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Encyclopedia > Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth
Outfielder/Pitcher
Born: February 6, 1895(1895-02-06)
Died: August 16, 1948 (aged 53)
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 11, 1914
for the Boston Red Sox
Final game
May 30, 1935
for the Boston Braves
Career statistics
AVG     .342
HR     714
RBI     2217
Teams
Career highlights and awards
All-Time records
  • Career SLUG: 0.690
  • Career OPS: 1.164
Pitching Statistics
Notable achievements
  • Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936
  • 2nd in career OBP (.469)
  • 3rd on All-Time Home Run list (714)
  • Only player to hit 3 home runs twice in a World Series game (1926 & 1928)
  • Won the 1923 AL League Award (precursor to MVP)
  • Appeared in 1933 & 1934 All-Star Game
  • First player ever to hit 30, 40, 50 and 60 home runs in a season
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1936
Vote     95.13%
Babe Ruth's number 3 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1948

George Herman Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895August 16, 1948), also popularly known as "Babe", "The Bambino", and "The Sultan of Swat", was an American Major League baseball player from 1914-1935. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball players in history. Many polls place him as the number one player of all time. Babe Ruth can refer to: Babe Ruth (1895-1948), American baseball player Baby Ruth, candy bar Babe Ruth Award, baseball award Babe Ruths called shot, famous home run Babe Ruth League, youth baseball program The Babe Ruth Story, 1948 biographical film The Babe, 1992 biographical film Curse of the... File links The following pages link to this file: Babe Ruth New York Yankees Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/April Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/All Categories: Images with unknown source ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... This article is about the player in baseball. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The following are the baseball events of the year 1914 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... In baseball statistics, on-base plus slugging (denoted by OPS) incorporates on base percentage (OBP) and slugging percentage (SLG). ... In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ... In Major League Baseball, a loss (denoted L) is charged to the pitcher of the losing team who allows the run that gives the opposing team the lead which the game is won with (the go-ahead run). ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links YankeesRetired3. ... Image File history File links YankeesRetired3. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1914 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world. ...


Although he spent most of his career as an outfielder with the New York Yankees, Ruth began his career as a successful starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. He compiled an 89-46 win-loss record during his time with the Red Sox and set several World Series pitching records. In 1918, Ruth started to play in the outfield and at first base so he could help the team on a day-to-day basis as a hitter. In 1919, appearing in 111 games as an outfielder, he hit 29 home runs to break Ned Williamson's record for a single season. Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In baseball or softball, a starting pitcher, often abbreviated as starter, is the pitcher who pitches the first pitch to the first batter of a game. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ... In Major League Baseball, a loss (denoted L) is charged to the pitcher of the losing team who allows the run that gives the opposing team the lead which the game is won with (the go-ahead run). ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The outfield is a sporting term used in cricket and baseball to refer to the area of the field of play further from the batsman or batter than the infield. ... The position of the first baseman First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a base runner in order to score a run for that players team. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... Homerun redirects here. ... Ned Williamson on an 1887-90 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge) (N172). ...


In 1920, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Ruth to the New York Yankees. In his next 15 seasons in New York, Ruth led the league or placed in the top ten in batting average, slugging percentage, runs, total bases, home runs, RBI, and walks several times. Ruth's 60 home runs in 1927 was the single season home run record for 34 years until it was broken by Roger Maris. Ruth's lifetime total of 714 home runs was once considered one of Major League Baseball's "unbreakable" records, but Hank Aaron broke it in 1974, although it required Aaron many more at bats. In contrast, after he was sold from the Red Sox, the Red Sox franchise floundered for decades after having been previously the most successful major league team prior to the trade. This great disparity of success between the Yankees and Red Sox eventually led to a superstition that was dubbed the "Curse of the Bambino", a "curse" that effectively ended in 2004 when the Red Sox won their first World Series title in 86 years. The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... Harry Frazee, 1916 Harry Herbert Frazee (June 29, 1881 in Peoria, Illinois - June 4, 1929 in New York City) was an American theatrical agent, producer and director, and former owner of the Major League Baseball Boston Red Sox from 1916 to 1923. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Babe Ruth — The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino (1918-2004) was a superstition cited, often jokingly, as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series in the 86 year period from 1918 until 2004. ...


Beyond his unprecedented statistics, Ruth completely changed baseball itself. The popularity of the game exploded in the 1920s, largely due to him. Ruth ushered in the "live-ball era" as his big swing led to gargantuan home run totals that not only excited fans, but helped baseball evolve from a low-scoring, speed-dominated game to a high-scoring power game. The live-ball era, also referred to as the lively ball era, is the period in Major League Baseball beginning in 1920, following the dead-ball era. ...


Ruth became the first true American sports celebrity superstar whose fame transcended baseball. Off the field he was famous for his charity, but also was noted for his often reckless lifestyle that epitomized the hedonistic 1920s. Ruth became an American icon, and even though he died nearly 60 years ago his name is still one of the most famous in all of American sports. His participation in an all-star tour of Japan in 1934 sparked that country's rabid interest in professional baseball; a decade later, Japanese soldiers seeking the ultimate insult for American troops would sometimes shout, "To hell with Babe Ruth!"[1] The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


In 1936, Ruth became one of the first five players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ...


In 1969, he was named baseball's Greatest Player Ever in a ballot commemorating the 100th anniversary of professional baseball. In 1998, The Sporting News ranked Ruth Number 1 on the list of "Baseball's 100 Greatest Players." The next year, baseball fans named Ruth to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. In a 1999 ESPN poll, he was ranked as the third greatest US athlete of the century, behind Michael Jordan and Muhammad Ali. The following are the baseball events of the year 1969 throughout the world. ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1998, The Sporting News compiled a list of Baseballs Greatest Players. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Ruth was born at 216 Emory Street in southern Baltimore, Maryland.[2] His maternal grandfather, German immigrant, Pius Schamberger was an upholsterer; he rented a house located only a block from where Oriole Park at Camden Yards now stands.[2] Ruth's German American parents, Kate Schamberger-Ruth and George Herman Ruth, Sr.,[3] eventually owned saloons on Lombard and Camden Street in Baltimore.[4] Only one of Ruth's seven siblings, his sister Mamie, survived past infancy.[3] Baltimore redirects here. ... Upholstery is the work of providing furniture, especially seats, with padding, springs, webbing, and fabric or leather covers. ... Oriole Park at Camden Yards is a baseball stadium located in Baltimore, Maryland, which was completed in 1992 to replace the aging Memorial Stadium. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Look up saloon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Ruth's parents worked long hours and had little time to take care of him. When he was seven years old, they sent him to St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys, a reformatory and orphanage, and signed custody over to the Catholic missionaries who ran the school. Ruth remained at St. Mary's for the next 12 years, rarely visited by his family. At St. Mary's, a man by the name of Brother Matthias became a father figure in his life. Brother Matthias taught Ruth the game of baseball. He worked with Ruth on hitting, fielding and, later, pitching. [3] Although Ruth batted and threw lefthanded, he wrote righthanded. A reformatory is a juvenile prison where legal minors are sent by (juvenile or general) courts to spend a custodial sentence, separate from the bad example of and abuse by adult (often hardened) convicts, usually gender-separated (mainly boys). ... // An orphanage is an institution or asylum for the care of a child bereaved of both father and mother; sometimes, also, a child who has but one parent living. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ...

Ruth (top row, far left) at St Mary's Industrial School for Boys

In early 1914, a teacher at St. Mary's brought George to the attention of Jack Dunn, owner and manager of the then minor-league Baltimore Orioles. After watching Ruth pitch, Dunn signed Ruth to a contract. Since Ruth was only 19 years old, Dunn had to become Ruth's legal guardian as well (at that time, the age of majority was 25) [5] When the other players on the Orioles caught sight of Ruth, they nicknamed him "Jack's newest babe." The reference stayed with Ruth the rest of his life, and he was most commonly referred to as Babe Ruth from then on.[6] Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... John Joseph Dunn (October 6, 1872 - October 22, 1928) was an American journeyman pitcher in Major League Baseball at the turn of the 20th century who later went on to become a minor league baseball club owner, discovering two future Hall of Famers. ... The city of Baltimore, Maryland has been home to several major league and minor league teams called the Baltimore Orioles. ... A legal guardian is a person who has the legal authority (and the corresponding duty) to care for the personal and property interests of another person, called a ward. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


On July 7, 1914, Dunn offered Ruth, along with Ernie Shore and Ben Egan, to Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics. Dunn asked $10,000 for the trio, but Mack refused the offer. The Cincinnati Reds, who had an agreement with the Orioles, also passed on Ruth. Instead, the team elected to take George Twombley and Claud Derrick.[7] is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ernest Grady Shore (born near East Bend, North Carolina March 24, 1891 - September 24, 1980) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox during some of their glory years in the 1910s. ... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine...


Two days later, on July 9, Dunn sold the trio to Joe Lannin and the Boston Red Sox.[8] The amount of money exchanged in the transaction is disputed. is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


Major League career

Ruth pitching for the Red Sox in 1914, at Comiskey Park in Chicago

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ...

