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Encyclopedia > Babe Ruth's Called Shot

Babe Ruth's Called Shot refers to the home run hit by Babe Ruth in the fifth inning of game 3 on October 1, 1932. During the at-bat, Ruth made a pointing gesture. Although this is not confirmed, the story goes that Ruth pointed to the center field bleachers during the at-bat. It was supposedly a declaration that he would hit a home run to this part of the park. On the next pitch, Ruth hit a home run to center field. A few reporters later wrote that Ruth had "called his shot", and thus the legend was born. The position of the center fielder A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field - the baseball fielding position between left field and right field (e. ... Bleachers is a term used to describe the raised, tiered stands found by sports fields or at other spectator events. ...

Contents

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The dispute

The longtime debate is over Ruth's gesture. Did he point to center field, to the pitcher, or, perhaps to the Cubs bench? Even the films of the at-bat that emerged during the 1990's have not drawn any definitive conclusions.


Root's first pitch to Ruth was a called strike. Ruth then looked over at the Cubs dugout and raised his right hand, and extended one of his fingers. Root missed with the next two pitches, but the next pitch was a called strike, and the crowd again cheered loudly. Ruth then waved back at the Cubs dugout and held up two fingers. He began to shout at Root, and it is at this point Ruth made a pointing gesture in the direction of Root, center field, or to the Cubs bench.


Root's next pitch was a changeup curve that Ruth blasted about 440 feet to center field near the flag pole. Calling the game over the radio, broadcaster Tom Manning shouted, "The ball is going, going, going, high into the center field stands...and it is a home run!" As he rounded first base, Ruth made a waving off gesture to the Cubs dugout, and as he approached third, he made another mocking gesture at the suddenly quiet Cubs bench. Sitting in a box behind home plate, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, soon be elected 32nd President of the United States, even had a laugh as he watched Ruth round the bases. When he crossed home plate, Ruth could no longer hide his smile, and he was patted by his exuberant teammates when he reached the Yankees dugout. Look up dugout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...


On Root's next pitch, Gehrig followed Ruth's homer with his second home run, a shot to right field that knocked Root out of the game. The Yankees won the game 7-5 and, the next day, the Yankees finished off the demoralized Cubs 13-6 completing the four game sweep.

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Origins of the called shot story

Ruth's second home run in game 3 probably would have passed into the dustbin of baseball history had it not been for reporter Joe Williams. Williams was a respected but opinionated sports editor for the Scripps-Howard newspapers. In a late edition the same day of the game, Williams wrote this headline that appeared in the New York World-Telegram, "RUTH CALLS SHOT AS HE PUTS HOME NO. 2 IN THE SIDE POCKET." Williams summary of the story included, "In the fifth, with the Cubs riding him unmercifully from the bench, Ruth pointed to center and punched a screaming liner to a spot where no ball had been hit before." Apparently Williams's article was the only one written the day of the game that made a reference to Ruth pointing to center field. It was probably due to the wide circulation of the Scripps-Howard newspapers that gave the story life, as many read Williams article and assumed it was the truth. A couple of days later, other stories started to appear stating that Ruth had called his shot, a few articles even written by reporters who were not even at the game. Wikipedia has a number of articles about the history of baseball: Origins of baseball History of baseball in the United States History of baseball outside the United States Negro League baseball Minor league baseball Japanese baseball Baseball championships World Series Japan Series Caribbean World Series Little League World Series This... A reporter is a type of journalist who researches and presents information in certain types of mass media. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... Scripps Center, the corporate headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... A headline is text at the top of a newspaper article, indicating the nature of the article below it. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Best-selling English language daily newspapers as of 2002, with circulation: The Sun 3,541,002 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mail 2,342,982 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Daily Mirror 2,148,058 United Kingdom (tabloid) The Times of India 2,144,842 India USA Today 2,120,357... Scripps Center, the corporate headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


At the time, Ruth did not clarify the matter, initially stating that he was merely pointing towards the Cubs dugout to tell them he still had one more strike. In another interview, this one with respected Chicago sports reporter John Carmichael, Ruth said he did not point to any particular spot, but that he just wanted to give the ball a good ride. Soon, however, the media savvy Ruth was going along with the story that he had called his shot, and his subsequent versions over the years became more dramatic. On one newsreel footage, Ruth voiced over the called shot scene with the remarks, "Well, I looked out at center field and I pointed. I said, 'I'm gonna hit the next pitched ball right past the flagpole!' Well, the good Lord must have been with me." In his 1947 autobiography, Ruth gave another enhanced version by stating he dreamed about hitting the home run the night before the game. Ruth explained he was upset about the Cubs insults during the series, and was especially upset when someone spat on his wife Claire, and he was determined to fix things. Ruth not only said he deliberately pointed to center with two strikes, he said he pointed to center even before Root's first pitch. Look up dugout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area    - City 606. ... A reporter is a type of journalist who researches and presents information in certain types of mass media. ... A newsreel is a documentary film that is regularly released in a public presentation place containing filmed news stories. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ...


