generation is that name given by Strauss and Howe in their book Generations to those Americans born from 1724 to 1741. ... The Republican Generation is the name given to that generation of Americans born from 1742 to 1766 by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book Generations. ... The Compromise Generation is that name given to the generation of Americans born from 1767 to 1791 by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book Generations. ... The Second Great Awakening was the second great religious revival in United States history and consisted of several kinds of activity, distinguished by locale and expression of religious commitment. ... The Transcendental Generation is the name given by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book Generations for that generation of Americans born from 1792 to 1821. ... The Gilded Generation is the name coined by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book Generations for the generation of Americans born from 1822 to 1842. ... The Progressive Generation is a name coined by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book Generations for that generation of Americans born from 1843 to 1859. ... The Third Great Awakening was a period in American history from 1886 to 1908. ... The Missionary Generation is the designation given by Strauss and Howe in their book Generations to that generation in the United States of America born from 1860 to 1882. ... The term Lost Generation was coined by Gertrude Stein to refer to a group of American literary notables who lived in Paris from the time period which saw the end of World War I to the beginning of the Great Depression. ... Interbellum Generation is a term sometimes used to denote persons born in the United States during the first decade of the 20th Century, often expressed specifically as the years 1901 through 1910. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Greatest Generation is a term sometimes used to denote the younger half of what is often referred to as the G.I. Generation. ... The Jazz Age describes the period of the 1920s and 1930s, the years between World War I and World War II, particularly in North America, largely coinciding with the Roaring Twenties; with the rise of the Great Depression, the values of this age saw much decline. ... The name Silent Generation was coined in the November 5, 1951 cover story of Time to refer to the generation coming of age at the time. ... A baby boomer is someone who was born during the period of increased birth rates when economic prosperity arose in many countries following World War II. In the United States, the term is commonly used to refer to the generation which demographic popularizers have identified with birth years from the... The term Beat Generation refers to a certain group of American counter-culture writers of the 1950s whose writing reflected the new consciousness which became the groundwork for the social/cultural revolution of the 60s. ... Generation Jones, according to American social scientist Jonathan Pontell (born 1958), includes those Americans born from 1954 through 1965, all inclusive. ... The Consciousness Revolution was a period of spiritual awakening in American history, according to Strauss and Howe in their books Generations and Fourth Turning. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The MTV Generation is a term describing a generation gap or sub-generation that includes the end of the Generation X (a generation following the Baby Boom, especially Americans and Canadians born in the 1960s and 1970s) yet importantly includes the elders of Generation Y (a generation considered to follow... The term Culture Wars has been used to describe ideologically-driven and often strident confrontations typical of American public culture and politics since the 1960s, but especially beginning in the 1980s. ... Boomerang Generation is a term not uncommonly used to describe the current generation of young adults in contemporary western culture, having been born between the years of roughly 1981-1986 and possibly later than 1986. ... Generation Y is the cohort of Americans born immediately after Generation X, though the term is itself controversial and is synonymous with several alternative terms including The Net Generation, Millennials and Echo Boomers. ... iGeneration is a term used to describe the generation born primarily in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... The New Silent Generation is a proposed holding name used by Neil Howe and William Strauss in their demographic history of America, Generations to describe the generation whose birth years begin in 2001 and continue to an as yet unknown year in the future. ... The Crisis of 2020 is a conflict predicted by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their books Generations and Fourth Turning. ...