Red Sox years

Ruth appeared in five games for the Red Sox in 1914, pitching in four of them. He picked up the victory in his major league debut on July 11; ironically, Duffy Lewis scored the winning run after pinch-hitting for Ruth. The Red Sox had many star players in 1914, so Ruth was soon optioned to the minor league Providence Grays of Providence, Rhode Island for most of the remaining season. Behind Ruth and Carl Mays, the Grays won the International League pennant. Duffy Lewis of the Boston Red Sox at Comiskey Park in 1912. ... The Providence Grays were a 19th century baseball team. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ...


Shortly after the season, in which he'd finished with a 2-1 record, Ruth proposed to Helen Woodford, a waitress he met in Boston. They were married in Ellicott City, Maryland, on October 17, 1914. Boston redirects here. ... Main Street, Ellicott City Ellicott City is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Howard County, Maryland, United States. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


During spring training in 1915, Ruth secured a spot in the starting rotation. He joined a pitching staff that included Rube Foster, Dutch Leonard, and Smokey Joe Wood. Ruth won 18 games,[9] lost eight, and helped himself by hitting .315. He also hit his first four home runs. The Red Sox won 101 games that year on their way to a victory in the World Series. Ruth was not a factor; he did not pitch in the series, and he grounded out in his only at-bat. Hubert Benjamin Leonard (born April 16, 1892 Birmingham, Ohio - died July 11, 1952 Fresno, California) was a pitcher with an 11 year career from 1913-1921, 1924-1925. ... Joe Wood on an American Tobacco Company baseball card, 1912 Joe Smoky Joe Wood (October 25, 1889 - July 27, 1985) was a Major League Baseball player for the Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians during the early part of the 20th century. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


In 1916, after a slightly shaky spring, he went 23-12, with a 1.75 ERA and 9 shutouts. On June 27, he struck out 10 Philadelphia A's, a career high. On July 11, he started both games of a doubleheader, but the feat was not what it seemed; he only pitched a third of an inning in the opener because the scheduled starter Rube Foster was having trouble getting loose. Ruth then pitched a complete game victory in the nightcap. Ruth had unusual success against Washington Senators star pitcher Walter Johnson, beating him four times in 1916 alone, by scores of 5-1, 1-0, 1-0 in 13 innings, and 2-1. Johnson finally outlasted Ruth for an extra-inning 4-3 victory on September 12; in the years to come, Ruth would hit 10 home runs off Johnson, including the only two Johnson would allow in 1918-1919. Ruth had nine shutouts in 1916, an AL record for lefthanders that was unmatched until Ron Guidry tied it in 1978. See also: 1915 in sports, other events of 1916, 1917 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football ( Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 20th VFL Premiership (12. ... Andrew Rube Foster (September 17, 1879 - December 9, 1930) was an American baseball player, manager, and executive in the Negro Leagues. ... Washington Senators may refer to an American League baseball team based in Washington, D.C. from 1901 to 1960, mostly at Griffith Stadium, that moved to Minneapolis-St. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Pitcher Ron Guidry Ronald Ames Guidry (Louisiana Lightning and Gator) (born August 28, 1950 in Lafayette, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


Despite a weak offense and hurt by the sale of Tris Speaker to the Indians, the Red Sox still made it to the World Series. They defeated the Brooklyn Robins four games to one. This time Ruth made a major contribution, pitching a 14-inning complete-game victory in Game Two. Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ...

Ruth batting in 1918

Ruth went 24-13 with a 2.01 ERA and 6 shutouts in 1917, and hit .325, but the Sox finished second, nine games behind the Chicago White Sox. Ruth's most memorable game of the season was one he had very little part in playing. On June 23 against the Washington Senators, after walking the leadoff hitter, Ruth erupted in anger, was ejected, and threw a punch at the umpire (he'd be suspended for 10 games). Ernie Shore came into the game as an impromptu replacement, and pitched a perfect game the rest of the way. Ruth's outburst was an example of self-discipline problems that plagued Ruth throughout his career, and is regarded as the primary reason (other than financial) that Frazee was willing to sell him to the Yankees two years later. Image File history File links Ruth1918. ... Image File history File links Ruth1918. ... See also: 1916 in sports, 1918 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Collingwood wins the 21st VFL Premiership (Collingwood 9. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Washington Senators may refer to an American League baseball team based in Washington, D.C. from 1901 to 1960, mostly at Griffith Stadium, that moved to Minneapolis-St. ... Ernest Grady Shore (born near East Bend, North Carolina March 24, 1891 - September 24, 1980) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox during some of their glory years in the 1910s. ... Pitcher David Cone (left) of the New York Yankees reacting to the completion of his perfect game with catcher Joe Girardi on July 18, 1999. ...


Less than three weeks later, June 11 was an example of why Ruth was so valuable to Boston. The lefthander was pitching a no-hitter in a 0-0 game against the Detroit Tigers, before a single deflected off his glove in the 8th inning. Boston finally pushed across a run in the 9th, and Ruth held onto his 1-0 victory by striking out Ty Cobb. In 1942, Ruth called this game his greatest thrill on the field. is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ...


In 1918, Ruth pitched in 20 games, posting a 13-7 record with a 2.22 ERA. He was mostly used as an outfielder, and hit a league-leading 11 home runs. His statistics were curtailed slightly when he walked off the team in July following an argument with Boston's manager.


Ruth threw a 1-0 shutout in the opener of 1918 World Series, then won Game Four in what would be his final World Series appearance as a pitcher. In three games, Ruth was 3-0 with an 0.87 ERA, allowing 19 hits in 31 innings. Ruth extended his World Series consecutive scoreless inning streak to 29⅔ innings,[10] But since lefthanders Hippo Vaughn and Lefty Tyler pitched nearly all the innings for the Cubs, Ruth, who batted left-handed, registered only five at-bats in the Series. The 1918 World Series featured the Boston Red Sox, who defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two. ... Jim Hippo Vaughn was a major league baseball pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during the 1910s. ...


Emergence as a hitter

Despite his exceptional pitching numbers, Ruth's hitting prowess had become undeniable, and his playing record reflected it. Between 1915-1917, Ruth had been used in just 44 games in which he had not pitched. After the 1917 season in which he hit .325, albeit with limited at bats, teammate Harry Hooper suggested that Ruth might be more valuable in the lineup as an everyday player. Harry Hooper Baseball card issued by American Tobacco Company, 1912. ...


In 1918, he began playing in the outfield more and pitching less, making 75 hitting-only appearances. His contemporaries thought this was ridiculous; former teammate Tris Speaker speculated the move would shorten Ruth's career, but Ruth himself wanted to hit more and pitch less. In 1918, Ruth batted .300 and led the A.L. in home runs with 11 despite having only 317 at bats, well below the total for an everyday player. Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ...


During the 1919 season, Ruth threw a pitch in only 17 of his 130 games. He also set his first single-season home run record that year with 29, including a game-winning walkoff homer on a September "Babe Ruth Day" promotion. It was Babe Ruth's last season with the Red Sox. The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ...


Sold to New York

Ruth in 1920, the year he joined the Yankees.

On December 26, 1919, Frazee sold Ruth to the New York Yankees. Popular legend has it that Frazee sold Ruth and several other of his best players to finance a Broadway play, No, No, Nanette (which actually didn't debut until 1925). The truth is somewhat more nuanced. Image File history File links Ruth1920. ... Image File history File links Ruth1920. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... No, No, Nanette is an English musical comedy with lyrics by Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach, music by Vincent Youmans, and a book by Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the 1919 season, Ruth demanded a raise to $20,000-double his previous salary. However, Frazee refused, and Ruth responded by letting it be known he wouldn't play until he got his raise. He'd actually jumped the team several times, including the last game of the 1919 season.


Frazee finally lost patience with Ruth, and decided to trade him. However, he was effectively limited to two trading partners--the Chicago White Sox and the then-moribund Yankees. The other five clubs rejected his deals out of hand under pressure from American League president Ban Johnson, who never liked Frazee and was actively trying to "Yank" the Red Sox out from under him. The White Sox offered Shoeless Joe Jackson and $60,000, but Yankees owners Jacob Ruppert and Cap Huston offered an all-cash deal--$100,000. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees. ...


Frazee, Ruppert and Huston quickly agreed to a deal. In exchange for Ruth, the Red Sox would get $125,000 in cash and three $25,000 notes payable every year at 6 percent interest. Ruppert and Huston also loaned Frazee $300,000, with the mortgage on Fenway Park as collateral. The deal was contingent on Ruth signing a new contract, which was quickly agreed to, and Ruth officially became property of the Yankees on December 26. The deal was announced ten days later. Fenway redirects here. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the January 6, 1920 edition of the Boston Globe, Frazee described the transaction: is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ...

“I should have preferred to take players in exchange for Ruth, but no club could have given me the equivalent in men without wrecking itself, and so the deal had to be made on a cash basis. No other club could afford to give me the amount the Yankees have paid for him, and I don’t mind saying I think they are taking a gamble. With this money the Boston club can now go into the market and buy other players and have a stronger and better team in all respects than we would have had if Ruth had remained with us.”

However, the January 6, 1920 New York Times was more prescient: The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

“The short right field wall at the Polo Grounds should prove an easy target for Ruth next season and, playing seventy-seven games at home, it would not be surprising if Ruth surpassed his home run record of twenty-nine circuit clouts next Summer.”

The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their...