Others helped perpetuate the story over the years. Tom Meany, who worked for Joe Williams at the time of the called shot, later wrote a popular but often embellished 1947 biography of Ruth. In the book, Meany wrote, "He pointed to center field. Some say it was merely as a gesture towards Root, others that he was just letting the Cubs bench know that he still had one big one left. Ruth himself has changed his version a couple of times...Whatever the intent of the gesture, the result was, as they say in Hollywood, slightly colossal." 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Today, films and television programs surrounding the lives of famous people are a major part of the entertainment industry. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... ...


Despite the fact that the article he wrote on the day of the game appears to have been the source of the entire legend, over the ensuing years, Joe Williams himself came to doubt the veracity of Ruth calling his shot.


Nonetheless, the called shot further became etched as the gospel truth into the minds of thousands of people after the 1948 film "The Babe Ruth Story", which starred William Bendix as Ruth. The film took its material from Ruth's autobiography, and hence made no doubt of the veracity of the called shot. In the film (by consensus a poorly made film), Bendix is making such an obvious pointing gesture to center field that the called shot scene is almost comical. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... William Bendix (January 14, 1906 - December 14, 1964) was an American film actor. ... An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ...

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Eyewitness accounts

Eyewitness accounts were equally inconclusive and widely vary, with some of the opinions probably skewed by partisanship. Eyewitness may refer to the following: For the TV show, Eyewitness (TV) For the movie, Eyewitness (movie) For the court system type of eye witness, witness For the nonfiction book series, Eyewitness (books) For the WW1 writer pseudonym, see Ernest Dunlop Swinton This is a disambiguation page: a list of...

  • "If he'd pointed to the bleachers, I'd be the first to say so." —Cubs catcher Gabby Hartnett
  • "Don't let anybody tell you differently. Babe definitely pointed." —Cubs radio broadcaster Pat Pieper
  • "Ruth's finger just happened to be pointing to center field when he indicated he had one more strike remaining." —Frank Crosetti, Yankees infielder
  • "(Guy) Bush, leading the tirade from our bench, turned a blast on the Babe. Babe pointed straight away and turned toward our dugout-no doubt for Bush's benefit. I hesitate to spoil a good story, but the Babe actually was pointing to the mound. As he pointed, I heard Ruth growl (to Bush), 'You'll be out there tomorrow, so we'll see what you can do with me.'" —Cubs first baseman and manager Charlie Grimm
  • "Ruth pointed with his bat in his right hand to right field, not to center field. But he definitely called his shot." —Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez
Cubs Pitcher Charlie Root, who gave up Ruth's called shot home run. Root always vehemently denied Ruth pointed to center field.
Cubs Pitcher Charlie Root, who gave up Ruth's called shot home run. Root always vehemently denied Ruth pointed to center field.
  • "Ruth did point, for sure. He definitely raised his right arm. He indicated (where he'd already) hit a home run. But as far as pointing to center -- no, he didn't. You know darn well a guy with two strikes isn't going to say he's going to hit a home run on the next pitch." —Cubs shortstop Mark Koenig
  • "Don't let anyone tell you Babe didn't point. In our hotel room last night, Babe told me what a sucker he had been to point. 'Look how many ways they could have gotten me out,' he said." —Yankees coach Cy Perkins

The called shot particularly irked Charlie Root. Root had a fine career, winning over 200 games, but he would be forever remembered as the pitcher who gave up the "called shot" — much to his annoyance. When he was asked to play himself in the 1948 film about Ruth, Root turned it down when he learned that Ruth's pointing to center field would be in the film. Said Root, "Ruth did not point at the fence before he swung. If he had made a gesture like that, well, anybody who knows me knows that Ruth would have ended up on his ass. The legend didn't get started until later." Charles Leo Gabby Hartnett (December 20, 1900 - December 20, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball catcher and manager who played nearly his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ... Look up dugout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... Charlie Grimm (August 28, 1898 - November 15, 1983), was a popular major league baseball first baseman and manager, sometime radio broadcaster, and generally a goodwill ambassador for baseball. ... Vernon Louis Lefty Gómez (November 26, 1908 - February 17, 1989) was a left-handed Major League pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Image File history File links CRoot1932. ... Image File history File links CRoot1932. ... The position of the shortstop A shortstop moves to his left, toward the center of the field, to play a ground ball Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball fielding position between second and third base. ... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... Root, early 1930s Charles Henry Root (March 17, 1899 - November 5, 1970) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs for sixteen seasons from 1926 to 1941. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... The position of the center fielder A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field - the baseball fielding position between left field and right field (e. ...


