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Encyclopedia > BT Tower
BT Tower from the Euston Road, looking south.
BT Tower from the Euston Road, looking south.
Annotated 1995 view from BT Tower webcam on T35
The tower seen from its base
The tower seen from its base
View from 34th floor Revolving restaurant with Centre Point on the left and the BA London Eye in the centre

The BT Tower is a tall cylindrical building in London, England. The tower is located at 60 Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia. It has been previously known as the Post Office Tower and the London Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177 metres (581 ft) tall, with a further section of aerial bringing the total height to 189 metres (620 ft). Contrary to popular belief, it is not the same as the BT Centre (the national headquarters of BT), which is located at 81 Newgate Street, London. Download high resolution version (716x1724, 233 KB)The BT Tower. ... Download high resolution version (716x1724, 233 KB)The BT Tower. ... Euston Road is an important thoroughfare in central London. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Download high resolution version (640x951, 50 KB)BT Tower - from base - London - England - Photo by and copyright Tagishsimon - 2nd May 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (640x951, 50 KB)BT Tower - from base - London - England - Photo by and copyright Tagishsimon - 2nd May 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... See also Sydney Tower, for Centrepoint in Australia Centre Point An advert for tenants willing to rent Centre Point. ... The London Eye, also known as the Millennium Wheel, is an observation wheel in London, England. ... There are several BT Towers in England: The BT Tower in London, the most famous The BT Tower in Birmingham The BT Tower on Cannock Chase, Staffordshire This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Fitzrovia is an area of central London. ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ...

Contents

History

The tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country. The term General Post Office is or has been used by a number of postal and telecommunications governmental administrations worldwide, including: United Kingdom until 1969, see Post Office UK. After 1981 see Royal Mail for a continuing history of the British Post Office. ... This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ... A yagi antenna Most simply, an antenna is an electronic component designed to send or receive radio waves. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ...


It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.


The tower was designed by the architects of the Ministry of Public Building and Works: the chief architects were Eric Bedford and G. R. Yeats. Typical for its time, the building is concrete clad in glass. The narrow cylindrical shape was chosen because of the requirements of the communications aerials: the building will shift no more than 25 centimetres (10 in) in wind speeds of up to 150 km/h (95 mph). Initially the first sixteen floors were for technical equipment and power, above that was a 35 metre section for the microwave aerials, and above that were six floors of suites, kitchens, technical equipment and finally a cantilevered steel lattice tower. To prevent heat build-up the glass cladding was of a special tint. The construction cost was £2.5 million. For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... The Ministry of Works was a department of the UK Government formed in 1943 to organise the requisitioning of property for wartime use. ... Eric Bedford (February 18, 1928 - July 8, 2006) was an Australian politician, elected as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ... This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. ... A schematic image of two cantilevers. ...


Construction began in June 1961. The tower was topped out on 15 July 1964 and officially opened by Prime Minister Harold Wilson on 8 October 1965. The building contractors were Peter Lind & Company. is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Lind & Company Limited are a firm of building contractors and civil engineers based in London and Moulton Chapel in the United Kingdom. ...


The tower was originally designed to be just 111 metres (364 ft), and its foundations are sunk down through 53 metres of London clay and are formed of a concrete raft 27 metres square, a metre thick, reinforced with six layers of cables on top of which sits a reinforced concrete pyramid.[1]


The tower was officially opened to the public on 16 May 1966 by Tony Benn and Billy Butlin. As well as the communications equipment and office space there were viewing galleries, a souvenir shop, and a rotating restaurant, the "Top of the Tower", on the 34th floor, operated by Butlins. It made one revolution every 22 minutes. An annual race up the stairs of the tower was established and the first race was won by UCL student Alan Green. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Anthony Tony Neil Wedgwood Benn (born 3 April 1925), formerly 2nd Viscount Stansgate, is a British socialist politician. ... Sir William Heygate Edmund Colborne (Billy) Butlin, (September 29, 1899 – June 12, 1980), was the founder of Butlins Holiday Camps. ... A revolving restaurant is a restaurant on a revolving floorplate. ... Butlins current logo Butlins Holiday Camps were founded by (later Sir) Billy Butlin to provide economical holidays in the United Kingdom and Ireland. ...