Yankee years

1920-1925

Babe Ruth in 1921, maybe his finest season.

Ruth hit 54 home runs and batted .376 in 1920, his first year with the Yankmees. His .847 slugging average was a Major League record until 2001, when it was broken by Barry Bonds. Aside from the Yankmees, only the Philadelphia Phillies managed to hit more as a team than Ruth did as an individual, slugging 64 in hitter-friendly Baker Bowl. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x719, 59 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x719, 59 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... See also: 2000 in sports, other events of 2001, 2002 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Michael Waltrip won the Daytona 500, a race that also saw the death of seven-time NASCAR champion Dale Earnhardt in an unspectacular crash during the... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Baker Bowl was the popular name of a baseball park that formerly stood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


In 1921, Ruth improved to arguably the best year of his career, hitting 959 home runs, batting .379 and slugging .846 while leading the Yankmees to their first league championship. On July 18, 1921, Babe Ruth hit career home run #139, breaking Roger Connor's record of 138 in just the eighth year of his career. (This was not recognized at the time, as Connor's correct career total was not accurately documented until the 1970s. Even if the record had been celebrated, it would have been on an earlier date, as Connor's total was at one time thought to be only 131.) The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world. ... Roger Connor baseball card, 1887 Roger Connor (July 1, 1857 - January 4, 1931) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player. ...


Ruth quickly became synonymous with the home run, because he led the transformation of baseball strategy from the "inside game" to the "power game", and because of the style and manner in which he hit them. His ability to drive a significant number of his home runs in the 450–500 foot range and beyond resulted in the lasting adjective "Ruthian," to describe any long home run hit by any player. Probably his deepest hit in official game play (and perhaps the longest home run by any player), occurred on July 18, at Detroit's Navin Field, in which he hit one to straightaway center, over the wall of the then-single-deck bleachers, and to the intersection, some 575 feet from home plate. Tiger Stadium with football configuration. ...


As impressive as Ruth's 1921 numbers were, they could have been more so under modern conditions. Bill Jenkinson's 2006 book, The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs, attempts to examine each of Ruth's 714 career home runs, plus several hundred long inside-the-park drives and "fair-foul" balls. (Until 1931 in the AL, balls that hit the foul pole were considered ground-rule doubles, and balls that went over the wall in fair territory but hooked foul were ruled foul. The author concluded that Ruth would have been credited with 104 home runs in 1921, if modern rules and field dimensions were in place. In baseball, a ground rule double is any award of two bases from the time of pitch to all baserunners including the batter-runner. ...


The Yankees had high expectations when they met the New York Giants in the 1921 World Series, and the Yankees won the first two games with Ruth in the lineup. However, Ruth badly scraped his elbow during Game 2 sliding into third base (he had walked and stolen both second and third). After the game, he was told by the team physician not to play the rest of the series. Although he did play in Games 3, 4 and 5, and pinch-hit in Game 8 of the best-of-9 Series, his productivity was diminished, and the Yankees lost the series. Ruth hit .316, drove in five runs and hit his first World Series home run. (Although the Yankees won the fifth game, Ruth wrenched his knee and did not return to the Series until the eighth [last] game.) Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 8 games. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ...


Ruth's appearance in the 1921 World Series also led to a problem and triggered another disciplinary action. After the series, Ruth played in a barnstorming tour. A rule at the time prohibited World Series participants from playing in exhibition games during the off-season. Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis suspended Ruth for the first six weeks of the 1922 season. Barnstorming in athletics refers to sports teams that travel to various locations, usually small towns, to stage exhibition matches. ... In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ...


Ruth's off-the-field life often interfered with his performance, and sometimes he just proved to be a thorn in the side of his manager, Miller Huggins. A policeman pulled Ruth over one night for driving up a one-way street, and Babe protested, "Well, I was only going one way!" But Huggins saw nothing funny about it--Ruth was supposed to be in the hotel room at the time, not out carousing. When he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame years later, he was present for the posthumous induction of Huggins. Ruth admitted, Huggins "was the only one who could handle me." [11] Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... A one-way function is a function which is easy to calculate but hard to invert — it is difficult to calculate the input to the function given its output. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...


Despite his suspension, Ruth started his 1922 season on May 20 as the Yankees' new on-field captain. But five days later, he was ejected from a game for throwing dirt on an umpire, and then climbed into the stands to confront a heckler; Ruth was subsequently stripped of the captaincy. In his shortened season, Ruth appeared in 110 games, hit 35 home runs and drove in 99 runs. Despite Ruth's partial absence, the Yankees still made it to the 1922 World Series. Ruth had just two hits in seventeen at-bats, and the Yankees lost to the Giants for the second straight year. See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 5 games. ...

The Sultan of Swat in 1923

In 1923, the Yankees moved from the Polo Grounds, where they had sublet from the Giants, to their new Yankee Stadium, which was quickly dubbed "The House That Ruth Built". Characteristically, he hit the stadium's first home run on the way to a Yankees victory. Ruth finished the 1923 season with a career-high .393 batting average and major-league leading 41 home runs. For the third straight year the Yankees faced the Giants in the 1923 World Series. Ruth batted .368, walked eight times, scored eight runs, hit three home runs and slugged 1.000 during the series. The Yankees won their first World Series title by 4 games to 2, and the groundwork for the Yankees dynasty had been established. Image File history File linksMetadata Ruthbatting. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ruthbatting. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... The New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ...


Ruth narrowly missed winning the Triple Crown in 1924. He hit .378 to lead the American League in batting, led the major leagues with 46 home runs, and batted in 121 runs to finish second to Goose Goslin's 129. Ruth's on-base percentage was .513, the fourth of 5 years in which his OBP exceeded .500. However, the Yankees finished second, 2 games behind the Washington Senators, who went on to win their first and only World Series while based in D.C. Leon Allen Goslin (October 16, 1900 – May 15, 1971), better known as Goose Goslin, was a left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his powerful left-handed swing and dependable clutch hitting. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960...


During spring training in 1925, Ruth fell ill, and returned to New York for what was reported as stomach surgery. The press dubbed Ruth's ailment as "the bellyache heard round the world," and wrote about an alleged hot dog binge, but more recent writers have suggested that Ruth was suffering from untreated gonorrhea. Playing just 98 games, Ruth finished the season with a .290 average and 25 home runs. The team finished next to last in the American League with a 69-85 mark. It would be 40 years before a Yankees team would again experience such a poor season. See also: 1924 in sports, other events of 1925, 1926 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball (Major League) Pittsburgh Pirates def. ... This article is about the state. ... The clap redirects here. ...


1926-1930

Ruth thrown out to end the 1926 World Series.
Ruth thrown out to end the 1926 World Series.

Babe Ruth performed at a much higher level during 1926 season, batting .372 with 47 home runs and 146 RBI. The Yankees won the AL title and advanced to the 1926 World Series. The St. Louis Cardinals beat the Yankees in seven games. However, Ruth had his moments. In Game 4, he hit three home runs,[12] Despite his batting heroics, he is also remembered for a costly baserunning blunder. Ruth had a reputation as a good but overaggressive baserunner (he had 123 stolen bases, including 10 steals of home, but only a 51% career percentage). With two outs in the bottom of the 9th inning of the deciding 7th game, with the Yankees trailing 3-2, Ruth tried to steal second base. But he was thrown out, and the Cardinals were champions. It is the only time that the final out of a World Series was a "caught stealing." Image File history File links Ruth1926-3. ... Image File history File links Ruth1926-3. ... In the 1926 World Series, the St. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... In the 1926 World Series, the St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ...


Ruth was the leader of the famous 1927 Yankees, also known as Murderer's Row because of the strength of its hitting lineup and its effect on opposing pitchers. The team won a then AL-record 110 games (The 2001 Seattle Mariners now hold the record with 116 wins), took the AL pennant by 19 games, and swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1927 World Series. See also: 1926 in sports, 1928 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football ([cvvvvvvv[American Football|American]]) New York Giants win National Football League title You are a Gay bo! Golf First Ryder Cup held in United States beats Britain 9 1/2 to 2 1/2... Murderers Row is also the title of a 1960s motion picture starring Dean Martin as secret agent Matt Helm. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... This article is about the baseball team. ... In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four big games. ...


With the race long since decided, the nation's attention turned to Ruth's pursuit of his own home run mark of 59. Early in the season, Ruth expressed doubts about his chances: "I don't suppose I'll ever break that 1921 record. To do that, you've got to start early, and the pitchers have got to pitch to you. I don't start early, and the pitchers haven't really pitched to me in four seasons. I get more bad balls to hit than any other six men...and fewer good ones." Ruth was also being challenged for his slugger's crown by teammate Lou Gehrig, who nudged ahead of Ruth's total in midseason, prompting the New York World-Telegram to anoint Gehrig the favorite. But Ruth caught Gehrig (who would finish with 47), and then had a remarkable last leg of the season, hitting 17 home runs in September. His 60th came on September 30, in the Yankees' next-to-last game. Ruth was exultant, shouting after the game, "Sixty, count 'em, sixty! Let's see some son-of-a-bitch match that!" In later years, he would give Gehrig some credit: "Pitchers began pitching to me because if they passed me they still had Lou to contend with." In addition to his career-high 60 home runs, Ruth batted .356, drove in 164 runs and slugged .772. Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... The New York World-Telegram was formed by the 1931 sale of the New York World by the heirs of Joseph Pulitzer to Scripps Howard, owners since 1927 of the Evening Telegram. ...