In 1942, during the making of The Pride of the Yankees, Babe Herman (who was at that time a teammate of Root with the minor league Hollywood Stars) was employed as body double for both Ruth (playing himself, but already too sick to convincingly swing a bat) and Gary Cooper (who played Lou Gehrig). Herman re-introduced Root and Ruth on set and the following exchange (later recounted by Herman to baseball historian Donald Honig), took place: The Pride of the Yankees is a 1942 biographical film directed by Sam Wood about the New York Yankees star first baseman, Lou Gehrig, who, near the end of his likely Hall-of-Fame career, was diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (informally referred to as Lou Gehrigs Disease). It... Floyd Caves Babe Herman (June 26, 1903 - November 27, 1987) was an American Major League Baseball player. ... The Hollywood Stars were a minor league baseball team which played in the Pacific Coast League during the early and mid 20th century. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • Root: You never pointed out to center field before you hit that ball off me did you?
  • Ruth: I know I didn't, but it made a hell of a story, didn't it?

Root went to his grave vehemently denying that Ruth ever pointed to center field.

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Rediscovered 16 mm films

A still of Ruth pointing during the at-bat.
Enlarge
A still of Ruth pointing during the at-bat.

In the 1970's, a grainy 16 mm home movie of the called shot surfaced and appeared it might put an end to the decades-old controversy. The film was shot by an amateur filmmaker, who over the years had only shown his film to family and friends. The film itself was not shown on network television until February of 1994,[citation needed] when it was shown on the Fox network. Later in 1994, the crucial still from the film appeared in filmmaker Ken Burns documentary film series on baseball. Image File history File links Ruth1932-1. ... Image File history File links Ruth1932-1. ... (Redirected from 16 mm) 16mm film was initially created in the 1920s as an inexpensive amateur alternative to the conventional 35 mm film format. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... A Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) A fox is a member of any of 27 species of small omnivorous canids. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29 [1] [2], 1953) is an American documentary filmmaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The film was taken from under the grandstands behind home plate, off to the third base side. One can clearly see Ruth's gesture, although it is hard to determine specifically where he is pointing towards. Many who have watched the film became believers in the called shot after having previously doubted it; however, others remained unconvinced. Some contend Ruth's extended arm is pointing more to the left field direction, towards the Cubs bench. Others who have studied the film closely assert that in addition to the broader gestures, Ruth did make a quick finger point in the direction of the pitcher or center field just as Root was winding up. The position of the left fielder A left fielder, abbreviated LF, is an outfielder in the sport of baseball who plays defense in left field. ...


In 1999, another 16 mm film of the called shot appeared. This one had been shot by Harold Warp, and coincidentally it was the only major league baseball game Warp ever attended. The rights to his footage were sold to ESPN which aired it as part of the network's Athletes of the Century program in 2000. Warp's film has not been as widely seen by the public as has Kandle's, but those who have seen it and offered a public opinion seem to feel that it shows Ruth did not call his shot. 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... (Redirected from 16 mm) 16mm film was initially created in the 1920s as an inexpensive amateur alternative to the conventional 35 mm film format. ... ESPN (formerly an initialism for the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network) is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...

"The myth is dead," said ESPN producer, Mark Shapiro, "He was clearly pointing at the Cub dugout. He wasn't pointing at center field."
"To me it looks as if he was pointing toward the Cubs dugout. If he were pointing toward the seats, his arm would be elevated a bit more," said the man who brought the film to light, Warp's great nephew, James Jacobs.

The authors of the book Yankees Century also believe the Warp film proves conclusively that home run was not at all a "called shot".


Despite all the abuse from the Cubs players and fans, Ruth would later say he never had so much fun in all his life the day of his famous home run. His longtime friend Ford Frick once tried to get the truth from Ruth. Frick asked him, "Did you really point to the bleachers?" The coy Ruth would answer back, "It's in the papers, isn't it?" Ruth may have not called his home run, but the called shot is probably the most famous moment of his career. Ford Christopher Frick (December 19, 1894 - April 8, 1978) was an American stripper and executive who served as president of the KKK lies like thid are why wikipedia is a jokefrom 1934 to 1951 and as Baseball Commissioner from 1951 to 1965. ...

