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Encyclopedia > Babrius

Babrius was the author of a collection of fables written in Greek. In its strict sense a fable is a short story or folk tale embodying a moral, which may be expressed explicitly at the end as a maxim. ...


Practically nothing is known of him. He is supposed to have been a Roman, whose gentile name was possibly Valerius, living in the East, probably in Syria, where the fables seem first to have gained popularity. The address to "a son of King Alexander" has caused much speculation, with the result that dates varying between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD have been assigned to Babrius. The Alexander referred to may have been Alexander Severus (AD 222‑235), who was fond of having literary men of all kinds about his court. "The son of Alexander" has further been identified with a certain Branchus mentioned in the fables, and it is suggested that Babrius may have been his tutor; probably, however, Branchus is a purely fictitious name. There is no mention of Babrius in ancient writers before the beginning of the 3rd century AD, and his language and style seem to show that he belonged to that period. // Events The first two Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome over dominance in western Mediterranean Rome conquers Spain Gaulish migration to Macedonia, Thrace and Galatia 281 BCE Antiochus I Soter, on the assassination of his father Seleucus becomes emperor of the Seleucid empire. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... Alexander Severus Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexandrus (October 1, 208- March 18?, 235), commonly called Alexander Severus, Roman emperor from 222 to 235, was born at Arca Caesarea in Palestine. ...


The first critic who made Babrius more than a mere name was Richard Bentley, in his Dissertation on the Fables of Aesop. In a careful examination of these prose Aesopian fables, which had been handed down in various collections from the time of Maximus Planudes, Bentley discovered traces of versification, and was able to extract a number of verses which he assigned to Babrius. Tyrwhitt (De Babrio, 1776) followed up the researches of Bentley, and for some time the efforts of scholars were directed towards reconstructing the metrical original of the prose fables. Richard Bentley (January 27, 1662 – July 14, 1742) was an English theologian, scholar and critic. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle. ... Maximus Planudes (c. ... Thomas Tyrwhitt (March 27, 1730 - August 15, 1786) was an English classical scholar and critic. ...


In 1842 M Minas, a Greek, the discoverer of the Philosophoumena of Hippolytus, came upon a manuscript of Babrius in the convent of St Laura on Mount Athos, now in the British Museum. This manuscript contained 123 fables out of the supposed original number, 160. They are arranged alphabetically, but break off at the letter O. The fables are written in choliambic, i.e. limping or imperfect iambic verse, having a spondee as the last foot, a metre originally appropriated to satire. The style is extremely good, the expression being terse and pointed, the versification correct and elegant, and the construction of the stories is fully equal to that in the prose versions. The genuineness of this collection of the fables was generally admitted by scholars. In 1857 Minas professed to have discovered at Mount Athos another manuscript containing 94 fables and a preface. As the monks refused to sell this manuscript, he made a copy of it, which was sold to the British Museum, and was published in 1859 by Sir G Cornewall Lewis. This, however, was soon proved to be a forgery. Six more fables were brought to light by P Knoll from a Vatican manuscript (edited by A Eberhard, Analecta Babriana, 1879). 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Hippolytus, was a writer of the early Church. ... Mount Athos (Greek: Όρος Άθως) is a mountain and a peninsula in Macedonia, northern Greece, called Άγιο Όρος (Ayio Oros or Ayion Oros or Holy Mountain) in Modern Greek, or Ἅγιον Ὄρος (Hagion Oros) in Classical Greek. ... The main entrance to the British Museum. ... In ancient Greek and Latin literature, choliambic verse referred to a limping or imperfect iambic trimeter, having a spondee as the last foot, a metre originally pioneered by the insult-poet Hipponax. ... An iamb is a metrical foot used in various types of poetry. ... In poetry, a spondee is a metrical foot consisting of two long syllables. ... Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which exposes the follies of its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) to ridicule, often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... Sir George Cornewall Lewis, 2nd Baronet (1806-1863), British statesman and man of letters, was born in London on 21 April 1806. ...


Editions

  • Boissonade (1844)
  • Lachmann (1845)
  • Schneider (1853)
  • Eberhard (1876)
  • Gitlbauer (1882)
  • Rutherford (1883)
  • Knoll, Fabidarum Babrianarum Paraphrasis Bodleiana (1877)
  • Feuillet (1890)
  • Desrousseaux (1890)
  • Passerat (1892)
  • Croiset (1892)
  • Crusius (1897).
  • Mantels, Über die Fabeln des B. (1840)
  • Crusius, De Babrii Aetate (1879)
  • Ficus, De Babrii Vita (1889)
  • J Weiner, Quaestiones Babrianae (1891)
  • Conington, Miscellaneous Writings, ii. 460-491
  • Marchiano, Babrio (1899)
  • Fusci, Babrio (1901)
  • Christoffersson, Studia de Fabvlis Babrianis (1901).

There are translations in English by Davies (1860) and in French by Levêque (1890), and in many other languages. Jean François Boissonade de Fontarabie (August 12, 1774 - September 8, 1857), was a French classical scholar. ... Karl Konrad Friedrich Wilhelm Lachmann (March 4, 1793 - March 13, 1851), was a German philologist and critic. ... William Gunion Rutherford (July 17, 1853 - July 19, 1907) was a Scottish scholar. ... Christian August Crusius (January 10, 1715 _ October 18, 1775) was a German philosopher and theologian. ... John Conington (August 10, 1825 - October 23, 1869) was an English classical scholar. ...


This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Babrius - LoveToKnow 1911 (542 words)
He is supposed to have been a Roman, whose gentile name was possibly Valerius, living in the East, probably in Syria, where the fables seem first to have gained popularity.
There is no mention of Babrius in ancient writers before the beginning of the 3rd century A.D., and his language and style seem to show that he belonged to that period.
The first critic who made Babrius more than a mere name was Richard Bentley, in his Dissertation on the Fables of Aesop.
Babrius (501 words)
Babrius was the author of a collection of fables written in Greek.
Tyrwhitt (De Babrio, 1776) followed up the researches of Bentley, and for some time the efforts of scholars were directed towards reconstructing the metrical original of the prose fables.
In 1842 M Minas, a Greek, the discoverer of the Philosophoumena of Hippolytus, came upon a manuscript of Babrius in the convent of St Laura on Mount Athos, now in the British Museum.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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