The 1927 New York Yankees, one of the greatest baseball teams of all-time. (Ruth is on top row, fifth from the left.)

The following season started off very well for the Yankees, who led the AL by 13 games in July. But the Yankees were soon plagued by some key injuries, erratic pitching and inconsistent play. The Philadelphia Athletics, rebuilding after some lean years, were erasing the Yankees' lead. In early September, the A's took over first place by a game over New York. But in a pivotal series later that month, the Yankees took 3 out of 4 games and held on to win the pennant. Image File history File links 1927NYYankees5. ... See also: 1927 in sports, other events of 1928, 1929 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Cricket 23 June-26 June, London - West Indies play their first Test match, against England. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ...


Ruth's play in 1928 mirrored his team's performance. He got off to a hot start and on August 1, he had 42 home runs. This put him ahead of his 60 home run pace from the previous season. But Ruth's power waned, and he hit just 12 home runs in the last two months of the regular season. Still, he ended the season with an impressive 54, the fourth (and last) time he passed 50 home runs in a season. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Yankees had a 1928 World Series rematch with the St. Louis Cardinals, who had upset them in the 1926 series. The Cardinals had the same core players as the 1926 team, except for Rogers Hornsby, who was traded for Frankie Frisch after the 1926 season. Despite the Cardinals' strength and the Yankees' problems, once the Yankees got to the series they were ready, and the series proved to be no contest. The Yankees swept the Cardinals 4 games to 0, the first time a team had swept consecutive championships. Ruth batted .625 and had his second three home run World Series game in the finale. In the 1928 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the St. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973), nicknamed the Fordham Flash, was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century and a Baseball Hall of Fame inductee. ...


Decline and end with Yankees

In 1929, the Yankees failed to make the World Series for the first time in three years, and it would be another three years before they returned. Although the Yankees had slipped, Ruth led or tied for the league lead in home runs each year during 1929–1931. At one point during the 1930 season, as a stunt, Ruth was called upon to pitch for the first time since 1921, and he pitched a complete-game victory. (He had often pitched in exhibitions in the intervening years). See also: 1928 in sports, other events of 1929, 1930 in sports and the list of years in sports. // January 22: The New York Yankees announce they will put numbers on the backs of their uniforms, becoming the first baseball team to engage in continuous use of numbers. ...

A well-dressed Ruth in 1930.

Also in 1929, the Yankees became the first team to use uniform numbers regularly (the Cleveland Indians used them briefly in 1916). Since Ruth normally batted third in the order (ahead of Gehrig), he was assigned number 3 (to Gehrig's 4). The Yankees retired Ruth's number on June 13, 1948; however, it was kept in circulation prior to that. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x638, 55 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x638, 55 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1930, which was not a pennant year for the Yankees, Ruth was asked by a reporter what he thought of his yearly salary of $80,000 being more than President Hoover's $75,000. His response: "I know, but I had a better year than Hoover." Ruth had supported Al Smith in the 1928 Presidential election. That quote has also been rendered as, "How many home runs did he hit last year?" Three years later, Ruth would make a public appearance with the ex-President at a StanfordUSC football game. Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...


In the 1932 season, the Yankees went 107-47 and won the pennant under manager Joe McCarthy. Ruth did his part by hitting .341, with 41 home runs and 137 RBIs. Ruth did miss 21 games on the schedule that year; this included the last few weeks of the season. The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ...


The Yankees faced the Chicago Cubs in the 1932 World Series. The Yankees dispatched the Cubs in 4 games and batted .313 as a team. During Game 3 of the series, after having already homered earlier in the game, Ruth hit what has now become known as Babe Ruth's Called Shot. During the at-bat, Ruth supposedly gestured to the deepest part of the park in center-field, predicting a home run. The ball he hit traveled past the flagpole to the right of the scoreboard and ended up in temporary bleachers just outside Wrigley Field's outer wall. The center field corner was 440 feet away, and at age 37, Ruth had hit a straightaway center home run that was perhaps a 490 foot blow [13]. It was Ruth's last Series homer (and his last Series hit), and it became one of the legendary moments of the game. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ... Babe Ruths Called Shot refers to the home run hit by Babe Ruth in the fifth inning of game 3 on October 1, 1932. ... For the former ballpark in Los Angeles, see Wrigley Field (Los Angeles). ...


Ruth remained productive in 1933. He batted .301, hit 34 home runs, drove in 103 runs, and led the league in walks. As a result, Ruth was elected to play in the first All-Star game. He hit the first home run in the game's history on July 6, 1933, at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The two-run home run helped the AL score a 4-2 victory. As the footage of that hit reveals, the 38-year-old Ruth had become noticeably overweight by then, as his playing career was winding down. However, he was again called upon to pitch in one game, and again pitched a complete game victory, his final appearance as a pitcher. For the most part, his Yankee pitching appearances (five in fifteen years) were widely-advertised attempts to boost attendance. Despite unremarkable pitching numbers, Ruth had a 5-0 record in those five games, raising his career totals to 94-46, an exceptionally high winning percentage. All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ...

Babe Ruth with former U.S. President Herbert Hoover at Stanford - USC Armistice Day football game during the Great Depression (November 11, 1933)

In 1934, Babe Ruth recorded a .288 average, 22 home runs, and made the All-Star team for the second consecutive year. During the game, Ruth was the first of five consecutive strikeout victims for Carl Hubbell. In what turned out to be his last game at Yankee Stadium, only 2,000 fans attended. By this time, Ruth had reached a personal milestone of 700 home runs and was about ready to retire. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1933 in sports, 1935 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball July 10 - In the second Major League Baseball All-Star Game, played at the Polo Grounds in New York City, left-handed pitcher Carl Hubbell sets a record by striking out Babe Ruth, Lou... Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 - November 21, 1988) was a left-handed screwball pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943. ...


After the 1934 season, Ruth went on a baseball barnstorming tour in the Far East. Players such as Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Gomez, Earl Averill, Charlie Gehringer, and Lou Gehrig were among 14 players who played a series of 22 games. The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Earl Averill (May 21, 1902 - August 16, 1983) was an American player in Major League Baseball who was a center fielder from 1929 to 1941. ... Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers (1924-1942). ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ...


Sold to the Braves

By this time, Ruth knew he didn't have many years left as a player, and made no secret that he wanted to manage the Yankees. However, Ruppert wouldn't even consider dumping McCarthy. Ruth and McCarthy had never gotten along, and Ruth's managerial ambitions only made relations between the two chillier. Just before the 1934 season, Ruppert offered to make Ruth manager of the Yankees' top minor-league team, the Newark Bears. However, Ruth's wife, Claire Merritt Hodgson, and his business manager both advised him to turn it down. After the 1934 season, Ruppert talked to nearly every other major-league owner, but no one was interested in making Ruth manager. By this time, McCarthy didn't want Ruth on the team, and Ruppert decided to trade Ruth. League affiliations Atlantic League of Professional Baseball North Division  Name Newark Bears (1998-present) Team Colors red, black Ballpark Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium Championships League titles: (1) 2002 Division titles: (1) 2001  Owner(s)/Operated By: Marc Berson General Manager: John Brandt Manager: Wayne Krenchicki Media: The Star-Ledger Website... Claire Merritt Hodgson (born Clara Mae Merritt September 11, 1897 - October 25, 1976) is most famous for being the second wife of Babe Ruth. ...


Ruppert finally found a taker in Boston Braves owner Emil Fuchs. Even though the Braves had fielded fairly competitive teams in the last three seasons, Fuchs was sinking in debt and couldn't afford the rent on Braves Field. Fuchs thought Ruth was just what the Braves needed, both on and off the field. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Braves Field was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


After a series of phone calls, letters and meetings, the Yankees traded Ruth to the Braves on February 26, 1935. It was announced that in addition to remaining as a player, Ruth would become team vice president and would be consulted on all club transactions. He was also made assistant manager to Braves skipper Bill McKechnie. In a long letter to Ruth a few days before the press conference, Fuchs promised Ruth a share in the Braves' profits, with the possibility of becoming co-owner of the team. Fuchs also raised the possibility of Ruth becoming the Braves' manager, perhaps as early as 1936. is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Bill McKechnie baseball card, 1912 William Boyd McKechnie (August 7, 1886 - October 29, 1965) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ...

Ruth in a Boston Braves uniform in 1935, his last year as a player.

Amid much media hoopla, Ruth played his first home game in Boston in over 16 years. Before an opening-day crowd of over 25,000, Ruth accounted for all of the Braves' runs in a 4-2 defeat of the New York Giants. The Braves had long played second fiddle to the Red Sox in Boston, but Ruth's arrival spiked interest in the Braves to levels not seen since their stunning win in the 1914 World Series. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x639, 81 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x639, 81 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves beat the Philadelphia Athletics in 4 games. ...