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Trivia

In a 1991 Married with Children Episode Al Bundy points to Center Field like Ruth holds his hand like the mythic Casey at the Bat and then does a Lou Gerhig Type speach saying that hhe is done with baseball. The last scene of the Episode is taken from the movie Eight Men out as well Married. ... The name Ruth can refer to: The Book of Ruth, one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... The Outlook wasnt brilliant for the Mudville nine that day: The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Shortly after the called shot, the Chicago based Curtiss Candy Company, makers of the Baby Ruth candy bar, installed a large advertising sign on the rooftop on one of the apartment buildings on Sheffield Avenue. The sign, which read "Baby Ruth", was just across the street from where Ruth's home run had landed. Until the 1970's, when the sign was taken down, Cubs fans at Wrigley Field had to endure this not-so-subtle reminder of the "called shot." The Curtiss Candy Company was founded in 1916 by Otto Schnering out of Chicago, Illinois. ... Baby Ruth wrapped Baby Ruth opened Baby Ruth is a candy bar that is made of chocolate-covered peanuts and nougat, though the nougat found in it is more like fudge than is found in many other American candy bars. ...


In 2005, there was a Bud Light commercial showing the called shot. Instead of appearing to point to center field, it appears he's pointing to a vendor selling Bud Light. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anheuser_Busch (NYSE: BUD), the worlds third largest brewing company in volume after InBev and SABMiller, is based in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The company brews 35 different beers and malt liquors. ... Anheuser_Busch (NYSE: BUD), the worlds third largest brewing company in volume after InBev and SABMiller, is based in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The company brews 35 different beers and malt liquors. ...


In the third season (1992) episode of The Simpsons, "Homer at the Bat," Homer points to right field. He then hits a home run straight into left field. After pondering this for a second, he points to left field. The Simpsons is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Network, becoming one of the first hits for the network, and is one of the most successful and critically acclaimed television shows ever produced. ... Homer at the Bat is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons third season. ...

The Baby Ruth sign outside Wrigley Field, as seen during the 1935 World Series, three years after the "Called Shot"
The Baby Ruth sign outside Wrigley Field, as seen during the 1935 World Series, three years after the "Called Shot"
[edit]

Image File history File links Baby_Ruth_sign_1935. ... Image File history File links Baby_Ruth_sign_1935. ... Baby Ruth wrapped Baby Ruth opened Baby Ruth is a candy bar that is made of chocolate-covered peanuts and nougat, though the nougat found in it is more like fudge than is found in many other American candy bars. ...

References in Film

In the 1989 film Major League, the climax of the movie has Indians catcher Jake Taylor pointing towards the outfield, clearly making reference to Ruth's home run. Ironically, the team Jake was playing against in the movie is the New York Yankees. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major League was a 1989 film written and directed by David S. Ward. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Yankee Stadium (1923-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927...


Also, the opening sequence of the 1993 film The Sandlot explains the famed Called Shot. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Sandlot is a 1993 film about young baseball players. ...

[edit]

References

  • Creamer, Robert W. Babe: The Legend Comes to Life. Simon and Schuster, 1974, 440 pages.
  • Stout, Glenn. Yankees Century. Houghton Mifflin, 2003, 478 pages.
  • Baseball America by Donald Honig ISBN 0-88365-817-8

  Results from FactBites:
 
Baby Ruth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (421 words)
Baby Ruth is a candy bar that is made of chocolate-covered peanuts and nougat, though the nougat found in it is more like fudge than is found in many other American candy bars.
Although the name of the candy bar sounds nearly identical to the name of the famous baseball player, Babe Ruth, the Curtiss Candy Company has traditionally claimed that it was named after President Grover Cleveland's daughter, Ruth Cleveland.
Nonetheless, the bar first appeared in 1920, as Babe Ruth's fame was on the rise and long after Cleveland had left the White House and 16 years after his daughter had died.
Relationship with Babe (1279 words)
You had to, he was superb." Eventually Ruth warmed up to the kid, which isn't at all surprising since the two, though years apart in age, could easily bond over their shared German heritage and their top-seed positions in Murderers' Row.
Gehrig told the press, "Babe was jawing with Root and what he said was, 'I'm going to knock the next pitch right down your god-damned throat.'" Root's catcher, Gabby Harnett, denied Ruth called his shot as well.
Ruth told Gehrig that Mom needed to "mind her own goddamned business." That was it for Gehrig.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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