For Baby Buster celebrities born from 1961 through 1968 see the list at baby boom and Generation X. Christiane Amanpour Christiane Amanpour (born January 12, 1958) is chief international correspondent for CNN. Based out of CNNs London bureau, Amanpour is one of the most recognized and highly distinguished international correspondents on American television. ... Maria E. Cantwell (born October 13, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Washington state and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... Steve Case (born August 21, 1958) is a businessman best known as the former chief executive officer and chairman of America Online (AOL). ... America Online, or AOL for short, is a U.S.-based online service provider and Internet service provider that is owned by Time Warner. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Mark Cuban (born July 31, 1958 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an outspoken billionaire who is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team. ... The Dallas Mavericks are a National Basketball Association team based in Dallas, Texas. ... The Benefactor is a six-episode (originally eight episodes) US reality television show broadcast on ABC starting on September 13, 2004. ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None Capital Carson City Largest city Las Vegas Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 7th 286,367 km² 519 km 788 km 0. ... Andy Gibb (March 5, 1958 – March 10, 1988) was an Anglo-Australian singer and teen idol, and the younger brother of Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, also known as the Bee Gees. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eric Arthur Heiden (born June 15, 1958) is an American speed skater who won all the distances and thus an unprecedented five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympic Games in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Gaetan Boucher training for the 1976 Olympics Speed skating (as well Speedskating) is a form of ice skating in which the competitors attempt to travel a certain distance over the ice as quickly as possible. ... Rickey Henderson Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958) is a professional baseball player. ... Baseball is a team sport in which a player on one team (the pitcher) attempts to throw a hard, fist-sized ball past a player on the other team (the batter), who attempts to hit the baseball with a tapered, smooth, cylindrical stick called a bat. ... Ice T Tracy Morrow (born February 16, 1958 in Newark, New Jersey), better known as Ice-T or Ice T, is an American rapper, singer, and actor. ... Gangsta rap is a subgenre of hip hop music which involves a lyrical focus on the lifestyles of inner-city criminals. ... For other people with the same name, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation) Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958), also known as the King of Pop and Wacko Jacko, is an American musician whose successful music career and controversial personal life have been at the forefront of pop culture for the... Joan Jett (born Joan Marie Larkin on September 22, 1960 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American rock and roll guitarist, singer, and actress best known for her hits I Love Rock N Roll, Crimson and Clover, Do You Wanna Touch Me, Bad Reputation, I Hate Myself For Loving You, and... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Marc H. Morial Marc Haydel Morial (born 1958) is an American political and civic leader and former mayor of New Orleans. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Prince (born Prince Rogers Nelson on June 7, 1958), known as (or, The Artist Formerly Known As Prince) from 1993 to 2000, is a popular and influential American musician. ... This article is about the singer. ... Jason Alexander Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan, September 23, 1959, in Newark, New Jersey), is a television, cinema and musical theatre actor. ... Shaun Paul Cassidy (born September 27, 1958 in Los Angeles, California) is an American singer, actor and TV producer. ... Jonathan Franzen (August 17, 1959, Chicago, Illinois) is an American novelist and essayist, currently living in New York City. ... Jennifer Mulhern Granholm (born February 5, 1959) is the current Governor of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... HI A governor is also, a monkey who is smart and can fly like a penguin is a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... Official language(s) English de-facto Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 11th 96,716 mi² 250,494 km² 239 miles 385 km 491 miles 790 km 41. ... Earvin Magic Johnson, Jr. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 Basketball is a sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Delorez Florence Griffith-Joyner a. ... For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... David Koresh David Koresh was born Vernon Wayne Howell (August 17, 1959 – April 19, 1993). ... In religion and sociology, a cult is a cohesive group of people (often a relatively small and new religious movement) devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture or society considers to be far outside the mainstream. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Olive Marie Osmond (born October 13, 1959 in Ogden, Utah) is an American entertainer and a member of the show business family, The Osmonds. ... Bret Schundler Bret Davis Schundler (born January 14, 1959 in Colonia, New Jersey) is a Republican Party politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Nicole Simpson Nicole Brown Simpson (May 19, 1959 – June 12, 1994) was murdered at her home in Los Angeles, California. ... O.J. Simpsons mugshot Orenthal James Simpson (born July 9, 1947 in San Francisco, California), publicly known by the initials O.J., and nicknamed The Juice, is a Hall of Fame former college and professional football player and film actor. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Lawrence Julius Taylor (born February 4, 1959, in Williamsburg, Virginia) is a retired Hall of Fame American football player. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Alfred Matthew Weird Al Yankovic (born October 23, 1959) is a American musician best known for his parodies of contemporary radio hits. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... Mark Martin Mark Martin during qualifying of Pepsi 400 at Daytona. ... Categories: Stub | 1960 births | American actors ... Erin Brockovich-Ellis (born June 22, 1960) is a woman who, despite the lack of a formal law school education, in 1993 was instrumental in constructing a case against the US$ 30 billion Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E), of California, alleging contamination of drinking water with hexavalent chromium in... Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer (May 21, 1960 – November 28, 1994) was an American serial killer who murdered 17 men between 1978 and 1991 (with the majority of the murders occurring between 1989 and 1991). ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... John Albert Elway (born June 28, 1960) is a former American football quarterback in the NFL for the Denver Broncos from 1983 through 1998. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Costabile Farace (Costabile Farace Jr. ... The Mafia, also referred to in Italian as Cosa Nostra, which is literally Our Thing in the Italian language, is a organized criminal secret society which evolved in mid-19th century Sicily. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Fitzgerald Peter G. Fitzgerald (born October 20, 1960) was the junior United States Senator from Illinois from 1999 until 2005. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... Ari Fleischer conducts a White House press conference Lawrence Ari Fleischer (born October 13, 1960) was the press secretary for U.S. President George W. Bush from January 2001 to July 2003. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... A press secretary is a senior advisor (usually to a politician) who provides advice on how to deal with the media and, using news management techniques, helps them to maintain a positive public image and avoid negative media coverage. ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California,) is a former Major League Baseball player often considered one of the best hitters in baseball history. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... Blanche Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is a Democratic United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137 732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ... Trisha Meili (b. ... Jafar Panahi (born July 11, 1960 in Mianeh, Iran) is an internationally-acclaimed independent filmmaker. ... Sean Penn at Cannes, 2000 Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960 in Santa Monica, California) is an Oscar winning American film actor. ... Cal Ripken, Jr. ... Baseball is a team sport in which a player on one team (the pitcher) attempts to throw a hard, fist-sized ball past a player on the other team (the batter), who attempts to hit the baseball with a tapered, smooth, cylindrical stick called a bat. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... A baby boom is any period of greatly increased birth rate within temporal and usually geographical bounds. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


External links

Preceded by:
Greatest Generation
c. 1911 – c. 1924
Generation Jones / Baby Busters
c. 1954 – c. 1965 / c. 1958 – c. 1968
Succeeded by:
MTV Generation
c. 1975 – c. 1985

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baby Boom (547 words)
The baby boomers caused a swelling in the demographic curves, likened to a rabbit swallowed by a python snake and moving along the body of the snake.
The baby bust additions to the labour force beginning with the late 1980s are small and result in a pronounced change in the proportions of the population producing the national income and consuming it.
The society comprising baby boomers that was once young is aging: the historical highs in median age experienced during the 1980s and 1990s (34 in 1994) will adjust to a median age of 40 in the year 2016.
Generation gap: moral beliefs of young, old differ greatly (838 words)
Seventy-five percent of mosaics and 72 percent of baby busters believe that cohabitation is morally acceptable.
Forty percent of mosaics and 41 percent of baby busters believe that homosexual sex is morally acceptable.
Only 20 percent of mosaics, 22 percent of baby busters, 16 percent of baby boomers and 12 percent of elders say it is morally acceptable.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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