But this couldn't last. That win proved to be the only time the Braves were over .500 that year. By May 20, they were 7-17, and their season was effectively over. While Ruth could still hit, he could do little else, and soon stopped hitting as well. His conditioning had deteriorated so much that he could do little more than trot around the bases. His fielding was dreadful; at one point, three of the Braves' pitchers threatened not to take the mound if Ruth was in the lineup. Ruth was also miffed that McKechnie ignored most of his advice. He soon discovered that he was vice president and assistant manager in name only, and Fuchs' promise of a share of team profits was nothing more than hot air. In fact, Fuchs expected Ruth to invest some of his money in the team. is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On May 25, at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Ruth went 4-for-4, drove in 6 runs and hit 3 home runs in an 11-7 loss to the Pirates. These were the last three home runs of his career. His last home run cleared the roof at the old Forbes Field—he became the first player to accomplish that feat. Five days later, in Philadelphia, Ruth played in his last major league game. He struck out in the first inning and, while playing the field in the same inning, hurt his knee and left the game. is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes Field (disambiguation). ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


Two days after that, Ruth summoned reporters to the locker room after a game against the Giants and announced he was retiring. He'd wanted to retire as early as May 12, but Fuchs persuaded him to stay on because the Braves hadn't played in every National League park yet. That season, he hit just .181 with six home runs in 72 at-bats. The Braves had similar results. They finished 38-115, and it was the third-worst record in major league history, just a few percentage points fewer than the infamous 1962 New York Mets. Fuchs finally caved in under mounting debt and lost control of the Braves with just over two months left in the season. is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Listed below are the worst Major League Baseball teams of all time, as determined by winning percentage (.300 or less), minimum 140 games played. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league...


Personal life

Ruth married Helen Woodford, his first wife, in 1914.[14] Together, they adopted a daughter.[15] They were reportedly separated as early as 1920[16] and as late as 1926.[17] After they separated, Helen perished in a house fire in January 1929. Ruth and several Yankees attended her funeral.


On April 17, 1929, Ruth married actress Claire Hodgson.[18] They stayed married until Babe Ruth's death in 1948.[19] is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Claire Merritt Hodgson (born Clara Mae Merritt September 11, 1897 - October 25, 1976) is most famous for being the second wife of Babe Ruth. ... See also: 1947 in sports, 1949 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball January 29: Commissioner Happy Chandler fines the Yankees, Cubs, and Phillies $500 each for signing high school players. ...


He had two daughters, Dorothy Ruth[20] and Julia Ruth. Dorothy Helen Ruth Pirone was the daughter of Babe Ruth and his mistress Juanita Jennings. ...


Ruth regularly wintered in Florida, frequently playing golf during the off-season and while the Yankees were spring training in St. Petersburg, Florida. After retirement, he had a winter beachfront home in Treasure Island, Florida, near St. Petersburg. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see St. ... Treasure Island is a city located in Pinellas County, Florida. ...

Weight misconception

Though Babe Ruth is usually remembered as having been very overweight, this is largely because of oft-repeated showings of newsreels taken late in his career. Ruth was a large man who did indeed battle weight gain (especially given his sometimes careless diet), but for much of his career he was not especially overweight. In fact, photographs from his early career (such as the ones accompanying this article) show a trim and athletic Ruth.


Radio and films

Among his many forays into various popular media, Ruth was heard often on radio in the 1930s and 1940s as both a guest and on his own programs with various titles: The Adventures of Babe Ruth was a 15-minute Blue Network show heard three times a week from April 16 to July 13, 1934. Three years later, he was on CBS twice a week in Here's Babe Ruth which was broadcast from April 14 to July 9, 1937. That same year he portrayed himself in "Alibi Ike" on Lux Radio Theater. His Baseball Quiz was first heard Saturdays on NBC June 5 to July 10, 1943 and then later that year from August 28 to November 20 on NBC, followed by another NBC run from July 8 to October 21, 1944. The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American radio and television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alibi Ike is a series of short stories written by Ring Lardner and first publised in the Saturday Evening Post on July 31, 1915. ... Lux Radio Theater, one of the genuine classic radio anthology series (NBC Blue Network (1934-1935); CBS (1935-1954); NBC (1954-1955)) adapted first Broadway stage works, and then (especially) films to hour-long live radio presentations. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


His film roles included a cameo appearance as himself in the Harold Lloyd film Speedy (1928). His first film appearance occurred in 1920, in the silent movie Headin' Home. He made numerous other film appearances in the silent era, usually either playing himself or playing a ballplayer similar to himself. Ruth's voice was said by some biographers to be similar to that of film star Clark Gable, although that was obviously not evident in the silent film era. He had an appropriate role, as himself, in Pride of the Yankees, the story of his ill-fated teammate Lou Gehrig. Ruth had three scenes in the film: One in which he appeared with a straw hat. He said "If I see anyone touch it, I'll knock his teeth in!" The teammates convinced young Gehrig (Gary Cooper) to chew the hat up; he got away with it. In the second scene, the players go to a restaurant, where Babe sees a side of beef cooking and jokes, "Well, I'll have one of those..." and, the dramatic scene near the end, where Gehrig makes his speech at Yankee Stadium ending with "I consider myself the luckiest man..." Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ... Speedy is a 1928 silent film that was one of the films to be nominated for the short-lived Academy Award for Best Director of a Comedy. ... This article is about the comedy film. ... Larger-than life baseball superstar Babe Ruth plays himself in this entertaining silent bio-pic from 1920. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... ya ya baby ya you rock my world uh huh oh ya the yankees sometin of that sort well goodbye i got to go suck some pussy. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ...


Retirement and post-playing days

Nat Fein's Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph of Ruth at Yankee Stadium, June 13, 1948. This was his last public appearance before his death.

In 1936, Ruth was one of the first five players elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Two years later, Larry MacPhail, the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager, offered him a first base coaching job in June. Ruth took the job but quit at the end of the season. The coaching position was his last job in Major League Baseball. His baseball career finally came to an end in 1943. In a charity game at Yankee Stadium, he pinch hit and drew a walk. Image File history File linksMetadata 2Ruth1948April. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 2Ruth1948April. ... Nat Fein (b. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leland Stanford Larry MacPhail, Sr. ... The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 1947, he became director of the American Legion's youth baseball program.[21] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Babe Ruth's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1703 × 2278 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1703 × 2278 pixel, file size: 1. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...

Illness

In 1946, he began experiencing severe pain over his left eye. In November 1946, a visit to French Hospital in New York revealed Ruth had a malignant tumor in his neck that had encircled his left carotid artery. He received post-operative radiation therapy and female hormone treatments. In total he spent 3 months in the hospital and lost approximately 80 pounds (35 kg). He was released from the hospital in February 1947. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... In human anatomy, the carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck. ...


A parallel development in the field of chemotherapy crossed over with Ruth at this time. A new drug named teropterin, a folic acid derivative, was developed by Dr. Brian Hutchings of the Lederle Laboratories. It had been shown to cause significant remissions in children with leukemia. Ruth was administered this new drug in June 1947. He was suffering from headaches, hoarseness and had difficulty swallowing. He agreed to use this new medicine but did not want to know any details about it. All the while he was receiving this experimental medication, he did not know it was for cancer. On June 29, 1947, he began receiving injections and he responded with dramatic improvement. He gained over 20 pounds (9 kg) and had resolution of his headaches. On September 6, 1947, his case was presented anonymously at the 4th Annual Internal cancer Research Congress in St. Louis. Teropterin ended up being a precursor for methotrexate, a now commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. Chemotherapy is the use of chemical substances to treat disease. ... Leukemia or leukaemia(Greek leukos λευκός, “white”; aima αίμα, “blood”) (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Amethopterin redirects here. ...


It is now known that Ruth suffered from nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPCA), a relatively rare tumor located in the back of the nose near the eustachian tube. Contemporary management for NPCA includes concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rare tumor arising from the epithelium of the nasopharynx. ... The Eustachian tube (or auditory tube) is a tube that links the pharynx to the middle ear. ... Varian Clinac 2100C Linear Accelerator Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis). ...


On April 27, 1947, the Yankees held a ceremony at Yankee Stadium. Despite his health problems, Ruth was able to attend "Babe Ruth Day". Ruth spoke to a capacity crowd of more than 60,000, including many American Legion youth baseball players. (Babe Ruth speaking at Yankee Stadium) is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Later, Ruth started the Babe Ruth Foundation, a charity for disadvantaged children. Another Babe Ruth Day held at Yankee Stadium in September 1947 helped to raise money for this charity.


After the cancer returned, Ruth attended the 25th anniversary celebration of the opening of Yankee Stadium on June 13, 1948. He was reunited with old teammates from the 1923 Yankee team and posed for photographs. is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Death

A cancer-ravaged Ruth (right) in 1948, visited by New York City Mayor William O'Dwyer.

Shortly after he attended the Yankee Stadium anniversary event, Ruth was back in the hospital. He received hundreds of well-wishing letters and messages. This included a phone call from President Harry Truman. Claire helped him respond to the letters. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ODwyer (left) visiting a cancer-ravaged Babe Ruth in 1948. ... For the victim of Mt. ...