A bomb, responsibility for which was claimed by the Provisional IRA,[2] exploded in the roof of the men's toilets at the Top of the Tower restaurant on 31 October 1971. The restaurant was closed to the public for security reasons in 1980, the year in which the Butlins' lease eventually expired. Public access to the building ceased in 1981. The Tower is sometimes used for BT Corporate events, but is not available for hire or use by outside companies. The closure of the Tower restaurant to the public means London has no revolving restaurant of the type common in major cities throughout the world. For other uses, see Bomb (disambiguation). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


The London BT Tower today

When the GPO telecommunications services were split off in 1981 (in advance of the 1984 privatisation) the tower was renamed the London Telecom Tower. After the rebranding of the company in 1992 it became the BT Tower. The building is no longer open to the public. The restaurant has been re-opened as a venue for use by BT for events and promotions: since the re-discovery of spare parts for the mechanism, it is even rotated occasionally. Occasional broadcasts are made from the top of the tower, including BBC Radio 1 DJ Chris Moyles on his birthday, 22 February 2006. This article is about the year. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Christopher Moyles (born February 22, 1974[2]) is an English broadcaster. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The tower is still in use, and is the site of a major UK communications hub. Subterranean fibre optic links have replaced microwave links for most mainstream purposes, but the tower is still used for microwave links. The second floor of the base of the tower contains the TV Network Switching Centre which carries broadcasting traffic and relays signals between television broadcasters (including the BBC), production companies, advertisers, international satellite services and uplink companies. The metropolis of London has been occupied for many centuries, and has acquired a number of subterranean landmarks. ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... A microwave link is a transmission device which allows video / audio / data to be sent using radio waves between two locations from just a few feet to several miles apart. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The outside broadcast control is located about the former revolving restaurant, with the kitchens on floor 35.


A renovation in the 2000s installed coloured lighting projecting onto a new 360-degree light panel, extending out from the old light boxes, bearing the company logo, as part of BT's "connected world" corporate styling. Seven colours are programmed to vary constantly at night and are intended to appear as a rotating globe. The success of this is debatable but the building's night appearance is now more distinctive. The tower has always been a useful late-night navigational beacon for nearby residents, especially the numerous university halls within walking distance. The term company may refer to a separate legal entity, as in English law, or may simply refer to a business, as is the common use in the United States. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Halls of residence in British English (commonly referred to as halls, and to a lesser extent hall) are a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students, similar to dormitories in the United States. ...


Until the mid-1990s, the building was officially a secret, and did not appear on official maps. Its existence was finally "confirmed" by Kate Hoey, MP, on 19 February 1993: "Hon. Members have given examples of seemingly trivial information that remains officially secret. An example that has not been mentioned, but which is so trivial that it is worth mentioning, is the absence of the British Telecom tower from Ordnance Survey maps. I hope that I am covered by parliamentary privilege when I reveal that the British Telecom tower does exist and that its address is 60 Cleveland Street, London."[3] Catharine Letitia Hoey, known as Kate Hoey (born 21 June 1946, Belfast) is a Labour Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ... Parliamentary privilege, also known as absolute privilege, is a legal mechanism employed within the legislative bodies of countries whose constitutions are based on the Westminster system. ...


The BT Tower was given Grade II listed building status in 2003, several of the now defunct antennas located on the building now cannot be removed, as they are protected by this listing. The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


Entry to the building is provided by two high-speed lifts which travel at 6 metres per second, reaching the top of the building in 30 seconds. Interestingly, an Act of Parliament was passed to vary fire regulations, allowing the building to be evacuated by using the lifts — it is the only building in the country where this is permitted.


BT Tower in London is being used in a major study to help improve the air quality in the capital - with the aim of reducing serious effects on human health.[4]


Appearances in fiction

  • Large portions of the 1966 Doctor Who serial The War Machines were set in the tower.
  • In the 1967 film Smashing Time it appeared to spin out of control and short-circuit the whole of London's power supply.
  • The Tower is featured in Stanley Donen's 1967 film Bedazzled as a vantage point from which Peter Cook, playing Satan, launches various forms of mischief.
  • The tower is featured in the most famous scene in The Goodies when it is toppled over by Twinkle the Giant Kitten in the episode Kitten Kong.
  • In Alan Moore's graphic novel V for Vendetta the tower is headquarters for both the "Eye", and the "Ear", the visual and audio surveillance divisions of the government. The tower is destroyed through sabotage. It's also featured in the film adaptation although it is not destroyed. It is renamed BTN Tower in the film.
  • The tower is destroyed in the James Herbert novel The Fog by a Boeing 747 whose captain has been driven mad by fog.
  • The tower appears abandoned and covered in pleurococcus in a BBC TV adaption of The Day of the Triffids.
  • The design of the starship HMS Camden Lock from the BBC 2 science fiction sitcom Hyperdrive is based on the tower.
  • In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry is spotted flying over the tower in a Ford Anglia with his friend, Ron Weasley.
  • It appears on the cover of, and figures in, Saturday by Ian McEwan.
  • Frank Muir's short story "The law is not concerned with trifles" is set in the tower's revolving restaurant.
  • Rowan Atkinson in Not the Nine O'Clock News plays a Frenchman who claims that the Post Office Tower was not a communications tower but a London phallus.
  • In The Bourne Ultimatum movie, there is a helicopter's view shot of the tower building for a brief period of time to show the location.
  • In Season 4 of ReBoot, a tower closely resembling the BT tower is seen in the first episode as a control tower being able to open the system of Mainframe to the net.
  • In Patrick Keiller's film London (1992) the narrator claims the tower is a monument to the love affair between Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine, who lived nearby.