On July 26, 1948, Ruth attended the premiere of the film The Babe Ruth Story, a biopic about his life. William Bendix portrayed Ruth. Shortly thereafter, Ruth returned to the hospital for the final time. He was barely able to speak. Ruth's condition gradually became worse, and in his last days, scores of reporters and photographers hovered around the hospital. Only a few visitors were allowed to see him, one of whom was National League president and future Commissioner of Baseball, Ford Frick. “Ruth was so thin it was unbelievable. He had been such a big man and his arms were just skinny little bones, and his face was so haggard,” Frick said years later. is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Babe Ruth Story is a 1948 baseball film biography of Babe Ruth, the famed New York Yankees slugger. ... William Bendix (January 14, 1906 - December 14, 1964) was an American film actor. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ... Ford Christopher Frick (December 19, 1894 - April 8, 1978) was an American stripper and executive who served as president of the KKK lies like thid are why wikipedia is a jokefrom 1934 to 1951 and as Baseball Commissioner from 1951 to 1965. ...

The grave of Babe Ruth

On August 16, the day after Frick's visit, Babe Ruth died at age 53. His body lay in repose in Yankee Stadium. His funeral was two days later at St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York. Ruth was then buried in the Cemetery of the Gate of Heaven in Hawthorne, New York. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lying in repose is when the remains of a deceased person, often one of some stature, are available for viewing by the public. ... St. ... The Cemetery of the Gate of Heaven, approximately 25 miles north of New York City, was established in 1917 at 10 West Stevens Ave. ... Hawthorne is an unincorporated hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County, New York. ...


At his death, the New York Times called Babe Ruth, "a figure unprecedented in American life. A born showman off the field and a marvelous performer on it, he had an amazing flair for doing the spectacular at the most dramatic moment." [22]


Legacy

Ruth's impact on American culture still commands attention. Top performers in other sports are referred to as "The Babe Ruth of ______."


His name comes up anytime home runs are discussed, including Barry Bonds' passing Ruth's career number in 2006. Films have been made featuring Ruth, or a Ruth-like figure ("The Whammer" in The Natural, for example). TV commercials are still made which feature caricatures of Ruth. The Natural is a 1952 novel about baseball written by Bernard Malamud. ...


In addition to the Yankees dynasty itself, one living monument to Ruth is Yankee Stadium. That part of the legacy will be revised in a few years: Groundbreaking for a new Yankee Stadium, replacing the adjacent structure known as "The House That Ruth Built", took place on August 16, 2006, the 58th anniversary of Ruth's death. is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As a sidelight to his prominent role in changing the game to the power game, the frequency and popularity of Ruth's home runs eventually led to a rule change pertaining to those hit in sudden-death mode (bottom of the ninth or later inning). Prior to 1931, as soon as the first necessary run to win the game scored, the play was over, and the batter was credited only with the number of bases needed to drive in the winning run. Thus, if the score was 3-2 with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth, and the batter smacked an "over the fence home run", the game would end at 4-3, with the batter only allowed a double, and the runners officially stopped on 2nd and 3rd (since they weren't needed to win the game). The new rule allowed the entire play to complete, justified on the grounds that the ball was dead and that all runners could freely advance, thus granting the full allotment of HR and RBI's to the batter, as we know it today. Several players lost home runs that way, including Ruth, whose career total would have been changed to 715 if historians during the 1960s had been successful in pursuing this matter. Major League Baseball elected not to retrofit the records to the modern rules, and Ruth's total stayed at 714.


Another rules change that affected Ruth was the method used by umpires to judge potential home runs when the batted ball left the field near a foul pole. Before 1931, i.e through most of Ruth's most productive years, the umpire called the play based on the ball's final resting place "when last seen". Thus, if a ball went over the fence fair, and curved behind the foul pole, it was ruled foul. Beginning in 1931 and continuing to the present day, the rule was changed to require the umpire to judge based on the point where the ball cleared the fence. Jenkinson's book (p.374-375) lists 78 foul balls near the foul pole in Ruth's career, claiming that at least 50 of them were likely to have been home runs under the modern rule.


Ruth's 1919 contract that sent him from Boston to New York was sold at auction for $996,000 at Sotheby's on June 10, 2005. The most valuable memorabilia item relating to Ruth was his 1923 bat which he used to hit the first home run at Yankee Stadium on April 18, 1923. Ruth's heavy Louisville Slugger solid ash wood bat sold for $1.26 million at a Sotheby's auction in December 2004, making it the second most valuable baseball memorabilia item to date, just behind the famous 1909 Honus Wagner baseball card. Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A souvenir stall in London, England A souvenir (from the French for memory) is an object that is treasured for the memories associated with it. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Louisville Slugger brand is made by Hillerich & Bradsby Hillerich & Bradsby Company is a company located in Louisville, Kentucky that produces the famous Louisville Slugger baseball bat. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman, was an American baseball player who played during the 1890s until the 1910s. ...


Ruth was immortalized in the poem "Lineup for Yesterday":

R is for Ruth.

To tell you the truth,
There's no more to be said,
Just R is for Ruth.

Ogden Nash Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ...

Career batting statistics

Season G AB R H HR RBI BB SO Avg. SLG
1914 5 10 1 2 0 2 0 4 .200 .300
1915 42 92 16 29 4 21 9 23 .315 .576
1916 67 136 18 37 3 15 10 23 .272 .419
1917 52 123 14 40 2 12 12 18 .325 .472
1918 95 317 50 95 11 66 58 58 .300 .555
1919 130 432 103 139 29 114 101 58 .322 .657
1920 142 458 158 172 54 137 150 80 .376 .849
1921 152 540 177 204 59 171 145 81 .378 .846
1922 110 406 94 128 35 99 84 80 .315 .672
1923 152 522 151 205 41 131 170 93 .393 .764
1924 153 529 143 200 46 121 142 81 .378 .739
1925 98 359 61 104 25 66 59 68 .290 .543
1926 152 495 139 184 47 150 144 76 .372 .737
1927 151 540 158 192 60 164 137 89 .356 .772
1928 154 536 163 173 54 142 137 87 .323 .709
1929 135 499 121 172 46 154 72 60 .345 .697
1930 145 518 150 186 49 153 136 61 .359 .732
1931 145 534 149 199 46 163 128 51 .373 .700
1932 133 457 120 156 41 137 130 62 .341 .661
1933 137 459 97 138 34 103 114 90 .301 .582
1934 125 365 78 105 22 84 104 63 .288 .537
1935 28 72 13 13 6 12 20 24 .181 .431
Career Statistics 2,503 8,398 2,174 2,874 714 2,217 2,062 1,330 .342 .690

The following are the baseball events of the year 1914 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1916 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1917 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1918 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1924 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1929 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1931 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world. ...

Career pitching statistics

W L ERA G GS CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR HBP BB SO WPct WHIP AVG BB/9 K/9
94 46 2.28 163 148 107 17 4 1,221.1 974 400 309 10 29 441 488 .671 1.16 .220 3.25 3.60

Ruth was 89-46 with the Red Sox, 5-0 with the Yankees overall. In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ... In Major League Baseball, a loss (denoted L) is charged to the pitcher of the losing team who allows the run that gives the opposing team the lead which the game is won with (the go-ahead run). ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, games started (denoted by GS) is credited to a pitcher who throws the very first pitch to the opposing team of a single game. ... In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game himself, without the benefit of a relief pitcher. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Trevor Hoffman, a closer for the San Diego Padres, is currently the leader on the all-time save list. ... In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is in the game. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball, an earned run is any run for which the pitcher is held accountable (i. ... Homerun redirects here. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... For the typographical mode indicating deleted text, see Strikethrough. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In baseball, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of how many baserunners a pitcher is responsible for allowing per inning pitched. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, bases on balls per 9 innings pitched (BB/9IP) is the mean of bases on balls, (or walks) given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball statistics, strikeouts per 9 innings pitched (K/9IP) is the mean of strikeouts, (or Ks) by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ...


See also

  • Babe Ruth League
  • List of Major League Baseball Home Run Records
  • List of Major League Baseball RBI Records

Babe Ruth League is a youth baseball program. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ http://www.pressboxonline.com/story.cfm?id=1610
  2. ^ a b History of the Birthplace. 714 Club. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  3. ^ a b c Biography. BabeRuth.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  4. ^ George Herman "Babe" Ruth. 714 Club. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  5. ^ Ruth information. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  6. ^ Ruth biography. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  7. ^ Jack Dunn bio. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  8. ^ Ruth Transaction info (bottom of page). Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  9. ^ Creamer, Robert W. (1999). "Babe Ruth: Living Large", 1900-1929, 1st edition, SportsCentury, Chicago: Rare Air Media, 28. ISBN 1-892866-08-0. 
  10. ^ a record that would last until Whitey Ford broke it in 1961
  11. ^ The Baseball Hall of Fame, by Tom Meany
  12. ^ the first time a player hit 3 home runs in a World Series game.
  13. ^ as per Bill Jenkinson's book
  14. ^ Ruth & his marriage. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  15. ^ Ruth facts. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  16. ^ Ruth & his women. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  17. ^ Ruth & his marriage. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  18. ^ Ruth & Clair Hodgson. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  19. ^ Ruth facts. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  20. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Ruth
  21. ^ History Channel audio clip of Babe Ruth at Yankee Stadium April 27, 1947.
  22. ^ "Babe Ruth, Baseball's Great Star and Idol of Children, Had a Career Both Dramatic and Bizarre", New York Times, August 17, 1948. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. “Probably nowhere in all the imaginative field of fiction could one find a career more dramatic and bizarre than that portrayed in real life by George Herman Ruth. Known the world over, even in foreign lands where baseball is never played, as the Babe, he was the boy who rose from the obscurity of a charitable institution in Baltimore to a position as the leading figure in professional baseball. He was also its greatest drawing-card, its highest salaried performer--at least of his day--and the idol of millions of youngsters throughout the land.” 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Robert W. Creamer (b. ... Whitey Fords number 16 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1974 Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Babe Ruth
  • baberuth.com - Official site
  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs
  • baseballhalloffame.org – Hall of Fame biography page
  • baberuthmuseum.com Ruth Museum
  • espn.go.com - article by Larry Schwartz
  • Babe Ruth at the Internet Movie Database
  • Find-A-Grave profile for Babe Ruth
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Roger Peckinpaugh
New York Yankees team captain
May 20, 1922 to May 25, 1922
Succeeded by
Everett Scott


  Joe Wood on an American Tobacco Company baseball card, 1912 Joe Smoky Joe Wood (October 25, 1889 - July 27, 1985) was a Major League Baseball player for the Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians during the early part of the 20th century. ... Major League Baseball recognizes earned run average champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ... Wally Pipp Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 - January 11, 1965) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball, now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrigs streak of 2,130 consecutive games. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Clarence William Tilly Walker (September 4, 1887 - September 20, 1959) was an American left and center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1911-1923. ... Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 - January 22, 1959) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who led the American League in 1922 with 39 home runs and 155 RBIs. ... Robert Hayes Bobby Veach (June 29, 1888 - August 7, 1945) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 - January 22, 1959) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who led the American League in 1922 with 39 home runs and 155 RBIs. ... Roger Connor baseball card, 1887 Roger Connor (July 1, 1857 - January 4, 1931) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player. ... The following is a chronology of the top ten leaders in lifetime home runs in Major League Baseball. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Ned Williamson on an 1887-90 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge) (N172). ... Homerun redirects here. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 - January 22, 1959) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who led the American League in 1922 with 39 home runs and 155 RBIs. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 - January 22, 1959) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who led the American League in 1922 with 39 home runs and 155 RBIs. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leon Allen Goslin (October 16, 1900 – May 15, 1971), better known as Goose Goslin, was a left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his powerful left-handed swing and dependable clutch hitting. ... George Sisler Michael Allen Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Harry Edwin Heilmann (August 3, 1894 – July 9, 1951), nicknamed “Slug,” was a Major League Baseball player who played 17 season with the Detroit Tigers (1914, 1916-1929) and Cincinnati Reds (1930, 1932). ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Harry Edwin Heilmann (August 3, 1894 – July 9, 1951), nicknamed “Slug,” was a Major League Baseball player who played 17 season with the Detroit Tigers (1914, 1916-1929) and Cincinnati Reds (1930, 1932). ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius SzymaÅ„ski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... In the 1915 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Philadelphia Phillies in 5 games. ... John Joseph Jack Barry (April 26, 1887 - April 23, 1961) was an American shortstop, second baseman, and manager in Major League Baseball, and later a renowned college baseball coach. ... Forrest Leroy (Hick) Cady (January 26, 1886 - March 3, 1946) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1912-1917) and Philadelphia Phillies (1919). ... William Francis Carrigan (October 22, 1883 - July 8, 1969), nicknamed Rough, was a Major League baseball catcher. ... George Rube Foster (January 5, 1888 in Lehigh, Oklahoma - March 1, 1976 in Bokoshe, Oklahoma) was a former Major League Baseball player. ... Del Gainer, Boston Red Sox Dellos Clinton Gainer (November 10, 1886 - January 29, 1947), nicknamed Sheriff, was a Major League Baseball first baseman who played 10 seasons in the Major Leagues. ... William Lawrence Larry Gardner (May 13, 1886 - March 11, 1976) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Olaf Henriksen baseball card, 1912 Olaf Henriksen (April 26, 1888 - October 17, 1962) has been the only player in Major League Baseball history to be born in Denmark. ... Richard Carleton Dick Hoblitzel (born October 26, 1888 in Waverly, West Virginia as Richard Carleton Hoblitzell - died November 14, 1962 in Parkersburg, West Virginia), is a former professional baseball player who played first base in the Major Leagues from 1908-1918. ... Harry Hooper Baseball card issued by American Tobacco Company, 1912. ... Harold Chandler Janvrin (August 27, 1892 - March 1, 1962) born in Haverhill, Massachusetts was a Utility Infielder for the Boston Red Sox (1911 and 1913-17), Washington Senators (1919), St. ... Hubert Benjamin Leonard (born April 16, 1892 Birmingham, Ohio - died July 11, 1952 Fresno, California) was a pitcher with an 11 year career from 1913-1921, 1924-1925. ... Duffy Lewis of the Boston Red Sox at Comiskey Park in 1912. ... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Ernest Grady Shore (born near East Bend, North Carolina March 24, 1891 - September 24, 1980) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox during some of their glory years in the 1910s. ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... Chester David Thomas (January 24, 1888 - December 24, 1953) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1912 through 1921 for the Boston Red Sox (1912-17) and Cleveland Indians (1918-21). ... William Francis Carrigan (October 22, 1883 - July 8, 1969), nicknamed Rough, was a Major League baseball catcher. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... In the 1916 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Brooklyn Robins in 5 games. ... Forrest Leroy (Hick) Cady (January 26, 1886 - March 3, 1946) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1912-1917) and Philadelphia Phillies (1919). ... William Francis Carrigan (October 22, 1883 - July 8, 1969), nicknamed Rough, was a Major League baseball catcher. ... George Rube Foster (January 5, 1888 in Lehigh, Oklahoma - March 1, 1976 in Bokoshe, Oklahoma) was a former Major League Baseball player. ... Del Gainer, Boston Red Sox Dellos Clinton Gainer (November 10, 1886 - January 29, 1947), nicknamed Sheriff, was a Major League Baseball first baseman who played 10 seasons in the Major Leagues. ... William Lawrence Larry Gardner (May 13, 1886 - March 11, 1976) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Olaf Henriksen baseball card, 1912 Olaf Henriksen (April 26, 1888 - October 17, 1962) has been the only player in Major League Baseball history to be born in Denmark. ... Richard Carleton Dick Hoblitzel (born October 26, 1888 in Waverly, West Virginia as Richard Carleton Hoblitzell - died November 14, 1962 in Parkersburg, West Virginia), is a former professional baseball player who played first base in the Major Leagues from 1908-1918. ... Harry Hooper Baseball card issued by American Tobacco Company, 1912. ... Harold Chandler Janvrin (August 27, 1892 - March 1, 1962) born in Haverhill, Massachusetts was a Utility Infielder for the Boston Red Sox (1911 and 1913-17), Washington Senators (1919), St. ... Hubert Benjamin Leonard (born April 16, 1892 Birmingham, Ohio - died July 11, 1952 Fresno, California) was a pitcher with an 11 year career from 1913-1921, 1924-1925. ... Duffy Lewis of the Boston Red Sox at Comiskey Park in 1912. ... Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Ernest Grady Shore (born near East Bend, North Carolina March 24, 1891 - September 24, 1980) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox during some of their glory years in the 1910s. ... Charles Henry Chick Shorten (1892-1965), born and died in Scranton, Pennsylvania. ... Chester David Thomas (January 24, 1888 - December 24, 1953) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1912 through 1921 for the Boston Red Sox (1912-17) and Cleveland Indians (1918-21). ... Clarence William Tilly Walker (September 4, 1887 - September 20, 1959) was an American left and center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1911-1923. ... William Francis Carrigan (October 22, 1883 - July 8, 1969), nicknamed Rough, was a Major League baseball catcher. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The 1918 World Series featured the Boston Red Sox, who defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two. ... Samuel Lester (Slam) Agnew (April 12, 1887 - July 19, 1951) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Leslie Ambrose (Bullet Joe) Bush (November 27, 1892 - November 1, 1974) born in Brainerd, Minnesota was a Pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1912-17 and 1928), Boston Red Sox (1918-21), New York Yankees (1922-24), St. ... Jean Dubuc baseball card Jean Joseph Octave Arthur Dubuc (September 15, 1888 – August 28, 1958) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Harry Hooper Baseball card issued by American Tobacco Company, 1912. ... Samuel Pond Sad Sam Jones ( July 26, 1892 - July 6, 1966) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in the American League with the Cleveland Indians (1914-15), Boston Red Sox (1916-21), New York Yankees (1922-26), St. ... Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... John Phalen (Stuffy) McInnis (September 19, 1890 - February 16, 1960) was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Laurence H. Hack Miller (January 1, 1894 in New York, New York - September 17, 1971 in Oakland, California), was a former professional baseball player who played outfielder in the Major Leagues from 1916-1925. ... Wally Schang with the Philadelphia Athletics, American League (circa 1915) Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 - March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Amos Aaron Strunk (January 22, 1889 - July 22, 1979) was a center fielder who played in Major League Baseball from 1908 through 1924. ... George (Lucky) Whiteman (December 23, 1882 - February 10, 1947) was an utility outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1907, 1918) and New York Yankees (1913). ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ... Leslie Ambrose (Bullet Joe) Bush (November 27, 1892 - November 1, 1974) born in Brainerd, Minnesota was a Pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1912-17 and 1928), Boston Red Sox (1918-21), New York Yankees (1922-24), St. ... Joe Dugan (b. ... Mike Gazella (October 13, 1895-September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Henry Luther Hinkey Haines is a former Major League Baseball outfielder for the New York Yankees. ... Harvey Gink Hendrick[1] (November 9, 1897 - October 29, 1941) was an American major league baseball player who played for several different teams during an eleven-year career. ... Fred Hofmann [Bootnose] (June 10, 1894 - November 19, 1964) was a catcher , coach and scout in Major League Baseball, as well a player and manager in the Minor Leagues. ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Ernest Rudolph Johnson (April 29, 1888 – May 1, 1952) was a Major League Baseball shortstop. ... Samuel Pond Sad Sam Jones ( July 26, 1892 - July 6, 1966) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in the American League with the Cleveland Indians (1914-15), Boston Red Sox (1916-21), New York Yankees (1922-26), St. ... Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... Wally Pipp Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 - January 11, 1965) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball, now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrigs streak of 2,130 consecutive games. ... Oscar Frederick Louis Roettger (born February 19, 1900, in St. ... Wally Schang with the Philadelphia Athletics, American League (circa 1915) Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 - March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 - December 31, 1980) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1913 to 1927. ... Elmer John Smith (September 21, 1892 - August 3, 1984) born in Sandusky, Ohio was an Outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1914-16, 1917 and 1919-21), Washington Senators (1916-17), Boston Red Sox (1922), New York Yankees (1922-23) and Cincinnati Reds (1925). ... Aaron Lee Ward (August 28, 1896 - January 30, 1961) born in Booneville, Arkansas was an Infielder for the New York Yankees (1917-26), Chicago White Sox (1927) and Cleveland Indians (1928). ... Lawton Walter Whitey Witt (born Ladislaw Waldemar Wittkowski on September 28, 1895-died July 14, 1988) is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four big games. ... Walter Esau Beall (July 29, 1899-January 28, 1959) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ... Pat Collins (born September 13, 1896-died May 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... Joe Dugan (b. ... Cedric Montgomery Durst (August 23, 1896 - February 16, 1971) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played between 1922 and 1930 for the St. ... Mike Gazella (October 13, 1895-September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Joseph Oscar Giard (October 7, 1898 - July 10, 1956) was an American major league baseball player. ... John Patrick Grabowski (January 7, 1900 - May 23, 1946), nicknamed Nig, was a Major League Baseball catcher who played 7 seasons for the Chicago White Sox (1924-26), New York Yankees (1927-29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Mark Koenig (July 19, 1904 - April 22, 1993) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... William Wilcy Cy Moore (May 20, 1897 - March 29, 1963) was a former professional baseball player. ... Raymond Anderson Morehart (December 2, 1899 - December 2, 1989) was an American major league baseball player. ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Benjamin Edwin Paschal (October 13, 1895 - November 10, 1974) born in Enterprise, Alabama was an Outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1915), Boston Red Sox (1920) and New York Yankees (1924-29). ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... Walter Henry Ruether (September 29, 1893-May 16, 1970) was an American baseball player who pitched for five different Major League teams. ... James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 - December 31, 1980) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1913 to 1927. ... Urban James Shocker (August 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockor, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. ... Myles Lewis Thomas (October 22, 1897 - December 12, 1963) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Julian Valentine Wera (February 9, 1902 in Winona, Minnesota – December 12, 1975 in Rochester, Minnesota) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the New York Yankees. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In the 1928 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the St. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ... George Henry Burns (January 31, 1893 - January 7, 1978) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Pat Collins (born September 13, 1896-died May 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... Stanley Anthony Coveleski (Kowalewski) (July 13, 1889 - March 20, 1984) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1910s and 1920s. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Joe Dugan (b. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Cedric Montgomery Durst (August 23, 1896 - February 16, 1971) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played between 1922 and 1930 for the St. ... Mike Gazella (October 13, 1895-September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... John Patrick Grabowski (January 7, 1900 - May 23, 1946), nicknamed Nig, was a Major League Baseball catcher who played 7 seasons for the Chicago White Sox (1924-26), New York Yankees (1927-29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). ... Frederick Amos Heimach (January 27, 1901 - June 1, 1973) born in Camden, New Jersey, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1920-26), Boston Red Sox (1926), New York Yankees (1928-29) and Brooklyn Robins/Brooklyn Dodgers (1930-33). ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Mark Koenig (July 19, 1904 - April 22, 1993) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... William Wilcy Cy Moore (May 20, 1897 - March 29, 1963) was a former professional baseball player. ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Benjamin Edwin Paschal (October 13, 1895 - November 10, 1974) born in Enterprise, Alabama was an Outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1915), Boston Red Sox (1920) and New York Yankees (1924-29). ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 - December 31, 1980) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1913 to 1927. ... Urban James Shocker (August 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockor, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. ... Myles Lewis Thomas (October 22, 1897 - December 12, 1963) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Jonathan Thompson Walton Zachary (born May 7, 1896 Graham, NC - died January 24, 1969 Burlington, NC) was a pitcher who had a 19 year career from 1918 to 1936. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... Lynford Hobart (Lyn) Lary (January 28, 1906 - January 9, 1973) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (The Crow) (born October 4, 1910 in San Francisco, CA - died February 11, 2002 in Stockton, CA) was an infielder for the New York Yankees for his entire career. ... William Benjamin Chapman (December 25, 1908, Nashville, Tennessee - July 7, 1993, Hoover, Alabama) was an outfielder, pitcher, manager and coach in American Major League Baseball. ... Otto Hamlin Saltzgaver (January 23, 1903 - February 1, 1978) was a United States Major League Baseball player from 1932 to 1937 for the New York Yankees and again in 1945 for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Card #78 from the 1991 Charles M. Conlon The Sporting News set   Arndt Ludwig (Art) Jorgens (May 18, 1905 - March 1, 1980) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1929-1939). ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Edwin Lee Wells (June 7, 1900 - May 1, 1986), nicknamed Satchelfoot [1], was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played 11 seasons in the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers (1923-1927), New York Yankees (1929-1932), and St. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Daniel Knowles (Danny) MacFayden (June 10, 1905 - August 26, 1972) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... John Thomas Allen (September 30, 1905 - March 29, 1959) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, St. ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ... Joseph Wheeler Sewell (October 9, 1898 - March 6, 1990) was a Major League Baseball infielder for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees. ... Edward Stephen Farrell (December 26, 1901 - December 20, 1966) was an utility infielder in Major League Baseball, playing mainly as a shortstop between 1925 and 1935 for the New York Giants (1925-1927[start], 1929[end]), Boston Braves (1927[end]-1929[start]), St. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... Samuel Dewey Byrd (October 15, 1906 – May 11, 1981) was an American professional baseball player and professional golfer. ... Joseph Charles (Joe) Glenn (November 19, 1908 - May 6, 1985) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1932-33, 1935-38), St. ... Myril Hoag (March 9, 1908 - July 28, 1971) was a major league outfielder for the New York Yankees, along with a few other teams. ... 1933 Tattoo Orbit R305 baseball card Ivy Paul Andrews (May 6, 1907 - November 24, 1970) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Allen Lindsey Cooke (June 23, 1907 - November 21, 1987) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams between 1930 and 1938. ... Edward David Phillips (February 17, 1901 - January 26, 1968) born in Worcester, Massachusetts was a Catcher for the Boston Braves (1924), Detroit Tigers (1929), Pittsburgh Pirates (1931), New York Yankees (1932), Washington Senators (1934) and Cleveland Indians (1935). ... Le Roy John Schalk (born November 9, 1908, in Chicago, Illinois; died March 11, 1990, in Gainesville, Texas) was an American major league baseball player. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ...