This article is about the television series. ... The War Machines is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in 4 weekly parts from June 25 to July 16, 1966. ... Smashing Time is a 1967 comedy film starring Rita Tushingham and Lynn Redgrave. ... Bedazzled can refer to: 1967 comic movie; see: Bedazzled (1967 movie) 2000 comic movie; see: Bedazzled (2000 movie) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article discusses the Goodies trio and the origins of their comedy TV series For information about the television series, see The Goodies (TV series) The Goodies are a trio of British comedians (Tim Brooke-Taylor, Graeme Garden and Bill Oddie), who created, wrote, and starred in a surreal British... Kitten Kong is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... This article is about the comic book series. ... This article is about the film. ... James Herbert (born 8 April 1943, London) is a best selling English horror writer known for his simple yet compelling sensationalist novels, which are notable for their use of horrific set pieces. ... The Boeing 747, sometimes nicknamed the Jumbo Jet,[4][5] is a long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing in the United States. ... The Day of the Triffids is a 1981 BBC television science fiction serial, based on the novel of the same name by English science fiction author John Wyndham. ... One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... Nick Frost as Henderson Kevin Eldon as York Hyperdrive is a British television science fiction sitcom produced by the BBC created under the working title of Set in 2151, it follows the crew of HMS Camden Lock as they stumble through their heroic mission to protect British interests in a... “HP2” redirects here. ... The Ford Anglia was a British car from Ford in the UK. It was related to the Ford Prefect and the later Ford Popular. ... The British hardcover edition, with the BT Tower in the background Saturday (2005) is a novel by the British author Ian McEwan that charts the day of a 48 year old London neurosurgeon called Henry Perowne. ... Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... Frank Muir (5 February 1920 - 2 January 1998) was an English comedy writer, radio and television personality, and raconteur. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Not the Nine OClock News is a comedy television programme that was shown on the BBC, broadcast from 1979 to 1982. ... For the 2007 film starring Matt Damon , see The Bourne Ultimatum (film). ... This article is about the television program ReBoot. ... Patrick Keiller (born 1950) is a British film-maker, writer and lecturer. ... Rimbaud redirects here. ... Paul Verlaine Paul-Marie Verlaine (IPA: ; March 30, 1844–January 8, 1896) was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. ...

See also

The British Telecom Tower (formerly known as the Post Office Tower and, before that the GPO Tower) is a landmark in Birmingham, England, and is also the tallest building in the city. ... The British Telecom microwave network was a network of point-to-point microwave radio links in the United Kingdom, operated at first by the General Post Office, and subsequently by its successor BT plc. ... It has been suggested that List of tallest buildings and structures in the world#Radio masts taller than 600 metres be merged into this article or section. ... A list of the tallest structures in Great Britain. ... The following fall under the definition of a tower which is a tall man-made structure, always taller than it is wide, and usually much higher. ... 30 St. ... The two major operators of radio masts and towers in the UK are Arqiva and National Grid Wireless. ... Sharing of telecom infrastructure among telecom service providers is becoming the requirement and process of business in the telecom industry where competitors are becoming partners in order to lower their increasing investments. ...

References

  1. ^ "BT Tower: serving the nation 24 hours a day", BT, 1993
  2. ^ BBC ON THIS DAY - 31 - 1971: Bomb explodes in Post Office tower (3 April 2007).
  3. ^ House of Commons Hansard Debates for 19 Feb 1993
  4. ^ BT Tower in pollution study

is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Why we love the BT Tower - Arts critics - Guardian Unlimited Arts. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  • Connected Earth: Learning Centre. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  • BBC - Radio 1 - Annie Nightingale. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  • The great communicator - 2005 - Guardian Unlimited Arts. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  • BT Tower (1964) in the Structurae database. Retrieved on 2007-05-30.
  • Peter Lind and Company - Building Contractors. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  • http://www.btplc.com/thegroup/BTsHistory/1912to1968/1965.htm
  • Post Office Tower

Coordinates: 51.5215° N 0.1389° W Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Structurae is an on-line database containing works of structural and civil engineering of all kinds such as Bridges, High-rise buildings, towers, dams, etc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
BT Tower on DigiLondon - The London visitor resource (417 words)
The BT Tower in London, England, previously the Post Office Tower and also the London Telecom Tower, is a tall cylindrical building at 60 Cleveland Street in Fitzrovia.
The tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO).
The tower was designed by the architects of the Ministry of Public Building and Works: the chief architects were Eric Bedford and G. Yeats.
BT Tower - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1076 words)
The BT Tower in London, England, previously the Post Office Tower and also the London Telecom Tower, is a tall cylindrical building at 60 Cleveland Street in Fitzrovia.
The tower was officially opened to the public on May 16, 1966 by Tony Benn and Billy Butlin.
According to the novelization, the tower is headquarters for the "Eye", or the visual surveillance division of the government.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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