Persondata
NAME Ruth, Babe
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Ruth, George Herman
SHORT DESCRIPTION Major League baseball player
DATE OF BIRTH February 6, 1895(1895-02-06)
PLACE OF BIRTH Baltimore, Maryland
DATE OF DEATH August 16, 1948
PLACE OF DEATH New York, New York

  Results from FactBites:
 
Babe Ruth - MSN Encarta (1088 words)
Ruth’s love for baseball, generosity, and dramatic rise from humble beginnings endeared him to fans, and he is one of the greatest sports heroes of American culture.
Ruth’s pitching and hitting earned him the devotion of Boston fans, but in 1920 Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Ruth’s contract to the Yankees to cover financial losses sustained in other business ventures (including a failed Broadway show).
Ruth’s extraordinary home run slugging touched off a nationwide resurgence of fan support for baseball, which had suffered in the aftermath of the 1919 World Series scandal, in which several Chicago White Sox players had intentionally played badly in exchange for payments from gamblers.
Babe Ruth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (13436 words)
Ruth threw a tantrum and quit the team for a few days, and it was reported he had signed a new contract with the Chester Shipyards, a Pennsylvania-based pro team.
Ruth took the job, perhaps thinking he would have a chance to manage the Dodgers in the future, but MacPhail had clearly stated to Ruth that Leo Durocher was being groomed to take over the managerial reigns of the Dodgers for next season.
Babe Ruth and Billy Martin are buried about 150 feet apart in the same section of the cemetery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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